Kaplan Course Syllabus
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Kaplan Course Syllabus

Course Number: BUISNESS CM220, Spring 2012

College/University: Kaplan University

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Course Syllabus CM 220:25 College Composition II TABLE OF CONTENTS Ctrl & Click on a link below to view that section in the syllabus. Course Calendar Course Description Course Information Course Materials Course Outcomes Discussion Boards Grading Criteria/Course Evaluation Instructors Grading Criteria/Timetable Instructor and Seminar Information Kaplan University Grading Scale Netiquette Projects Rubrics...

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Syllabus CM Course 220:25 College Composition II TABLE OF CONTENTS Ctrl & Click on a link below to view that section in the syllabus. Course Calendar Course Description Course Information Course Materials Course Outcomes Discussion Boards Grading Criteria/Course Evaluation Instructors Grading Criteria/Timetable Instructor and Seminar Information Kaplan University Grading Scale Netiquette Projects Rubrics Seminars Tutoring COURSE INFORMATION TOP Term: 1201C February 2012 Term Dates: February 1, 2012-April 10, 2012 Course Number/Section: CM 220- 25 Course Title: College Composition II Credit Hours: 5 Prerequisites: Any College Composition I course It is strongly recommended that you complete the Campus Tour, available on your Student Homepage. This essential tutorial discusses hardware and software requirements as well as presenting an overview of learning with the eCollege platform. INSTRUCTOR AND SEMINAR INFORMATION TOP Instructor Name and Credentials: Dr. Jeffrey Hanson Kaplan Email Address: JHanson@kaplan.edu AIM Instant Messenger Name: JHansonPoetryman AIM Office Hours (EST): By appointment Course/Seminar Day and Time (EST): TBA You can participate in seminar through either of the 2 options listed on the seminar page for each Unit. Live seminars will be held using the KHE Seminar tool. In order to participate in a KHE seminar, you need the most recent version of Flash. The most recent version of Flash is available as a free download from the following link: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/. Click on the Download button to start the download process. Log in to your home page to access your current classes. You can get into the seminar one of two ways: 1) selecting the My Studies tab at the top of the page and then My Seminars, or 2) clicking on the My Seminars link with your course in the Current Classes section of your home page. The My Seminars area has both a calendar and table view that will show all previous and upcoming seminars that have been scheduled by your instructor. Double-click on the seminar you desire to access. Thirty minutes before the scheduled start time, the Enter option will appear. For additional instructions, review the KHE Seminar Student User Guide found in the classroom. COURSE MATERIALS TOP The Kaplan Guide to Successful Writing [available in PDF form on the Writing Center web site] Software Requirements AOL Instant Messenger: If you are not an AIM Member you can download the free service by visiting the following site: http://www.aim.aol.com/ Courses within the School of General Education may also require other software programs such as Microsoft Word, Excel, Adobe Reader, Java, Flash Player, etc. See Software Requirements in the classroom under Course Home for the specific requirements for this class. COURSE DESCRIPTION TOP CM220 introduces the theme of invention and the exploration of BIG IDEAS that impact the world, our communities, and our lives, while situating these themes within a persuasive writing framework. Students explore and practice several persuasive forms of writing throughout the course and examine writing as invention in various settings and situations. They will create an appeal for change as a final project that presents an idea and a plan for implementation. One component of the final will be a multi-modal component such as a blog, podcast, or web site that can disseminate the students idea to a wide audience. COURSE OUTCOMES TOP Course Outcomes: By the end of this course, you should be able to: 1. CM220-1: Construct logical arguments 2. CM220-2: Develop strategies for effective problem solving 3. CM220-3: Conduct research to support assertions made in personal, academic, and professional situations 4. CM220-4: Articulate what constitutes effective communication in personal, professional and diverse contexts 5. CM220-5: Demonstrate effective listening strategies COURSE CALENDAR Unit # and Topic Learning Activities TOP Assessments Unit 1: Changing the World, One Idea at a Time Introduce Yourself Reading Invention Lab Seminar Seminar Unit 2: Making the Pitch: How to Win Friends and Influence Audiences Reading Invention Lab Seminar Project Tech Lab Seminar Unit 3: Primary Research: Listening to Experts Reading Invention Lab Seminar Tech Lab Seminar Unit 4: Interpreting the Reading Experts and Finding Invention Lab Your Voice Quiz Seminar Project Tech Lab Seminar Unit 5: Understanding Reading Your Audience and Invention Lab 1 Outlining Your Big Idea Invention Lab 2 Seminar Tech Lab Seminar Unit 6: A Blueprint for Progress: Putting the Pieces Together Seminar Reading Invention Lab Seminar Project (draft) Tech Lab Invention Lab Invention Lab Project Invention Lab (CLA CM220-4, CLA CM 220-5) Invention Lab Project Invention Lab 1 Invention Lab 2 Invention Lab Project Unit 7: Presenting Your Reading Big Idea in an Invention Lab 1 Innovative Way Invention Lab 2 Seminar Tech Lab Seminar Unit 8: Framing Your Reading Argument: Introductions Invention Lab and Conclusions Seminar Seminar Unit 9: Presenting Your Reading Big Idea to the World Invention Lab Seminar Final Project Seminar Unit 10: The Journey Continues Invention Lab 1 Invention Lab 2 Invention Lab Invention Lab Final project (CLA CM220-1, CLA CM220-2, CLA CM220-3) Reading Discussion GRADING CRITERIA/COURSE EVALUATION TOP Assessments Total Points Number Points each Seminars 9 10 90 Discussions 9 40 360 Unit 2 project 1 60 60 Unit 4 project 1 100 100 Draft project (Unit 6) 1 150 150 Final Project 1 240 240 1000 1000 Points Total Points KAPLAN UNIVERSITY GRADING SCALE Grade Points Percentage TOP Grade Point A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D F W AU EC I P S U TC R No Grade 930 1000 900 929 870 899 830 869 800 829 770 799 730 769 700 729 670 699 600 669 0 599 Withdrawal in first 25% of term 93-100% 90-92% 87-89% 83-86% 80-82% 77-79% 73-76% 70-72% 67-69% 60-66% 0-59% Withdrawal Audit Experiential Credit Incomplete Pass Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Transfer Credit Repeat 4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2.0 1.7 1.3 1.0 0.0 N/A N/A N/A 0.0 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A INSTRUCTORS GRADING CRITERIA/TIMETABLE TOP All assignments submitted on time will be graded within five days of their due date (the Sunday of the following unit). Late work will be graded within five days of the submission date. POLICIES Students who wish to review current policies (academic appeals, attendance/tardiness, plagiarism, etc.) should refer to the current Kaplan University Catalog and/or Addendum. LATE POLICY TOP Late Assignments: All unit assignments (projects, quizzes, discussion, seminar, etc.) are due Tuesday by 11:59 pm ET of the unit assigned. At the discretion of your professor: Late assignments can be marked down one letter grade for each unit the assignment is late. For example, if you turn in your Unit 5 project, a B paper with a grade of an 85%, during Unit 6, one letter grade will be deducted from it, giving you a grade of C (75%). If you turn this project in during Unit 7, two letter grades will be deducted from it, giving you a grade of D (65%). As you can see, it is to your benefit to submit assignments on time. Late discussion posts to classmates may not receive credit as their purpose is to further the discussion and the discussion cannot be furthered after it has ended. Assignments submitted more than three units late may not be accepted. Late Unit 9 projects will not be accepted without