Intermediate Accounting

Intermediate Accounting

Title: Intermediate Accounting

Author: Donald E. Kieso, Jerry J. Weygandt, Terry D. Warfield

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CHAPTER 19 ACCOUNTING FOR INCOME TAXES IFRS questions are available at the end of this chapter. TRUE-FALSE--Conceptual Answer F F T T F T F T F T F T T F F T T T F F No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Description Taxable income. Use of pretax financial income. Taxable amounts. Deferred tax liability. Deductible amounts. Deferred tax asset. Need for valuation allowance...

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19 ACCOUNTING CHAPTER FOR INCOME TAXES IFRS questions are available at the end of this chapter. TRUE-FALSE--Conceptual Answer F F T T F T F T F T F T T F F T T T F F No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Description Taxable income. Use of pretax financial income. Taxable amounts. Deferred tax liability. Deductible amounts. Deferred tax asset. Need for valuation allowance account. Positive and negative evidence. Computation of income tax expense. Taxable temporary differences. Taxable temporary difference examples. Permanent differences. Applying tax rates to temporary differences. Change in tax rates. Accounting for a loss carryback. Tax effect of a loss carryforward. Possible source of taxable income. Classification of deferred tax assets and liabilities. Classification of deferred tax accounts. Method used for accounting for income taxes. MULTIPLE CHOICE--Conceptual Answer b c b a a b c d b c d c d d d b a No. 21. 22. 23. 24. P 25. S 26. P 27. S 28. S 29. S 30. S 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. Description Differences between taxable and accounting income. Differences between taxable and accounting income. Determination of deferred tax expense. Differences arising from depreciation methods. Temporary difference and a revenue item. Effect of future taxable amount. Causes of a deferred tax liability. Distinction between temporary and permanent differences. Identification of deductible temporary difference. Identification of taxable temporary difference. Identification of future taxable amounts. Identify a permanent difference. Identification of permanent differences. Identification of temporary differences. Difference due to the equity method of investment accounting. Difference due to unrealized loss on marketable securities. Identification of deductible temporary differences. 19 - 2 d Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 38. Identification of temporary difference. Accounting for Income Taxes 19 - 3 MULTIPLE CHOICE--Conceptual (cont.) Answer c c b a d c d c b d d c c P S No. S Description Accounting for change in tax rate. Appropriate tax rate for deferred tax amounts. Recognition of tax benefit of a loss carryforward. Recognition of valuation account for deferred tax asset. Definition of uncertain tax positions. Recognition of tax benefit with uncertain tax position. Reasons for disclosure of deferred income tax information. Classification of deferred income tax on the balance sheet. Classification of deferred income tax on the balance sheet. Basis for classification as current or noncurrent. Income statement presentation of a tax benefit from NOL carryforward. Classification of a deferred tax liability. Procedures for computing deferred income taxes. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. S 50. 51. These questions also appear in the Problem-Solving Survival Guide. These questions also appear in the Study Guide. *This topic is dealt with in an Appendix to the chapter. MULTIPLE CHOICE--Computational Answer c b a a d c b d c d b d a a a c a b a a d b c d b d b b No. 52 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. Description Calculate book basis and tax basis of an asset. Calculate deferred tax liability balance. Calculate current/noncurrent portions of deferred tax liability. Calculate income tax expense for the year. Calculate amount of deferred tax asset to be recognized. Calculate current deferred tax liability. Determine income taxes payable for the year. Calculate amount of deferred tax asset to be recognized. Calculate current/noncurrent portions of deferred tax liability. Calculate amount deducted for depreciation on the tax return. Calculate amount of deferred tax asset to be recognized. Calculate deferred tax asset with temporary and permanent differences. Calculate amount of DTA valuation account. Calculate current portion of provision for income taxes. Calculate deferred portion of income tax expense. Computation of total income tax expense. Calculate installment accounts receivable. Computation of pretax financial income. Calculate deferred tax liability amount. Calculate income tax expense for the year. Calculate income tax expense for the year. Computation of income tax expense. Computation of income tax expense. Computation of warranty claims paid. Calculate taxable income for the year. Calculate deferred tax asset amount. Calculate deferred tax liability balance. Calculate income taxes payable amount. 19 - 4 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition MULTIPLE CHOICE--Computational (cont.) Answer a b b a c d b b d d b a a d c No. 80. 81. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94. Description Calculate deferred tax asset amount. Calculate taxable income for the year. Calculate pretax financial income. Calculate deferred tax liability with changing tax rates. Calculate deferred tax liability amount. Calculate income tax expense with changing tax rates. Determine change in deferred tax liability. Calculate deferred tax liability with changing tax rates. Calculate loss to be reported after NOL carryback. Calculate loss to be reported after NOL carryback. Calculate loss to be reported after NOL carryforward. Determine income tax refund following an NOL carryback. Calculate income tax benefit from an NOL carryback. Calculate income tax payable after NOL carryforward. Calculate deferred tax asset after NOL carryforward. MULTIPLE CHOICE--CPA Adapted Answer a a c d d b a a c c No. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 100. 101. 102. 103. 104. Description Determine current income tax liability. Determine current income tax liability. Deferred tax liability arising from depreciation methods. Deferred tax liability when using equity method of investment accounting. Calculate deferred tax liability and income taxes currently payable. Determine current income tax expense. Deferred income tax liability from temporary and permanent differences. Deferred tax liability arising from installment method. Differences arising from depreciation and warranty expenses. Deferred tax asset arising from warranty expenses. EXERCISES Item E19-105 E19-106 E19-107 E19-108 E19-109 E19-110 E19-111 E19-112 E19-113 Description Computation of taxable income. Future taxable and deductible amounts (essay). Deferred income taxes. Deferred income taxes. Recognition of deferred tax asset. Permanent and temporary differences. Permanent and temporary differences. Temporary differences. Operating loss carryforward. Accounting for Income Taxes 19 - 5 PROBLEMS Item P19-114 P19-115 P19-116 P19-117 Description Differences between accounting and taxable income and the effect on deferred taxes. Multiple temporary differences. Deferred tax asset. Interperiod tax allocation with change in enacted tax rates. CHAPTER LEARNING OBJECTIVES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. *11. Identify differences between pretax financial income and taxable income. Describe a temporary difference that results in future taxable amounts. Describe a temporary difference that results in future deductible amounts. Explain the purpose of a deferred tax asset valuation allowance. Describe the presentation of income tax expense in the income statement. Describe various temporary and permanent differences. Explain the effect of various tax rates and tax rate changes on deferred income taxes. Apply accounting procedures for a loss carryback and a loss carryforward. Describe the presentation of deferred income taxes in financial statements. Indicate the basic principles of the asset-liability method. Understand and apply the concepts and procedures of interperiod tax allocation. 19 - 6 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition SUMMARY OF LEARNING OBJECTIVES BY QUESTIONS Item 1. 2. 3. 4. 24. 5. 6. 56. 7. 9. 26. Type TF TF TF TF MC TF TF MC TF TF MC TF TF TF MC MC TF TF TF TF TF TF MC TF Item 21. 22. P Type MC MC MC MC MC MC MC MC TF MC MC MC MC MC MC MC MC MC TF MC MC MC MC MC Item 23. 95. 54. 55. 58. 63. 106. 107. 64. 67. 99. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 83. 84. 42. 88. 47. 48. 49. Type Item Type Item Type P P E E P P P P Item 116. Type P Item Type 25. 52. 53. 59. 61. 62. 8. 65. 66. S 10. 11. 12. P 27. S 28. 13. 14. 15. 16. 18. 19. 43. 20. Note: S S 29. 30. S 31. 32. 33. S 39. 40. 17. 41. 44. 45. 46. 51. Learning Objective 1 MC 96. MC 114. MC 105. E 115. Learning Objective 2 MC 97. MC 107. MC 98. MC 108. MC 106. E 114. Learning Objective 3 MC 108. E 114. E 109. E 115. E 113. E 116. Learning Objective 4 MC Learning Objective 5 MC 100. MC MC 113. E Learning Objective 6 MC 68. MC 73. MC 69. MC 74. MC 70. MC 75. MC 71. MC 76. MC 72. MC 77. Learning Objective 7 MC 85. MC 87. MC 86. MC 117. Learning Objective 8 MC 89. MC 91. MC 90. MC 92. Learning Objective 9 S MC 50. MC 100. MC 57. MC 101. MC 60. MC 102. Learning Objective 10 115. 116. P P MC MC MC MC MC MC P MC MC MC MC MC 78. 79. 80. 81. 82. MC MC MC MC MC 110. 111. 112. 114. 116. E E E P P 93. 94. 103. 104. 116. MC MC MC MC P 113. E TF = True-False MC = Multiple Choice E = Exercise P = Problem Accounting for Income Taxes 19 - 7 TRUE-FALSE--Conceptual 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. Taxable income is a tax accounting term and is also referred to as income before taxes. Pretax financial income is the amount used to compute income tax payable. Taxable amounts increase taxable income in future years. A deferred tax liability represents the increase in taxes payable in future years as a result of taxable temporary differences existing at the end of the current year. Deductible amounts cause taxable income to be greater than pretax financial income in the future as a result of existing temporary differences. A deferred tax asset represents the increase in taxes refundable in future years as a result of deductible temporary differences existing at the end of the current year. A company reduces a deferred tax asset by a valuation allowance if it is probable that it will not realize some portion of the deferred tax asset. Companies should consider both positive and negative evidence to determine whether it needs to record a valuation allowance to reduce a deferred tax asset. A company should add a decrease in a deferred tax liability to income tax payable in computing income tax expense. Taxable temporary differences will result in taxable amounts in future years when the related assets are recovered. Examples of taxable temporary differences are subscriptions received in advance and advance rental receipts. Permanent differences do not give rise to future taxable or deductible amounts. Companies must consider presently enacted changes in the tax rate that become effective in future years when determining the tax rate to apply to existing temporary differences. When a change in the tax rate is enacted, the effect is reported as an adjustment to income tax payable in the period of the change. Under the loss carryback approach, companies must apply a current year loss to the most recent year first and then to an earlier year. The tax effect of a loss carryforward represents future tax savings and results in the recognition of a deferred tax asset. A possible source of taxable income that may be available to realize a tax benefit for loss carryforwards is future reversals of existing taxable temporary differences. An individual deferred tax asset or liability is classified as current or noncurrent based on the classification of the related asset/liability for financial reporting purposes. 19 - 8 19. 20. Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition Companies should classify the balances in the deferred tax accounts on the balance sheet as noncurrent assets and noncurrent liabilities. The FASB believes that the deferred tax method is the most consistent method for accounting for income taxes. True-False Answers--Conceptual Item 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Register to View AnswerF T T F Item 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Register to View AnswerF T F T Item 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Register to View AnswerT T F F Item 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Register to View AnswerT T F F MULTIPLE CHOICE--Conceptual 21. Taxable income of a corporation a. differs from accounting income due to differences in intraperiod allocation between the two methods of income determination. b. differs from accounting income due to differences in interperiod allocation and permanent differences between the two methods of income determination. c. is based on generally accepted accounting principles. d. is reported on the corporation's income statement. Taxable income of a corporation differs from pretax financial income because of Permanent Differences No No Yes Yes Temporary Differences No Yes Yes No 22 a. b. c. d. 23. The deferred tax expense is the a. increase in balance of deferred tax asset minus the increase in balance of deferred tax liability. b. increase in balance of deferred tax liability minus the increase in balance of deferred tax asset. c. increase in balance of deferred tax asset plus the increase in balance of deferred tax liability. d. decrease in balance of deferred tax asset minus the increase in balance of deferred tax liability. Accounting for Income Taxes 24. 19 - 9 Machinery was acquired at the beginning of the year. Depreciation recorded during the life of the machinery could result in Future Taxable Amounts Yes Yes No No Future Deductible Amounts Yes No Yes No a. b. c. d. P 25. A temporary difference arises when a revenue item is reported for tax purposes in a period After it is reported Before it is reported in financial income in financial income a. Yes Yes b. Yes No c. No Yes d. No No At the December 31, 2012 balance sheet date, Unruh Corporation reports an accrued receivable for financial reporting purposes but not for tax purposes. When this asset is recovered in 2013, a future taxable amount will occur and a. pretax financial income will exceed taxable income in 2013. b. Unruh will record a decrease in a deferred tax liability in 2013. c. total income tax expense for 2011 will exceed current tax expense for 2013. d. Unruh will record an increase in a deferred tax asset in 2013. Assuming a 40% statutory tax rate applies to all years involved, which of the following situations will give rise to reporting a deferred tax liability on the balance sheet? I. II. III. IV. a. b. c. d. A revenue is deferred for financial reporting purposes but not for tax purposes. A revenue is deferred for tax purposes but not for financial reporting purposes. An expense is deferred for financial reporting purposes but not for tax purposes. An expense is deferred for tax purposes but not for financial reporting purposes. S 26. P 27. item II only items I and II only items II and III only items I and IV only S 28. A major distinction between temporary and permanent differences is a. permanent differences are not representative of acceptable accounting practice. b. temporary differences occur frequently, whereas permanent differences occur only once. c. once an item is determined to be a temporary difference, it maintains that status; however, a permanent difference can change in status with the passage of time. d. temporary differences reverse themselves in subsequent accounting periods, whereas permanent differences do not reverse. 19 - 10 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition S 29. Which of the following are temporary differences that are normally classified as expenses or losses that are deductible after they are recognized in financial income? a. Advance rental receipts. b. Product warranty liabilities. c. Depreciable property. d. Fines and expenses resulting from a violation of law. Which of the following is a temporary difference classified as a revenue or gain that is taxable after it is recognized in financial income? a. Subscriptions received in advance. b. Prepaid royalty received in advance. c. An installment sale accounted for on the accrual basis for financial reporting purposes and on the installment (cash) basis for tax purposes. d. Interest received on a municipal obligation. Which of the following differences would result in future taxable amounts? a. Expenses or losses that are tax deductible after they are recognized in financial income. b. Revenues or gains that are taxable before they are recognized in financial income. c. Revenues or gains that are recognized in financial income but are never included in taxable income. d. Expenses or losses that are tax deductible before they are recognized in financial income. Stuart Corporation's taxable income differed from its accounting income computed for this past year. An item that would create a permanent difference in accounting and taxable incomes for Stuart would be a. a balance in the Unearned Rent account at year end. b. using accelerated depreciation for tax purposes and straight-line depreciation for book purposes. c. a fine resulting from violations of OSHA regulations. d. making installment sales during the year. An example of a permanent difference is a. proceeds from life insurance on officers. b. interest expense on money borrowed to invest in municipal bonds. c. insurance expense for a life insurance policy on officers. d. all of these. Which of the following will not result in a temporary difference? a. Product warranty liabilities b. Advance rental receipts c. Installment sales d. All of these will result in a temporary difference. A company uses the equity method to account for an investment. This would result in what type of difference and in what type of deferred income tax? a. b. c. d. Type of Difference Permanent Permanent Temporary Temporary Deferred Tax Asset Liability Asset Liability S 30. S 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. Accounting for Income Taxes 36. 19 - 11 A company records an unrealized loss on short-term securities. This would result in what type of difference and in what type of deferred income tax? a. b. c. d. Type of Difference Temporary Temporary Permanent Permanent Deferred Tax Liability Asset Liability Asset 37. Which of the following temporary differences results in a deferred tax asset in the year the temporary difference originates? I. Accrual for product warranty liability. II. Subscriptions received in advance. III. Prepaid insurance expense. a. I and II only. b. II only. c. III only. d. I and III only. Which of the following is not considered a permanent difference? a. Interest received on municipal bonds. b. Fines resulting from violating the law. c. Premiums paid for life insurance on a company's CEO when the company is the beneficiary. d. Stock-based compensation expense. When a change in the tax rate is enacted into law, its effect on existing deferred income tax accounts should be a. handled retroactively in accordance with the guidance related to changes in accounting principles. b. considered, but it should only be recorded in the accounts if it reduces a deferred tax liability or increases a deferred tax asset. c. reported as an adjustment to tax expense in the period of change. d. applied to all temporary or permanent differences that arise prior to the date of the enactment of the tax rate change, but not subsequent to the date of the change. Tax rates other than the current tax rate may be used to calculate the deferred income tax amount on the balance sheet if a. it is probable that a future tax rate change will occur. b. it appears likely that a future tax rate will be greater than the current tax rate. c. the future tax rates have been enacted into law. d. it appears likely that a future tax rate will be less than the current tax rate. Recognition of tax benefits in the loss year due to a loss carryforward requires a. the establishment of a deferred tax liability. b. the establishment of a deferred tax asset. c. the establishment of an income tax refund receivable. d. only a note to the financial statements. 38. S 39. 40. 41. 19 - 12 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 42. Recognizing a valuation allowance for a deferred tax asset requires that a company a. consider all positive and negative information in determining the need for a valuation allowance. b. consider only the positive information in determining the need for a valuation allowance. c. take an aggressive approach in its tax planning. d. pass a recognition threshold, after assuming that it will be audited by taxing authorities. Uncertain tax positions I. Are positions for which the tax authorities may disallow a deduction in whole or in part. II. Include instances in which the tax law is clear and in which the company believes an audit is likely. III. Give rise to tax expense by increasing payables or increasing a deferred tax liability. a. I, II, and III. b. I and III only. c. II only. d. I only. With regard to uncertain tax positions, the FASB requires that companies recognize a tax benefit when a. it is probable and can be reasonably estimated. b. there is at least a 51% probability that the uncertain tax position will be approved by the taxing authorities. c. it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained upon audit. d. Any of the above exist. Major reasons for disclosure of deferred income tax information is (are) a. better assessment of quality of earnings. b. better predictions of future cash flows. c. that it may be helpful in setting government policy. d. all of these. Accounting for income taxes can result in the reporting of deferred taxes as any of the following except a. a current or long-term asset. b. a current or long-term liability. c. a contra-asset account. d. All of these are acceptable methods of reporting deferred taxes. Deferred taxes should be presented on the balance sheet a. as one net debit or credit amount. b. in two amounts: one for the net current amount and one for the net noncurrent amount. c. in two amounts: one for the net debit amount and one for the net credit amount. d. as reductions of the related asset or liability accounts. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. Accounting for Income Taxes 48. 19 - 13 Deferred tax amounts that are related to specific assets or liabilities should be classified as current or noncurrent based on a. their expected reversal dates. b. their debit or credit balance. c. the length of time the deferred tax amounts will generate future tax deferral benefits. d. the classification of the related asset or liability. Tanner, Inc. incurred a financial and taxable loss for 2013. Tanner therefore decided to use the carryback provisions as it had been profitable up to this year. How should the amounts related to the carryback be reported in the 2013 financial statements? a. The reduction of the loss should be reported as a prior period adjustment. b. The refund claimed should be reported as a deferred charge and amortized over five years. c. The refund claimed should be reported as revenue in the current year. d. The refund claimed should be shown as a reduction of the loss in 2013. A deferred tax liability is classified on the balance sheet as either a current or a noncurrent liability. The current amount of a deferred tax liability should generally be a. the net deferred tax consequences of temporary differences that will result in net taxable amounts during the next year. b. totally eliminated from the financial statements if the amount is related to a noncurrent asset. c. based on the classification of the related asset or liability for financial reporting purposes. d. the total of all deferred tax consequences that are not expected to reverse in the operating period or one year, whichever is greater. All of the following are procedures for the computation of deferred income taxes except to a. identify the types and amounts of existing temporary differences. b. measure the total deferred tax liability for taxable temporary differences. c. measure the total deferred tax asset for deductible temporary differences and operating loss carrybacks. d. All of these are procedures in computing deferred income taxes. 49. S 50. 51. Multiple Choice Answers--Conceptual Item Ans. Item Ans. Item Ans. Item Ans. Item Ans. Item Ans. Item Ans. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. b c b a a 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. b c d b c 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. d c d d d 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. b a d c c 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. b a d c d 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. c b d d c 51. c 19 - 14 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition MULTIPLE CHOICE--Computational Use the following information for questions 52 and 53. At the beginning of 2013, Pitman Co. purchased an asset for $900,000 with an estimated useful life of 5 years and an estimated salvage value of $75,000. For financial reporting purposes the asset is being depreciated using the straight-line method; for tax purposes the double-decliningbalance method is being used. Pitman Co.'s tax rate is 40% for 2013 and all future years. 