Chapter_14_IRM
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Chapter_14_IRM

Course Number: ACCT 202, Spring 2011

College/University: Old Dominion

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CHAPTER 14 LONG-TERM LIABILITIES Related Assignment Materials Student Learning Objectives Conceptual objectives: C1. Explain the types and payment patterns of notes. C2AExplain and compute the present value of an amount(s) to be paid at future date(s). C3CDescribe the accrual of bond interest when bond payments do not align with accounting periods. C4DDescribe accounting for leases and pensions. Analytical...

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14 LONG-TERM CHAPTER LIABILITIES Related Assignment Materials Student Learning Objectives Conceptual objectives: C1. Explain the types and payment patterns of notes. C2AExplain and compute the present value of an amount(s) to be paid at future date(s). C3CDescribe the accrual of bond interest when bond payments do not align with accounting periods. C4DDescribe accounting for leases and pensions. Analytical objectives: A1. Compare bond financing with stock financing. A2. Assess debt features and their implications. A3. Compute the debt-to-equity ratio and explain its use. Procedural objectives: P1. Prepare entries to record bond issuance and bond interest expense. P2. Compute and record amortization of bond discount. Questions 15 Quick Studies* 14-7 Exercises* Problems* 14-11 Beyond the Numbers 14-8 10 14-16 9 14-16 17, 18, 19 14-11, 14-12 14-9, 14-14, 14-10 14-15, 14-16 1, 3, 13, 14, 16 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 14-8, 14-9 11 12 14-9 RIA, EC, ED, HTR RIA, TTN, 14-13 14-1, 14-2, 14-1, 14-9, 14-3, 14-4, .14-10 14-6, 14-10 8 14-1, 14-4, P3. Compute and record 8 amortization of bond premium. 14-2, 14-4 EC 14-2, 14-3, 14-6, 14-8, 14-10 14-4, 14-5, 14-7 14-9 14-1, 14-2, 14-3, 14-4, 14-5, 14-6, 14-7 14-1, 14-2, 14-5, 14-6 14-1, 14-2, 14-3, 14-4, 14-7 14-8 14-7 14-11, 14-12 14-8 CA, GD TIA CIP, TIA P4. Record the retirement of bonds. 14-5, 14-6 P5. Prepare entries to account for notes. *See additional information on next page that pertains to these quick studies, exercises and problems. Instructors Resource Manual, Chapter 14 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2009 195 Additional Information on Related Assignment Material Corresponding problems in set B (in text) and set C (on books website), also relate to learning objectives identified in grid on previous page. The Serial Problem for Success Systems continues in this chapter. Problems 14-2A, 14-3A,14-6A, and 14-7A can be completed using Excel. Homework Manager (Available on the instructors course-specific website) repeats all numerical Quick Studies, all Exercises and Problems Set A. Homework Manager provides new numbers each time the Quick Study, Exercise or Problem is worked. It allows instructors to monitor, promote, and assess student learning. It can be used in practice, homework, or exam mode . Synopsis of Chapter Revisions Rap Snacks NEW Opener with new entrepreneurial assignment Enhanced graphic and explanation of determining bond discount and premium Revised bond illustration to use a 4-period bond Streamlined bond illustration to show entire amortization process from issuance to majority Decision Analysis: debt features and debt-to-equity ratio updated with new data and graphics Streamlined bond illustration for effective interest amortization New material on bond interest computation for U.S. GAAP vis--vis IFRSs Added new assignments that require accounting for bonds given an amortization table Active Learning Activities Found in STUDENT LEARNING TOOLS Activity SLT pp.# Topic(s) Class Activity # 37 159-161 Bonds payable Class Activity # 38 162-165 Effective interest method of amortization Writing Assignment # 18 278-279 Bonds, stocks, accounting principles and ethics The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2009 196 Description Uses team collaboration and writing to learn techniques to introduce the topic of bonds payable. Engages students in comparing bond issues to stock issues. Requires students to use critical thinking skills to deduce topic concepts and identify the impacts of various bond related events. Uses observation and comparison and team collaboration techniques to reinforce the concepts of effective interest amortization and the necessary