prior approval from the instructor or an approved incomplete grade request. Extenuating Circumstances: If you have extenuating circumstances that prevent you from completing projects, quizzes, seminars or participating in the class, please contact the professor to discuss alternative arrangements. The possibility of alternative arrangements is at the discretion of the professor. Active communication is the key to overcoming any hurdles you may encounter during the term. It is your responsibility to inform the professor (ahead of time, whenever possible) of extenuating circumstances that might prevent you from completing work by the assigned deadline. Prior notification does not automatically result in a waiver of the late penalties. Please note that evaluation of extenuating circumstances is at the discretion of the instructor and documentation may be required for verification of the extenuating circumstance. Examples of extenuating circumstances may include but are not limited to: personal/family member hospitalization, death in the family, weather/environmental evacuation due to fire/hurricane, or active military assignment where internet connectivity is unavailable for a limited time period. General computer-related or internet connectivity issues are not considered extenuating circumstances. As the 2010-2011 Kaplan University catalog notes, To be part of Kaplan Universitys online program, students will need an Internet service provider (ISP) (2011, p. 22). It is your responsibility to locate a reliable Internet connection and computer. They are available at most public libraries as well as locations such as FedEx Kinkos. Incompletes Incompletes provide students with limited additional time to complete coursework after the terms end. To be considered for an incomplete, you should have completed approximately 75% of the coursework. Please see the Kaplan University catalog for further information. Whether or not to grant an incomplete is your instructors decision. Requests for an incomplete must be made to the instructor by the Monday of Unit 9. TUTORING TOP Online, live tutoring and many other services are available through the Kaplan University Writing Center (KUWC). You can find everything from using commas to conducting research. You can learn APA citation, review grammar, see sample essays, and chat with a live tutor. Please visit the KUWC within the Academic Support Center for a full list of services, resources and live tutoring hours. Finally, you can submit a paper and receive comments specific to that paper within 48-72 hours. PROJECTS TOP All projects are due by 11:59 PM ET of Tuesday of the unit for which they are assigned. For the specifics of which projects are due for each unit consult the Course Calendar and for the specifics of how projects will be graded consult the appropriate Project Rubrics. SEMINARS TOP A description of all seminars to be held can be found in the Flex Seminar Guide under the Course Home in your class. For the day and time of seminar for this course, refer to the Instructor Information and Seminar Time section of this document. Seminar Participation (synchronous discussion): You can earn credit for seminar by participating in 1 of the 2 options listed on the seminar page for a Unit. Seminar Option 1: Live seminars will be held using the KHE Seminar tool. In order to participate in a KHE seminar, you will need the most recent version of Flash, available as a free download from the following link: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/. Click on the Download button to start the download process. Log in to your home page to access your current classes. You can get into the seminar in one of two ways: 1) select the My Studies tab at the top of the page and then My Seminars, or 2) click on the My Seminars link with your course in the Current Classes section of your home page. The My Seminars area has both a calendar and table view that will show all previous and upcoming seminars that have been scheduled by your instructor or other instructors in the flex seminar cohort. Double-click on the seminar you wish to access. Thirty minutes before the scheduled start time, the Enter option will appear. For additional instructions, review the KHE Seminar Student User Guide found in the classroom. Seminar Option 2: Respond to the seminar discussion questions listed. Each response will be graded individually and posted to the grade book using the rubric found in the Rubrics section of this document. For information on seminar grading, please find the Seminar Rubric in the Rubrics section at the end of this document, or click here to skip to that section. DISCUSSION BOARDS TOP A description of all discussion questions can be found under each of the units in the course. Discussion Question Participation: Discussions provide a forum for students to ask questions and answer important questions about the course material. The discussion questions also allow students to receive feedback from the instructor and other students in the class. The professor will interact with students within the discussion board each week. A discussion grade will be posted to the grade sheet for each Unit. Please find your Discussion Board Rubrics for all discussions in the Rubrics section at the end of this document, or click here to skip to that section. NETIQUETTE TOP Interactions in an online classroom are in written form. Your comfort level with expressing ideas and feelings in writing will add to your success in an online course. The ability to write is necessary, but you also need to understand what is considered appropriate when communicating online. The word "netiquette" is short for "Internet etiquette." Rules of netiquette have grown organically with the growth of the Internet to help users act responsibly when they access or transmit information online. As a Kaplan University student, you should be aware of the common rules of netiquette for the Web and employ a communication style that follows these guidelines. Wait to respond to a message that upsets you and be careful of what you say and how you say it. Be considerate. Rude or threatening language, inflammatory assertions (often referred to as "flaming"), personal attacks, and other inappropriate communication will not be tolerated. Never post a message that is in all capital letters -- it comes across to the reader as SHOUTING! Use boldface and italics sparingly, as they can denote sarcasm. Keep messages short and to the point. Always practice good grammar, punctuation, and composition. This shows that youve taken the time to craft your response and that you respect your classmates' work. Keep in mind that threaded discussions are meant to be constructive exchanges. Be respectful and treat everyone as you would want to be treated yourself. Use spell check! You should also review and refer to the Electronic Communications Policy contained in the most recent Kaplan University Catalog. RUBRICS TOP Discussion Board Participation Rubric Grade: A: 36-40 points Grading Criteria Responses are on topic, original, and contribute to the quality of the discussion. Responses to questions make frequent, informed references to unit readings and material. Responses are clearly written in Standard American English (SAE) and appropriate for academic discourse. (Check your posts for spelling and grammar errors). Responses meet or exceed individual units posted length requirements. Responses show evidence of active engagement in the discussion (for example, asking peers questions and answering questions B: 32-35.99 points C: 28-31.99 points D: 24-27.99 points F: 0 23.99points posed by peers throughout the week). Responses to classmates are thoughtful, advance the discussion, and meet or exceed that units participation requirements. Responses are on mostly on topic, original, and contribute to the quality of the discussion. Responses make some informed references to unit readings and material. Responses are clearly written in SAE with some minor errors and mostly appropriate for academic discourse. Responses meet individual units posted length requirements. Responses to classmates are thoughtful, advance the