52. At the end of 2013, what is the book basis and the tax basis of the asset? Book basis Tax basis a. $660,000 $465,000 b. $735,000 $465,000 c. $735,000 $540,000 d. $660,000 $540,000 At the end of 2013, which of the following deferred tax accounts and balances is reported on Pitman's balance sheet? Account _ Balance a. Deferred tax asset $78,000 b. Deferred tax liability $78,000 c. Deferred tax asset $117,000 d. Deferred tax liability $117,000 Lehman Corporation purchased a machine on January 2, 2011, for $2,000,000. The machine has an estimated 5-year life with no salvage value. The straight-line method of depreciation is being used for financial statement purposes and the following MACRS amounts will be deducted for tax purposes: 2011 2012 2013 $400,000 640,000 384,000 2014 2015 2016 $230,000 230,000 116,000 53. 54. Assuming an income tax rate of 30% for all years, the net deferred tax liability that should be reflected on Lehman's balance sheet at December 31, 2012, should be Deferred Tax Liability Current Noncurrent $0 $72,000 $4,800 $67,200 $67,200 $4,800 $72,000 $0 a. b. c. d. Use the following information for questions 55 through 57. Mathis Co. at the end of 2012, its first year of operations, prepared a reconciliation between pretax financial income and taxable income as follows: Pretax financial income $ 600,000 Estimated litigation expense 1,500,000 Installment sales (1,200,000) Taxable income $ 900,000 Accounting for Income Taxes 19 - 15 The estimated litigation expense of $1,500,000 will be deductible in 2014 when it is expected to be paid. The gross profit from the installment sales will be realized in the amount of $600,000 in each of the next two years. The estimated liability for litigation is classified as noncurrent and the installment accounts receivable are classified as $600,000 current and $600,000 noncurrent. The income tax rate is 30% for all years. 55. The income tax expense is a. $180,000. b. $270,000. c. $300,000. d. $600,000. The deferred tax asset to be recognized is a. $0. b. $90,000 current. c. $450,000 current. d. $450,000 noncurrent. The deferred tax liability--current to be recognized is a. $90,000. b. $270,000. c. $180,000. d. $360,000. 56. 57. Use the following information for questions 58 through 60. Hopkins Co. at the end of 2012, its first year of operations, prepared a reconciliation between pretax financial income and taxable income as follows: Pretax financial income Estimated litigation expense Extra depreciation for taxes Taxable income $ 900,000 1,200,000 (1,800,000) $ 300,000 The estimated litigation expense of $1,200,000 will be deductible in 2013 when it is expected to be paid. Use of the depreciable assets will result in taxable amounts of $600,000 in each of the next three years. The income tax rate is 30% for all years. 58. Income tax payable is a. $0. b. $90,000. c. $180,000. d. $270,000. The deferred tax asset to be recognized is a. $90,000 current. b. $180,000 current. c. $270,000 current. d. $360,000 current. 59. 19 - 16 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 60. The deferred tax liability to be recognized is Current Noncurrent a. $180,000 $360,000 b. $180,000 $270,000 c. $0 $540,000 d. $0 $450,000 Eckert Corporation's partial income statement after its first year of operations is as follows: Income before income taxes Income tax expense Current Deferred Net income $3,750,000 $1,035,000 90,000 1,125,000 $2,625,000 61. Eckert uses the straight-line method of depreciation for financial reporting purposes and accelerated depreciation for tax purposes. The amount charged to depreciation expense on its books this year was $1,800,000. No other differences existed between book income and taxable income except for the amount of depreciation. Assuming a 30% tax rate, what amount was deducted for depreciation on the corporation's tax return for the current year? a. $1,500,000 b. $1,125,000 c. $1,800,000 d. $2,100,000 62. Cross Company reported the following results for the year ended December 31, 2012, its first year of operations: 2012 Income (per books before income taxes) $ 1,250,000 Taxable income 2,000,000 The disparity between book income and taxable income is attributable to a temporary difference which will reverse in 2013. What should Cross record as a net deferred tax asset or liability for the year ended December 31, 2012, assuming that the enacted tax rates in effect are 40% in 2012 and 35% in 2013? a. $300,000 deferred tax liability b. $262,500 deferred tax asset c. $300,000 deferred tax asset d. $262,500 deferred tax liability 63. In 2012, Krause Company accrued, for financial statement reporting, estimated losses on disposal of unused plant facilities of $1,800,000. The facilities were sold in March 2013 and a $1,800,000 loss was recognized for tax purposes. Also in 2012, Krause paid $100,000 in premiums for a two-year life insurance policy in which the company was the beneficiary. Assuming that the enacted tax rate is 30% in both 2012 and 2013, and that Krause paid $780,000 in income taxes in 2012, the amount reported as net deferred income taxes on Krause's balance sheet at December 31, 2012, should be a a. $510,000 asset. b. $270,000 asset. c. $270,000 liability. d. $540,000 asset. Accounting for Income Taxes 64. 19 - 17 Horner Corporation has a deferred tax asset at December 31, 2013 of $120,000 due to the recognition of potential tax benefits of an operating loss carryforward. The enacted tax rates are as follows: 40% for 20102012; 35% for 2013; and 30% for 2014 and thereafter. Assuming that management expects that only 50% of the related benefits will actually be realized, a valuation account should be established in the amount of: a. $60,000 b. $24,000 c. $21,000 d. $18,000 Watson Corporation prepared the following reconciliation for its first year of operations: Pretax financial income for 2013 $1,400,000 Tax exempt interest (100,000) Originating temporary difference (300,000) Taxable income $1,000,000 The temporary difference will reverse evenly over the next two years at an enacted tax rate of 40%. The enacted tax rate for 2013 is 28%. What amount should be reported in its 2013 income statement as the current portion of its provision for income taxes? a. $280,000 b. $400,000 c. $392,000 d. $560,000 65. Use the following information for questions 66 and 67. Mitchell Corporation prepared the following reconciliation for its first year of operations: Pretax financial income for 2013 Tax exempt interest Originating temporary difference Taxable income $ 900,000 (75,000) (125,000) $700,000 The temporary difference will reverse evenly over the next two years at an enacted tax rate of 40%. The enacted tax rate for 2013 is 35%. 66. What amount should be reported in its 2013 income statement as the deferred portion of income tax expense? a. $50,000 debit b. $90,000 debit c. $50,000 credit d. $70,000 credit In Mitchell's 2013 income statement, what amount should be reported for total income tax expense? a. $325,000 b. $315,000 c. $295,000 d. $245,000 67. 19 - 18 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 68. Ewing Company sells household furniture. Customers who purchase furniture on the installment basis make payments in equal monthly installments over a two-year period, with no down payment required. Ewing's gross profit on installment sales equals 40% of the selling price of the furniture. For financial accounting purposes, sales revenue is recognized at the time the sale is made. For income tax purposes, however, the installment method is used. There are no other book and income tax accounting differences, and Ewing's income tax rate is 30%. If Ewing's December 31, 2013, balance sheet includes a deferred tax liability of $450,000 arising from the difference between book and tax treatment of the installment sales, it should also include installment accounts receivable of a. $3,750,000. b. $1,500,000. c. $1,125,000. d. $450,000. 69. Ferguson Company has the following cumulative taxable temporary differences: 12/31/13 $1,800,000 12/31/12 $1,280,000 The tax rate enacted for 2013 is 40%, while the tax rate enacted for future years is 30%. Taxable income for 2013 is $3,200,000 and there are no permanent differences. Ferguson's pretax financial income for 2013 is a. $5,000,000. b. $3,720,000. c. $2,680,000. d. $1,400,000. Use the following information for questions 70 through 72. Lyons Company deducts insurance expense of $105,000 for tax purposes in 2012, but the expense is not yet recognized for accounting purposes. In 2013, 2014, and 2015, no insurance expense will be deducted for tax purposes, but $35,000 of insurance expense will be reported for accounting purposes in each of these years. Lyons Company has a tax rate of 40% and income taxes payable of $90,000 at the end of 2012. There were no deferred taxes at the beginning of 2012. 70. What is the amount of the deferred tax liability at the end of 2012? a. $42,000 b. $36,000 c. $15,000 d. $0 What is the amount of income tax expense for 2012? a. $132,000 b. $126,000 c. $105,000 d. $90,000 71. Accounting for Income Taxes 72. 19 - 19 Assuming that income tax payable for 2013 is $120,000, the income tax expense for 2013 would be what amount? a. $162,000 b. $134,000 c. $120,000 d. $106,000 Use the following information for questions 73 and 74. Kraft Company made the following journal entry in late 2012 for rent on property it leases to Danford Corporation. Cash Unearned Rent Revenue 90,000 90,000 The payment represents rent for the years 2013 and 2014, the period covered by the lease. Kraft Company is a cash basis taxpayer. Kraft has income tax payable of $138,000 at the end of 2012, and its tax rate is 35%. 73. What amount of income tax expense should Kraft Company report at the end of 2012? a. $79,500 b. $106,500 c. $122,250 d. $169,500 Assuming the income taxes payable at the end of 2013 is $153,000, what amount of income tax expense would Kraft Company record for 2013? a. $121,500 b. $137,250 c. $168,750 d. $184,500 The following information is available for Kessler Company after its first year of operations: Income before taxes Federal income tax payable Deferred income tax Income tax expense Net income $250,000 $104,000 (4,000) 100,000 $150,000 74. 75. Kessler estimates its annual warranty expense as a percentage of sales. The amount charged to warranty expense on its books was $105,000. Assuming a 40% income tax rate, what amount was actually paid this year for warranty claims? a. $115,000 b. $100,000 c. $105,000 d. $95,000 19 - 20 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition Use the following information for questions 7678. At the beginning of 2012; Elephant, Inc. had a deferred tax asset of $8,000 and a deferred tax liability of $12,000. Pre-tax accounting income for 2012 was $600,000 and the enacted tax rate is 40%. The following items are included in Elephant's pre-tax income: Interest income from municipal bonds Accrued warranty costs, estimated to be paid in 2013 Operating loss carryforward Installment sales revenue, will be collected in 2013 Prepaid rent expense, will be used in 2013 76. $ 48,000 $104,000 $ 76,000 $ 52,000 $24,000 What is Elephant, Inc.'s taxable income for 2012? a. $600,000 b. $504,000 c. $696,000 d. $904,000 Which of the following is required to adjust Elephant, Inc.'s deferred tax asset to its correct balance at December 31, 2012? a. A debit of $41,600 b. A credit of $30,400 c. A debit of $30,400 d. A debit of $33,600 The ending balance in Elephant, Inc's deferred tax liability at December 31, 2012 is a. $18,400 b. $30,400 c. $20,800 d. $62,400 77. 78. Use the following information for questions 79 and 80. Rowen, Inc. had pre-tax accounting income of $1,350,000 and a tax rate of 40% in 2013, its first year of operations. During 2013 the company had the following transactions: Received rent from Jane, Co. for 2014 Municipal bond income Depreciation for tax purposes in excess of book depreciation Installment sales revenue to be collected in 2014 79. $48,000 $60,000 $30,000 $81,000 For 2013, what is the amount of income taxes payable for Rowen, Inc? a. $452,400 b. $490,800 c. $514,800 d. $579,600 Accounting for Income Taxes 80. 