Chapter 17 - Test Bank
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Chapter 17 - Test Bank

Course Number: ACCT 3420, Spring 2012

College/University: Utah State

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CHAPTER 17 INVESTMENTS IFRS questions are available at the end of this chapter. TRUE-FALSEConceptual Answer F T F F T F T F T T F T F T F T F T F T No. Description 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Examples of debt securities. Definition of trading securities. Available-for-sale unrealized gains/losses. Classifying held-to-maturity securities. Fair value changes in AFS...

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17 INVESTMENTS IFRS CHAPTER questions are available at the end of this chapter. TRUE-FALSEConceptual Answer F T F F T F T F T T F T F T F T F T F T No. Description 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Examples of debt securities. Definition of trading securities. Available-for-sale unrealized gains/losses. Classifying held-to-maturity securities. Fair value changes in AFS securities. Fair Value Adjustment account. Accounting for trading securities. Definition of significant influence. Reporting Unrealized Holding Gain/LossEquity account. Examples of significant influence. Definition of controlling interest. Effect of dividends on investment under equity. Reporting revenue under fair value method. Definition of controlling interest. Using fair value option. Accounting for changes in fair value. Temporary declines and write downs. Necessary of reclassification adjustment. Transfer of held-to-maturity securities. Transfers from trading to available-for-sale. MULTIPLE CHOICEConceptual Answer c b c c a a c b a d b c d c c d c a c No. 21. 22. 23. 24. P 25. S 26. S 27. S 28. S 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. Description Debt securities. Valuation of debt securities. Held-to-maturity securities. Unrealized gain/loss recognition for securities. Accounting for accrued interest. Identifying securities accounted for at amortized cost. Accounting for available-for-sale securities. Using effective-interest method of amortization. Identifying available-for-sale securities. Classification as held-to-maturity. Reporting held-to-maturity securities. Acquisition of held-to-maturity securities. Accounting for trading securities. Accounting for trading debt securities. Recording investments in debt securities. Calculating the issue price of bonds. Valuation of investments in debt securities. Recording amortization of bond discount. Amortization of premium/discount on investment in a debt security. 17 - 2 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition MULTIPLE CHOICEConceptual (cont.) Answer d c c b a c b d a d d d a d c b b d c b a c b d c b a c a d No. 40. 41. 42. S 43. S 44. P 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. P 57. 58. 59. *60. *61. *62. *63. *64. *65. *66. *67. *68. *69. Description Effective-interest rate method. Debt securities purchased between interest dates. Sale of debt security prior to maturity. Passive interest investment. Fair value vs. equity method. Fair value vs. equity method. Conditions for using the equity method. Ownership interest required for using the equity method. Recording of dividends received under the equity method. Recognition of earnings of investee using the equity method. Effect of using the fair value method in error. Determine value of investment. Fair value option. Accounting for impairments. Reclassification adjustment in comprehensive income. Reclassification of securities. Reclassification of securities. Transfer of a debt security. Definition of gains trading or cherry picking. Accounting for transfers between Categories. Accounting for derivatives. Characteristics of a derivative instrument. Identifying companies that are arbitrageurs. Identifying equity securities. Accounting for fair value hedges. Gains/losses on cash flow hedges. Identifying an embedded derivative. Requirements for financial instrument disclosures. Variable-interest entity. Risk-and-reward model and voting-interest approach. P These questions also appear in the Problem-Solving Survival Guide. These questions also appear in the Study Guide. *This topic is dealt with in an Appendix to the chapter. S MULTIPLE CHOICEComputational Answer c b d b a c a b c a b No. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. Description Recording the purchase of debt securities. Computing cost of bond investment. Calculation of discount amortization. Calculation of revenue from HTM securities. Computation of other comprehensive income. Computation of gain/loss on sale of bonds. Acquisition of held-to-maturity securities. Carrying value of held-to-maturity securities. Carrying value of available-for-sale debt securities. Calculation of income from available-for-sale debt securities. Calculation of income from HTM securities. Investments MULTIPLE CHOICEComputational (cont.) Answer b d a d b d b c b c a a b a b c c a c b b b c c c b c b d b No. 81. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 100. 101. 102. 103. 104. 105. 106. 107. 108. 109. 110. Description Determine gain on sale of debt securities. Computation of revenue from HTM securities. Calculation of premium amortization. Calculation of other comprehensive income. Calculation of loss on sale of bonds. Calculation of loss on sale of trading security. Determination of unrealized loss on trading security. Determination of accumulated other comprehensive income. Entry to record unrealized gain on AFS securities. Fair value for trading securities. Unrealized gain on available-for-sale securities. Calculation of gain on sale of equity security. Determination of unrealized loss on AFS securities. Calculation of unrealized loss included in comprehensive income. Computation of purchase price of equity method investment. Computation of revenue from investment. Computation of investment account balance. Calculation of investment revenue. Accounting for stock investments/fair value method. Accounting for stock investments/equity method. Accounting for stock investments/fair value method. Equity method of accounting. Fair value method of accounting for stock investment. Equity method of accounting for stock investment. Balance of investment account using the equity method. Investment income recognized under the equity method. Balance of investment account using the equity method. Balance of investment account using the equity method. Investment income recognized under the equity method. Other comprehensive income. MULTIPLE CHOICECPA Adapted Answer d d c d c b c a b No. 111. 112. 113. 114. 115. 116. 117. 118. 119. Description Carrying value of AFS debt securities. Unrealized loss on trading and AFS securities. Unrealized loss on trading and AFS securities. Classification of an equity security. Investment income recognized under the equity method. Balance of investment account using the equity method. Sale of stock investment. Calculate the acquisition price of a stock investment. Transfer of securities from trading to AFS. 17 - 3 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 17 - 4 EXERCISES Item E17-120 E17-121 E17-122 E17-123 E17-124 E17-125 E17-126 *E17-127 *E17-128 Description Investment in debt securities at a premium. Investment in debt securities at a discount. Investments in equity securities (essay). Investment in equity securities. Fair value and equity methods (essay). Fair value and equity methods. Comprehensive income calculation. Fair value hedge. Cash flow hedge. PROBLEMS Item P17-129 P17-130 P17-131 *P17-132 *P17-133 Description Trading equity securities. Trading securities. Available-for-sale securities. Derivative financial instrument. Free-standing derivative. CHAPTER LEARNING OBJECTIVES 1. Identify the three categories of debt securities and describe the accounting and reporting treatment for each category. 