discussion, and meet that units minimum requirements for participation. Responses are on topic, but lack originality or fail to make a significant contribution to the quality of the discussion. Responses make vague or summary references to unit readings and material. Responses have several mechanical or stylistic errors and are not written using SAE. While some consideration for audience appropriateness is taken into account, the response is largely casual and not appropriate for academic discourse. Responses do not meet individual units posted length requirements. Response(s) to others does not advance the discussion or does not meet the minimum requirements for participation in that unit. Responses are only partially on topic, lack originality, and lack a significant contribution to the quality of the discussion. Responses make little or no references to unit readings and material. Responses have several mechanical or stylistic errors and are written mostly in non-academic, non-standard English and are not appropriate for academic discourse. Responses do not meet posted length requirements. No responses to classmates. If there are two questions, student didnt respond to one. Responses are off topic, lack originality, and lack any contribution to the quality of the discussion. Responses make little or no references to unit readings and material. Responses are generally filled with mechanical or stylistic errors and are not written in SAE. Discourse inappropriate for an academic audience. Response is abusive or inappropriate (will result in 0 points automatically). Response is plagiarized (will result in 0 points automatically). No response to the question(s). No responses to classmates. Seminar Participation Rubrics Option 1: Attendance at Live Seminar Grade: Grading Criteria A: 9-10 points Frequent interaction on concepts being discussed by students and instructor. These could include questions, on-topic comments to instructor and classmates, and relevant observations and examples. While difficult to quantify, students who fall in this range will fall within the class average of interactions, usually 1525 during the hour. Posts are on topic and contribute to the quality of the seminar. Student arrives on time and stays the entire seminar. B: 8-8.99 points Good interaction on concepts being discussed by students and instructor. Student interaction falls slightly below the average response rate. Posts are generally on topic and contribute to the quality of the seminar. Student may have been tardy or have left early. C: 7-7.99 points Some interactions on concepts being discussed by students and instructor. Student interaction is probably about half of the average response rate. Several posts are off-topic. Student is tardy or leaves early. D: 6-6.99 points Few interactions on concepts being discussed by students and instructor. Student interaction is less than half of the average response rate. Frequent Off-topic conversations. Student attends less than half of the seminar, or is tardy and leaves early. F: 0-5.99 points Off-topic conversations. Abusive or inappropriate behavior. Minimal or no interactions with students and instructor (logs on but has 0-3 interactions). Student attends a fraction of the seminar. Option 2: No Attendance at Live Seminar, Alternate Assignment Completed Grade: Grading Criteria A: 9-10 points Response is on topic and original. Response makes frequent, informed references to unit material and the seminar archive. B: 8-8.99 points C: 7-7.99 points D: 6-6.99 points F: 0-5.99 points Response is clearly written, in Standard American English (SAE) and appropriate for academic discourse. Response meets posted length requirements, generally in the 250 word range. Response is on topic and original, but not as thoughtful as the A response. Response makes some informed references to unit material and the seminar archive. Response is generally clearly written (has some minor errors), in SAE, and appropriate for academic discourse. Response almost meets posted length requirements, generally in the 200-250 word range. Response is on topic but lacks originality. Response makes vague or summary references to unit material and seminar archive. Response has several mechanical or stylistic errors, may not be in SAE, and somewhat inappropriate for academic discourse. Response does not meet posted length requirements; length is fewer than 200 words. Response is only on partially topic and lacks originality. Response makes little or no references to unit material or seminar archive. Response has several mechanical or stylistic errors, is not in SAE, and is inappropriate for academic discourse. Response does not meet posted length requirements; length is fewer than 150 words. Response is off topic and lacks originality Response makes little or no references to lesson material. Response has numerous mechanical or stylistic errors, is not in SAE, and is inappropriate for academic discourse. Response is abusive, inappropriate, or plagiarized. Response is significantly shorter than the posted length requirements; may be fewer than 100 words. Project Rubrics Project Rubrics: UNIT 2 PROJECT RUBRIC (60 points) Meets Expectations The project includes a single persuasive thesis statement of 1-2 (52-60 points) sentences, describes a practical and credible research strategy, and articulates a pitch for the students big idea that appeals to a specific audience. Student identifies a topic appropriate for an academic, persuasive research assignment. Responses are written in 2 to 3 well-developed paragraphs. The discussion is logical and clearly written. Meets Some Expectations (42-50 points) Does Not Meet Expectations (41 points-below) The project may be missing one or more components or the pitch is not articulated clearly. May only be one paragraph. Project may have significant editing, grammar, and/or punctuation errors. Topic selection may not be appropriate or researchable. Project meets few or none of the assignment criteria or has so many errors that understanding meaning is difficult. Topic selection is inappropriate or not researchable. It may be plagiarized. Comments: UNIT 4 PROJECT RUBRIC: (100 points) A 90-100 points B 80-89 points Content and Organization: Part I: Responses to all pre-interview questions are written in complete sentences. Includes both open and closed questions which are original and appropriate for the interview subject and topic. Part II: Paragraphs for part 2 are well-developed, coherent, and logically organized. Summarizes, assesses, and reflects upon 3 secondary sources, one of which presents challenges to the students big idea. Sources are appropriate for an academic audience. Part III: Creates a References page with citations for each of the sources in Part II. Follows APA guidelines. Style and Mechanics: The style is appropriate to the assignment, and sentences are engaging to read as well as clear, concise, and precise. Project is free of serious errors; grammar, punctuation, and spelling help to clarify the meaning by following accepted conventions of Standard American English. Content and Organization: Part I: Responses to all pre-interview questions are answered, and most are in complete sentences. Includes both open and closed questions which are original and mostly appropriate for the interview subject and topic. Part II: Paragraphs for part 2 are well-developed. Transitions and coherence are not as strong as those in an A project. C 70-79 points D 60-69 points Summarizes, assesses, and reflects upon 3 secondary sources, one of which presents challenges to the students big idea. Sources are mostly appropriate for an academic audience. Part III: Creates a References page with citations for each of the sources in Part II. Mostly follows APA guidelines, with some errors. Style and Mechanics: The style is mostly appropriate to the assignment. Sentences are clear and precise, but may not be as engaging to read or as concise as those in the A project. Project contains some generally minor grammatical and punctuation errors. Few misspellings. Generally follows the accepted conventions of Standard American English. Content and Organization: Part I: Responds to most of the pre-interview questions and may not use complete sentences for some answers. May not include both open and closed questions, or some questions may be inappropriate for the interview subject or topic. Part II: Paragraphs for part 2 need to be more fully developed. Paragraphs may have some problems with coherence and transitions. Summarizes at least 2 secondary sources, one of which presents challenges to the students big idea. May not assess and reflect upon the value of these sources to the students project or sources may not be appropriate for an academic audience. Part III: Creates a References page with citations for each of the sources in part II, but does not follow APA guidelines for citation style. Style and Mechanics: The style may not always be appropriate to the assignment. Language may be vague or sentences too wordy. Numerous grammatical and punctuation errors. Misspellings are more frequent, but they may not be caught by a spell checker. Does not always follow the accepted conventions of Standard American English. Content and Organization: Part I: Responds to half of the pre-interview questions and does not use complete sentences for many of the answers. Does not include both open and closed questions. Questions are not appropriate for the interview subject or topic. Part II: Paragraphs for part 2 are underdeveloped and sources are inappropriate for an academic audience. Paragraphs lack coherence and transitions. Does not summarize, assess, or reflect upon selected sources. Part III: Does not include a complete References page with citations for all of the sources in Part II and does not follow APA guidelines for citations. Style and Mechanics: The style is inappropriate to the assignment and interferes with the development and clarity of the main points. Many serious and minor grammar, punctuation, and spelling errors, including those that would be flagged by a spell and grammar checker. Often fails to meet the conventions of Standard American English. F 59-below points It meets no or few of the assignment's guidelines. The components outlined for a 'D' project are not met. It may be plagiarized. Comments: UNIT 6 PROJECT RUBRIC: (150 points) A Content: 135-150 points Includes an introduction with a logical persuasive thesis statement and a conclusion that wraps up the essay. The thesis statement is effective and needs little revision for the final project. Supports main points effectively and clearly (no logical fallacies, outside sources used to support arguments where appropriate) and skillfully refutes counter-arguments without ignoring data that contradicts the students thesis. Shows original thought. Refers to at least 3 secondary sources in the body of the paper and on the references page. At least one source comes from the Kaplan University Library, and other sources are appropriate for an academic essay. Meets 3-5 page length requirement. Organization and Style: Paragraphs are well-developed, coherent, and logically organized. The style is appropriate for an academic essay, and sentences are engaging to read as well as clear, concise, and precise. Mechanics and APA: Project is free of serious errors; grammar, punctuation, and spelling help to clarify the meaning by following accepted conventions of Standard American English. Follows APA guidelines for the document layout and citations. B Content: 120-134 points Includes an introduction with a logical thesis statement and a conclusion that wraps up the essay; these need some revision but form a good basis for the final project. The thesis statement may need to be clearer or more persuasive and should be revised for the final. C 105-119 points Supports most main points effectively and clearly (no logical fallacies, outside sources usually used to support arguments where appropriate) and refutes counter-arguments without ignoring data that contradicts the students thesis, although the refutation needs strengthening for the final project. Shows original thought. Refers to 3 secondary sources in the body of the paper and on the references page. Includes at least one source from the Kaplan University Library, and other sources are mostly appropriate for an academic audience. Not quite 3 pages. Organization and Style: Paragraphs are developed and organized effectively, but transitions within or between paragraphs need to be stronger. The style is mostly appropriate for an academic essay. Sentences are clear and precise, but may not be as engaging to read or as concise as those in the A project. Mechanics and APA: Project contains some generally minor grammatical and punctuation errors. Few misspellings. Generally follows the accepted conventions of Standard American English. Mostly follows APA guidelines for the document layout and citations, with some minor errors. Content: Includes a thesis statement that needs revision. The introduction and conclusion do not set up or close the paper very effectively and need significant revision for the final. Main points are adequately defined in some parts of the paper, but some may be repeated and others underdeveloped. Shows too little original thought. Relies too heavily on personal experience or one or two sources, but does include in-text and reference page citations for at least 2 sources. Sources may not be appropriate for an academic essay or does not include a Kaplan University Library source. Does not address some obvious counter-arguments or includes logical fallacies. Paper is largely informative and lacks persuasive qualities. One half page short of the 3 page requirement. Organization and Style: Paragraphs may have problems with development, coherence, and/or transitions. The style may not always be appropriate for an academic essay (frequent use of first person pronouns or use of informal or slang language, for example). Language may be vague or sentences too wordy. Mechanics and APA: Numerous grammatical and punctuation errors. Misspellings are D 90-104 points F 89-below points more frequent, but they may not be caught by a spell checker. Does not always follow the accepted conventions of Standard American English. An attempt at APA formatting and citations was made, but project contains several significant errors in layout or citation style. Content: The paper identifies a topic but lacks a clear thesis statement with a persuasive claim. Lacks an introduction and/or conclusion, or they are so poorly developed that they need to be completely rewritten for the final project. The main points are not clearly identified, and many counterarguments are ignored. Too little original thought. Relies on personal experience or common knowledge to the near exclusion of outside research and does not meet the source requirements. Sources are not appropriate for an academic audience. The essay is informative with no identifiably persuasive elements. A page or more short of the length requirement. Organization and Style: Paragraphs are underdeveloped and lack coherence and transitions. The style is inappropriate for an academic essay and interferes with the development and clarity of the main points. Mechanics and APA: Many serious and minor grammar, punctuation, and spelling errors, including those that would be flagged by a spell and grammar checker. Often fails to meet the conventions of Standard American English. Citation and formatting meet few APA guidelines. It meets no or few of the assignment's guidelines. The components outlined for a 'D' paper are not met. It may be plagiarized. Comments: Final Project Your Final Project will be due at the end of Unit 9. Unit 9 Project Rubric (240 points: 150 for essay, 50 for presentation, 20 for letter, and 20 for reflection question responses) A 216-240 points B 192-215 points Essay: Content: Includes a compelling introduction with a logical persuasive thesis statement and a conclusion that effectively wraps up the essay. Supports main points effectively and clearly (no logical fallacies, outside sources used to support arguments where appropriate) and skillfully refutes counter-arguments without ignoring data that contradicts the students thesis. Shows original thought. Refers to at least 5 