19 - 21 At the end of 2013, which of the following deferred tax accounts and balances is reported on Rowen, Inc.'s balance sheet? Account _ Balance a. Deferred tax asset $19,200 b. Deferred tax liability $19,200 c. Deferred tax asset $31,200 d. Deferred tax liability $31,200 Based on the following information, compute 2013 taxable income for South Co. assuming that its pre-tax accounting income for the year ended December 31, 2013 is $460,000. Future taxable Temporary difference (deductible) amount Installment sales $384,000 Depreciation $120,000 Unearned rent ($400,000) a. b. c. d. $564,000 $356,000 $964,000 $444,000 81. 82. Fleming Company has the following cumulative taxable temporary differences: 12/31/13 12/31/12 $960,000 $1,350,000 The tax rate enacted for 2013 is 40%, while the tax rate enacted for future years is 30%. Taxable income for 2013 is $2,400,000 and there are no permanent differences. Fleming's pretax financial income for 2013 is: a. b. c. d. $1,440,000 $2,010,000 $2,595,000 $3,360,000 83. Larsen Corporation reported $100,000 in revenues in its 2012 financial statements, of which $55,000 will not be included in the tax return until 2013. The enacted tax rate is 40% for 2012 and 35% for 2013. What amount should Larsen report for deferred income tax liability in its balance sheet at December 31, 2012? a. $19,250 b. $22,000 c. $24,500 d. $28,000 19 - 22 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 84. Duncan Inc. uses the accrual method of accounting for financial reporting purposes and appropriately uses the installment method of accounting for income tax purposes. Profits of $900,000 recognized for books in 2012 will be collected in the following years: Collection of Profits 2013 $150,000 2014 $300,000 2015 $450,000 The enacted tax rates are: 40% for 2012, 35% for 2013, and 30% for 2014 and 2015. Taxable income is expected in all future years. What amount should be included in the December 31, 2012, balance sheet for the deferred tax liability related to the above temporary difference? a. $ 52,500 b. $225,000 c. $277,500 d. $360,000 85. At December 31, 2012 Raymond Corporation reported a deferred tax liability of $150,000 which was attributable to a taxable type temporary difference of $500,000. The temporary difference is scheduled to reverse in 2016. During 2013, a new tax law increased the corporate tax rate from 30% to 40%. Raymond should record this change by debiting a. Retained Earnings for $50,000. b. Retained Earnings for $15,000. c. Income Tax Expense for $15,000. d. Income Tax Expense for $50,000. Palmer Co. had a deferred tax liability balance due to a temporary difference at the beginning of 2012 related to $800,000 of excess depreciation. In December of 2012, a new income tax act is signed into law that lowers the corporate rate from 40% to 35%, effective January 1, 2014. If taxable amounts related to the temporary difference are scheduled to be reversed by $400,000 for both 2013 and 2014, Palmer should increase or decrease deferred tax liability by what amount? a. Decrease by $40,000 b. Decrease by $20,000 c. Increase by $20,000 d. Increase by $40,000 A reconciliation of Gentry Company's pretax accounting income with its taxable income for 2012, its first year of operations, is as follows: Pretax accounting income Excess tax depreciation Taxable income $3,000,000 (180,000) $2,820,000 86. 87. The excess tax depreciation will result in equal net taxable amounts in each of the next three years. Enacted tax rates are 40% in 2012, 35% in 2013 and 2014, and 30% in 2015. The total deferred tax liability to be reported on Gentry's balance sheet at December 31, 2012, is a. $72,000. b. $60,000. c. $63,000. d. $54,000. Accounting for Income Taxes 88. 19 - 23 Khan, Inc. reports a taxable and financial loss of $1,300,000 for 2013. Its pretax financial income for the last two years was as follows: 2011 2012 $600,000 800,000 The amount that Khan, Inc. reports as a net loss for financial reporting purposes in 2013, assuming that it uses the carryback provisions, and that the tax rate is 30% for all periods affected, is a. $1,300,000 loss. b. $ -0-. c. $390,000 loss. d. $910,000 loss. Use the following information for questions 89 and 90. Wilcox Corporation reported the following results for its first three years of operation: 2012 income (before income taxes) 2013 loss (before income taxes) 2014 income (before income taxes) $ 150,000 (1,350,000) 1,500,000 There were no permanent or temporary differences during these three years. Assume a corporate tax rate of 30% for 2012 and 2013, and 40% for 2014. 89. Assuming that Wilcox elects to use the carryback provision, what income (loss) is reported in 2013? (Assume that any deferred tax asset recognized is more likely than not to be realized.) a. $(1,350,000) b. $ -0c. $(1,305,000) d. $ (825,000) Assuming that Wilcox elects to use the carryforward provision and not the carryback provision, what income (loss) is reported in 2013? a. $(1,350,000) b. $(810,000) c. $ -0d. $(1,305,000) Rodd Co. reports a taxable and pretax financial loss of $600,000 for 2013. Rodd's taxable and pretax financial income and tax rates for the last two years were: 2011 2012 $600,000 600,000 30% 35% 90. 91. The amount that Rodd should report as an income tax refund receivable in 2013, assuming that it uses the carryback and provisions that the tax rate is 40% in 2013, is a. $180,000. b. $210,000. c. $240,000. d. $270,000. 19 - 24 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 92. Nickerson Corporation began operations in 2011. There have been no permanent or temporary differences to account for since the inception of the business. The following data are available: Year Enacted Tax Rate Taxable Income Taxes Paid 2011 45% $1,250,000 $562,500 2012 40% 1,500,000 600,000 2013 35% 2014 30% In 2013, Nickerson had an operating loss of $1,550,000. What amount of income tax benefits should be reported on the 2013 income statement due to this loss? a. $682,500 b. $622,500 c. $620,000 d. $465,000 Use the following information for questions 93 and 94. Operating income and tax rates for C.J. Company's first three years of operations were as follows: Income _ Enacted tax rate 2012 $200,000 35% 2013 ($500,000) 30% 2014 $840,000 40% 93. Assuming that C.J. Company opts to carryback its 2013 NOL, what is the amount of income tax payable at December 31, 2014? a. $136,000 b. $336,000 c. $246,000 d. $216,000 Assuming that C.J. Company opts only to carryforward its 2013 NOL, what is the amount of deferred tax asset or liability that C.J. Company would report on its December 31, 2013 balance sheet? Amount _ Deferred tax asset or liability a. $150,000 Deferred tax liability b. $175,000 Deferred tax liability c. $200,000 Deferred tax asset d. $150,000 Deferred tax asset 94. Multiple Choice Answers--Computational Item Ans. Item Ans. Item Ans. Item Ans. Item Ans. Item Ans. Item Ans. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. c b a a d c 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. b d c d b d 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. a a a c a b 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. a a d b c d 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81. 82. b d b b a b b 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. a c d b b d 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94. d b a a d c Accounting for Income Taxes 19 - 25 MULTIPLE CHOICE--CPA Adapted 95. Munoz Corp.'s books showed pretax financial income of $1,800,000 for the year ended December 31, 2013. In the computation of federal income taxes, the following data were considered: Gain on an involuntary conversion $780,000 (Munoz has elected to replace the property within the statutory period using total proceeds.) Depreciation deducted for tax purposes in excess of depreciation deducted for book purposes 120,000 Federal estimated tax payments, 2013 150,000 Enacted federal tax rate, 2013 30% What amount should Munoz report as its current federal income tax liability on its December 31, 2013 balance sheet? a. $120,000 b. $156,000 c. $270,000 d. $306,000 96. Haag Corp.'s 2013 income statement showed pretax accounting income of $1,250,000. To compute the federal income tax liability, the following 2013 data are provided: Income from exempt municipal bonds $ 50,000 Depreciation deducted for tax purposes in excess of depreciation deducted for financial statement purposes 100,000 Estimated federal income tax payments made 250,000 Enacted corporate income tax rate 30% What amount of current federal income tax liability should be included in Hagg's December 31, 2013 balance sheet? a. $ 80,000 b. $110,000 c. $125,000 d. $330,000 97. On January 1, 2013, Gore, Inc. purchased a machine for $900,000 which will be depreciated $90,000 per year for financial statement reporting purposes. For income tax reporting, Gore elected to expense $100,000 and to use straight-line depreciation which will allow a cost recovery deduction of $80,000 for 2013. Assume a present and future enacted income tax rate of 30%. What amount should be added to Gore's deferred income tax liability for this temporary difference at December 31, 2013? a. $54,000 b. $30,000 c. $27,000 d. $24,000 19 - 26 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 98. On January 1, 2013, Piper Corp. purchased 40% of the voting common stock of Betz, Inc. and appropriately accounts for its investment by the equity method. During 2013, Betz reported earnings of $540,000 and paid dividends of $180,000. Piper assumes that all of Betz's undistributed earnings will be distributed as dividends in future periods when the enacted tax rate will be 30%. Ignore the dividend-received deduction. Piper's current enacted income tax rate is 25%. The increase in Piper's deferred income tax liability for this temporary difference is a. $108,000. b. $90,000. c. $64,800. d. $43,200. Foltz Corp.'s 2012 income statement had pretax financial income of $250,000 in its first year of operations. Foltz uses an accelerated cost recovery method on its tax return and straight-line depreciation for financial reporting. The differences between the book and tax deductions for depreciation over the five-year life of the assets acquired in 2012, and the enacted tax rates for 2012 to 2016 are as follows: 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Book Over (Under) Tax $(50,000) (65,000) (15,000) 60,000 70,000 Tax Rates 35% 30% 30% 30% 30% 99. There are no other temporary differences. In Foltz's December 31, 2012 balance sheet, the noncurrent deferred income tax liability and the income taxes currently payable should be Noncurrent Deferred Income Taxes Income Tax Liability Currently Payable a. $39,000 $50,000 b. $39,000 $70,000 c. $15,000 $60,000 d. $15,000 $70,000 100. Didde Corp. prepared the following reconciliation of income per books with income per tax return for the year ended December 31, 2013: Book income before income taxes $1,500,000 Add temporary difference Construction contract revenue which will reverse in 2014 160,000 Deduct temporary difference Depreciation expense which will reverse in equal amounts in each of the next four years (640,000) Taxable income $1,020,000 Didde's effective income tax rate is 34% for 2013. What amount should Didde report in its 2013 income statement as the current provision for income taxes? a. $54,400 b. $346,800 c. $510,000 d. $564,400 Accounting for Income Taxes 101. 19 - 27 In its 2012 income statement, Cohen Corp. reported depreciation of $1,480,000 and interest revenue on municipal obligations of $280,000. Cohen reported depreciation of $2,200,000 on its 2012 income tax return. The difference in depreciation is the only temporary difference, and it will reverse equally over the next three years. Cohen's enacted income tax rates are 35% for 2012, 30% for 2013, and 25% for 2014 and 2015. What amount should be included in the deferred income tax liability in Hertz's December 31, 2012 balance sheet? a. $192,000 b. $248,000 c. $300,000 d. $350,000 Dunn, Inc. uses the accrual method of accounting for financial reporting purposes and appropriately uses the installment method of accounting for income tax purposes. Installment income of $1,500,000 will be collected in the following years when the enacted tax rates are: Collection of Income Enacted Tax Rates 2012 $150,000 35% 2013 300,000 30% 2014 450,000 30% 2015 600,000 25% The installment income is Dunn's only temporary difference. What amount should be included in the deferred income tax liability in Dunn's December 31, 2012 balance sheet? a. $375,000 b. $427,500 c. $472,500 d. $525,000 102. 