DQ ANT 101
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DQ ANT 101

Course Number: ANT 101, Spring 2012

College/University: Ashford University

Word Count: 2615

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Hi let me start by saying that I am sorry I have not posted anything until now I was having trouble, I guess you could say that I over extended myself. My daughter asked me to watch my grandson for a few days and it took more energy than I even realized it would. I forgot how time consuming a toddler can be; it has been a while since my children were young. I guess that it does take a whole village to raise a...

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let Hi me start by saying that I am sorry I have not posted anything until now I was having trouble, I guess you could say that I over extended myself. My daughter asked me to watch my grandson for a few days and it took more energy than I even realized it would. I forgot how time consuming a toddler can be; it has been a while since my children were young. I guess that it does take a whole village to raise a child, moving on to our discussion now. Gender and Economy DQ 1 ANT 101 What role do women play in foraging and horticultural based societies? The role of women in foraging and horticultural based societies: The women are the primary food gathers which will allocate for 80% and the men will gather the other 20% of the meat diet. In certain arctic regions, there is little food to gather during the arctic winter, so men gather all the food and other items the people may need. The gathering of fruits, nuts, and other vegetation is extremely important. Birth spacing is also an important factor in controlling the growth of the population. Infanticide, or the killing or abandonment of newborn babies, is a form of birth spacing that women use when a baby is born deformed, when a new mother is already breastfeeding a young baby, or in times of starvation. That to me sounds extremely harsh, but if that's the way these people live, who am I to judge. We all have our faults and down falls. How is a woman's status impacted by her participation in food procurement? The technology employed by foragers is simple but effective. Even though the technology is simple, it requires knowledge to find and fashion the appropriate tools. The most basic tool is something called a "digging stick," used by women to dig up root products such as tubers. Woman play an important role, they are the most active when it comes to food procurement. They're role as the gather of food has changed over the years. How is a woman's status in these societies, compares to that of women in American society today? Modernday hunters and gatherers probably do not live in the environments they would have exploited a millennium ago. Pushed by more dominant, powerful cultures into very marginal environments, modern foragers have been able to maintain their sociocultural patterns in a relatively isolated existence. When they desire outside contact, foragers have been able to moderate the communication mostly on their terms. In my personal opinion though women and men are hardly treated equally, I mean in less than modern times women were treated like they were second class citizens and as if they were not as important as men were. Don't get me wrong we have come a long way but even today not all people are treated equally still. I mean I would have thought that the children of yesterday would have learned something from their parents' mistakes why does history seem to keep repeating the bad parts in time? Exchange System DQ 2 ANT 101 Identify and explain the major forms of reciprocity found in both Foraging and Horticultural societies and provide examples regarding how they impact the level of conflict found in these societies? The Foraging society use generalized reciprocity which is a form of exchange that does not have immediate return of an exchange. This society is based on family or people that are considered family. This means that the consumption of food and other resources occurs immediately. The basic underlying principle is reciprocity, a mutual, agreed-upon exchange of goods and services. Reciprocity works well in a society in which food items need to be consumed quickly due to spoilage. There is little surplus and little desire to develop any storage capacity. Foragers want to remain mobile and not be tied down by surplus. There is no need for storage, because the environment is their warehouse. Whenever they want something, they can access it. Consider the use of reciprocity in your own life and comment on its impact on the level of conflict/divisions in your own relationships? Generalized reciprocity is a form of exchange in which there is no expectation for the immediate return of an item in exchange for something else; in the long run, things are expected to even out. An item's value is not calculated, and no one keeps exact track of the transactions. This kind of distribution of food also means that a hunter does not need to go looking for food daily. I guess that you could say that I use reciprocity in my life while dealing with my siblings. I do many tasks for my siblings and expect in return that they will help me in my time of need but that is usually not the case though. In reciprocity no keeps track and in my family no keeps track either. Social Organization Divorce The correlation between bride wealth and the stability of marriage. Bride wealth in other cultures is mainly the responsibility of the man to provide a portion of his wealth and or his patrilineal wealth as a