2. Understand the procedures for discount and premium amortization on bond investments. 3. Identify the categories of equity securities and describe the accounting and reporting treatment for each category. 4. Explain the equity method of accounting and compare it to the fair value method for equity securities. 5. Describe the accounting for the fair value option. 6. Discuss the accounting for impairments of debt and equity investments. 7. Explain why companies report reclassification adjustments. 8. Describe the accounting for transfer of investment securities between categories. *9. Explain who uses derivatives and why. *10. Understand the basic guidelines for accounting for derivatives. *11. Describe the accounting for derivative financial instruments. *12. Explain how to account for a fair value hedge. *13. Explain how to account for a cash flow hedge. Investments 17 - 5 *14. Identify special reporting issues related to derivative financial instruments that cause unique accounting problems. *15. Describe the accounting for variable-interest entities. SUMMARY OF LEARNING OBJECTIVES BY QUESTIONS Item Type Item Type Item 1. 2. TF TF 3. 21. TF MC 22. 23. 4. 5. 6. 7. S 28. S 29. TF TF TF TF MC MC 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. MC MC MC MC MC MC 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 8. 9. 10. TF TF TF 11. 43. 86. TF MC MC 87. 88. 89. 12. 13. 14. S 44. P 45. TF TF TF MC MC 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. MC MC MC MC MC 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 15. TF 16. TF 51. 17. TF 53. MC 122. 18. TF 54. Type Item Type Item Learning Objective 1 S MC 24. MC 26. P S MC 25. MC 27. Learning Objective 2 MC 42. MC 77. MC 72. MC 78. MC 73. MC 79. MC 74. MC 80. MC 75. MC 81. MC 76. MC 82. Learning Objective 3 MC 90. MC 93. MC 91. MC 94. MC 92. MC 112. Learning Objective 4 MC 100. MC 105. MC 101. MC 106. MC 102. MC 107. MC 103. MC 108. MC 104. MC 109. Learning Objective 5 MC 52. MC 110. Learning Objective 6 E 130. P Learning Objective 7 Type Item Type Item Type MC MC 70. 71. MC MC MC MC MC MC MC MC 83. 84. 85. 111. 120. 121. MC MC MC MC E E MC MC MC 113. 114. 122. MC MC E 129. 130. 131. P P P MC MC MC MC MC 115. 116. 117. 118. 123. MC MC MC MC E 124. 125. 126. E E E 130. P MC 19. 20. TF TF 60. S 55. 56. MC MC P 57. 58. Learning Objective 8 MC 59. MC 122. MC 119. MC 129. Learning Objective 9* MC Learning Objective 10* 61. MC 62. MC 63. MC 64. MC 127. E 132. Learning Objective 11* P 133. P Learning Objective 12* MC E P 17 - 6 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition SUMMARY OF LEARNING OBJECTIVES BY QUESTIONS (cont.) Learning Objective 13* 65. MC 128. E Learning Objective 14* 66. 67. Note: MC MC 68. MC 69. TF = True-False MC = Multiple Choice Learning Objective 15* MC E = Exercise P = Problem TRUE-FALSEConceptual 1. Debt securities include corporate bonds and convertible debt, but not U.S. government securities. 2. Trading securities are securities bought and held primarily for sale in the near term to generate income on short-term price differences. 3. Unrealized holding gains and losses are recognized in net income for available-for-sale debt securities. 4. A company can classify a debt security as held-to-maturity if it has the positive intent to hold the securities to maturity. 5. Companies do not report changes in the fair value of available-for-sale debt securities as income until the security is sold. 6. The Fair Value Adjustment account has a normal credit balance. 7. Companies report trading securities at fair value, with unrealized holding gains and losses reported in net income. 8. Equity security holdings between 20 and 50 percent indicates that the investor has a controlling interest over the investee. 9. The Unrealized Holding Gain/LossEquity account is reported as a part of other comprehensive income. 10. Significant influence over an investee may be indicated by material intercompany transactions and interchange of managerial personnel. 11. The accounting profession has concluded that an investment of more than 50 percent of the voting stock of an investee should lead to a presumption of significant influence over an investee. Investments 17 - 7 12. All dividends received by an investor from the investee decrease the investments carrying value under the equity method. 13. Under the fair value method, the investor reports as revenue its share of the net income reported by the investee. 14. A controlling interest occurs when one corporation acquires a voting interest of more than 50 percent in another corporation. 15. Companies may not use the fair value option for investments that follow the equity method of accounting. 16. Changes in the fair value of a company's debt instruments are included as part of earnings in any given period. 17. If a decline in a securitys value is judged to be temporary, a company needs to write down the cost basis of the individual security to a new cost basis. 18. A reclassification adjustment is necessary when a company reports realized gains/losses as part of net income but also shows unrealized gains/losses as part of other comprehensive income. 19. If a company transfers held-to-maturity securities to available-for-sale securities, the unrealized gain or loss is recognized in income. 20. The transfer of securities from trading to available-for-sale and from available-for-sale to trading has the same impact on stockholders equity and net income. True-False AnswersConceptual Item 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Register to View AnswerT F F T Item 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Register to View AnswerT F T T Item 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Register to View AnswerT F T F Item 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Register to View AnswerF T F T MULTIPLE CHOICEConceptual 21. Which of the following is not a debt security? a. Convertible bonds b. Commercial paper c. Loans receivable d. All of these are debt securities. 22. A correct valuation is a. available-for-sale at amortized cost. b. held-to-maturity at amortized cost. c. held-to-maturity at fair value. d. none of these. 17 - 8 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 23. Securities which could be classified as held-to-maturity are a. redeemable preferred stock. b. warrants. c. municipal bonds. d. treasury stock. 