103. For calendar year 2012, Kane Corp. reported depreciation of $1,200,000 in its income statement. On its 2012 income tax return, Kane reported depreciation of $1,800,000. Kane's income statement also included $225,000 accrued warranty expense that will be deducted for tax purposes when paid. Kane's enacted tax rates are 30% for 2012 and 2013, and 24% for 2014 and 2015. The depreciation difference and warranty expense will reverse over the next three years as follows: Depreciation Difference Warranty Expense 2013 $240,000 $ 45,000 2014 210,000 75,000 2015 150,000 105,000 $600,000 $225,000 These were Kane's only temporary differences. In Kane's 2012 income statement, the deferred portion of its provision for income taxes should be a. $200,700. b. $112,500. c. $101,700. d. $109,800. 19 - 28 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 104. Wright Co., organized on January 2, 2012, had pretax accounting income of $640,000 and taxable income of $1,600,000 for the year ended December 31, 2012 The only temporary difference is accrued product warranty costs which are expected to be paid as follows: 2013 2014 2015 2016 $320,000 160,000 160,000 320,000 The enacted income tax rates are 35% for 2012, 30% for 2013 through 2015, and 25% for 2016. If Wright expects taxable income in future years, the deferred tax asset in Wright's December 31, 2012 balance sheet should be a. $192,000. b. $224,000. c. $272,000. d. $336,000. Multiple Choice Answers--CPA Adapted Item Ans. Item Ans. Item Ans. Item Ans. Item Ans. 95. 96. a a 97. 98. c d 99. 100. d b 101. 102. a a 103. 104. c c DERIVATIONS -- Computational No. Answer 52. c Derivation $900,000 [($900,000 $75,000) 5)] = $735,000; $900,000 (900,000 1/5 2) = $540,000. ($735,000 $540,000) .40 = $78,000. ($640,000 $400,000) 30% = $72,000. Income tax payable = ($900,000 30%) = $270,000 Change in deferred tax liability = ($1,200,000 30%) = $360,000 Change in deferred tax asset = ($1,500,000 30%) = $450,000 $270,000 + $360,000 $450,000 = $180,000. ($1,500,000 30%) = $450,000. ($600,000 30%) = $180,000. ($300,000 30%) = $90,000. ($1,200,000 30%) = $360,000. ($1,800,000 30%) = $540,000. 53. 54. 55. b a a 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. d c b d c Accounting for Income Taxes 19 - 29 DERIVATIONS -- Computational (cont.) No. Answer 61. d Derivation (30% Temporary Difference) = $90,000; Temporary Difference = ($90,000 30%) = $300,000; $1,800,000 + $300,000 = $2,100,000. ($2,000,000 $1,250,000) 35% = $262,500. ($1,800,000 30%) = $540,000. $120,000 .50 = $60,000. $1,000,000 .28 = $280,000. $125,000 .40 = $50,000 debit. ($700,000 .35) + ($125,000 .40) = $295,000. $450,000 30% = $1,500,000 temporary difference $1,500,000 40% = $3,750,000. $3,200,000 + ($1,800,000 $1,280,000) = $3,720,000. $105,000 .40 = $42,000. $90,000 + ($105,000 .40) = $132,000. $120,000 ($35,000 .40) = $106,000. $138,000 ($90,000 .35) = $106,500. $153,000 + ($45,000 .35) = $168,750. $105,000 ($4,000 .40) = $95,000. $600,000 $48,000 + $104,000 $76,000 $52,000 $24,000 = $504,000. ($104,000 .40) $8,000 = $33,600. ($52,000 + $24,000) .40 = $30,400. $1,350,000 + $48,000 $60,000 $30,000 $81,000 = $1,227,000 $1,227,000 .40 = $490,800. $48,000 .40 = $19,200 DTA. $460,000 - $384,000 $120,000 + $400,000 = $356,000. $2,400,000 ($1,350,000 $960,000) = $2,010,000. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. b d a a a c a b a a d b c d b d b b 80. 81. 82. a b b 19 - 30 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition DERIVATIONS -- Computational (cont.) No. Answer 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94. a c d b b d d b a a d c Derivation $55,000 .35 = $19,250. ($150,000 .35) + [($300,000 + $450,000) .30] = $277,500. $500,000 (.40 .30) = $50,000 ITE. $400,000 (.35 .40) = $20,000 decrease. ($60,000 35%) + ($60,000 35%) + ($60,000 30%) = $60,000. $1,300,000 (30% $1,300,000) = $910,000. ($150,000 30%) = $45,000; $1,200,000 40% = $480,000; ($1,350,000 $45,000 $480,000) = $825,000. ($1,350,000 40%) = $540,000; $1,350,000 $540,000 = $810,000. ($600,000 30%) = $180,000. ($1,250,000 .45) + [($1,550,000 $1,250,000) .40] = $682,500. [$840,000 ($500,000 $200,000)] .40 = $216,000. $500,000 .40 = $200,000. DERIVATIONS -- CPA Adapted No. Answer 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 100. 101. 102. a a c d d b a a Derivation ($1,800,000 $780,000 $120,000) 30% = $270,000; $270,000 $150,000 = $120,000. ($1,250,000 $50,000 $100,000) 30% = $330,000; $330,000 $250,000 = $80,000. ($100,000 + $80,000 $90,000) 30% = $27,000. ($540,000 $180,000) 40% = $144,000; $144,000 30% = $43,200. ($50,000 30%) = $15,000; ($250,000 $50,000) 35% = $70,000. ($1,020,000 34%) = $346,800. ($240,000 30%) + ($240,000 25%) + ($240,000 25%) = $192,000. ($300,000 30%) + ($450,000 30%) + ($600,000 25%) = $375,000. Accounting for Income Taxes 19 - 31 DERIVATIONS -- CPA Adapted (cont.) No. Answer 103. c Derivation ($240,000 $45,000) 30% = $58,500; ($210,000 $75,000) 24% = $32,400; ($150,000 $105,000) 24% = $10,800; $58,500 + $32,400 + $10,800 = $101,700. ($320,000 + $160,000 + $160,000) 30% = $192,000; $320,000 25% = $80,000; $192,000 + $80,000 = $272,000. 104. c EXERCISES Ex. 19-105--Computation of taxable income. The records for Bosch Co. show this data for 2013: Gross profit on installment sales recorded on the books was $360,000. Gross profit from collections of installment receivables was $240,000. Life insurance on officers was $3,800. Machinery was acquired in January for $300,000. Straight-line depreciation over a ten-year life (no salvage value) is used. For tax purposes, MACRS depreciation is used and Bosch may deduct 14% for 2013. Interest received on tax exempt Iowa State bonds was $9,000. The estimated warranty liability related to 2013 sales was $21,600. Repair costs under warranties during 2013 were $13,600. The remainder will be incurred in 2014. Pretax financial income is $600,000. The tax rate is 30%. Instructions (a) Prepare a schedule starting with pretax financial income and compute taxable income. (b) Prepare the journal entry to record income taxes for 2013. Solution 19-105 (a) Pretax financial income Permanent differences Life insurance Tax-exempt interest Temporary differences Installment sales ($360,000 $240,000) Extra depreciation ($42,000 $30,000) Warranties ($21,600 $13,600) Taxable income $600,000 3,800 (9,000) (120,000) (12,000) 8,000 $470,800 178,440 2,400 39,600 141,240 (b) Income Tax Expense [$141,240 + ($39,600 $2,400)] ................ Deferred Tax Asset (30% $8,000) .............................................. Deferred Tax Liability (30% $132,000) ........................... Income Tax Payable (30% $470,800) ............................ 19 - 32 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition Ex. 19-106--Future taxable and deductible amounts. Define temporary differences, future taxable amounts, and future deductible amounts. Solution 19-106 Temporary differences are differences between the tax basis of an asset or liability and its reported amount in the financial statements that will result in taxable amounts or deductible amounts in future years. Future taxable amounts increase taxable income in future years and cause a deferred tax liability to be recorded. Future deductible amounts decrease taxable income in future years and cause a deferred tax asset to be recorded. Ex. 19-107--Deferred income taxes. Pole Co. at the end of 2013, its first year of operations, prepared a reconciliation between pretax financial income and taxable income as follows: Pretax financial income Extra depreciation taken for tax purposes Estimated expenses deductible for taxes when paid Taxable income $ 420,000 (1,050,000) 940,000 $ 310,000 Use of the depreciable assets will result in taxable amounts of $350,000 in each of the next three years. The estimated litigation expenses of $940,000 will be deductible in 2016 when settlement is expected. Instructions (a) Prepare a schedule of future taxable and deductible amounts. (b) Prepare the journal entry to record income tax expense, deferred taxes, and income taxes payable for 2013, assuming a tax rate of 40% for all years. Solution 19-107 (a) Future taxable (deductible) amounts Extra depreciation Litigation (b) 2014 $350,000 2015 $350,000 2016 Total $350,000 $1,050,000 (940,000) (940,000) 168,000 376,000 420,000 124,000 Income Tax Expense ($124,000 + $420,000 $376,000) ........... Deferred Tax Asset ($940,000 40%) .......................................... Deferred Tax Liability ($1,050,000 40%) ........................ Income Tax Payable ($310,000 40%) ............................ Accounting for Income Taxes Ex. 19-108--Deferred income taxes. 19 - 33 Hunt Co. at the end of 2012, its first year of operations, prepared a reconciliation between pretax financial income and taxable income as follows: Pretax financial income $ 750,000 Estimated expenses deductible for taxes when paid 1,200,000 Extra depreciation (1,500,000) Taxable income $ 450,000 Estimated warranty expense of $800,000 will be deductible in 2013, $300,000 in 2014, and $100,000 in 2015. The use of the depreciable assets will result in taxable amounts of $500,000 in each of the next three years. Instructions (a) Prepare a table of future taxable and deductible amounts. (b) Prepare the journal entry to record income tax expense, deferred income taxes, and income taxes payable for 2012, assuming an income tax rate of 40% for all years. Solution 19-108 (a) 2013 Future taxable (deductible) amounts Warranties $(800,000) Excess depreciation 500,000 2014 2015 Total $(300,000) $(100,000) $(1,200,000) 500,000 500,000 1,500,000 300,000 480,000 600,000 180,000 (b) Income Tax Expense [$180,000 + ($600,000 $480,000)].......... Deferred Tax Asset ($1,200,000 40%)........................................ Deferred Tax Liability ($1,500,000 40%) ........................ Income Tax Payable ($450,000 40%) ............................ Ex. 19-109--Recognition of deferred tax asset. (a) (b) Describe a deferred tax asset. When should a deferred tax asset be reduced by a valuation allowance? Solution 19-109 (a) (b) A deferred tax asset is the deferred tax consequences attributable to deductible temporary differences and operating loss carryforwards. A deferred tax asset should be reduced by a valuation allowance if, based on all available evidence, it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax asset will not be realized. More likely than not means a level of likelihood that is at least slightly more than 50%. 19 - 34 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition Ex. 19-110--Permanent and temporary differences. Listed below are items that are treated differently for accounting purposes than they are for tax purposes. Indicate whether the items are permanent differences or temporary differences. For temporary differences, indicate whether they will create deferred tax assets or deferred tax liabilities. 1. Investments accounted for by the equity method. 2. Advance rental receipts. 3. Fine for polluting. 4. Estimated future warranty costs. 5. Excess of contributions over pension expense. 6. Expenses incurred in obtaining tax-exempt revenue. 7. Installment sales. 8. Excess tax depreciation over accounting depreciation. 9. Long-term construction contracts. 