Solving for a Reactant Using a Chemical Equations
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Solving for a Reactant Using a Chemical Equations

Course Number: CHEM 152, Fall 2011

College/University: Washington

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Solving for a Reactant Using a Chemical Equation Write a balanced chemical equation for the reaction The mole ratio of any two compounds in a chemical reaction is given by the ratio of the stoichiometric coefficients of those compounds in the balanced chemical equation. Use this plan to answer the question: 1. Convert grams of (1st molecule) consumed to moles using the molar mass of phosphoric acid 2. Calculate...

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for Solving a Reactant Using a Chemical Equation Write a balanced chemical equation for the reaction The mole ratio of any two compounds in a chemical reaction is given by the ratio of the stoichiometric coefficients of those compounds in the balanced chemical equation. Use this plan to answer the question: 1. Convert of grams (1st molecule) consumed to moles using the molar mass of phosphoric acid 2. Calculate moles of (2nd molecule) consumed from moles of (1st molecule) consumed using the mole ratio 3. Convert moles of (2nd molecule) consumed to grams using the molar mass of (2nd molecule)

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