24. Unrealized holding gains or losses which are recognized in income are from securities classified as a. held-to-maturity. b. available-for-sale. c. trading. d. none of these. P 25. When an investor's accounting period ends on a date that does not coincide with an interest receipt date for bonds held as an investment, the investor must a. make an adjusting entry to debit Interest Receivable and to credit Interest Revenue for the amount of interest accrued since the last interest receipt date. b. notify the issuer and request that a special payment be made for the appropriate portion of the interest period. c. make an adjusting entry to debit Interest Receivable and to credit Interest Revenue for the total amount of interest to be received at the next interest receipt date. d. do nothing special and ignore the fact that the accounting period does not coincide with the bond's interest period. S 26. Debt securities that are accounted for at amortized cost, not fair value, are a. held-to-maturity debt securities. b. trading debt securities. c. available-for-sale debt securities. d. never-sell debt securities. S 27. Debt securities acquired by a corporation which are accounted for by recognizing unrealized holding gains or losses and are included as other comprehensive income and as a separate component of stockholders' equity are a. held-to-maturity debt securities. b. trading debt securities. c. available-for-sale debt securities. d. never-sell debt securities. S 28. Use of the effective-interest method in amortizing bond premiums and discounts results in a. a greater amount of interest income over the life of the bond issue than would result from use of the straight-line method. b. a varying amount being recorded as interest income from period to period. c. a variable rate of return on the book value of the investment. d. a smaller amount of interest income over the life of the bond issue than would result from use of the straight-line method. S 29. Equity securities acquired by a corporation which are accounted for by recognizing unrealized holding gains or losses as other comprehensive income and as a separate component of stockholders' equity are a. available-for-sale securities where a company has holdings of less than 20%. b. trading securities where a company has holdings of less than 20%. c securities where a company has holdings of between 20% and 50%. d. securities where a company has holdings of more than 50%. Investments 17 - 9 30. A requirement for a security to be classified as held-to-maturity is a. ability to hold the security to maturity. b. positive intent. c. the security must be a debt security. d. All of these are required. 31. Held-to-maturity securities are reported at a. acquisition cost. b. acquisition cost plus amortization of a discount. c. acquisition cost plus amortization of a premium. d. fair value. 32. Watt Co. purchased $300,000 of bonds for $315,000. If Watt intends to hold the securities to maturity, the entry to record the investment includes a. a debit to Held-to-Maturity Securities at $300,000. b. a credit to Premium on Investments of $15,000. c. a debit to Held-to-Maturity Securities at $315,000. d. none of these. 33. Which of the following is not correct in regard to trading securities? a. They are held with the intention of selling them in a short period of time. b. Unrealized holding gains and losses are reported as part of net income. c. Any discount or premium is not amortized. d. All of these are correct. 34. In accounting for investments in debt securities that are classified as trading securities, a. a discount is reported separately. b. a premium is reported separately. c. any discount or premium is not amortized. d. none of these. 35. Investments in debt securities are generally recorded at a. cost including accrued interest. b. maturity value. c. cost including brokerage and other fees. d. maturity value with a separate discount or premium account. 36. Jordan Co. purchased ten-year, 10% bonds that pay interest semiannually. The bonds are sold to yield 8%. One step in calculating the issue price of the bonds is to multiply the principal by the table value for a. 10 periods and 10% from the present value of 1 table. b. 10 periods and 8% from the present value of 1 table. c. 20 periods and 5% from the present value of 1 table. d. 20 periods and 4% from the present value of 1 table. 37. Investments in debt securities should be recorded on the date of acquisition at a. lower of cost or market. b. market value. c. market value plus brokerage fees and other costs incident to the purchase. d. face value plus brokerage fees and other costs incident to the purchase. 17 - 10 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 38. An available-for-sale debt security is purchased at a discount. The entry to record the amortization of the discount includes a a. debit to Available-for-Sale Securities. b. debit to the discount account. c. debit to Interest Revenue. d. none of these. 39. APB Opinion No. 21 specifies that, regarding the amortization of a premium or discount on a debt security, the a. effective-interest method of allocation must be used. b. straight-line method of allocation must be used. c. effective-interest method of allocation should be used but other methods can be applied if there is no material difference in the results obtained. d. par value method must be used and therefore no allocation is necessary. 40. Which of the following is correct about the effective-interest method of amortization? a. The effective interest method applied to investments in debt securities is different from that applied to bonds payable. b. Amortization of a discount decreases from period to period. c. Amortization of a premium decreases from period to period. d. The effective-interest method produces a constant rate of return on the book value of the investment from period to period. 41. When investments in debt securities are purchased between interest payment dates, preferably the a. securities account should include accrued interest. b. accrued interest is debited to Interest Expense. c. accrued interest is debited to Interest Revenue. d. accrued interest is debited to Interest Receivable. 42. Which of the following is not generally correct about recording a sale of a debt security before maturity date? a. Accrued interest will be received by the seller even though it is not an interest payment date. b. An entry must be made to amortize a discount to the date of sale. c. The entry to amortize a premium to the date of sale includes a credit to the Premium on Investments in Debt Securities. d. A gain or loss on the sale is not extraordinary. S 43. When a company has acquired a "passive interest" in another corporation, the acquiring company should account for the investment a. by using the equity method. b. by using the fair value method. c. by using the effective interest method. d. by consolidation. Investments 17 - 11 S 44. Santo Corporation declares and distributes a cash dividend that is a result of current earnings. How will the receipt of those dividends affect the investment account of the investor under each of the following accounting methods? a. b. c. d. Fair Value Method No Effect Increase No Effect Decrease Equity Method Decrease Decrease No Effect No Effect P 45. An investor has a long-term investment in stocks. Regular cash dividends received by the investor are recorded as Fair Value Method a. Income b. A reduction of the investment c. Income d. A reduction of the investment Equity Method Income A reduction of the investment A reduction of the investment Income 46. When a company holds between 20% and 50% of the outstanding stock of an investee, which of the following statements applies? a. The investor should always use the equity method to account for its investment. b. The investor should use the equity method to account for its investment unless circumstances indicate that it is unable to exercise "significant influence" over the investee. c. The investor must use the fair value method unless it can clearly demonstrate the ability to exercise "significant influence" over the investee. d. The investor should always use the fair value method to account for its investment. 