04 Designing Productive and Satisfying Work
27 Pages

04 Designing Productive and Satisfying Work

Course Number: MGT 310, Fall 2011

College/University: Rider

Word Count: 1310

Rating:

Document Preview

Designing Productive & Satisfying Work Who does what? HRM The Big Picture St ra te g y lI a eg L s ue ss Focus of This Section: 2 important HR activities: 1. Job Analysis Analyzing jobs within an organization to gather relevant information about the tasks that workers perform 2. Job Design (Work design) Assigning and coordinating work tasks among employees Reconfiguring or redesigning...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> New Jersey >> Rider >> MGT 310

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Productive Designing & Satisfying Work Who does what? HRM The Big Picture St ra te g y lI a eg L s ue ss Focus of This Section: 2 important HR activities: 1. Job Analysis Analyzing jobs within an organization to gather relevant information about the tasks that workers perform 2. Job Design (Work design) Assigning and coordinating work tasks among employees Reconfiguring or redesigning existing jobs to improve them (efficiency, motivation) Many times, these HR activities revolve around a workflow analysis Work Flow Analysis The process of analyzing the tasks necessary for production of service or product ACTIVITY what tasks are required? OUTPUT - product/service - how measured? Raw Inputs - material - information Equipment - facilities - systems People - knowledge - skills - abilities Inputs Processes Outputs Logic of WFA Begin from the end Knowledge of desired outputs crucial for remaining elements Product/service, quality, quantity Work processes adapted to outputs Job analysis and design, role assignment and differentiation, organizational structure Goal is to maximize efficiency/productivity "Lean production" Inputs based on required processes Equipment, raw materials, worker KSAs Job Analysis Systematically collecting information about the tasks that workers perform on a specific job Job = Collection of tasks Goal: Defining a job in terms of its component tasks/duties and the knowledge or skills required to perform them A job analysis tells us What tasks are performed on the job The situation in which they are performed The worker qualities needed to perform the work A job analysis describes a job, not a person Job analysis is one of the most vital HR activities Basis for almost all other HR functions Uses of JA Information 1. Tells us what should be done on the job Performance appraisal, training programs 2. Reveals what is needed to be successful on job Employee selection, training programs 3. Indicates problems with the design of a job Job redesign 4. Determine the worth of a job to the organization Job evaluation 5. Necessary for human resource planning Match skills of workers with requirements of job opportunities 6. Outcomes of a Job Analysis Job description Describes the activities (tasks, duties, responsibilities TDRs) completed on the job as well as the general environment within which the job is performed Job Specifications The "people requirements" of the job KSAOs deemed necessary to perform the job Sample Job Description Job Title: Maintenance Mechanic General Description of Job: General maintenance and repair of all equipment used in the operations of a particular district. Includes the servicing of company used vehicles, shop equipment, and machinery used on job sites. 1. Essential duty (40%) Maintenance of Equipment Tasks: keep maintenance log, regularly check gauges... 2. Essential duty (40%) Repair of Equipment Tasks: Inspection for repairs needed, decision to repair... 3. Essential duty (10%) Testing and Approval Tasks: Approve equipment for use on job.... The Job Analysis Process Selecting Job Agents 3 Sources of JA Information 1. Job incumbents Knowledge of correct way to do job (Shortcuts?) Accurate assessment of time spent and hazards What they say they do vs. what they actually do 2. Supervisors Knowledge of job, "Big picture" understanding Accurate assessment of importance of TDRs 3. Trained Job Analysts Specificity of information Reality Check... "I am in charge of maintaining the office wide mail system on a daily basis." Reality: Opened the door to employee mailroom every morning "I am in charge of making sure that all work in this office is done correctly." Reality: Proofread memos coming out of the office. "I am in charge of computer operations in the office." Reality: Turned on all of the computers in the office when he arrived in the morning. Methods for Collecting JA Information 1. Interview 2. Questionnaires 3. Direct Observation 4. Work Diaries Specific Job Analysis Techniques Task analysis inventory Data on TDRs collected from subject matter experts (SMEs) SMEs then asked to rate TDRs Frequency, importance, difficulty, consequences of errors, etc. Tasks grouped into similar functions to give