10. Premiums paid on life insurance of officers (company is the beneficiary). Solution 19-110 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Temporary difference, deferred tax liability. Temporary difference, deferred tax asset. Permanent difference. Temporary difference, deferred tax asset. Temporary difference, deferred tax liability. Permanent difference. Temporary difference, deferred tax liability. Temporary difference, deferred tax liability. Temporary difference, deferred tax liability. Permanent difference. Ex. 19-111--Permanent and temporary differences. Indicate and explain whether each of the following independent situations should be treated as a temporary difference or a permanent difference. (a) For accounting purposes, a company reports revenue from installment sales on the accrual basis. For income tax purposes, it reports the revenues by the installment-sales method, deferring recognition of gross profit until cash is collected. (b) Pretax accounting income and taxable income differ because 80% of dividends received from U.S. corporations was deducted from taxable income, while 100% of the dividends received was reported for financial statement purposes. (c) Estimated warranty costs (covering a three-year warranty) are expensed for accounting purposes at the time of sale but deducted for income tax purposes when paid. Accounting for Income Taxes Solution 19-111 (a) 19 - 35 Temporary difference. This difference in the timing of revenue recognition for pretax financial income and taxable income will initially increase pretax financial income, but will increase taxable income by the amount of deferred gross profits as cash is collected in subsequent years. Assuming the estimate as to collectibility of installment receivables is valid, the total amounts reported as gross profits for accounting purposes and for tax purposes will be equal over the life of a group of installment receivables. The time lag between the accrual for accounting purposes and the recognition for tax purposes will result in credit entries to a company's deferred tax liability as long as installment sales are level or increasing. The credit entries related to particular installment receivables will be "drawn down," or reversed, however, when the receivables are collected. Permanent difference. This difference in pretax financial income and taxable income will never reverse because present tax laws allow a company that owns stock in another U.S. corporation to deduct 80% of the dividends it receives from that company. Taxes will not be paid on the dividends deducted and there are no tax consequences for those dividends, even though they are recognized as income for book purposes. Temporary difference. The full estimated three years of warranty expenses reduce the current year's pretax financial income, but will reduce taxable income in varying amounts each year as paid. Assuming the estimate for each warranty is valid, the total amounts deducted for accounting and for tax purposes will be equal over the three-year period for each warranty. This is an example of an expense that, in the first period, reduces pretax financial income more than taxable income and, in later years, reverses and reduces taxable income without affecting pretax financial income. (b) (c) Ex. 19-112--Temporary differences. There are four types of temporary differences. For each type: (1) indicate the cause of the difference, (2) give an example, and (3) indicate whether it will create a taxable or deductible amount in the future. Solution 19-112 (a) Revenues or gains are taxable after they are recognized in pretax financial income. Examples are installment sales, long-term construction contracts, and the equity method of accounting for investments. They result in future taxable amounts. (b) Revenues or gains are taxable before they are recognized in pretax financial income. Examples are subscriptions received in advance and rents received in advance. They result in future deductible amounts. (c) Expenses or losses are deductible before they are recognized in pretax financial income. Examples are extra depreciation, prepaid expenses, and pension funding in excess of pension expense. They result in future taxable amounts. Expenses or losses are deductible after they are recognized in pretax financial income. Examples are warranty expenses, estimated litigation losses, and unrealized loss on marketable securities. They result in future deductible amounts. (d) 19 - 36 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition Ex. 19-113--Operating loss carryforward. In 2012, its first year of operations, Kimble Corp. has a $700,000 net operating loss when the tax rate is 30%. In 2013, Kimble has $320,000 taxable income and the tax rate remains 30%. Instructions Assume the management of Kimble Corp. thinks that it is more likely than not that the loss carryforward will not be realized in the near future because it is a new company (this is before results of 2013 operations are known). (a) (b) What are the entries in 2012 to record the tax loss carryforward? What entries would be made in 2013 to record the current and deferred income taxes and to recognize the loss carryforward? (Assume that at the end of 2013 it is more likely than not that the deferred tax asset will be realized.) Solution 19-113 (a) Deferred Tax Asset ($700,000 30%)........................................... Benefit Due to Loss Carryforward...................................... Benefit Due to Loss Carryforward.................................................. Allowance to Reduce Deferred Tax Asset to Expected Realizable Value............................................ (b) Income Tax Expense ($320,000 30%)........................................ Deferred Tax Asset............................................................. Allowance to Reduce Deferred Tax Asset to Expected Realizable Value........................................................................ Benefit Due to Loss Carryforward...................................... 210,000 210,000 210,000 210,000 96,000 96,000 96,000 96,000 Accounting for Income Taxes 19 - 37 PROBLEMS Pr. 19-114--Differences between accounting and taxable income and the effect on deferred taxes. The following differences enter into the reconciliation of financial income and taxable income of Abbott Company for the year ended December 31, 2012, its first year of operations. The enacted income tax rate is 30% for all years. Pretax accounting income Excess tax depreciation Litigation accrual Unearned rent revenue deferred on the books but appropriately recognized in taxable income Interest income from New York municipal bonds Taxable income 1. 2. 3. 4. $700,000 (320,000) 70,000 80,000 (20,000) $510,000 Excess tax depreciation will reverse equally over a four-year period, 2013-2016. It is estimated that the litigation liability will be paid in 2016. Rent revenue will be recognized during the last year of the lease, 2016. Interest revenue from the New York bonds is expected to be $20,000 each year until their maturity at the end of 2016. Instructions (a) Prepare a schedule of future taxable and (deductible) amounts. (b) Prepare a schedule of the deferred tax (asset) and liability. (c) Since this is the first year of operations, there is no beginning deferred tax asset or liability. Compute the net deferred tax expense (benefit). (d) Prepare the journal entry to record income tax expense, deferred taxes, and the income taxes payable for 2012. Solution 19-114 (a) 2013 Future taxable (deductible) amounts: Depreciation $80,000 Litigation Unearned rent Future Taxable (Deductible) Amounts $320,000 (70,000) (80,000) $170,000 2014 $80,000 2015 $80,000 2016 Total $80,000 $320,000 (70,000) (70,000) (80,000) (80,000) (b) Temporary Differences Depreciation Litigation Unearned rent Totals (c) Deferred tax expense Deferred tax benefit Net deferred tax expense Tax Rate 30% 30% 30% Deferred Tax (Asset) Liability $96,000 $(21,000) (24,000) $(45,000) $96,000 $96,000 (45,000) $51,000 19 - 38 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition Solution 19-114 (cont.) (d) Income Tax Expense ($153,000 + $51,000).................................. Deferred Tax Asset ........................................................................ Deferred Tax Liability ......................................................... Income Tax Payable ($510,000 30%) ............................ 204,000 45,000 96,000 153,000 Pr. 19-115--Multiple temporary differences. The following information is available for the first three years of operations for Cooper Company: 1. Year 2012 2013 2014 Taxable Income $500,000 360,000 400,000 2. On January 2, 2012, heavy equipment costing $600,000 was purchased. The equipment had a life of 5 years and no salvage value. The straight-line method of depreciation is used for book purposes and the tax depreciation taken each year is listed below: 2012 $198,000 2013 $270,000 Tax Depreciation 2014 2015 $90,000 $42,000 Total $600,000 3. On January 2, 2013, $270,000 was collected in advance for rental of a building for a threeyear period. The entire $270,000 was reported as taxable income in 2013, but $180,000 of the $270,000 was reported as unearned revenue at December 31, 2013 for book purposes. 4. The enacted tax rates are 40% for all years. Instructions (a) Prepare a schedule comparing depreciation for financial reporting and tax purposes. (b) Determine the deferred tax (asset) or liability at the end of 2012. (c) Prepare a schedule of future taxable and (deductible) amounts at the end of 2013. (d) Prepare a schedule of the deferred tax (asset) and liability at the end of 2013. (e) Compute the net deferred tax expense (benefit) for 2013. (f) Prepare the journal entry to record income tax expense, deferred income taxes, and income tax payable for 2013. Solution 19-115 (a) Year 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Depreciation for Financial Reporting Purposes $120,000 120,000 120,000 120,000 120,000 $600,000 Depreciation for Tax Purposes $198,000 270,000 90,000 42,000 -0$600,000 Temporary Difference $ (78,000) (150,000) 30,000 78,000 120,000 $ -0- Accounting for Income Taxes Solution 19-115 (cont.) (b) 2013 Future taxable (deductible) amounts: Depreciation $(150,000) 2014 $30,000 2015 $78,000 2016 $120,000 19 - 39 Total $78,000 Deferred tax liability: $78,000 40% = $31,200 at the end of 2012. (c) Future taxable (deductible) amounts: Depreciation Rent (d) Temporary Differences Depreciation Rent Totals (e) 2014 $30,000 (90,000) 2015 $78,000 (90,000) 2016 $120,000 Total $228,000 (180,000) Deferred Tax (Asset) Liability $91,200 $(72,000) $(72,000) $91,200 Future Taxable (Deductible) Amounts $228,000 (180,000) $ 48,000 Tax Rate 40% 40% Deferred tax asset at end of 2013 Deferred tax asset at beginning of 2013 Deferred tax (benefit) Deferred tax liability at end of 2013 Deferred tax liability at beginning of 2013 Deferred tax expense Deferred tax (benefit) Deferred tax expense Net deferred tax benefit for 2013 $(72,000) -0$(72,000) $91,200 31,200 $60,000 $(72,000) 60,000 $(12,000) 132,000 72,000 60,000 144,000 (f) Income Tax Expense ($144,000 $12,000).................................. Deferred Tax Asset......................................................................... Deferred Tax Liability.......................................................... Income Tax Payable ($360,000 40%)............................. Pr. 19-116--Deferred tax asset. Farmer Inc. began business on January 1, 2012. Its pretax financial income for the first 2 years was as follows: 2012 2013 $240,000 560,000 The following items caused the only differences between pretax financial income and taxable income. 19 - 40 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition Pr. 19-116 (cont.) 1. In 2012, the company collected $240,000 of rent; of this amount, $80,000 was earned in 2012; the other $160,000 will be earned equally over the 20132014 period. The full $240,000 was included in taxable income in 2012. 2. The company pays $10,000 a year for life insurance on officers. 3. In 2013, the company terminated a top executive and agreed to $90,000 of severance pay. The amount will be paid $30,000 per year for 20132015. The 2013 payment was made. The $90,000 was expensed in 2013. For tax purposes, the severance pay is deductible as it is paid. The enacted tax rates existing at December 31, 2012 are: 2012 2013 30% 35% 2014 2015 40% 40% Instructions (a) Determine taxable income for 2012 and 2013. (b) Determine the deferred income taxes at the end of 2012, and prepare the journal entry to record income taxes for 2012. (c) Prepare a schedule of future taxable and (deductible) amounts at the end of 2013. (d) Prepare a schedule of the deferred tax (asset) and liability at the end of 2013. (e) Compute the net deferred tax expense (benefit) for 2013. (f) Prepare the journal entry to record income taxes for 2013. (g) Show how the deferred income taxes should be reported on the balance sheet at December 31, 2013. Solution 19-116 (a) Pretax financial income Permanent differences: Life insurance Temporary differences: Rent Severance pay Taxable income (b) Future taxable (deductible) amounts: Rent Tax rate Deferred tax (asset) liability 2012 $240,000 10,000 250,000 160,000 -0$410,000 2013 $(80,000) 35% $(28,000) 2013 $560,000 10,000 570,000 (80,000) 60,000 $550,000 2014 $(80,000) 40% $(32,000) Total $(160,000) $(60,000) 63,000 60,000 123,000 at end of 2012 Income Tax Expense ($123,000 $60,000).................................. Deferred Tax Asset......................................................................... Income Tax Payable ($410,000 30%)........................... Accounting for Income Taxes Solution 19-116 (cont.) (c) Future taxable (deductible) amounts: Rent Severance pay (d) Temporary Difference Rent Severance pay Totals (e) 2014 $(80,000) (30,000) 2015 $(30,000) Tax Rate 40% 40% $(56,000) (60,000) $ (4,000) 196,500 Total $(80,000) (60,000) 19 - 41 Future Taxable (Deductible) Amounts $ (80,000) (60,000) $(140,000) Deferred Tax (Asset) Liability $(32,000) (24,000) $(56,000) Deferred tax asset at end of 2013 Deferred tax asset at beginning of 2013 Net deferred tax (expense) for 2013 (f) Income Tax Expense ($192,500 + $4,000).................................... Deferred Tax Asset............................................................. Income Tax Payable ($550,000 35%)............................. 