47. If the parent company owns 90% of the subsidiary company's outstanding common stock, the company should generally account for the income of the subsidiary under the a. cost method. b. fair value method. c. divesture method. d. equity method. 48. Koehn Corporation accounts for its investment in the common stock of Sells Company under the equity method. Koehn Corporation should ordinarily record a cash dividend received from Sells as a. a reduction of the carrying value of the investment. b. additional paid-in capital. c. an addition to the carrying value of the investment. d. dividend income. 49. Under the equity method of accounting for investments, an investor recognizes its share of the earnings in the period in which the a. investor sells the investment. b. investee declares a dividend. c. investee pays a dividend. d. earnings are reported by the investee in its financial statements. 17 - 12 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 50. Judd, Inc., owns 35% of Cosby Corporation. During the calendar year 2012, Cosby had net earnings of $300,000 and paid dividends of $30,000. Judd mistakenly recorded these transactions using the fair value method rather than the equity method of accounting. What effect would this have on the investment account, net income, and retained earnings, respectively? a. Understate, overstate, overstate b. Overstate, understate, understate c. Overstate, overstate, overstate d. Understate, understate, understate 51. Dublin Co. holds a 30% stake in Club Co. which was purchased in 2013 at a cost of $3,000,000. After applying the equity method, the Investment in Club Co. account has a balance of $3,040,000. At December 31, 2013 the fair value of the investment is $3,120,000. Which of the following values is acceptable for Dublin to use in its balance sheet at December 31, 2013? I. $3,000,000 II. $3,040,000 III. $3,120,000 a. I, II, or III. b. I or II only. c. II only. d. II or III only. 52. The fair value option allows a company to a. value its own liabilities at fair value. b. record income when the fair value of its bonds increases. c. report most financial instruments at fair value by recording gains and losses as a separate component of stockholders equity. d. All of the above are true of the fair value option. 53. Impairments are a. based on discounted cash flows for securities. b. recognized as a realized loss if the impairment is judged to be temporary. c. based on fair value for available-for-sale investments and on negotiated values for held-to-maturity investments. d. evaluated at each reporting date for every investment. 54. A reclassification adjustment is reported in the a. income statement as an Other revenue or expense. b. stockholders equity section of the balance sheet. c. statement of comprehensive income as other comprehensive income. d. statement of stockholders equity. 55. When an investment in a held-to-maturity security is transferred to an available-for-sale security, the carrying value assigned to the available-for-sale security should be a. its original cost. b. its fair value at the date of the transfer. c. the lower of its original cost or its fair value at the date of the transfer. d. the higher of its original cost or its fair value at the date of the transfer. Investments 17 - 13 56. When an investment in an available-for-sale security is transferred to trading because the company anticipates selling the stock in the near future, the carrying value assigned to the investment upon entering it in the trading portfolio should be a. its original cost. b. its fair value at the date of the transfer. c. the higher of its original cost or its fair value at the date of the transfer. d. the lower of its original cost or its fair value at the date of the transfer. 57. A debt security is transferred from one category to another. Generally acceptable accounting principles require that for this particular reclassification (1) the security be transferred at fair value at the date of transfer, and (2) the unrealized gain or loss at the date of transfer currently carried as a separate component of stockholders' equity be amortized over the remaining life of the security. What type of transfer is being described? a. Transfer from trading to available-for-sale b. Transfer from available-for-sale to trading c. Transfer from held-to-maturity to available-for-sale d. Transfer from available-for-sale to held-to-maturity 58. Gains trading or cherry picking involves a. moving securities whose value has decreased since acquisition from available-for-sale to held-to-maturity in order to avoid reporting losses. b. reporting investment securities at fair value but liabilities at amortized cost. c. selling securities whose value has increased since acquisition while holding those whose value has decreased since acquisition. d. All of the above are considered methods of gains trading or cherry picking. 59. Transfers between categories a. result in companies omitting recognition of fair value in the year of the transfer. b. are accounted for at fair value for all transfers. c. are considered unrealized and unrecognized if transferred out of held-to-maturity into trading. d. will always result in an impact on net income. *60. Companies that attempt to exploit inefficiencies in various derivative markets by attempting to lock in profits by simultaneously entering into transactions in two or more markets are called a. arbitrageurs. b. gamblers. c. hedgers. d. speculators. *61. All of the following statements regarding accounting for derivatives are correct except that a. they should be recognized in the financial statements as assets and liabilities. b. they should be reported at fair value. c. gains and losses resulting from speculation should be deferred. d. gains and losses resulting from hedge transactions are reported in different ways, depending upon the type of hedge. P 17 - 14 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition *62. All of the following are characteristics of a derivative financial instrument except the instrument a. has one or more underlyings and an identified payment provision. b. requires a large investment at the inception of the contract. c. requires or permits net settlement. d. All of these are characteristics. *63. Which of the following are considered equity securities? I. Convertible debt. II. Redeemable preferred stock. III. Call or put options. a. I and II only. b. I and III only. c. II only. d. III only. *64. The accounting for fair value hedges records the derivative at its a. amortized cost. b. carrying value. c. fair value. d. historical cost. *65. Gains or losses on cash flow hedges are a. ignored completely. b. recorded in equity, as part of other comprehensive income. c. reported directly in net income. d. reported directly in retained earnings. *66. An option to convert a convertible bond into shares of common stock is a(n) a. embedded derivative. b. host security. c. hybrid security. d. fair value hedge. *67. All of the following are requirements for disclosures related to financial instruments except a. disclosing the fair value and related carrying value of the instruments. b. distinguishing between financial instruments held or issued for purposes other than trading. c. combining or netting the fair value of separate financial instruments. d. displaying as a separate classification of other comprehensive income the net gain/loss on derivative instruments designated in cash flow hedges. *68. A variable-interest entity has a. insufficient equity investment at risk. b. stockholders who have decision-making rights. c. stockholders who absorb the losses or receive the benefits of a normal stockholder. d. All of the above are characteristics of a variable-interest entity. Investments *69. 