overall sense of what job focuses on Detailed and concrete, but job specific Critical Incidents Technique Examples of effective and ineffective job behaviors are collected Themes or categories of behavior identified Identifies most important activity categories on the job Common Job Analysis Techniques Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ) 187 items describing work general behaviors, work conditions, and job characteristics Rated along relevance, frequency, and importance Information input, mental processes, work outputs, relationship with others, job context, other job characteristics 6 dimensions of jobs Generic, but can be applied across jobs Common Metric System (CMS) 2077 items, 80 dimensions (Required? Frequency? Importance?) Job Analysis Techniques Functional Job Analysis Task statements generated & rated by SMEs on 3 dimensions Data Does task require the use of cognitive resources in handling information, ideas, and facts? 0 = Synthesizing, 7 = Serving Does task require use of interpersonal resources? 0 = Mentoring, 8 = Taking instructions Does task require the use of physical resources? 0 = Precision working, 6 = Feeding People Things Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT 1991) Developed by Department of Labor using FJA http://www.occupationalinfo.org/ 920.687082 DENTAL FLOSS PACKER Assembles dental floss packages: Mounts dental floss cutter in container top, using jig, and locks cutter in place, using cap. Cuts away excess floss from roll, using scissors. Positions roll in bottom half of container and mounts cutter top. Threads end of dental floss through cutting mechanism. Places completed unit in shipping container. The O*NET Occupational Information Network http://online.onetcenter.org/ Replaced DOT in 1998 Focuses on more general occupations than specific job titles 1000 occupations vs. 12000 jobs Describes job in terms of: Experience requirements (training & licensing) Worker requirements (KSAs) Occupational requirements (TDRs, organizational & work context) Also provides salary info Legal Issues in Job Analysis Job analysis is not optional! Analysis should be in writing Experts should be included in JA Collect enough data to be sure results are accurate Must specifically identify TDRs Should focus on minimum KSAs necessary for Competency Modeling Some companies have moved towards competency modeling instead of job analysis Focuses on a broader set of characteristics that workers need to effectively perform their jobs Competencies Tend to be more "big picture" and strategic Tends to be less specific and more general Not competing approaches, should be complementary Job Design Defining how work will be performed and what tasks are part of a given job Deciding what tasks will be grouped together to define the duties for a specific work position Redesign = Changing or reassessing task groupings to create new sets of duties 4 general approaches: Mechanistic Motivational Biological PerceptualMotor Mechanistic Job Design Simplest way to structure work to maximize efficiency Jobs are highly specialized and differentiated Simple jobs Automated whenever possible Minimize costs Frederick Taylor and Scientific Management (1911) Time and motion studies: Identify single, best way The science of shoveling Simple as possible, reducing HR needs Focus on physical capabilities and limitations Selection based on T&M studies Not popular with workers (downsizing, repetitious jobs) Motivational Job Design Goal: Make job as motivating as possible (resulting in efficiency or productivity) Response to mechanistic approach Most of these systems involve making the job more complex, not less Job Characteristics Model (Hackman & Oldham, 1976) and Motivational Potential Scores (MPS) Job Characteristics Model Core job dimensions Skill variety Task identity Task significance Critical psychological states Experienced meaningfulness of work Outcomes High internal work motivation High quality work performance Autonomy Experienced responsibility for outcomes of work High satisfaction with work Low absenteeism and turnover Feedback Knowledge of results of work activities Application of JCM Job enlargement Job extension & rotation Job enrichment Empowering employees, decision making Selfmanaged work teams Flexible work schedules Reduced workfamily conflict Flextime Other Job Design Approaches Biological Design Ergonomic considerations Seeks to minimize physical strain (and possibly increase efficiency) Biomechanics, work physiology, occupational safety and health Not optional (OSHA), complements other approaches Perceptual Job Design Focus on mental capabilities and limitations Jobs should not exceed capabilities of workers Reduce mental workload of job (air traffic controllers) Conclusions Job analysis and job design are critical to organizational success Often ignored: boring and tedious Should be tailored to organizational mission and strategy