calculations. Requires students to read a brief article provided from The New York Times and prepare a written report that includes responses to questions provided. Fundamental Accounting Principles, 19/e Chapter Outline I. Notes Basics of Bonds A. Bond Financing 1. A bond is its issuers written promise to pay an amount identified as the par value of the bond and interest at a stated annual rate. a. Most bonds require the issuer to make periodic interest payments. b. Par value of bond, also called the face amount, is paid at a specified future date known as the maturity date. 2. Advantages of bonds a. Bonds do not affect owner control. b. Interest on bonds is tax deductible. c. Bonds can increase return on equity (if return is higher on use of borrowed funds than interest paid; called financial leverage or trading on the equity). 3. Disadvantages of bonds a. Bonds can decrease return on equity (if interest paid is higher than return on use of borrowed funds). b. Bonds require payment of both periodic interest and par value at maturity (required cash outflowdividends on stock not required). B. Bond Trading 1. Bonds can be traded on exchanges (New York Stock Exchange, American Stock Exchange). 2. A bond issue consists of a large number of bonds (denominations of $1,000 or $5,000, etc.) that are sold to many different lenders. 3. Market value (price) is expressed as a percentage of par (face) value. C. Bond Issuing Procedures Governed by state and federal laws. Bond issuers also ensure they do not violate any existing contractual agreements. 1. Bond indenture is the contract between the bond issuer and the bondholders; it identifies the obligations and rights of each party. 2. Issuing corporation sells bonds to an investment firm (the underwriter), which resells bonds to the public. 3. A trustee (usually a bank or trust company) monitors issuer to ensure it complies with the obligations in the indenture. Instructors Resource Manual, Chapter 14 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2009 197 Chapter Outline II. Notes Bond Issuances A. Issuing Bonds at Par Sell bonds for face amount. 1. Issue dateDebit Cash, credit Bonds Payable (face amount). 2. Interest dateDebit Interest Expense, credit Cash (face times bond interest rate times interest period). 3. Maturity dateDebit Bonds Payable, credit Cash (face amount). B. Bond Discount or Premium Sold for amount different than face amount. 1. Contract rate(also called coupon rate, stated rate, or nominal rate) annual interest rate paid by the issuer of bonds (applied to par value). 2. Market rateannual rate borrowers are willing to pay and lenders are willing to accept for a particular bond and its risk level. 3. When contract rate and market rate are equal, bonds sell at par value; when contract rate is above market rate, bonds sell at a premium (above par); when it is below market rate, bonds sell at a discount (below par). C. Issuing Bonds at a Discount Sell bonds for less than par value. 1. Discount on bonds payable is the difference between the par (face) value of a bond and its lower issuance price. 2. Entry: debit Cash (issue price) and Discount on Bonds Payable (amount of discount) and credit Bonds Payable (par value). 3. Discount on Bonds Payable is a contra liability account. 4. Discount is deducted from par value to yield the carrying (or book) value of the bonds payable. 5. Bonds are reported in the long-term liability section of the issuers balance sheet. D. Amortizing a Bond Discount 1. Total bond interest expense is the sum of the interest payments and bond discount (or can be computed by comparing total amount borrowed to total amount repaid over life). 2. Discount must be systematically reduced (amortized) over the life of the bond to report periodic interest expense incurred. 3. Requires crediting Discount on Bonds Payable when bond interest expense is recorded (payment and/or accruals) and increasing Interest Expense by the amortized amount. The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2009 198 Fundamental Accounting Principles, 19/e Chapter Outline Notes 4. Amortizing discount updates the book value of the bond (periodically increases book value until, at maturity, book value equals face value). 5. Two methods of amortization: a. Straight-line(simpler) allocates an equal portion of the total discount to bond interest expense in each of the sixmonth interest periods. b. Effective interest methoddiscussed in Appendix 14B E. Issuing Bonds at a Premium Sell bonds for more than par value. 