17 - 15 Under U.S. GAAP, which of the following models may be used to determine if an investment is consolidated? Risk-and-reward model Voting-interest approach a. Yes No b. No Yes c. No No d. Yes Yes Multiple Choice AnswersConceptual Item 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. Register to View Answerb c c a a c Item 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. Register to View Answera d b c d c Item 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. Register to View Answerd c a c d c Item 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. Register to View Answerb a c b d a Item 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. Ans. Item Ans. Item Register to View Answerd d a d c b 56. 57. 58. 59. *60. *61. *62. b d c b a c b *63. *64. *65. *66. *67. *68. *69. d c b a c a d MULTIPLE CHOICEComputational 70. On August 1, 2012, Dambro Co. acquired 400, $1,000, 9% bonds at 97 plus accrued interest. The bonds were dated May 1, 2012, and mature on April 30, 2018, with interest paid each October 31 and April 30. The bonds will be added to Dambros available-forsale portfolio. The preferred entry to record the purchase of the bonds on August 1, 2012 is a. Debt Investments ................................................................. 397,000 Cash ......................................................................... 397,000 b. Debt Investments ................................................................. Interest Receivable............................................................... Cash ......................................................................... 388,000 9,000 c. Debt Investments ................................................................. Interest Revenue .................................................................. Cash ......................................................................... 388,000 9,000 d. Debt Investments ................................................................. Interest Revenue .................................................................. Discount on Debt Investments.................................. Cash ........................................................................ 400,000 9,000 397,000 397,000 12,000 397,000 71. Kern Company purchased bonds with a face amount of $600,000 between interest payment dates. Kern purchased the bonds at 102, paid brokerage costs of $9,000, and paid accrued interest for three months of $15,000. The amount to record as the cost of this long-term debt investment is a. $636,000. b. $621,000. c. $612,000. d. $600,000. 17 - 16 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition Use the following information for questions 72 and 73. Patton Company purchased $600,000 of 10% bonds of Scott Co. on January 1, 2013, paying $564,150. The bonds mature January 1, 2023; interest is payable each July 1 and January 1. The discount of $35,850 provides an effective yield of 11%. Patton Company uses the effectiveinterest method and plans to hold these bonds to maturity. 72. On July 1, 2013, Patton Company should increase its Debt Investments account for the Scott Co. bonds by a. $3,588. b. $2,056. c. $1,794. d. $1,028. 73. For the year ended December 31, 2013, Patton Company should report interest revenue from the Scott Co. bonds of: a. $63,588. b. $62,113. c. $62,052. d. $60,000. Use the following information for questions 74 and 75. Landis Co. purchased $1,000,000 of 8%, 5-year bonds from Ritter, Inc. on January 1, 2012, with interest payable on July 1 and January 1. The bonds sold for $1,041,580 at an effective interest rate of 7%. Using the effective-interest method, Landis Co. decreased the available-for-sale Debt Investments account for the Ritter, Inc. bonds on July 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012 by the amortized premiums of $3,540 and $3,660, respectively. 74. At December 31, 2012, the fair value of the Ritter, Inc. bonds was $1,060,000. What should Landis Co. report as other comprehensive income and as a separate component of stockholders' equity? a. $25,620. b. $18,420. c. $7,200. d. No entry should be made. 75. At April 1, 2013, Landis Co. sold the Ritter bonds for $1,030,000. After accruing for interest, the carrying value of the Ritter bonds on April 1, 2013 was $1,033,750. Assuming Landis Co. has a portfolio of available-for-sale Debt Investments, what should Landis Co. report as a gain or loss on the bonds? a. ($29,370). b. ($21,870). c. ($3,750). d. $ 0. Investments 76. 17 - 17 On August 1, 2012, Fowler Company acquired $600,000 face value 10% bonds of Kasnic Corporation at 104 plus accrued interest. The bonds were dated May 1, 2012, and mature on April 30, 2017, with interest payable each October 31 and April 30. The bonds will be held to maturity. What entry should Fowler make to record the purchase of the bonds on August 1, 2012? a. Debt Investments ................................................................. 624,000 Interest Revenue .................................................................. 15,000 Cash ......................................................................... 639,000 b. Debt Investments ................................................................. Cash ......................................................................... 639,000 c. Debt Investments ................................................................. Interest Revenue ...................................................... Cash ......................................................................... 639,000 d. Debt Investments ................................................................. Premium on Bonds............................................................... Cash ......................................................................... 600,000 39,000 639,000 15,000 624,000 639,000 77. On October 1, 2012, Renfro Co. purchased to hold to maturity, 2,000, $1,000, 9% bonds for $1,980,000 which includes $30,000 accrued interest. The bonds, which mature on February 1, 2021, pay interest semiannually on February 1 and August 1. Renfro uses the straight-line method of amortization. The bonds should be reported in the December 31, 2012 balance sheet at a carrying value of a. $1,950,000. b. $1,951,500. c. $1,980,000. d. $1,980,500. 