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

Rider - MGT - 310
Recruiting Talented Employees Getting the right people to apply for your jobsHRM The Big PictureSt ra te gyal eg Ls ue s IsFocus of This Section Recruiting Getting people to apply for a job at your organization Based on HR Planning HR Planning D
Rider - MGT - 310
Employee selection: Selecting employees who fitHRM The Big PictureSt ra te gylI a eg Ls ue ssFocus of This SectionUnderstanding how we hire employees What makes a selection tool or technique "good" Evaluating the common selection methods used by or
Rider - MGT - 310
Training for Improved (High) PerformanceHRM The Big PictureSt ra te gylI a eg Ls ue ssFocus of this SectionUnderstanding the process of designing training programsTraining needs analysisEvaluating different training techniques Establishing method
Rider - MGT - 310
Motivating Employees Through CompensationPart I Comp. Background & Establishing a Basic Pay StructureHRM The Big PictureSt ra te g ylI a eg Ls ue ssFocus of this SectionUnderstanding the basics of how compensation systems are set upStrategic consi
Rider - MGT - 310
Managing Employee Separation and Retention Keeping the good ones and throwing the rest back.HRM The Big PictureSt ra te g ylI a eg Ls ue ssFocus of this SectionUnderstanding what HR can do to help keep goodworkers at your organizationEmployee rete
Rider - GSC - 115
Intro to Global Supp Chain Mgt
Rider - GSC - 115
PROBLEM: MANUFACTURING vs INVENTORY CARRYING COST PROBLEMShould Manufacturer Changeover (i.e., Produce) Each Tile Size 1 or 2 Times Per YearAnnual Manufacturing Costs vs. Inventory Carrying Costs PRODUCE EACH SIZE ONCE PER YEAR PRODUCE EACH SIZE TWICE P
Rider - GSC - 115
PROBLEM: PLANT TO DC REPLENISHMENT DECISIONShould Manufacturer use truckload or intermodal carrier to replenish DC From PlantFreight Costs vs. Inventory Carrying Costs DATA Trailer Capacity (in Cases) - Assume always ship a full trailer Freight Cost Per
Rider - GSC - 115
PROBLEM: CALCULATE DC's INVENTORY INVESTMENT AND CARRYING COST DC'S DATAAverage Inventory In DC in units The cost of one unit of inventory Annual Inventory Carrying Cost Interest Rate Q1: What is DC's Inventory Investment? Q2: What is DC's Annual Invento
Rider - FIN - 308
International Finance
Rider - FIN - 308
Rider - FIN - 308
Rider - FIN - 308
Rider - FIN - 308
Rider - FIN - 308
Rider - FIN - 308
Rider - FIN - 308
FIN308, International Finance, Selected Homework AnswersCHAPTER ONE: Answers to selected problems1. Agency Problems of MNCs. a. Explain the agency problem of MNCs. ANSWER: The agency problem reflects a conflict of interests between decision-making manag
Rider - FIN - 308
Rider University, Summer 2011 International Finance Course Pack Prepared by Dr. Mitchell Ratner How to be Successful in this Course We all need to do our respective jobs for you to learn a lot and get a good grade. Here's what you need to do to succeed:
Rider - FIN - 308
Rider University International Finance (FIN308), Summer 2011 (MEM 318, Tues/Thurs.) Instructor: Dr. Mitchell Ratner, Associate Professor of Finance Office: Sweigart Hall, room 242 Office hours: Tuesday/Thursday 6:00-6:30, or by appointment Contact: (609)
Rider - BUS - 360
Moore Library http:/www.rider.edu/library Instruction for BUS-300 Social and Legal Environment of Business Professor Bob Kenny, Fall 2010Assignment: 1. A case/issue review discussing arguments on both sides and a recommended resolution. 2. 8-10 pages inc
Rider - BUS - 360
BRIEFING A CASE Name of the Case Court and Date I. Facts: a. Identify the parties (by "role" not necessarily by name; ex. employer, manufacturer, etc.). b. Summarize the facts: Briefly state only the important, necessary facts("less is more"). c. Explain
Rider - BUS - 360
Wake Up and Smell the CoffeeBy Sheralyn Mar, Esq. When people talk about personal injury lawsuits, it is usually not long before conversation turns to the infamous McDonald's "coffee spill" case. Unfortunately, the picture that has been painted in our mi
Rider - BUS - 360
Raising a Red Flag Isn't Enough By Kara Scannell and Almar Latour 1,242 words 21 April 2004 The Wall Street Journal C1 English (Copyright (c) 2004, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.) THE WAY THINGS are going with corporate-fraud cases, Royal Dutch/Shell Group's f
Rider - BUS - 360
Waiving Your Right To a Jury Trial - After Years of Requiring Arbitration, Companies Return to the Court System - but With Conditions By Jane Spencer 1,167 words 17 August 2004 The Wall Street Journal D1 English (Copyright (c) 2004, Dow Jones & Company, I
Rider - BUS - 360
Greif v. Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc. 114 F.Supp.2d 100 (D.Conn. 2000) FACTS: Bicyclist brought state court action against beer manufacturers to recover for personal injuries sustained when she was struck by automobile driven by motorist who had consume
Rider - BUS - 360
HOW TO BRIEF CASESTo fully understand the law with respect to business, you need to be able to read and understand court decisions. To make this task easier, you can use a method of case analysis that is called briefing. There is a fairly standard proced