4,000 192,500 (g) The deferred income taxes should be reported on the December 31, 2013 balance sheet as follows: Current assets Deferred tax asset ($110,000* 40%) $44,000 Other assets Deferred tax asset ($30,000 40%) *$80,000 + $30,000 $12,000 Pr. 19-117--Interperiod tax allocation with change in enacted tax rates. Murphy Company purchased equipment for $300,000 on January 2, 2012, its first day of operations. For book purposes, the equipment will be depreciated using the straight-line method over three years with no salvage value. Pretax financial income and taxable income are as follows: 2012 2013 2014 Pretax financial income $224,000 $260,000 $300,000 Taxable income 184,000 260,000 340,000 The temporary difference between pretax financial income and taxable income is due to the use of accelerated depreciation for tax purposes. Instructions (a) Prepare the journal entries to record income taxes for all three years (expense, deferrals, and liabilities) assuming that the enacted tax rate applicable to all three years is 30%. (b) Prepare the journal entries to record income taxes for all three years (expense, deferrals, and liabilities) assuming that the enacted tax rate as of 2012 is 30% but that in the middle of 2013, Congress raises the income tax rate to 35% retroactive to the beginning of 2013. 19 - 42 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition Solution 19-117 (a) Book depreciation Tax depreciation Temporary difference 2012 2012 $ 100,000 140,000 $(40,000) 2013 $100,000 100,000 $ -02014 $100,000 60,000 $40,000 Total $300,000 300,000 $ -067,200 12,000 55,200 78,000 78,000 90,000 12,000 102,000 67,200 12,000 55,200 93,000 2,000* 91,000 105,000 14,000 119,000 Income Tax Expense.......................................................... Deferred Tax Liability ($40,000 .30).................... Income Tax Payable ($184,000 .30)................... Income Tax Expense.......................................................... Income Tax Payable ($260,000 .30)................... Income Tax Expense.......................................................... Deferred Tax Liability.......................................................... Income Tax Payable ($340,000 .30)................... Income Tax Expense.......................................................... Deferred Tax Liability ($40,000 .30).................... Income Tax Payable ($184,000 .30)................... Income Tax Expense.......................................................... Deferred Tax Liability.............................................. Income Tax Payable ($260,000 .35)................... Income Tax Expense.......................................................... Deferred Tax Liability.......................................................... Income Tax Payable ($340,000 .35)................... 2013 $40,000 12,000 14,000 $ 2,000 2013 2014 (b) 2012 2013 2014 *Future taxable amount Deferred tax @ 30% Deferred tax @ 35% Adjustment Accounting for Income Taxes 19 - 43 IFRS QUESTIONS True/False Questions 1. Under IFRS an affirmative judgment approach is used for recognizing deferred tax assets by recognizing assets up to the amount that is probable to be realized. 2. Under U.S. GAAP, the rate used to compute deferred taxes is either the enacted tax rate, or a substantially enacted tax rate (virtually certain). 3. Under IFRS, a deferred tax liability is classified as current or noncurrent based on the classification of the asset or liability to which it relates. 4. Under IFRS, all tax effects are charged or credited to income. 5. Under IFRS, all potential liabilities associated with uncertain tax positions are recognized. Answers to True/False: 1. True 2. False 3. False 4. False 5. True Multiple Choice Questions 1. Which of the following is false regarding accounting for deferred taxes under IFRS? a. A deferred tax liability is classified as current or noncurrent based on the classification of the asset or liability to which it relates. b. A deferred tax asset is recognized up to the amount that is probable to be realized. c. Tax effects of certain items are recognized in equity. d. The rate used to compute deferred taxes is either the enacted tax rate, or a substantially enacted tax rate (virtually certain). 2. Jerome Co. has the following deferred tax liabilities at December 31, 2012: Amount $100,000 $300,000 $90,000 Related to Installment sales, expected to be collected in 2013 Fixed asset, 10-year remaining useful life, 2012 tax depreciation exceeds book depreciation Prepaid insurance related to 2013 What amount would Jerome Co. report as a noncurrent deferred tax liability under IFRS and under U.S. GAAP? IFRS U.S. GAAP a. $0 $400,000 b. $490,000 $300,000 c. $300,000 $300,000 d. $490,000 $490,000 19 - 44 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 3. With regard to recognition of deferred tax assets, IFRS requires a. b. c. d. Approach Affirmative judgment Impairment approach Affirmative judgment Impairment approach Recognition Recognize an asset up to the amount that is probable to be realized Recognize asset in full, reduced by valuation allowance if it's more likely than not that all or a portion of the asset won't be realized Recognize asset in full, reduced by valuation allowance if it's more likely than not that all or a portion of the asset won't be realized Recognize an asset up to the amount that is probable to be realized 4. Match the approach, IFRS or U.S. GAAP, with the location where tax effects are reported: a. b. c. d. Approach IFRS U.S. GAAP IFRS U.S. GAAP Location Charge or credit only taxable temporary differences to income Charge or credit certain tax effects to equity Charge or credit certain tax effects to equity Charge or credit only deductible temporary differences to income 5. Alice, Inc. has the following deferred tax assets at December 31, 2012: Amount $120,000 $50,000 $170,000 Related to Rent revenue collected in advance related to 2013 Warranty liability, expected to be paid in 2013 Accrued liability related to a lawsuit expected to settle in 2016 What amount would Alice, Inc. report as a current deferred tax asset under IFRS and under U.S. GAAP? _IFRS_ U.S. GAAP a $340,000 $340,000 b. $0 $170,000 c. $170,000 $340,000 d. $340,000 $170,000 Answers to Multiple Choice: 1. a 2. b 3. a 4. c 5. b Accounting for Income Taxes 19 - 45 Short Answer: 1. Breifly describe some of the similarities and differences between U.S. GAAP and IFRS with respect to income tax accounting. 19 - 46 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 1. Both IFRS and U.S. GAAP use the asset and liability approach for recording deferred tax assets. In general, the differences between IFRS and U.S. GAAP involve limited differences in the exceptions to the asset-liability approach, some minor differences in the recognition, measurement and disclosure criteria, and differences in implementation guidance. Following are some key elements for comparison Under IFRS, an affirmative judgment approach is used by which a deferred tax asset is recognized up to the amount that is probable to be realized. U.S. GAAP uses an impairment approach. In this situation, the deferred tax asset is recognized in full. It is then reduced by a valuation account if it is more likely than not that all or a portion of the deferred tax asset will not be realized. IFRS uses the enacted tax rate or substantially enacted tax rate (Substantially enacted means virtually certain). For U.S. GAAP the enacted tax rate must be used. The tax effects related to certain items are reported in equity under IFRS. That is not the case under U.S. GAAP, which charges or credits the tax effects to income. U.S. GAAP requires companies to assess the likelihood of uncertain tax positions being sustainable upon audit. Potential liabilities must be accrued and disclosed if the position is "more likely than not" to be disallowed. Under IFRS, all potential liabilities must be recognized. With respect to measurement, IFRS uses an expected value approach to measure the tax liability which differs from U.S. GAAP. The classification of deferred taxes under IFRS is always noncurrent. As indicated in the chapter, U.S. GAAP classifies deferred taxes based on the classification of the asset or liability to which it relates. 2. Describe the current convergence efforts of the FASB and IASB in the area of accounting for taxes. 2. The FASB and the IASB have been working to address some of the differences in the accounting for income taxes. Some of the issues under discussion are the term "probable" under IFRS for recognition of a deferred tax asset, which might be interpreted to mean "more likely than not". If changed, the reporting for impairments of deferred tax assets will be essentially the same between U.S. GAAP and IFRS. In addition, the IASB is considering adoption of the classification approach used in U.S. GAAP for deferred tax assets and liabilities. Also, U.S. GAAP will likely continue to use the enacted tax rate in computing deferred taxes, except in situations where the U.S. taxing jurisdiction is not involved. In that case, companies should use IFRS which is based on enacted rates or substantially enacted tax rates. Finally, the issue of allocation of deferred income taxes to equity for certain transactions under IFRS must be addressed in order to conform to U.S. GAAP which allocates the effects to income.

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CUNY Baruch - ACCT - 102
P191 (Three Differences, No Beginning Deferred Taxes, Multiple Rates) The following information is available for Remmers Corporation for 2012.1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.Depreciation reported on the tax return exceeded depreciation reported on the income statement
CUNY Baruch - ACCT - 102
E14-4(Entries for BondTransactions-Straight-Line)Foreman Company issued$800,000 of 10%, 20-yearbonds on January 1, 2013, at102. Interest is payablesemiannually on July 1 andJanuary 1. Foreman Companyuses the straight-line method ofamortization f
CUNY Baruch - ACCT - 102
E15-1(Recording the Issuances of Common Stock)During its first year of operations, Sitwell Corporation had the following transactions pertaining to itscommon stock.Jan.10 Issued 80,000 shares for cash at $6 per share.Mar.1 Issued 5,000 shares to at
CUNY Baruch - ACCT - 102
E15-6(Stock Issuances and Repurchase)Loxley Corporation is authorized to issue 50,000 shares of $10 par value common stock. During 2012,Loxley took part in the following selected transactions.1.Issued 5,000 shares of stock at $45 per share, less cost
CUNY Baruch - ACCT - 102
E15-14(Entries for Stock Dividends and Stock Splits)The stockholders' equity accounts of Lawrence Company have the following balances on December 31,2012.Common stock, $10 par, 200,000 shares issued and outstanding$2,000,000Common stock1,200,000Re
CUNY Baruch - ACCT - 102
E15-18(Dividends and Stockholders' Equity Section)Elizabeth Company reported the following amounts in the stockholders' equity section of its December 31,2012, balance sheet.Preferred stock, 8%, $100 par (10,000 shares authorized, 2,000 shares issued)
CUNY Baruch - ACCT - 102
E15-21(Preferred Dividends)The outstanding capital stock ofPennington Corporation consists of2,000 shares of $100 par value, 6%preferred, and 5,000 shares of $50par value common.Assuming that the company hasretained earnings of $70,000, all ofwhi
CUNY Baruch - ACCT - 100
E19-21(Two Temporary Differences, Multiple Rates, Future Taxable Income) Flynn Inc. has two temporary differences at the end of 2012. The first difference stems from installment sales, and the second one results from the accrual of a loss contingency. Fl
Harvard - MCB - 169
BcelldevelopmentandtoleranceTuesday,September29,200910:02AM1. Commitment2. ThepreBCRcheckpoint3. Tolerance(control)ReceptorEditingDeletionAnalogy4. PositiveSelectionTonicBCRsignalingAsenseofangstwhenyouhavetomakemajordecisions immunologyorvirol
Harvard - MCB - 169
MCB169 ImmunologySept 3rd :Sept 8th:Sept. 10th:Overview: a dangerous world (CMI Ch 1)Innate Immunity (CMI Chs 2/3)Innate Immunity and the rules of Adaptive Immunity(CMI Chs 2/3)Antibodies and antigens (CMI Ch 4)Sept 15th:Sept. 17th:Antigen rece
Harvard - MCB - 169
Harvard - MCB - 169
MCB169 ImmunologySept 3rd :Sept 8th:Sept. 10th:Overview: a dangerous world (CMI Ch 1)Innate Immunity (CMI Chs 2/3)Innate Immunity and the rules of Adaptive Immunity(CMI Chs 2/3)Antibodies and antigens (CMI Ch 4)Sept 15th:Sept. 17th:Antigen rece
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 01 Quiz - Marketing's Value to Consumers, Firms, and SocietyScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1.According to the text:A.marketing is much more than selling or advertising.B.the cost of marketing is about 25 percent of the consumer's dollar.C.