78. On November 1, 2012, Howell Company purchased 900 of the $1,000 face value, 9% bonds of Ramsey, Incorporated, for $948,000, which includes accrued interest of $13,500. The bonds, which mature on January 1, 2017, pay interest semiannually on March 1 and September 1. Assuming that Howell uses the straight-line method of amortization and that the bonds are appropriately classified as available-for-sale, the net carrying value of the bonds should be shown on Howell's December 31, 2012, balance sheet at a. $900,000. b. $934,500. c. $933,120. d. $948,000. 79. On November 1, 2012, Horton Co. purchased Lopez, Inc., 10-year, 9%, bonds with a face value of $500,000, for $450,000. An additional $15,000 was paid for the accrued interest. Interest is payable semiannually on January 1 and July 1. The bonds mature on July 1, 2019. Horton uses the straight-line method of amortization. Ignoring income taxes, the amount reported in Horton's 2012 income statement as a result of Horton's available-forsale investment in Lopez was a. $8,750. b. $8,333. c. $7,500. d. $6,666. 17 - 18 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 80. On October 1, 2012, Menke Co. purchased to hold to maturity, 500, $1,000, 9% bonds for $520,000. An additional $15,000 was paid for accrued interest. Interest is paid semiannually on December 1 and June 1 and the bonds mature on December 1, 2016. Menke uses straight-line amortization. Ignoring income taxes, the amount reported in Menke's 2012 income statement from this investment should be a. $11,250. b. $10,050. c. $12,450. d. $13,650. 81. During 2010, Hauke Co. purchased 3,000, $1,000, 9% bonds. The carrying value of the bonds at December 31, 2012 was $2,940,000. The bonds mature on March 1, 2017, and pay interest on March 1 and September 1. Hauke sells 1,500 bonds on September 1, 2014, for $1,482,000, after the interest has been received. Hauke uses straight-line amortization. The gain on the sale is a. $0. b. $7,200. c. $12,000. d. $16,800. Use the following information for 82 and 83. On January 3, 2012, Moss Co. acquires $400,000 of Adam Companys 10-year, 10% bonds at a price of $425,672 to yield 9%. Interest is payable each December 31. The bonds are classified as held-to-maturity. 82. Assuming that Moss Co. uses the effective-interest method, what is the amount of interest revenue that would be recognized in 2013 related to these bonds? a. $40,000 b. $42,568 c. $38,312 d. $38,160 83. Assuming that Moss Co. uses the straight-line method, what is the amount of premium amortization that would be recognized in 2014 related to these bonds? a. $2,568 b. $1,688 c. $1,840 d. $2,008 Questions 84 and 85 are based on the following information: Richman Co. purchased $600,000 of 8%, 5-year bonds from Carlin, Inc. on January 1, 2012, with interest payable on July 1 and January 1. The bonds sold for $624,948 at an effective interest rate of 7%. Using the effective interest method, Richman Co. decreased the available-for-sale Debt Investments account for the Carlin, Inc. bonds on July 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012 by the amortized premiums of $2,124 and $2,196, respectively. Investments 17 - 19 84. At December 31, 2012, the fair value of the Carlin, Inc. bonds was $636,000. What should Richman Co. report as other comprehensive income and as a separate component of stockholders equity? a. $0 b. $4,320 c. $11,052 d. $15,372 85. At February 1, 2013, Richman Co. sold the Carlin bonds for $618,000. After accruing for interest, the carrying value of the Carlin bonds on February 1, 2013 was $620,250. Assuming Richman Co. has a portfolio of available-for-sale debt investments, what should Richman Co. report as a gain (or loss) on the bonds? a. $0. b. ($2,250). c. ($13,122). d. ($17,622). 86. During 2012 Logic Company purchased 6,000 shares of Midi, Inc. for $30 per share. The investment was classified as a trading security. During the year Logic Company sold 1,500 shares of Midi, Inc. for $35 per share. At December 31, 2012 the market price of Midi, Inc.s stock was $28 per share. What is the total amount of gain/(loss) that Logic Company will report in its income statement for the year ended December 31, 2012 related to its investment in Midi, Inc. stock? a. ($12,000) b. $7,500 c. ($4,500) d. ($1,500) Use the following information for questions 87 and 88. Instrument Corp. has the following investments which were held throughout 20122013: Fair Value Cost 12/31/12 12/31/13 Trading $450,000 $600,000 $570,000 Available-for-sale 450,000 480,000 540,000 87. What amount of gain or loss would Instrument Corp. report in its income statement for the year ended December 31, 2013 related to its investments? a. $30,000 gain. b. $30,000 loss. c. $210,000 gain. d. $120,000 gain. 88. What amount would be reported as accumulated other comprehensive income related to investments in Instrument Corp.s balance sheet at December 31, 2012? a. $60,000 gain. b. $90,000 gain. c. $30,000 gain. d. $180,000 gain. 17 - 20 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 89. At December 31, 2013, Atlanta Co. has a stock portfolio valued at $120,000. Its cost was $99,000. If the Securities Fair Value Adjustment (Available-for-Sale) has a debit balance of $6,000, which of the following journal entries is required at December 31, 2013? a. Fair Value Adjustment (available-for-sale) Unrealized Holding Gain or Loss-Equity b. Fair Value Adjustment (available-for-sale) Unrealized Holding Gain or Loss-Equity c. Unrealized Holding Gain or Loss-Equity Fair Value Adjustment (available-for-sale) d. Unrealized Holding Gain or Loss-Equity Fair Value Adjustment (available-for-sale) 90. 21,000 21,000 15,000 15,000 21,000 21,000 15,000 15,000 Kramer Company's trading securities portfolio which is appropriately included in current assets is as follows: December 31, 2012 Fair Unrealized Cost Value Gain (Loss) Catlett Corp. $250,000 $205,000 $(45,000) Lyman, Inc. 245,000 265,000 20,000 $495,000 $470,000 $(25,000) Ignoring income taxes, what amount should be reported as a charge against income in Kramer's 2012 income statement if 2012 is Kramer's first year of operation? a. $0. b. $20,000. c. $25,000. d. $45,000. 91. On its December 31, 2012, balance sheet, Trump Co. reported its investment in availablefor-sale securities, which had cost $600,000, at fair value of $550,000. At December 31, 2013, the fair value of the securities was $585,000. What should Trump report on its 2013 income statement as a result of the increase in fair value of the investments in 2013? a. $0. b. Unrealized loss of $15,000. c. Realized gain of $35,000. d. Unrealized gain of $35,000. 92. During 2012, Woods Company purchased 40,000 shares of Holmes Corp. common stock for $630,000 as an available-for-sale investment. The fair value of these shares was $600,000 at December 31, 2012. Woods sold all of the Holmes stock for $17 per share on December 3, 2013, $28,000 incurring in brokerage commissions. Woods Company should report a realized gain on the sale of stock in 2013 of a. $22,000. b. $50,000. c. $52,000. d. $80,000. Investments 17 - 21 Use the following information for questions 93 and 94. On its December 31, 2012 balance sheet, Calhoun Company appropriately reported a $10,000 debit balance in its Fair Value Adjustment (available-for-sale) account. There was no change during 2013 in the composition of Calhouns portfolio of equity investments held as available-forsale securities. The following information pertains to that portfolio: Security X Y Z Cost $125,000 100,000 175,000 $400,000 Fair value at 12/31/13 $160,000 85,000 125,000 $370,000 93. What amount of unrealized loss on these securities should be included in Calhoun's stockholders' equity section of the balance sheet at December 31, 2013? a. $40,000. b. $30,000. c. $10,000. d. $0. 