contribution to his future wife's family for their loss of a working member of the tribe (Nowak & Laird, 2010). In correlation to stability of marriage this is a test of the man's financial status to see if he can provide the requested gift of wealth to the family. If so, then this means he is stable enough to give and still have wealth left to take care of his new wife and their family. It is almost like collecting an inheritance upfront for the woman and kid's value to the paternal family. The impact marriage on the status of women in pastoral societies As I understand the relationship, they value women as property even though the anthroploigical term is not brideprice, which means the wife is valued at just that, property (Nowak & Laird, 2010). However, from my etic perspective the woman is a unit of labor, taken away from labor, married off to do more labor, while the family gets compensated for the loss of her labor (slave). Her status is said to be equal to those of her children, or less if the child is a male. I understand that the man's duties are to take care of the household, leaving the wife to take care of the minor things, but sometimes those duties considered minor can have a major impact on the household if left undone (Nowak & Laird, Case Study: Social Organization, 2010). Therefore her role as wife should have equal value to his role as husband especially if both of their contributions make up the worth of their families wealth. From an emic perspective the man is asking for the woman's hand in marriage so that he may start his own lineage. The process begins by offering gifts of promise to the family he is vowing to them that he and his family welcomes them into their family and are willing to share the wealth of their patrilineal blood line with them as family. A man is not of value if he has not acquired and managed his wealth well enough to build from it and share the overflow. He must show sure signs of quality by learning from his father's father the lessons of responsibility as a family man. Marriage in current North American societies. The elders of our kinship group place more emphasis and value on long-term relationship rather than the long-term financial status. Although in our western culture it is your financial worth that makes you more attractive and the marrying type. I believe the younger generations have inverted the values that elders thought to be more important in a marriage. I believe it used to be the in this order; Factors that contribute significantly to the stability of marriages in American culture. 1. Emotional connection or Spiritual bond 2. Physical attraction 3. Financial contribution Now it has been reversed and look at as superficial love with no real stability 1. Financial contribution 2. Physical attraction 3. Emotional connection (if they even make it this far). Is there pressure to stay with a spouse from members of our kinship groups? My grandmother always matched the of attributes a marriage with the attributes of your Christian faith. She taught us that love is more than just being happy; it is being strong and enduring the hard times; it is showing patients and kindness even when life is not as sweet. It takes two or more to maintain a stable foundation in a marriage. Henceforth it is the responsibility of each family member to do their part in building upon that foundation to gain stability. Works Cited Nowak, B., & Laird, P. (2010). Case Study: Social Organization. In CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (p. chap 5.9). San Diego, California: Brindgepoint Education. Nowak, B., & Laird, P. (2010). Marriage: Social Organization. In CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (pp. Ch. 5.5, para). San Diego, California: Bridgepoint Education Inc. Chiefdom in a Changing World From an etic perspective and as a Christian myself, I understand the missionaries' objective to save their souls from eternal damnation for the worship of idols (Nowak & Laird, Case Study: Social Organization, 2010). I believe the missionaries had a truly honest endeavor to educate them about the truth and separate myth from fact. This should not have completely dismissed nor discredited their traditional religious culture, but it should have enhanced it adding knowledge to their spiritual wisdom, therefore allowing discernment to manifest. Now the followers and the chiefdoms that understood the value in what was taught to them had immediate acceptance of the change and voluntarily converted to Christianity. On one hand this may have caused the chiefdom to lose value in his position. If in fact the chiefdom did agreed with the dismissal of some of the practices because it went against the Christian belief system, then he had to either convince the tribe that other rituals were not practiced in vain, or that the rituals had new and improved meaning. On the other hand if the some members and leaders of the tribe were not as open minded as those that voluntarily converted then they each ran the risk of ridicule from the other. Tribal people have an inherited duty to keep their culture and its traditions sacred so the efforts put forth during the syncretic movement were of dire importance to those non-converts and their culture (Nowak & Laird, 2010). More than likely the converted members outnumbered the non-converted members so to keep the peace they were forced to convert. Works Cited Nowak, B., & Laird, P. (2010). Chiefdoms in the Changing World. In CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (p. ch. 6.8). San Diego, California: Brindgepoint Education. Monumental Architecture - DQ 1 Reflect on the material you read on band, tribes, and states. Explain why monumental architecture is unique to cities. What do such displays imply about the socio- economic and political organization of the society that created it? Consider pieces of monumental architecture found in the United States. Identify one of these monuments and describe the message it sends to the world. Monumental architecture is unique to cities because it is a representation of some part of their heritage that will legally be preserved forever. The monuments that were developed and built by man were a symbol of power and wealth. The heads of that state ordered the lower class to do the labor of building the monuments as they sat back and delegated the task and provided the resources to perform the labor. Since most states were stratified societies the laborers had to depend on the provisions given to them to survive (Nowak & Laird, 2010). Such immaculate displays imply the amount of control the leaders had over the lower class individuals to create such marvels. I am sure the amount of work those laborers put into building those monuments or the work to maintain the natural monuments was nowhere near equal to the small compensation, or the torture they had to accept in return. One of the U.S. monuments that placed somewhat of a value on the hard work of the slaves that served our country is the African Burial Ground in New York. This site contains the remains of 400 free and enslaved Africans buried during the 17 th and 18th century and as of 1993 is now a National Historic Landmark (National Park Services, 2006). This does not give them their dignity back for the torture they went through, nor is it repayment for wages unearned for hours of unethical labor they provided. The declaration of this burial ground as a National Monument sent a message of appreciation to the descendants of those slaves that they were of some value and deserved some national recognition for their hard work and endurance. Works Cited National Park Services . (2006, February 27). Retrieved July 21, 2011, from National Park Services: www.nps.gov Nowak, B., & Laird, P. (2010). Social Stratification. In CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (pp. ch. 7.8, para. 2). San Diego, California: Brindgepoint Education. Economy and Colonialism DQ 2 Apply what you have read in Chapter Eight regarding colonialism and the expansion of capitalism in modern industrial societies to the article, "Marketers Pursue the Shallow Pocketed." Is the information being discussed in this article another example of colonialism? Why or why not? Identify two potential positives and two negatives direct marketing of the poor has on people and their economies. What theory of development is most applicable to the expansion of global markets to poor, low income, and indigenous communities? Colonialism is the domination of one society by another, so yes this is a clear example of a company from a rich society capitalizing on a poor society (Nowak & Laird, 2010). Most indigenous countries like Brazil were forced to switch to capitalist mode of production in order to control the economy. This switch was more than likely a collaboration between the government of Brazil and predatory merchant MNC's like McCann World Group that targeted the low-income consumers. There are obvious negative effects direct marketing has on poor people and their economy. For example, the homemakers may have found a way to supplement their low income by making some of the products themselves and selling them or trading them for a fair price. But by the bigger companies mass producing cheaper products and putting them in visible markets this would cut their supplemental income. Another negative is the poor quality the product will now have as a result of the new cheaper price, causing them to have to repurchase the product multiple times because of its low quality. However, there is a positive side to direct marketing it treats the low income consumer as a valued customer giving them a chance to buy similar products as upper class consumers at a price they can afford. Secondly, the retailer can restock the shelves with brands and products the low income consumer can identify with. This allows the low income merchant and consumer a better shopping experience that fits their income bracket. The theory that explains this at best is the dependency and underdevelopment theories. The applicable point made by the Economic Commission for Latin America (ECLA), about the reversed control of the land and its natural resources had a direct effect on indigenous communities and the expansion of global markets to poor, low income people left with nothing (Nowak & Laird, Globalization, Development, and Native People: Dependency and Underdevelopment Theory, 2010). This forced them to be dependent and poor scrapping to buy products they used to grow and produce naturally. Works Cited Nowak, B., & Laird, P. (2010). Globalization, Development, and Native People: Dependency and Underdevelopment Theory. In CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (pp. chap 8.9, para 2). San Diego, California: Brindgepoint Education. Nowak, B., & Laird, P. (2010). The Industrial Revolution : Economy. In CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (pp. 8.2, para. 6). San Diego, California: Bridgepoint Education Inc.

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Ashford University - ANT - 101
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Ashford University - ANT - 101
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