1. Premium on bonds payable is the difference between the par value of a bond and its higher issuance price. 2. Entry: debit Cash (issue price) and credit Premium on Bonds Payable (amount of premium) and Bonds Payable (par value). 3. Premium on Bonds Payable is a liability account. 4. Premium is added to par value to yield the carrying (or book) value of the bonds payable. F. Amortizing a Bond Premium 1. Total bond interest expense incurred is the interest payments less the bond premium. 2. Premiums must be systematically reduced (amortized) over the life of the bond to report periodic interest expense incurred. 3. Requires debiting Premium on Bonds Payable when bond interest expense is recorded (payment and/or accruals) and decreasing Interest Expense by the amortized amount. 4. Amortizing premium updates the book value of the bond (periodically decreases book value until; at maturity, book value equals face value). 5. Two methods of amortization: a. Straight-linesame as for a discount. b. Effective interest methoddiscussed in Appendix 14B Instructors Resource Manual, Chapter 14 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2009 199 Chapter Outline III. IV. Notes G. Bond Pricing Price (quote) is the present value of bond's future cash flows discounted at the bonds market rate. Present value tables can be used to compute price, which is the combination of the following two values: 1. Present value of the maturity payment (found by using single payment table, the market rate, and number of periods until maturity). 2. Present value of the series of interest payments (found by using annuity table, the market rate, and number of periods until maturity). Bond Retirement A. At Maturity 1. Carrying value will equal par value. 2. Debit Bonds Payable, credit Cash. B. Before Maturity 1. Two common approaches: a. Exercise a call optionpay par value plus a call premium. b. Purchase them on the open market. 2. Difference between the purchase price and the bonds' carrying value is recorded as a gain (or loss) on retirement of bonds. C. By Conversion The carrying value of bonds is transferred to paid-in capital accounts and no gain or loss is recorded. Long-Term Notes PayableIssued to finance operations. Unlike bonds, usually involve a single lender. The note is recorded at its selling price and over the notes life the interest expense allocated to each period is computed by multiplying the market rate (at issuance) by the beginning of the period note balance. A. Installment Notes Obligations requiring a series of periodic payments to the lender. 1. At issue recorded as a debit to assets received and a credit to Notes Payable. 2. Payments include interest expense accruing to the date of the payment plus a portion of the amount borrowed (the principal). The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2009 200 Fundamental Accounting Principles, 19/e Chapter Outline V. Notes 3. Two possible payment patterns: a. Accrued interest plus equal principal payments i. Cash flows decrease over life of note (each payment reduces the notes principal balance an equal amount, yielding less accrued interest expense for the next period). ii. Debit Notes Payable (principal payment) and Interest Expense (issue rate times the declining carrying value of note) and credit Cash for the total of the two. b. Equal total payments i. Consists of changing amounts of interest and principal. ii. Credit Cash for amount the of the equal payment and debit Interest Expense (issue rate times the declining carrying value of note) and Notes Payable (for difference between the equal payment and the interest expense). B. Mortgage Notes and Bonds Mortgage notes carry a mortgage contract pledging title to specific assets as security for the note. 1. Accounting for mortgage notes and bondssimilar to accounting for unsecured notes and bonds. 2. Mortgage agreements must be disclosed in financial statements. Decision AnalysisDebt Features and the Debt-to-Equity Ratio A. Features of Bonds and Notes 1. Secured bonds have specific assets of the issuer pledged (or mortgaged) as collateral. 2. Unsecured bonds, also called debentures, are backed by the issuers general credit standing. 