94. The amount of unrealized loss to appear as a component of comprehensive income for the year ending December 31, 2013 is a. $40,000. b. $30,000. c. $10,000. d. $0. 95. On January 2, 2013 Pod Company purchased 25% of the outstanding common stock of Jobs, Inc. and subsequently used the equity method to account for the investment. During 2013 Jobs, Inc. reported net income of $630,000 and distributed dividends of $270,000. The ending balance in the Equity Investments account at December 31, 2013 was $480,000 after applying the equity method during 2013. What was the purchase price Pod Company paid for its investment in Jobs, Inc? a. $255,000 b. $390,000 c. $570,000 d. $705,000 96. Ziegler Corporation purchased 25,000 shares of common stock of the Sherman Corporation for $40 per share on January 2, 2010. Sherman Corporation had 100,000 shares of common stock outstanding during 2013, paid cash dividends of $120,000 during 2013, and reported net income of $400,000 for 2013. Ziegler Corporation should report revenue from investment for 2013 in the amount of a. $30,000. b. $70,000. c. $100,000. d. $110,000. Use the following information for questions 97 and 98. Harrison Co. owns 20,000 of the 50,000 outstanding shares of Taylor, Inc. common stock. During 2013, Taylor earns $1,200,000 and pays cash dividends of $960,000. 17 - 22 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 97. If the beginning balance in the investment account was $750,000, the balance at December 31, 2013 should be a. $1,230,000. b. $990,000. c. $846,000. d. $750,000. 98. Harrison should report investment revenue for 2013 of a. $480,000. b. $384,000. c. $96,000. d. $0. Use the following information for questions 99 through 102. The summarized balance sheets of Goebel Company and Dobbs Company as of December 31, 2012 are as follows: Goebel Company Balance Sheet December 31, 2012 Assets $1,200,000 Liabilities Capital stock Retained earnings Total equities $ 150,000 600,000 450,000 $1,200,000 Dobbs Company Balance Sheet December 31, 2012 Assets $900,000 Liabilities Capital stock Retained earnings Total equities $225,000 555,000 120,000 $900,000 99. If Goebel Company acquired a 20% interest in Dobbs Company on December 31, 2012 for $195,000 and the fair value method of accounting for the investment were used, the amount of the debit to Equity Investments (Dobbs) would have been a. $135,000. b. $111,000. c. $195,000. d. $180,000. 100. If Goebel Company acquired a 30% interest in Dobbs Company on December 31, 2012 for $225,000 and the equity method of accounting for the investment were used, the amount of the debit to Equity Investments (Dobbs) would have been a. $285,000. b. $225,000. c. $180,000. d. $202,500. Investments 17 - 23 101. If Goebel Company acquired a 20% interest in Dobbs Company on December 31, 2011 for $135,000 and during 2013 Dobbs Company had net income of $75,000 and paid a cash dividend of $30,000, applying the fair value method would give a debit balance in the Equity Investments (Dobbs) account at the end of 2013 of a. $111,000. b. $135,000. c. $150,000. d. $144,000. 102. If Goebel Company acquired a 30% interest in Dobbs Company on December 31, 2012 for $210,000 and during 2013 Dobbs Company had net income of $75,000 and paid a cash dividend of $30,000, applying the equity method would give a debit balance in the Equity Investments (Dobbs) account at the end of 2013 of a. $210,000. b. $223,500. c. $232,500. d. $201,000. Use the following information for questions 103 and 104. Blanco Company purchased 200 of the 1,000 outstanding shares of Darby Company's common stock for $600,000 on January 2, 2013. During 2013, Darby Company declared dividends of $100,000 and reported earnings for the year of $400,000. 103. If Blanco Company used the fair value method of accounting for its investment in Darby Company, its Equity Investments (Darby) account on December 31, 2013 should be a. $580,000. b. $660,000. c. $600,000. d. $680,000. 104. If Blanco Company uses the equity method of accounting for its investment in Darby Company, its Equity Investments (Darby) account at December 31, 2013 should be a. $580,000. b. $600,000. c. $660,000. d. $680,000. Use the following information for questions 105 and 106. Brown Corporation earns $600,000 and pays cash dividends of $200,000 during 2012. Dexter Corporation owns 3,000 of the 10,000 outstanding shares of Brown. 105. What amount should Dexter show in the investment account at December 31, 2012 if the beginning of the year balance in the account was $800,000? a. $980,000. b. $800,000. c. $920,000. d. $1,200,000. 17 - 24 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition 106. How much investment revenue should Dexter report in 2012? a. $200,000. b. $180,000. c. $120,000. d. $600,000. 107. Myers Co. acquired a 60% interest in Gannon Corp. on December 31, 2012 for $1,260,000. During 2013, Gannon had net income of $800,000 and paid cash dividends of $200,000. At December 31, 2013, the balance in the investment account should be a. $1,260,000. b. $1,740,000. c. $1,620,000. d. $1,860,000. Use the following information for questions 108 and 109. Tracy Co. owns 4,000 of the 10,000 outstanding shares of Penn Corp. common stock. During 2013, Penn earns $360,000 and pays cash dividends of $120,000. 108. If the beginning balance in the investment account was $720,000, the balance at December 31, 2013 should be a. $720,000. b. $816,000. c. $864,000. d. $960,000. 109. Tracy should report investment revenue for 2013 of a. $48,000. b. $96,000. c. $120,000. d. $144,000. 110. The following information relates to Windom Company for 2013: Realized gain on sale of available-for-sale securities Unrealized holding gains arising during the period on available-for-sale securities Reclassification adjustment for gains included in net income Windoms 2013 other comprehensive income is a. $50,000. b. $80,000. c. $100,000. d. $120,000. $30,000 70,000 20,000 Investments 17 - 25 Multiple Choice AnswersComputational Item 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. Register to View Answerb d b a c Item 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81. Register to View Answerb c a b b Item Ans. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. d a d b d b Item 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. Register to View Answerb c a a b Item 94. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. Ans. Item Ans. Item Register to View Answerb c c a c 100. 101. 102. 103. 104. 105. b b b c c c 106. 107. 108. 109. 