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Due Week 5 - Day 7100Complete the following exam and post it to the Assignment section.FINAL EXAM1) A portfolio with a correlation of +1 is not a well-diversified portfolio. What must you asan investor do to structure a portfolio with negative correl
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Investment Portfolio measurementFin 402Investment Portfolio Team AIn evaluating our portfolio, we have managed to put together a collection of investmentsthat have provided considerable return over time. Given the importance of risk versus return and
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
90Relative Performance AnalysisFIN/402Introduction:The overall performance of a stock or bond can be measured in many different ways.Identifying the industry of the stock or bond and comparing it to other like companies andsecurities can be a useful
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Risk and Return AnalysisRisk and Return Analysis PaperFIN/402Risk and Return AnalysisRisk and ReturnThe Sharpe Ratio, according to Bodie, Kane & Marcus (2008) describes the reward-tovolatility ratio indicating the reward per unit of risk. The Sharpe
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
1. Suppose you discover a treasure chest of $10 billion in cash.a. Is this a real or financial asset?Real Asset Cash Financialb. Is society any richer for the discovery?No, not until I spend it.c. Are you wealthier?Yes.d. Can you reconcile your ans
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
11. Using Formula 71 on page 144, compute RF (risk-free rate). The real rate of returnis 3 percent and the expected rate of inflation is 5 percent.Rf=(1+.03)(1+.05)-1=1.08-1 = 8%2. If RF = 6 percent, b =1.3, and the ERP = 6.5 percent, compute Ke (the
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
SelectionUniversity of PhoenixFIN/402An investment portfolio is developed by combining a collection of investmentinstruments like stocks, bonds, and cash to achieve a balanced grouping for each investor. Theseinvestment portfolios can be for individu
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
1In this web exercise, we will show how to determine the required rate of returnfor a stock using the capital asset pricing model.1. The formula for the capital asset pricing model is:Ki RF bi (KM RF ) (217)Ki is the required rate of return that we a
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
In this web exercise, we will show how to determine the required rate of returnfor a stock using the capital asset pricing model.1. The formula for the capital asset pricing model is:Ki RF bi (KM RF ) (217)Ki is the required rate of return that we are
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Casa BonitaMemoTo:Rainier EkstromRe:Risk & Return TradeoffThe stocks that have been chosen are: Levinthal Defense Systems, DesktopInc., Transconduit, Inc. and Goldstein & Delaney Bank.?When choosing my stock I took a look at the beta of each stock
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
A sound investment strategy will balance risk and reward within a portfolioaccording to individual investors goals, risk tolerance, and time horizon because thereare many different situations that a person can have in life, no two people's portfolio wil
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Describe your current budgeting system. What factors influence your financialdecisions? What are the benefits or concerns of your current budgeting system?To set some background, my wife and I both work and we do not have jointaccounts. It isn't that w
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Ch. 1 of Focus on Personal Finance introduces eight components of personalfinancial planning. Describe three components of personal financial planning. Visitone of the Key websites suggested on the corresponding pages of Focus onPersonal Finance for ea
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Week 1: Individual Assignment Submitted on timeFeedback from Instructor (Published: Thu XX/XX/2011 XX:XX PM MST)Earned Points:40/50Comments:Good job with this weeks assignment. Though a bit more detail was required. Overall Nice work.
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Short-Term Monetary Goals (less than two years)DescriptionVacation In ParisAmountneeded12000Monthstoachieve10DescriptionSaving For a new CarOpening a pizzeriaAmountneeded32200350000Monthstoachieve1478ActiontobetakenWill make a fixed depos
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Consider your personal cash flows. How would you adjust cash outflows (i.e. adjustyour budget) if your household income was cut in half? If your cash inflowsincreased, how would you reallocate your surplus to meet your personal needs andobjectives? How
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Many different types of financial institutions exist. Differentiate between depositinstitutions and non-deposit institutions. Provide two examples of deposit and nondeposit financial institutions with a brief explanation of each. How can you use eachof