3. Term bonds are scheduled for maturity at a single specified date. 4. Serial bonds mature at several different dates (repaid over a number of periods). 5. Registered bonds are issued in the names and addresses of their holders. Bond payments are sent directly to these registered holders. 6. Bearer bonds are made payable to whoever holds them; not registered. Instructors Resource Manual, Chapter 14 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2009 201 Chapter Outline VI. Notes 7. Coupon bonds are issued with interest coupons attached to the bond certificate; the coupons are detached as they become due and are presented to a bank for collection. 8. Convertible bonds can be exchanged by for a fixed number of shares of the issuing companys common stock 9. Callable bonds have an option exercisable by the issuer to retire them at a stated dollar amount prior to maturity. B. Debt-to-Equity Ratio 1. Assess the risk of a companys financing structure. 2. Computed by dividing total liabilities by total equity. 3. Ratio describes contribution of debtholders to equityholders. Present Value of Bonds and Notes Appendix 14A A. Present Value Concepts 1. Cash paid (or received) in the future has less value now than the same amount of cash paid (or received) today. 2. An amount borrowed equals the present value of the future payment. 3. Compounded interest means interest for a second period is based on the total of the amount borrowed plus the interest accrued from the first period. B. Present Value TablesComplete tables found in Appendix B 1. Present values can be computed using a formula or a table. 2. Present Value tables or formula can be used to determine present value of future cash payments of a single amount or an annuity. 3. Present value of $1 table or formula (1/(1+i)n )is used to compute present value of a single payment. (i =interest rate per period, n is the number of periods) 4. Present value of an annuity of $1 table is used to compute present value of a series of equal payments (annuity). C. Applying a Present Value Table 1. Determine the column with the interest rate. 2. Determine the row with the periods hence. 3. The column and row will intersect at the factor number. 4. To convert the single payment or annuity to its PV, multiply this amount by the factor. D. Compounding Periods Shorter than a Year 1. Interest rates are generally stated as annual rates. 2. They can be allocated to shorter periods of time. The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2009 202 Fundamental Accounting Principles, 19/e Chapter Outline VII. VIII. IV. Notes Effective Interest AmortizationAppendix 14B A. Effective Interest Amortization of a Discount Bond 1. Straight-line method yields changes in the bonds carrying value while the bond interest expense remains constant. 2. Effective interest method allocates bond interest expense over the life of the bonds in a way that yields a constant rate of interest equivalent to the market rate of interest on issue date. 3. Bond interest expense incurred for a period equals the carrying value (beginning of period) of the bond multiplied by the market rate. 4. Periodic amortization of bond discount equals bond interest expense incurred less bond interest paid. B. Effective Interest Amortization of a Premium Bond Same as a Discount Bond (above) except for (4) Periodic amortization of bond premium equals bond interest paid less bond interest expense incurred. Issuing Bonds between Interest DatesAppendix 14C A. Procedure used to simplify recordkeeping: 1. Buyers pay the purchase price plus any interest accrued since the prior interest payment date. 2. This accrued interest is repaid to these buyers on the next interest date. 3. The collection of the accrued interest is recorded as a liability until returned. B. Accruing Bond Interest Expense 1. Necessary when bonds interest period does not coincide with issuer's accounting period. 2. Adjusting entry is necessary to record bond interest expense accrued since the most recent interest payment and (requires amortization of the premium or discount for this period). 3. Affects the subsequent interest payment date entry. Leases and PensionsAppendix 14D A. Lease is a contractual agreement between a lessor (asset owner) and a lessee (asset renter or tenant ) that grants the lessee the right to use the asset for a period of time in return for cash (rent) payments. B. Operating leases are short-term (or cancelable) leases in which the lessor retains the risks and rewards of ownership. 