secondary sources in the body of the paper and on the references page. At least two of these sources are scholarly books or articles from the Kaplan Library or an academic database like Google Scholar. Other sources are appropriate for an academic audience. Meets 5-7 page length requirement (this does not include the title and references page). Significantly revises and expands the draft submitted in unit 6. Organization, Style, Mechanics, and APA: Paragraphs are well-developed, coherent, and logically organized. The style is appropriate for an academic audience, and sentences are engaging to read as well as clear, concise, and precise. Project is free of serious errors; grammar, punctuation, and spelling help to clarify the meaning by following accepted conventions of Standard American English. Follows APA guidelines for the document layout and citations. Letter to the editor: The letter is clearly written and has a strong sense of purpose. The style is appropriate for the audience and situation. Demonstrates appropriate revision of the version posted in the unit 5 invention lab. Reflection question responses: Responds to all reflection questions thoughtfully, providing specific examples from the students work throughout the course. Responses are written in at least two well-developed paragraphs. Presentation: Message in presentation is original, clear, and effective for the intended audience. Includes at least 5 pieces of research-supported information related to the students big idea. Cites research in APA format. Demonstrates significant revision of the version posted in the unit 7 invention lab. Essay: Content: Includes an introduction with a logical thesis statement and a conclusion that wraps up the essay; these are effective but not as engaging as the paragraphs in the A paper. Supports most main points effectively and clearly (no logical fallacies, outside sources usually used to support arguments where C 168-191 points appropriate) and refutes counter-arguments without ignoring data that contradicts the students thesis, although the refutation needed strengthening. Shows original thought. Refers to 5 secondary sources in the body of the paper and on the references page, but one may not be appropriate for an academic audience or only one is a scholarly book or article from the Kaplan University Library or another academic database. Does not meet the minimum length requirement of 5 pages (excluding title and references page), but is at least 4 pages. Thoughtfully revises and expands the draft submitted in unit 6, but not to the extent of an A essay. Organization, Style, Mechanics, and APA: Paragraphs are developed and organized effectively, but transitions within or between paragraphs need to be stronger. The style is mostly appropriate for an academic audience. Sentences are clear and precise, but may not be as engaging to read or as concise as those in the A project. Project contains some generally minor grammatical and punctuation errors. Few misspellings. Generally follows the accepted conventions of Standard American English. Mostly follows APA guidelines for the document layout and citations, with some minor errors. Letter to the editor: The letter is clearly written and has a sense of purpose. The style is mostly appropriate for the audience and situation. Demonstrates some revision of the version posted in the unit 5 invention lab. Reflection question responses: Responds to all reflection questions thoughtfully, but answers are not as specific and well-developed as those in the A paper. The style is mostly appropriate to the assignment. Presentation: Message in presentation is mostly original, clear, and effective for intended audience. Includes 4 pieces of research-supported information related to the students big idea. Research cited in APA format with some errors. Demonstrates some revision of the version posted in the unit 7 invention lab. Essay: Content: The thesis statement needs revision or is not persuasive. The introduction and conclusion do not set up or close the paper very effectively and needed significant revision. Main points are adequately defined in some parts of the paper, but some may be repeated and others underdeveloped. Does not address some obvious counter-arguments or includes logical fallacies. Paper is largely informative and lacks persuasive qualities. Shows too little original thought. D 144-167 points Relies too heavily on personal experience, common knowledge, or two or three sources, but does include in-text and reference page citations for at least 3-4 sources. Sources may not be appropriate for an academic audience. One to one and a half pages short of the length requirement, excluding the title and references page. Organization, Style, Mechanics, and APA: Paragraphs may have problems with development, coherence, and/or transitions. The style may not always be appropriate for an academic essay (frequent use of first person pronouns or use of informal or slang language, for example). Language may be vague or sentences too wordy. Numerous grammatical and punctuation errors. Misspellings are more frequent, but they may not be caught by a spell checker. Does not always follow the accepted conventions of Standard American English. An attempt at APA formatting and citations was made, but project contains several significant errors in layout or citation style. Letter to the Editor: Letter needed to be edited more thoroughly to enhance clarity and purpose. Demonstrates little revision of the version posted in the unit 5 invention lab. Reflection question responses: May not respond to all of the reflection questions, answers may not be in paragraph form, or lacks specific examples from the students work throughout the course. Presentation: Message in presentation lacks originality or may lack clarity and purpose. Not effective enough for intended audience. Includes only 3 pieces of information about the students big idea, or the information in the presentation is not research-supported. Research is cited, but not in APA format. Little revision of the version posted in the unit 7 invention lab. Essay: Content: The paper identifies a topic but lacks a thesis statement with a persuasive claim. Lacks an introduction and/or conclusion, or they are poorly developed. The main points are not clearly identified, and many counterarguments are ignored. The essay is informative with no persuasive elements. Shows little original thought. Relies on personal experience to the near exclusion of outside research, does not meet the source requirements, or sources are inappropriate for an academic essay. Two pages short of the length requirement, excluding the title and references page. Organization, Style, Mechanics, and APA: Paragraphs are underdeveloped and lack coherence and transitions. The style is inappropriate for an academic essay and interferes with the development and clarity of the main points. Many serious and minor grammar, punctuation, and spelling errors, including those that would be flagged by a spell and grammar checker. Often fails to meet the conventions of Standard American English. Citation and formatting meet few APA guidelines. Letter to the editor: The letter lacks clarity and a sense of purpose. Inappropriate for its intended audience. Demonstrates no revision of the version posted in the unit 5 invention lab. Reflection question responses: Only responds to some of the reflection questions, responses may be in incomplete sentences or are not in paragraph form, and responses lack any specific examples. Presentation: Message in presentation lacks originality, clarity, and purpose and is not effective for intended audience. Has only 1 or 2 pieces of information regarding the students big idea and lacks research to support points. Does not demonstrate revision of the version posted in the unit 7 invention lab. F 143-below points Comments: It meets no or few of the assignment's guidelines; missing one or more required components. The components outlined for a 'D' paper, presentation, letter to the editor, or reflection responses are not met. Essay, letter to editor, and/or presentation have not been revised. It may be plagiarized.