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Week 2: Individual Assignment Submitted on timeFeedback from Instructor (Published: Wed XX/XX/2011 XX:XX AM MST)Earned Points:45/50Comments:You provided the worksheets but no goals were provided. Still good work and let me know if you haveany questio
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Balance sheet as ofAssetsLiquid assetsChecking account balanceSavings/money market accounts, fundsCash value of life insuranceOther: Petty cash at homeTotal liquid assetsHousehold assets & possessionsCurrent market value of homeMarket value of a
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Week 2: LT Deliverable Submitted on timeFeedback from Instructor (Published: Sun XX/XX/2011 XX:XX AM MST)Earned Points:15/15Comments:Nice progress. I'm looking forward to the final product.
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Learning Team BWeek Two Final project PreparationThis week Matthew kicked off the discussions by reiterating the final project and all that needs tobe accomplished between now and the end of the class. He split the project into 6 main pointsand these
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Evaluate your personal risk tolerance using Exhibit 11-2 A Quick Test to MeasureInvestment Risk in Ch. 11 of Focus on Personal Finance. Based on your results,were you considered more conservative or less conservative? What factors affectedyour investme
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Financial experts agree that having an emergency fund is an essential component ofa comprehensive financial plan. However, advice regarding the number of months ofhousehold expenses the emergency fund should cover varies between 3 and 9months. Taking i
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Week 3: Individual Assignment Submitted on timeFeedback from Instructor (Published: Tue XX/XX/2011 XX:XX AM MST)Earned Points:150/150Comments:Excellent work on your weeks assignment - it was submitted on time and you completed it as instructed. Youfo
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Running Head: PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLAN1Personal Financial PlanFIN/420University of PhoenixIn order to maintain a positive savings some changes do need to be made. I am trying toincrease my savings to be able to help my children through college. There
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Week 3: LT Deliverable Submitted on timeFeedback from Instructor (Published: Thu XX/XX/2011 XX:XX AM MST)Earned Points:15/15Comments:Nice progress. It's time to get started on your drafts now.
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Learning TeamWeek Three Final Project PreparationThis week the team discussed adjusting assets relative to the personal goals of Naomi and James,as well as comparing loan options. The conversation started with a recap of a discussion fromlast week con
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Week 4: Individual Assignment Submitted on timeFeedback from Instructor (Published: Sat XX/XX/2012 XX:XX PM MST)Earned Points:150/150Comments:Your analysis and recommendations were good and I found this assignment to be well-written,thoughtful, and c
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
MARKET ANALYSIS PROPOSAL1Market Analysis ProposalFIN 420University of PhoenixMARKET ANALYSIS PROPOSAL2I. Clients Personal Financial GoalsStephen Hawkins is a 31 year-old Group Product Manager at Apple Inc. who aspires to anet worth of at least $5
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs) have received a great deal of bad press due tothe tremendous number of foreclosures resulting from families who could not affordthe loan payments once the interest rates increased. Do you believe this loan optionwas use
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Visit a site such as www.bankrate.com to determine current rates for both a 60month and a 36-month loan on a new car where the buyer must finance $20,000.Using the loan calculator, what is the difference in monthly payments between the60-month loan and
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Week 4: LT Deliverable Submitted on timeFeedback from Instructor (Published: Tue XX/XX/2011 XX:XX PM MST)Earned Points:20/20Comments:Great job! It looks like you guys have really worked together towards the final presenation. Be sure tomake good spea
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Learning TeamWeek Four Final Project PreparationThere was little to discuss this week since our past discussions have been very involved anddetailed. After multiple inquires from our teammates, the forum was open to discuss any mattersthat were unreso
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Life insurance is a topic many people do not like to discuss, but understanding yourfamilys needs and planning appropriately in the event of a premature death is alsopart of a comprehensive financial plan. Outlined in Ch. 10 are four methods forestimat
University of Phoenix - FIN - 102
Consider your current financial plan. Based on what you have learned about yourfinancial goals, risk tolerance, and risk and return of various investment options,what adjustments should you make to the asset allocation of your investmentportfolio? What