1. Lessee records lease payments as expenses. 2. Lessor records lease payments as revenues. Instructors Resource Manual, Chapter 14 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2009 203 Chapter Outline Notes C. Capital leases are long-term (or noncancelable) leases in which the lessor transfers substantially all risks and rewards of ownership to the lessor. 1. Lessee records the leased item as its own asset along with the lease liability at the start of the lease term. 2. Lessee depreciates leased asset over period of lease. 3. At each lease payment date, the liability is amortized to record interest expense incurred. 4. Failure to meet one of the four criteria for capital leases will result in off-balance-sheet financing (acquisition of assets with related liabilities not recorded on the balance sheet). D. Pension plan is a contractual agreement between an employer and its employees for the employer to provide benefits (payments) to employees after they have retired. 1. Employer records their payment into pension plan as a debit to Pension Expense and a credit to Cash. 2. Defined benefit plans can be overfunded (plan assets exceed accumulated benefits) resulting in a reported plan asset or underfunded (plan assets are less than accumulated benefits) resulting in plan liabilities. The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2009 204 Fundamental Accounting Principles, 19/e Alternate Demonstration Problem Chapter Fourteen ABC Company issued $200,000 face value bonds on January 1, 2009, with semiannual interest payments to be made on June 30 and December 31 at a contract rate of 10%. The bonds were scheduled to mature five years after they were issued. Three years after they were issued, on January 1, 2012, the company repurchased 40% of the outstanding bonds for $79,000. Required: Part A 1. Assume that the bonds were issued when the market rate of interest was 9%. Prepare a schedule showing the bond interest expense and amounts of amortization for the life of the bonds. 2. Prepare the journal entry to record the bond issuance. 3. Prepare journal entries for the first two interest payments. 4. Prepare the journal entry to recognize the partial repurchase of the bonds. Part B Redo Part A under the assumption that the market rate on the bonds when issued was 16%. Instructors Resource Manual, Chapter 14 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2009 205 Solution: Alternate Demonstration Problem Chapter Fourteen Part A 1. Period 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Beginning of Period Carrying Amount $207,907 207,263 206,590 205,887 205,152 204,384 203,581 202,742 201,865 200,949 Interest Expense to be Recorded Interest to be Paid Premium Unamortized to Bondto be Premium end holders Amortized of Period $9,356 9,327 9,297 9,265 9,232 9,197 9,161 9,123 9,084 9,051 $10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 $644 673 703 735 768 803 839 877 916 949 $7,907 7,263 6,590 5,887 5,152 4,383 3,581 2,742 1,865 949 0 End-ofPeriod Carrying Amount $207,907 * 207,263 206,590 205,887 205,152 204,384 203,581 202,742 201,865 200,949 200,000 *Present value of $200,000 to be received in 10 periods, discounted at 4.5% per period: $200,000 x .6439 = $128,780 Present value of $10,000 to be received periodically for 10 periods, discounted at 4.5% per period: $10,000 x 7.9127 = 79,127 $207,907 2. 3. 1/1/09 Cash.................................................................... Bonds Payable............................................. Premium on Bonds Payable........................ 207,907 200,000 7,907 6/30/09 Bond Interest Expense...................................... Premium on Bonds Payable.............................. Cash.............................................................. 9,356 644 12/31/09 Bond Interest Expense...................................... Premium on Bonds Payable.............................. Cash.............................................................. 9,327 673 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2009 206 10,000 10,000 Fundamental Accounting Principles, 19/e 4. 1/1/12 Bonds Payable................................................... Premium on Bonds Payable.............................. Cash.............................................................. Gain on the Retirement of Bonds................ 