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 02 Quiz - Marketing Strategy PlanningScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1.The marketing management process:A.includes the on-going job of planning marketing activities.B.is mainly concerned with obtaining continuous customer feedback.C.involve
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 03 Quiz - Evaluating Opportunities in the Changing MarketingEnvironmentScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1.When setting objectives for the whole firm, TOP MANAGEMENT should:A.involve the marketing manager in the objective setting process.B.set
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 04 Quiz - Focusing Marketing Strategy with Segmentation andPositioningScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1.A market consists of:A.a group of potential customers with similar needs who are willing to exchangesomething of value.B.various kinds o
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 05 Quiz - Final Consumers and Their Buying BehaviorScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1.The statement, "Of course people will buy our product-each of its features is betterthan the competition," most closely reflects which consumer behavior concept
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 06 Quiz - Business and Organizational Customers and TheirBuying BehaviorScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1.Which of the following is a business or organizational customer?A.producers of goods or services.B.a retailer.C.a wholesaler.D.a go
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 07 Quiz - Improving Decisions with Marketing InformationScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1.Marketing research:A.should be planned by research specialists who understand research techniquesbetter than marketing managers.B.is needed to keep mar
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 08 Quiz - Elements of Product Planning for Goods and ServicesScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1."Product" means:A.all the services needed with a physical good.B.a physical good with all its related services.C.the need-satisfying offering of
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 09 Quiz - Product Management and New-Product DevelopmentScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1.The product life cycle has four stages. Which of the following is not one of these?A.Market introductionB.Market growthC.Market maturityD.Economic c
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 10 Quiz - Place and Development of Channel SystemsScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1.Strategy "Place" decisions would NOT include:A.type of physical distribution facilities.B.type of channel of distribution.C.degree of market exposure desire
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 11 Quiz - Distribution Customer Service and LogisticsScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1.The physical distribution customer service level is important because:A.it is a measure of how rapidly and dependably a firm delivers what its customerswant
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 12 Quiz - Retailers, Wholesalers, and Their Strategy PlanningScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1."Retailing" refers to:A.the sale of products to final consumers.B.the sale of both business and consumer products.C.the sale of consumer products
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 13 Quiz - PromotionIntroduction to Integrated MarketingCommunicationsScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1."Promotion" is MAINLY concerned with:A.obtaining a favorable corporate image.B.telling the target market that the right Product is availab
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 14 Quiz - Personal Selling and Customer ServiceScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1.A professional salesperson:A.may negotiate prices or diagnose technical problems when a product doesn'twork well.B.doesn't try to "sell" customers, but rather t
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 15 Quiz - Advertising and Sales PromotionScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1.Total advertising expenditures by 2006:A.were about 15 percent of all firms' sales.B.were larger in Europe than in the U.S.C.were larger in Asia than in the U.S.D.
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 16 Quiz - Pricing Objectives and PoliciesScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1.Which of the following is NOT a "Something of Value" which might be offered toCONSUMERS in the "price equation"?A.Stocking allowanceB.ServiceC.Repair facilitiesD.
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 17 Quiz - Price Setting in the Business WorldScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1.The text says "markups":A.should always be stated as a percentage of cost.B.are a percentage of selling price-unless otherwise stated.C.are never stated as a per
UNC - BUSI - 406
Chapter 18 Quiz - Ethical Marketing in a Consumer-Oriented World:Appraisal and ChallengesScore: 0% (0 out of 20 correct)1.When evaluating the effectiveness of the macro-marketing systems of differentcountries:A.the evaluation should be limited to ba
Wisconsin - ACCT - 100
Accounting QuizGross Profit Rate=gross profit/net salesProfit Margin Ration=net income/net salesRevenue Recognition Principle- recognize revenue in the period it was earnedExpense Recognition Principle- Expenses (efforts) should be matched with revenu
Wisconsin - ACCT I S - 100
1. Which of the following accounts must be closed at the end of every accountingperiod? Interest Expense2. Which of the following accounting assumptions/principles best relates to one ofthe reasons why adjusting entries are made to revenue, expense, as
Wisconsin - ACCT - 100
AIS 100 BLC FINAL EXAM REVIEW1. All of the following are true about a corporation except:a. must abide by the lawsb. is a legal entityc. has the right to voted. must pay taxes2. Proof of stock ownership is evidenced by a printed or engraved form kno
Wisconsin - ANT - 100
Haylee DavisAnthropology 100 Archaeology Notes 11-1Art in the Paleolithic A creative explosion The Upper Paleolithic of Europe Paintings at Lascaux Cave, southwest France Why art?A Creative Explosion Upper Paleolithic tools Specialized economy E
Wisconsin - ANT - 100
Haylee DavisAnthropology Archaeology Notes 8The First Americans Who? When? How? The ecological setting and constraints Key archaeological sites and evidenceo Dyuktai cave, Siberia 18,000o Meadowcroft Rock Shelter, PA 19-14,000o Monte Verde, Chile
Wisconsin - ANT - 100
Haylee DavisAnthropology 100 Lecture Notes #4Miocene*Apes first evolved during Miocene-have lack of tail (differentiated from other mammals)-Apes outnumbered monkeys, ape evolution took off-8 mya-5mya (emergence of hominins) end of Miocene-East Afr
Wisconsin - ANT - 100
Haylee DavisAnthropology 100 Lecture Notes #5Classification:Homo, Pan, Gorilla, Pongo (greater apes)Hylobates (lesser apes)-no fossil record-lived and died in areas that didnt have preservation>40 known genera of nonhuman hominoids-probably just a
Wisconsin - ANT - 100
Haylee DavisAnthropology 100 Lecture Notes 6REVIEW OF EARLIET HOMININS-Three possible genera-Ardipithecus, Orrorin, Sahelanthropus-Dated c. 7-4.4 mya-All from wooded habitats-Antatomical links to later hominins1. Bipedalism2. Non-sectional lower
Wisconsin - ANT - 100
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Wisconsin - ANT - 100
1gametesreproductive cells2nucleotidesbasic units of DNA molecule; composed of a sugar, phosphate unit, and one of 4DNA bases.3enzymesspecialized proteins that initiate and direct chemical reactions in the body4hemoglobinprotein molecule that
Wisconsin - ANT - 100
1Le Solutre, Francesite with MNI 0f 100,000 horses2Mezhirich, UkraineMammoth bone hut95 mandibles3Sungir, Russiabands of beads found inside of burial4Dolni Vestonice, Czech RepublicFired clay ceramic figurines, kilnDiscovery of kiln and firin
Wisconsin - ANT - 100
1EthnographyTO describe or write about people and their social and cultural lifeEthnographic research or fieldwork is aimed at descriptiveanalysis2EmicSeeing something from a nativ'es point of view-the viewpoint andunderstanding of an insider3Et
Wisconsin - ANT - 100
Foragers, everyone how many years ago were foragers?Hunter-gatherseveryone 10,000 years ago were foragersArchaeologyReconstruction of past human behavior from the scientific study of its martialremains.Objects found were made/used from people in the
FIU - ECO - 3202
Chapter 1Economics: social science analyzing material problems. A means by which people cansatisfy desires for goods and services.Limited material resources Land Labor Capital EntrepreneurshipMacroeconomics: aggregated (seeing as a whole) economic
FIU - ECO - 3202
Chapter 1Economics: social science analyzing material problems. A means by which people cansatisfy desires for goods and services.Limited material resources Land Labor Capital EntrepreneurshipMacroeconomics: aggregated (seeing as a whole) economic
FIU - ECO - 3202
1. Unless business exactly maximizes profits and consumers exactly maximizesatisfaction, self-interest is NOT ruled out as economic motivation.2. If a curve is positively sloped, there is a direct relationship between the dependentand independent varia
FIU - ENC - 2012
1AlvarezDavid AlvarezProfessor Bentley-BakerENG 201221 April 2011Men Shut Their Doors on a Setting SunWhen reading Timon of Athens, the reader usually has a difficult time decidingwhether or not to feel compassion towards Timon during his downfall
FIU - ENC - 2012
David AlvarezENG 2012February 3, 2011Hills like White ElephantsOne of Ernest Hemingways short story pieces, Hills like White Elephants, is anexcellent example of his minimalistic style of writing. Minimalist writers opt to not go in depthwith the st
FIU - ENC - 2012
David AlvarezAMH 2041, MaxwellMarch 26, 2009Image Analysis:Jim Crow CartoonsRacial cartoons were a common sighting throughout the 1800s. Cartoons were away of expressing their views and perspectives on the African-Americans. The Life inPhiladelphia
FIU - ENC - 2012
1AlvarezDavid AlvarezProfessor Bentley-BakerENG 2012February 15, 2011Stick To Your Own BloodThe connection between father and son is one of the strongest bonds one can have toanother individual. Sartoris and Abners relationship, however, was a cla
FIU - ENC - 2012
1AlvarezDavid AlvarezProfessor Bentley-BakerENG 201221 April 2011TitleTimon of Athens, one of William Shakespeares most controversial dramas, has leftmany critics with uncertain interpretations of Timon, the protagonist of the play. One of themai
FIU - ENC - 2012
Alvarez1David AlvarezProfessor Bentley-BakerENG 2012March 10, 2011If There is a Fork in the Road, Take itMany people like to believe that everything happens for a reason, and the path for us isalready set. However, most of the time, those same peo
FIU - ENC - 1101
David AlvarezNovember 22, 2009ENC 1102, GilletteBioethicsBioethics is the study of how ethics is applied to different biological and medicalprocedures. For many years, the topic of bioethics has been on the center of minds ofmany people throughout t
FIU - ENC - 1101
Violence in AmericaDavid AlvarezENC 1102, GilletteOctober 21, 2009For many years, people have always wondered why America has had a history ofviolence. It shocks many when people see statistics like over 5 million teens are involvedin school bullyin
FIU - ENC - 1101
Online Social NetworksDavid AlvarezENC 1102, GilletteSeptember 28, 2009Exploratory EssayWhen we think of different kinds of addictions, we tend to think about alcohol,drugs, and things of that nature. There is, however, a new addiction that is rapid
FIU - ENC - 1101
Tattoos and TeenagersDavid AlvarezENC 1102, GilletteSeptember 11, 2009Rhetorical EssayMany teenagers in todays society feel the need to express themselves in unusualways such as tattoos, piercings, or clothing styles. It has become a leading fashion
FIU - AMH - 2041
Anne Hutchinsons ChallengeTo Puritan OrderDavid Alvarez2929955AMH 2041, MaxwellFebruary 15, 2010The 1600s were a time dominated by men. Men held high ranks politically, socially, andtheologically. To be a woman during this time was nothing but a st
FIU - AMH - 2041
David AlvarezAMH 2041, MaxwellApril 12, 2010LibertyThe Declaration of Independence laid down several powerful foundations for theshaping of America. It states all men are created equal and every man is entitled to life,liberty, and the pursuit of ha
GWU - JAPN - 003, 005,
Kanji GlossaryStrokesKanji ReadingMeaningUsageLesson22??; ?: ?person?( ?) ?( ?) ?( ?)07a33??; ?mouth?( ?) ?( ?) ?( ?) ?( ?07a?) ?( ?) ?( ?)4443-1 ???; ?tree?( ?) ?( ?) ?( ?) ?( ?)07a?; ?inside, center,middle?( ?) ?( ?) ?(
GWU - JAPN - 003, 005,
Japanese Media-NewspaperAsahi NewspaperMainichi NewspaperYomiuri NewspaperJapan Timeshttp:/www.asahi.comhttp:/www.mainichi.co.jp/http:/www.yomiuri.co.jp/http:/www.japantimes.co.jp/NHKNippon TelevisionTBSFuji TVhttp:/www.nhk.or.jp/http:/www.
GWU - JAPN - 003, 005,
English-Japanese Glossaryto receive?07av.??to make07av.??to show07av.??to look07av.??I (used by a man)07bn.??please give me07cexp.?pencil07cn.?money07cn.?change07cn.??semester07cn.??final exam07cn.??ca