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Kaplan University - BUISNESS - CM220
Slide 1INTRODUCTION TOCM220 TECH LABSUnit 7 DiscussionUnit 9 Final ProjectCM220: Tech LabThe following presentation provides an overview of Tech Lab content, and how the Tech Labsare important to student success in CM220. This presentation is not m
Kaplan University - BUISNESS - CM220
THE KAPLAN GUIDE TOSUCCESSFULWRITINGEdited by Diane Martinez,Susan Carlson, and Kara VanDamKaplan University Writing Center 2010 by Kaplan, Inc.Published by Kaplan Publishing, a division of Kaplan, Inc.1 Liberty Plaza, 24th FloorNew York, NY 1000
Kaplan University - BUISNESS - CM220
20112012 AcAdemic cAlendAr for KAplAn University cAmpUses,leArning centers, And online progrAmsUndErgradUatE prOgraMS/gradUatE artS and SCIEnCES, CrIMInaL JUStICE,EdUCatIOn, hEaLth SCIEnCES, LEgaL StUdIES, and nUrSIng prOgraMSa Term 20112012Track A M
Kaplan University - BUISNESS - CM220
chaPter 1college-level WritingtanYa PetersonWe all write every day. We write lists, letters, e-mails, and text messages. We post updates on sites like Twitter and Facebook. We leavenotes for friends, colleagues, parents, or children. We put pen topap
Kaplan University - BUISNESS - CM220
chapteR 11ReseaRchcaRolYn steVensonThe word research has many meanings ranging from visions of scientists working in labs to students reading piles of articles and books.T he primary focus of this chapter is on students process of researchand incorpo
Kaplan University - BUISNESS - CM220
chaPter 16effectiVe Peer reViewsellen Grady and dena KinGWords from WritersPeer ReviewWe have found in our 22 years of experience in teaching composition that effective peer reviews can bevery beneficial to students in the revision process.Ellen Gr
Kaplan University - BUISNESS - CM220
Fallacy GalleryStraw man fallacy: http:/www.youtube.com/watch?v=EEbRxTOyGf0[The straw man fallacy occurs when someone presents a misleading view of an opposingargument in order to refute the weak or fake argument. This has the effect of making thefirs
Kaplan University - BUISNESS - CM220
Tips for Conducting Personal InterviewsWhen conducting research, it may be necessary to go directly to the expert who can bestprovide information and insights on the topic; interviewing, either in person, over thetelephone, or through email, allows you
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
Running Head: PERSUASIVE ESSAYOutsourcing- Solution or Problem?1Unit 6 Persuasive EssayOutsourcing- Solution or Problem?Your Name HereYour SchoolCM 220College Composition IIDatePersuasive Essay2Unit 6 Persuasive EssayOutsourcingOutsourcing is a
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
I. Introduction to OutsourcingII. Types of OutsourcingA. Low wage/Off shore human outsourcingB. Manufacturing and Production OutsourcingC. Development and DesignIII. Factors that drive outsourcingA. Cost savingsB. Need for skilled laborIV. Problem
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
CM220 Unit 8 Reading:One big idea that emerged in the latter part of the 19th century and revolutionized the waypeople were entertained was the cinemamoving pictures. From a 21st Century perspective,imagining our lives without movies may be difficult t
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
Running Head: PERSUASIVE ESSAY1Unit 6 Persuasive Essay2Unit 6 Persuasive EssayOutsourcing is a very complex concept which many simply take at face value.Considering the repercussions of outsourcing, it is important to first and foremost properlyana
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
Running Head: PERSUASIVE ESSAY1Unit 6 Persuasive EssayNatalie AlcornKaplan UniversityCM 220College Composition IIDr. Jeffrey HansonMarch 18, 20122Unit 6 Persuasive EssayOutsourcing is a very complex concept which many simply take at face value.
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
Unit 6 persuasive essayOutsourcing is a very complex concept which I feel many simply take at face value.Considering the repercussions, it is foolish to outsource without the proper analysis. Properanalysis prior to outsourcing can help to avoid the hi
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
Outsourcing is a very complex concept which I feel many simply take at face value.Considering the repercussions, it is foolish to outsource without the proper analysis. Properanalysis prior to outsourcing can help to avoid the hindrance of all parties i
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
CM220 Unit 6 Project DescriptionBlueprint for ProgressThis weeks project is your first version of the essay component of your final.You will present your big idea in a persuasive and research supported mannerand include your revised thesis statement.