80,000 1,432 79,000 2,432 Part B 1. Period 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Beginning of-Period Carrying Amount $159,741 162,520 165,522 168,764 172,265 176,046 180,130 184,540 189,303 194,447 Interest Interest to Expense be Paid Discount Unamortized to be to Bondto be Discount end Recorded holders Amortized of Period $12,779 13,002 13,242 13,501 13,781 14,084 14,410 14,763 15,144 15,553 $10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 $2,779 3,002 3,242 3,501 3,781 4,084 4,410 4,763 5,144 5,553 $40,259 37,480 34,478 31,236 27,735 23,954 19,870 15,460 10,697 5,553 0 End-ofPeriod Carrying Amount $159,741 162,520 165,522 168,764 172,265 176,046 180,130 184,540 189,303 194,447 200,000 * *Present value of $200,000 to be received in 10 periods, discounted at 8% per period: $200,000 x .4632 = $ 92,640 Present value of $10,000 to be received periodically for 10 periods, discounted at 8% per period: $10,000 x 6.7101 = 67,101 $159,741 Instructors Resource Manual, Chapter 14 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2009 207 2. 3. 4. 1/1/09 Cash.................................................................... Discount on Bonds Payable.............................. Bonds Payable............................................. 6/30/09 Bond Interest Expense...................................... Discount on Bonds Payable........................ Cash.............................................................. 12/31/09 Bond Interest Expense...................................... Discount on Bonds Payable........................ Cash.............................................................. 1/1/12 Bonds Payable................................................... Loss on the Retirement of Bonds..................... Discount on Bonds Payable........................ Cash.............................................................. The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2009 208 159,741 40,259 200,000 12,779 2,779 10,000 13,002 3,002 10,000 80,000 6,948 7,948 79,000 Fundamental Accounting Principles, 19/e

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Old Dominion - ACCT - 202
CHAPTER 15INVESTMENTS ANDINTERNATIONAL OPERATIONSRelated Assignment MaterialsStudent Learning ObjectivesConceptual objectives:C1. Distinguish between debt and 1, 2, 5equity securities and betweenlong-term investments andshort-term investments.C2
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Chapter 002 Analyzing and Recording TransactionsSummary of Questions by Difficulty Level (DL) and Learning Objective (LO)True/FalseItemDLLOItemDLLOItemDLLO1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.11.12.13.14.15.16.17.18.19.20.EasyEasyEasyEa
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Old Dominion - ACCT - 201
CHAPTER 1ACCOUNTING IN BUSINESSRelated Assignment MaterialsStudent Learning ObjectivesConceptual objectivesC1. Explain the purpose andimportance of accounting in theinformation age.C2. Identify users and uses ofaccounting.C3. Identify opportunit
Old Dominion - ACCT - 201
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Old Dominion - ACCT - 201
CHAPTER 4COMPLETING THE ACCOUNTING CYCLERelated Assignment MaterialsStudent Learning ObjectivesQuestionsConceptual objectives:C1. Explain why temporary1, 2, 4, 5accounts are closed each period.C2. Identify steps in the accounting 8cycle.C3. Exp
Old Dominion - ACCT - 201
CHAPTER 5ACCOUNTING FOR MERCHANDISING OPERATIONSRelated Assignment MaterialsStudent Learning ObjectivesQuestionsQuickStudies*Exercises*Problems*Beyond theNumbersConceptual objectives:C1. Describe merchandising1, 2, 3, 45-35-3, 5-7, 5-8TTN,
Old Dominion - ACCT - 201
CHAPTER 6INVENTORIES AND COST OF SALESRelated Assignment MaterialsStudent Learning ObjectivesConceptual objectives:C1. Identify the items making upmerchandise inventory.C2. Identify the costs ofmerchandise inventory.Analytical objectives:A1. Ana
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Old Dominion - ACCT - 201
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Old Dominion - ACCT - 201
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Old Dominion - ACCT - 201
CHAPTER 11CURRENT LIABILITIES AND PAYROLL ACCOUNTINGRelated Assignment MaterialsStudent Learning ObjectivesQuestionsConceptual objectives:C1. Describe current and long-term 2liabilities and theircharacteristics.C2. Identify and describe known1,
