Chapter 11 Test Bank
61 Pages

Chapter 11 Test Bank

Course Number: ACCT 4121, Spring 2012

College/University: LSU

Word Count: 12603

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DECISION MAKING AND RELEVANT INFORMATION By :Dr. Suyanto, SE, MM, M.Ak TRUE/FALSE 1. A decision model is a formal method for making a choice, frequently involving both quantitative and qualitative analyses. Answer: Terms to Learn: 2. True Difficulty: 1 Objective: decision model, quantitative factors, qualitative factors 1 Email : suyanto@cbn.net.id Feedback from previous decisions uses historical information and,...

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DECISION MAKING AND RELEVANT INFORMATION By :Dr. Suyanto, SE, MM, M.Ak Email : suyanto@cbn.net.id TRUE/FALSE 1. A decision model is a formal method for making a choice, frequently involving both quantitative and qualitative analyses. Answer : True Difficulty : 1 Objective : 1 Terms to Learn : decision model, quantitative factors, qualitative factors 2. Feedback from previous decisions uses historical information and, therefore, is irrelevant for making future predictions. Answer : False Difficulty : 2 Objective : 1 Terms to Learn : relevant costs Historical costs may be helpful in making future predictions, but are not relevant costs for decision making. 3. The amount paid to purchase tools last month is an example of a sunk cost. Answer : True Difficulty : 2 Objective : 2 Terms to Learn : sunk costs 4. For decision making, differential costs assist in choosing between alternatives. Answer : True Difficulty : 1 Objective : 2 Terms to Learn : differential cost 5. For a particular decision, differential revenues and differential costs are always

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LSU - ACCT - 4121
CHAPTER 13 STRATEGY, BALANCED SCORECARD, AND STRATEGIC PROFITABILITY ANALYSISTRUE/FALSE 1. Strategy describes how an organization matches its own capabilities with the opportunities in the marketplace to accomplish its overall objectives. Answer: Terms t
LSU - ACCT - 4121
CHAPTER 20 INVENTORY MANAGEMENT, JUST-IN-TIME, AND SIMPLIFIED COSTING METHODSTRUE/FALSE 1. Retailers generally have a high percentage of net income to revenues. Answer: False Difficulty: 2 Terms to Learn: inventory management Retailers have a low percent
LSU - ACCT - 4121
CHAPTER 21 CAPITAL BUDGETING AND COST ANALYSISTRUE/FALSE 1. Capital budgeting focuses on projects over their entire lives to consider all the cash flows or cash savings from investing in a single project. Answer: Terms to Learn: 2. True Difficulty: capit
LSU - ACCT - 4121
CHAPTER 22 MANAGEMENT CONTROL SYSTEMS, TRANSFER PRICING, AND MULTINATIONAL CONSIDERATIONSTRUE/FALSE 1. The goal of a management control system is to improve the collective decisions in an organization in an economically feasible way. Answer: Terms to Lea
LSU - ACCT - 4121
CHAPTER 23 PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT, COMPENSATION, AND MULTINATIONAL CONSIDERATIONSTRUE/FALSE 1. Many common performance measures, such as customer satisfaction, rely on internal financial accounting information. Answer: False Difficulty: 1 Objective: 1 T
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CHAPTER 2 Linear, Constant-Coefficient SystemsThere are few classes of ode s for which exact, analytical solutions can be obtained by hand. However, for many systems which cannot be solvedexplicitly, we may approximate the dynamics by using simpler sys
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CHAPTER 3 Nonlinear Systems: Local Theorysystems is usually impossible, so we must settle for qualitative descriptions of the dynamics. On the other hand, nonlinear systems can exhibit a wide variety of behaviors that linear systems cannot. Moreover, mos
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CHAPTER 4 Periodic, Heteroclinic, and Homoclinic OrbitsIn this chapter, we shift our attention away from equilibria, instead seeking more "interesting" solutions of nonlinear systems x = f (x). Much of ourdiscussion involves planar systems (i.e., f : R
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CHAPTER 5 BifurcationsIn practice, we often deal with ode s which contain parameters (unspecified constants) whose values can profoundly influence the dynamical behavior ofthe system. For example, suppose we model population changes for a species. The
VCU - MATH - 532
CHAPTER 6 Introduction to Delay Differential EquationsIn this Chapter, we turn our attention to delay differential equations (dde s), a major departure from the ordinary differential equations that were consideredup to now. A basic reference for this m
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CHAPTER 7 Introduction to Difference EquationsThis Chapter concerns the dynamical behavior of systems in which time can be treated as a discrete quantity as opposed to a continuous one. Forexample, some mathematical models of the onset of cardiac arrhy
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CHAPTER 8 Introduction to Partial Differential Equationsperature T depends not only upon time, but also upon spatial location. If x and y denote latitude and longitude and t denotes time, then the function T ( x, y, t) describes how temperature varies in
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CHAPTER 9 Linear, First-Order Partial Differential EquationsIn this chapter, we will discuss the first of several special classes of pde s that can be solve via analytical techniques. In particular, we will investigate linear,first-order pde s a( x, t)
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CHAPTER 10 The Heat and Wave Equations on an Unbounded DomainAt first glance, the heat equation ut - u xx = 0 and the wave equationto be positive constants, the only apparent distinction is between the ut in theutt - c2 u xx = 0 appear very similar. S
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CHAPTER 11 Initial-Boundary Value ProblemsThe infinite spatial domains considered in the previous chapter give insight regarding the behavior of waves and diffusions. However, since suchdomains are not physically realistic, we need to develop new techn
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CHAPTER 12 Introduction to Fourier SeriesIn each example, we were able to construct series representations of the solutions provided that the initial conditions themselves had special series representations (i.e., Fourier sine and cosine series). In this
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CHAPTER 13 The Laplace and Poisson EquationsUp to now, we have dealt almost exclusively with pde s for which one independent variable corresponds to time. Now, we will analyze a pdefor which this is not the case: Laplace's equation. To motivate where L
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