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
In the season 1 finale of the television series, Mad Men, advertising executive Don Draperevokes nostalgia by flashing a series of his family photographs to sell the Carousel concept toKodak. In just a couple of minutes, he reduces a man to tears and le
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
ORIGNAL SOUR CEIn the 2004 presidential election campaign, jobs were a key domestic issue. Some polls ratedthe loss of jobs, particularly in manufacturing, as highly as national security. The omens forPresident George W. Bush were seemingly not good, w
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
Running head: UNIT 4 PROJECT1Reflecting on SourcesInsert your name hereKaplan UniversityCM 220 Section XInsert instructors name hereInsert due date hereUnit 4 Project2UNIT 4 PROJECT: Reflecting on SourcesComplete all three parts of the workshee
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
ORIGNAL SOUR CEIn the 2004 presidential election campaign, jobs were a key domestic issue. Some polls ratedthe loss of jobs, particularly in manufacturing, as highly as national security. The omens forPresident George W. Bush were seemingly not good, w
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
What is a problem in the nation or in your community that needs changing and why? Do youhave any big ideas for addressing this problem? This problem could be tied to your field ofstudy or it could be something with more personal implications.If you do
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
Part 11) What is outsourcing?I think that outsourcing will be hiring the assistance of another company or production facility toperform tasks for the organization. These tasks can include setting up website and the productionof goods and services.2)
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
Running head: UNIT 4 PROJECT1Reflecting on SourcesInsert your name hereKaplan UniversityCM 220 Section XInsert instructors name hereInsert due date hereUnit 4 Project2UNIT 4 PROJECT: Reflecting on SourcesComplete all three parts of the workshee
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
Outsourcing & Offshoring:Some Key Factors Guidingthe Academic & ResearchQuestionsQuestionsRiskIdentification,Analysis&ManagementResearch&InstructionalOpportunitiesAbstractAbstractAcademicinquiryusingindustrialorganizationtheoriesfromeconomics,l
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
One of the biggest problems I see in the community is the lack of knowledge that our teenagershave. I recently took custody of a young girl who is now 17. She used to babysit for me andafter I got to know her pretty well, I realized her situation at hom
Kaplan University - BUSINESS - CM220
Inspiration GalleryThe inspiration for this course is the MSNBC show The Big Idea, which features peoplewhose inventions and ideas have changed the business world and everyday life. Anyonecan come up with a life-changing idea: a housewife who realizes
Mesa CC - SOC - 101
Quiz 1.1.Which of the following is NOT an example of fatalistic suicide?StudentValueResponseImmigrants to 100%1 new country.2. Imprisonment3. MentalInstitution4. TerminalIllness5. All of theabove areexamples offatalisticsuicideCorrect A
Mesa CC - SOC - 101
Test 11.When a person commits suicide because of a drastic change, this is an example of which of the following:StudentValueResponse1. EgoisticSuicide2. AltruisticSuicideAnomic100%3 Suicide.4. FatalisticSuicideCorrect AnswerScore:Feedbac
Mesa CC - SOC - 101
Quiz 51.A role is:StudentValueResponse1. A positionanindividualoccupies insocietyBehavior 100%2 expected of. theoccupant ofa status3. A symbolor a cue weuse todetermine aperson'sstatus4. A statusthat is thefirst thingnoticedabout
Mesa CC - SOC - 101
1.A symbol or a cue we use to determine a person's status is a(n):StudentValueResponse1. Achievedstatus2. Ascribedstatus3. MasterstatusStatus100%4 symbol.Correct AnswerScore:Feedback1/12.What was Max Weber's term for the world getting
Mesa CC - SOC - 101
Quiz 9:1.In Merton's typology of "5 Modes of Social Adaptation" he said that hermits are:StudentValueResponse1. Conformists2. Innovators3. RitualistsRetreatists 100%4.5. RebelsCorrect AnswerScore:Feedback1/12.Which of the following symbo
Mesa CC - SOC - 101
Test 31.912In Merton's typology of "5 Modes of Social Adaptation" he said that hermits are:StudentValueResponse1. Conformists2. Innovators3. RitualistsRetreatists 100%4.5. RebelsCorrect AnswerScore:Feedback1/12.915When discussing what
Mesa CC - SOC - 101
Quiz 13:1.Being married to one person at a time, but than changing is referred to as:StudentValueResponse1. GroupMarriage2. Monogamy3. PolygamySerial100%4 Monogamy.Correct AnswerScore:Feedback1/12.When multiple males marry multiple fema
Mesa CC - SOC - 101
1.Polyandry is when:StudentValueResponseone female 100%1 marries. multiplemales2. one malemarriesmultiplefemales3. multiplemalesmarrymultiplefemales4. All of theaboveCorrect AnswerScore:Feedback1/12.Which of the following is NOT a
Australian National - MATHEMATIC - MATH1013
Continuity and Limits of Functions Exercise Answers1. Let f be given by f (x) =4 x for x 4 and let g be given by g (x) = x2 for allx R.(a) dom(f + g ) = dom(f g ) = (, 4], dom(f g ) = [2, 2] and dom(g f ) =(, 4](b) (f g )(0) = 2, (g f )(0) = 4, (f g
Australian National - MATHEMATIC - MATH1013
Equality Constraints and the Theorem of LagrangeExercise AnswersAll the referenece are to exercises from Simon & Blume.1. Exercises 18.1-18.9.2. Exercise 19.14.3. Find the maximum and minimum of f (x, y ) = x2 y 2 on the unit circle x2 + y 2 = 1usin
Australian National - MATHEMATIC - MATH1013
Functions and Cardinality Exercise Answers1. (a) A function.(d) Not a function.(b) Not a function.(e) Not a function.(c) A function(f) A function.2. (a) The domain and codomain are not specied, nor does it say for what x thestatement f (x) = cos x
Australian National - MATHEMATIC - MATH1013
Implicit Functions Exercise AnswersAll the exercises are from Simon & Blume.1. Exercise 15.1Solution.(a) We have to check that the conditions of the implicit function theorem are satised. We haveG(x, y ) = x2 xy 3 + y 5which is continuously dierenti
Australian National - MATHEMATIC - MATH1013