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Old Dominion - ACCT - 201
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Old Dominion - ACCT - 201
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Table of ContentsP.2 Table of ContentsP.3 Executive SummaryP.4 History and MissionP.5 Products and Services, Why we Chose This CompanyP.6 CompetitionP.7 Five Year Analysis- Raw DataP.8 Five Year Analysis- Vertical AnalysisP.9 Five Year Analysis- H
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
~Stress is any event or situation that brings us out of homeostasis.~Stress consists of 1.stressor 2.feeling stress.~Stress is any outside force or event that has an effect on our body or mind.~Stress is the non- specific response of the body to any de
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
9:00am It is Sunday and I am happy.10:00am I have to wash my dog and I dont want to do it.11:00am I am tired.12:00 pm I am tired and hungry.1:00 pm I just had Japanese food and I am satisfied.2:00 pm Its hot today and I am not feeling good.3:00 pm I
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
I do agree that managing stress effectively should be considered just as important to onesphysical health as diet and exercise. For many people, stress is so commonplace that itbecomes a way of modern life. Stress maybe a necessary part of everyday life
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
ElectronicCommunicationNetworks(ECNs)Group8SinYi,WongJennyGipTyleLe ECNs are automated systems for disclosing andexecuting stock trades. They were created in the mid- 1990s to publiclydisplay buy and sell orders of stock. Normally service instit
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
Name_SinYi,Wong(CHRISTY)_411EvaluationofLearningFinalExamDueatFinalExamtimeorbeforeNotmorethan2pages1.Whatdidyoulikeabouttheclass?I like the Strategy and Policy Game. It was fun and challenging.2.Whatdidyoudislikeabouttheclass?3.Whatwouldyouchan
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
DoddFrank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection ActFollowing the 2008 near collapse of the U.S. economy, which was fueled by the crashof the housing bubble, the Dodd-Frank Regulatory Reform Bill established restrictivemeasures in an attempt to pre
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
Stress Journal:A. Type A Personality Assessment1.) Score: 572.) I agree with what it said, I fall between somewhere between Type A and Type Bpersonality. Sometimes I am as laidback as Type B and sometimes I express impatientand hostility as Type A.3
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
I believe that our past experience influence our perception. Because our past experienceslead us to develop expectations and these affect current perception, which influence us toget stressed in particular situation. For instance, some people are so afr
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
In the Judeo-Christian Creation Story, the first man, Adam, was created by God, out ofthe dust of the earth; and the breath of life was breathed into him. God gave to Adamdominion over all his creation and the Garden of Eden as a home to tend it and kee
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
Sin Yi, WongKin 370 .04DiscussionLiving in a world with no hatred, people loving and treating each other equally would bethe first thing that exist in my perfect world. If there is no hatred, which mean therewould be such thing as war, and we have a
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
Question 11 out of 1 pointsCorporations thatlack a consistentstrategystructure-culturerelationship arewhat strategictype?AnswerSelectedAnswer:reactorsQuestion 21 out of 1 pointsA graph showingtime plottedagainst thedollar sales of aprodu
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
Question 11 out of 1 pointsThe measure ofcorporateperformance inwhich financialmeasures arecombines withoperationalmeasures ofcustomersatisfaction,internal processes,annd innovationand improvementactivities is calledAnswerSelectedAnswer:
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
Peer EvaluationPerson Evaluated_Rite Galvan_Evaluator_Sin Yi, Wong( Christy)_1. Rank each member of your company on a separate evaluation form. Rank from 1-5 foreach of the areas with 5 being the highest (best) and 1 being the lowest (worst).A.B.C.
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
1.IntroductionMy client Silvia Ho is the operations manager of a multinational industrial devicenetworking corporation. She has also been an award-winning real estate agent for over 20years. As an operations manager, her annual salary is between $150,0
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
Sin Yi, Wong (Christy)FRL 302Midterm 2A. The main emphasis of state corporate law is to regulate the creation, organization,and dissolution of a corporation, and it deals with the formation and operations ofcorporations and its related to commercial
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
TABLE OF CONTENTSI. Executive Summary.P.3II. History.P.4III. Industry Analysis.P.7IV. Internal Environment.P.8V. Vision, Mission, and Objectives.P.10VI. Strategies: Corporate/Business/Functional strategyP.10VII.Evaluation and Control.P.11VIII.So
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
I agree that we dont habitually think creatively because the emphasis in oursociety has always been on logical thinking, and there are more reasonsbeside that. Each of us has the power to be creative. We each have theability to access the unseen realms
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
Agency byRatificationA situation in which a person or company inaccurately claims to be an agent for another person or companyand conducts some act in that capacity, but which the principal (who is not actually a principal) lateraccepts and recognizes
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
Sin Yi, Wong (Christi)FRL 367HW21. What will be the Net Capital Spending in year 0 associated with switching to the 3Dmovie theater project? Calculate and explain.Long-term investment related cash flows: Initial investment (year 0 only), Salvage valu
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
Homework #5For Homework #5 you will choose two of the 10 sectors you chose weightings for in HW #4 andselect stocks for those sectors. Do not choose the Financials sector as one of your two sectors asthere are different valuation criteria we will need
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
CompanyUPSCurrent Price=Valuation Data$71.872010Tangible Bk. Val.Cash FlowEarningsDividendsPayout RatioPrices - High- LowP/E Ratio - High- Low##########20105.345.263.481.8854%73.9455.77211620094.963.882.141.884%59.
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
Asset AllocationStocksBondsCashAccount ValueStock DetailCons. DiscretionaryCons StaplesEnergyFinancialsHealth careIndustrialsInfo. Tech.Telecom ServicesMaterialsUtilities60%30%10%100%$10,000,000Your sectorS&PAllocation Difference10
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
Coca-Cola CoCurrent Price=$65.16Valuation Data##########20101.795.75.061.7635%65.8849.47131020095.23.462.931.6456%59.4537.44201320083.452.942.491.5261%65.5940.29261620078.5332.571.3653%64.3245.56251820
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
Procter & Gamble Co. (PG).Current Price=Valuation Data$61.002011##########Tangible Bk. Val.Cash FlowEarningsDividendsPayout RatioPrices - High- LowP/E Ratio - High- LowNM2010NM2009NM2008NM2007NM2006NM4.883.931.9750%6
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
JOHNSON & JOHNSONCurrent Price=$63.36Valuation Data##########20108.975.844.782.1144%66.256.86141220097.045.394.41.9344%65.4146.25151120085.355.574.571.7939%72.7652.06161120075.134.593.631.6245%68.7559.72
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
Wal-Mart StoresCurrent Price=Valuation Data##########$56.89200917.973.511.630.2516%48.4111.8307200814.26.614.760.357%121.9513.73263200713.353.542.570.2510%53.152321920069.113.242.60.249%27.5915.6910620
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
Medco Health SolutionCurrent Price=Valuation Data$57.012010##########Tangible Bk. Val.Cash FlowEarningsDividendsPayout RatioPrices - High- LowP/E Ratio - High- LowNM2009NM4.213.16NINI2008NM3.62.61NINI2007NM2.982.13
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
Sin Yi, Wong (Christi)FRL 420HW 1If Dame decided to sell the concept, since Crites and Sanabria hadnt invested any money todate, they will only receive for the amount or time that they had been contributed. For instance,each term member had invested
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
The automotive industry has long been, and continues to be, one of the most important part ofthe United State's economy. According to Kimberly Amadeo, the auto industry contributes3.6%, or 500 billion to total U.S. GDP output (about.com). In the automot
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
NetflixSummer 2011 TOM 411Sin Yi, WongRonnie ParkChenTABLE OF CONTENTSI.Executive Summary.P.3II.History Industry Analysis.P.4III.Internal Environment.P.IV.Vision, Mission, and Objectives.P.V.Strategies: Corporate/Business/Functional strateg
Mt. SAC - ECON - 101
DoddFrank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection ActFollowing the 2008 near collapse of the U.S. economy, which was fueled by the crash of the housingbubble, the Dodd-Frank Regulatory Reform Bill established restrictive measures in an attempt to pre