Linear Independence Exercise Answers1. Exercise 11.1.2. Exercise 11.2. Answers in S&B.(a) Let 1 and be scalars. To use the denition of linear independence directly,consider the equation121+ 21221 + 21 + 22==00.Thus we need 21 + 2 = 0 and
Australian National - MATHEMATIC - MATH1013
Systems of Linear Equations Exercise Answers1. Exercise 7.11.(a) First write the system in matrix form, using an augmented matrix.33| 41 1 | 10Interchange rows 1 and 2 (to avoid having to use fractions and add 1/3 of row1 to row 2 to eliminate the
Australian National - MATHEMATIC - MATH1013
Metric Space Properties of Euclidean Spaces ExerciseAnswersAll the exercises are from Simon & Blume.1. Exercise 12.11. Show that if cfw_xn and cfw_yn are two sequences of vectors inn=1n=1kR convergent to x and y respectively, then cfw_xn yn conv
Australian National - MATHEMATIC - MATH1013
Multivariable Exercise AnswersAll the exercises are from Simon & Blume.1. Any of Exercises 13.1-13.10.2. Exercises 13.11-13.14.3. Exercise 13.19. Let f = (f1 , . . . , fm ) be a function from Rk to Rm . Then, f iscontinuous at x i each of its compone
Australian National - ECON - 6003
2004mathprelimsanswersUniversity of SydneyDepartment of Economics Mathematical Methods of Economic AnalysisMathematical Preliminaries AnswersGeneral Note 1. In assignment answers, I often wish to make points that time does not permit me to make in lec
Australian National - ECON - 6003
2004vectorsanswersUniversity of SydneyDepartment of Economics Mathematical Methods of Economic AnalysisVECTOR ANSWERS PART I The answers are in the back of the book for most questions. What follows consists of a mixture of an elaboration of some of tho
Australian National - ECON - 6003
2004limitssetsanswersUniversity of SydneyDepartment of EconomicsMathematical Methods of Economic AnalysisLIMITS AND SETS ANSWERSPART I12.3 You are rst asked to prove that for arbitrary x, y R:|x + y | |x| + |y | .(1)I will give two proofs.Proof
Australian National - ECON - 6003
2004multivariablefunctionsanswersUniversity of SydneyDepartment of Economics Mathematical Methods of Economic Analysis Multivariable Functions AnswersPART I All answers are in the back of the book of Simon and Blume. PART IIQ1. Let f : R R, wheref (x
Australian National - ECON - 6003
2004derivativesanswersUniversity of SydneyDepartment of Economics Mathematical Methods of Economic Analysis DERIVATIVES ANSWERSPART I The answers are in the back of Simon and Blume. One answer that may require elaboration is the answer to 14.22. This i
Australian National - ECON - 6003
2004implicitfunctionsanswersUniversity of SydneyDepartment of EconomicsMathematical Methods of Economic AnalysisImplicit Functions AnswersPART IThe answers are in the back of the Simon and Blume book.PART IIQ1. Let the supply price (i.e., the pric
Australian National - ECON - 6003
2004constrainedoptanswers-1University of SydneyDepartment of Economics Mathematical Methods of Economic AnalysisCONSTRAINED OPTIMISATION ANSWERS: IQ1. (An unconstrained optimisation problem) Consider a perfectly competitive firm facingoutput price p,
Australian National - ECON - 6003
2004constrainedoptanswers-2University of SydneyDepartment of Economics Mathematical Methods of Economic AnalysisCONSTRAINED OPTIMISATION ANSWERS: IIQ1. Consider the following utility maximisation problem:Maximise subject to and Assume that p1 , p2 ,
Washington - THE - 202
THE 205: Biblical Traditions and CultureFall 2011Fr. Jeff Cooper, CSCTheophany Handout:Revelation (as defined by George Savran):Revelation involves a process of mutual groping toward a meeting, both partners (humanand divine) are eager for contact,
Washington - THE - 202
Unit 8 Homework Assignment Managerial & AccountingEXERCISE 10-6. Sales Budget for Service Company [LO 2] Oregon Adventures provides toursof scenic locations in Oregon.The company expects tours taken to increase dramatically comparedwith the prior year.
Washington - THE - 202
ProblemsPROBLEM 7-1. Decision Making and Ethics [LO 1, Ethics] Joan Paxton, VP of marketingforSupertone Recording Equipment, has developed a marketing plan for presentation to thecompanyspresident.The plan calls for television ads, something the comp
Washington - THE - 202
U.S. Constitution ExerciseIn each of these (generally absurd) cases, cite the relevant Article and Section or Amendment of the Constitution, and quotethe relevant phrase that would make each action unconstitutional. Note the example below:1. During pea
Kentucky State University - INTC - 1050
E-Bay Fine Tunes Its StrategyGlenda Jorge&Jazmine LewisFounded in 1995 by Pierre Omidyar.Generally known as Web Auction.25 Million Sellers all over theworld.In 1998 Revenues of $4.8 Million.Revenues Shrank for the 1st time inquarter 1 of 2009 be
Escuela Colombiana de Ingenieria - COST ACCOU - ACC1042
CHAPTER 7STOCKS AND THEIR VALUATION(Difficulty: E = Easy, M = Medium, and T = Tough)Multiple Choice: ConceptualEasy:Required returnAnswer: d Diff: E1.If the expected rate of return on a stock exceeds the required rate,a.b.c.d.e.The stock is
Grand Canyon - ACC - 491
What are the most important risks for the audit of the acquisition and payment cycles in theautomotive industry? Compare and contrast the risks for the automotive industry with anotherindustry of your choice. Your initial post should be approximately 25
Grand Canyon - ACC - 491
7-31 [LO 1, 2, 4]You have been assigned to work on your firms largest client, DOMO Electronics, a publicly traded company withoperations in North and South America, Europe, and Asia. In your process of evaluating ICFR, your audit planinstructs you to e
Grand Canyon - ACC - 491
Complete Problems 9-30 and 10-28 from the textbook9-30 [LO 5, 6]Listed below are several misstatements of inventory, accounts payable, and accrued liabilities accounts. Design asubstantive audit procedure that provides reasonable assurance of detecting
Grand Canyon - ACC - 491
Complete Problems 12-30, 12-31, and 13-31 from the textbook12-30 [LO 1, 3, 4]Identify and list the company controls in place related to purchase transactions and cash disbursements.(a) For each control identified:1. State the purpose of the control.T
Grand Canyon - ACC - 491
10-21 [LO 3, 4, 5]Medco Hospital Buyers Group (MHBG) processes a significant number of intercompany transactions each month,mainly transferring cash between business units to meet the needs of operating cash flows. None of MHBGsintercompany transaction