110. b c b d b MULTIPLE CHOICECPA Adapted 111. On October 1, 2012, Wenn Co. purchased 800 of the $1,000 face value, 8% bonds of Loy, Inc., for $936,000, including accrued interest of $16,000. The bonds, which mature on January 1, 2019, pay interest semiannually on January 1 and July 1. Wenn used the straight-line method of amortization and appropriately recorded the bonds as available-forsale. On Wenn's December 31, 2013 balance sheet, the carrying value of the bonds is a. $920,000. b. $912,000. c. $908,800. d. $896,000. 112. Valet Corp. began operations in 2013. An analysis of Valets equity securities portfolio acquired in 2013 shows the following totals at December 31, 2013 for trading and available-for-sale securities: Trading Available-for-Sale Securities Securities Aggregate cost $90,000 $110,000 Aggregate fair value 70,000 95,000 What amount should Valet report in its 2013 income statement for unrealized holding loss? a. $35,000. b. $5,000. c. $15,000. d. $20,000. 113. At December 31, 2013, Jeter Corp. had the following equity securities that were purchased during 2013, its first year of operation: Fair Unrealized Cost Value Gain (Loss) Trading Securities: Security A $ 95,000 $ 60,000 $(35,000) B 15,000 20,000 5,000 Totals $110,000 $ 80,000 $(30,000) Available-for-Sale Securities: Security Y Z Totals $ 70,000 85,000 $155,000 $ 80,000 55,000 $135,000 $ 10,000 (30,000) $(20,000) 17 - 26 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition All market declines are considered temporary. Fair value adjustments at December 31, 2013 should be established with a corresponding charge against Income Stockholders Equity a. $50,000 $0 b. $35,000 $30,000 c. $30,000 $20,000 d. $30,000 $0 114. On December 29, 2013, James Co. sold an equity security that had been purchased on January 4, 2012. James owned no other equity securities. An unrealized holding loss was reported in the 2012 income statement. A realized gain was reported in the 2013 income statement. Was the equity security classified as available-for-sale and did its 2012 market price decline exceed its 2013 market price recovery? 2012 Market Price Decline Exceeded 2013 Available-for-Sale Market Price Recovery a. Yes Yes b. Yes No c. No Yes d. No No Use the following information for questions 115 through 117. Rich, Inc. acquired 30% of Doane Corp.'s voting stock on January 1, 2012 for $600,000. During 2012, Doane earned $240,000 and paid dividends of $150,000. Rich's 30% interest in Doane gives Rich the ability to exercise significant influence over Doane's operating and financial policies. During 2013, Doane earned $300,000 and paid dividends of $90,000 on April 1 and $90,000 on October 1. On July 1, 2013, Rich sold half of its stock in Doane for $396,000 cash. 115. Before income taxes, what amount should Rich include in its 2012 income statement as a result of the investment? a. $240,000. b. $150,000. c. $72,000. d. $45,000. 116. The carrying amount of this investment in Rich's December 31, 2012 balance sheet should be a. $600,000. b. $627,000. c. $672,000. d. $690,000. 117. What should be the gain on sale of this investment in Rich's 2013 income statement? a. $96,000. b. $82,500. c. $73,500. d. $60,000. Investments 17 - 27 118. On January 1, 2013, Reston Co. purchased 25% of Ace Corp.'s common stock; no goodwill resulted from the purchase. Reston appropriately carries this investment at equity and the balance in Restons investment account was $960,000 at December 31, 2013. Ace reported net income of $600,000 for the year ended December 31, 2013, and paid common stock dividends totaling $240,000 during 2013. How much did Reston pay for its 25% interest in Ace? a. $870,000. b. $1,020,000. c. $1,050,000. d. $1,170,000. 119. On December 31, 2012, Patel Co. purchased equity investments as trading securities. Pertinent data are as follows: Fair Value Investment Cost At 12/31/13 A $132,000 $117,000 B 168,000 186,000 C 288,000 268,000 On December 31, 2013, Patel transferred its investment in security C from trading to available-for-sale because Patel intends to retain security C as a long-term investment. What total amount of gain or loss on its securities should be included in Patel's income statement for the year ended December 31, 2013? a. $3,000 gain. b. $17,000 loss. c. $20,000 loss. d. $35,000 loss. Multiple Choice AnswersCPA Adapted Item Ans. Item Ans. Item Ans. Item Ans. Item Ans. 111. 112. d d 113. 114. c d 115. 116. c b 117. 118. c a 119. b DERIVATIONS Computational No. Answer Derivation 70. c Dr. Debt Investments: 400 $1,000 .97 = $388,000 Dr. Interest Revenue: $400,000 .045 3/6 = $9,000 Cr. Cash: $388,000 + $9,000 = $397,000. 71. b ($600,000 1.02) + $9,000 = $621,000. 72. d ($564,150 .055) ($600,000 .05) = $1,028. 73. b $564,150 .055 = $31,028 ($564,150 + $1,028) .055 = $31,085; $31,028 + $31,085 = $62,113. 74. a $1,060,000 ($1,041,580 $3,540 $3,660) = $25,620. 75. c $1,033,750 $1,030,000 = $3,750. 17 - 28 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition DERIVATIONS Computational (cont.) No. Answer Derivation 76. a Dr. Debt Investments: $600,000 1.04 = $624,000 Dr. Interest Revenue: $600,000 .05 3/6 = $15,000 Cr. Cash: $624,000 + $15,000 = $639,000. 77. b $1,950,000 + ($50,000 3/100) = $1,951,500. 78. c $948,000 $13,500 = $934,500 $934,500 ($34,500 2/50) = $933,120. 79. a ($500,000 .045) + ($50,000 2/80) $15,000 = $8,750. 80. b ($500,000 .09 3/12) ($20,000 3/50) = $10,050. 81. b Discount amortization: $60,000 8/50 = $9,600 ($2,940,000 + $9,600) 2 = $1,474,800; $1,482,000 $1,474,800 = $7,200 gain. 82. d ($425,672 .09) ($400,000 .10) = ($1,688) ($425,672 $1,688) .09 = $38,160. 83. a ($425,672 $400,000) 10 = $2,568. 84. d $636,000 ($624,948 $2,124 $2,196) = $15,372. 85. b $620,250 $618,000 = $2,250. 86. d [($35 $30) 1,500] [($30 $28) 4,500] = ($1,500). 87. b $600,000 $570,000 = $30,000 loss. 88. c $480,000 $450,000 = $30,000 gain. 89. b ($120,000 $99,000) $6,000 = $15,000 unrealized gain. 90. c $25,000 (unrealized loss). 91. a $0 (available-for-sale securities). 92. a [(40,000 $17) $28,000] $630,000 = $22,000. 93. b ($400,000 $370,000) = $30,000. 94. a $10,000 + $30,000 = $40,000. 95. b X + [($630,000 $270,000) .25] = $480,000 X + $90,000 = $480,000 X = $390,000. 96. c $400,000 (25,000 100,000) = $100,000. Investments DERIVATIONS Computational (cont.) No. Answer Derivation 97. c $750,000 + [($1,200,000 $960,000) (20,000 50,000)] = $846,000. 98. a $1,200,000 (20,000 50,000) = $480,000. 99. c $195,000, acquisition cost. 100. b $225,000, acquisition cost. 101. b $135,000, acquisition cost. 102. b $210,000 + ($75,000 .3) ($30,000 .3) = $223,500. 103. c $600,000, acquisition cost. 104. c $600,000 + ($400,000 .2) ($100,000 .2) = $660,000. 105. c $800,000 + ($600,000 .3) ($200,000 .3) = $920,000. 106. b $600,000 .3 = $180,000. 107. c $1,260,000 + ($800,000 .6) ($200,000 .6) = $1,620,000. 108. b $720,000 + ($360,000 .4) ($120,000 .4) = $816,000. 109. d $360,000 .4 = $144,000. 110. b $30,000 + $70,000 $20,000 = $80,000. DERIVATIONS CPA Adapted No. 111. Answer Derivation d $936,000 $16,000 = $920,000 15 $920,000 $120,000 75 ( ) = $896,000. 112. d $90,000 $70,000 = $20,000. 113. c 114. d Conceptual. 115. c $240,000 30% = $72,000. 116. b $600,000 + $72,000 ($150,000 30%) = $627,000. 17 - 29 17 - 30 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition DERIVATIONS CPA Adapted (cont.) No. Answer Derivation 117. c $627,000 ($90,000 30%) + ($300,000 50% 30%) = $645,000. $396,000 ($645,000 2) = $73,500. 118. a $960,000 ($600,000 25%) + ($240,000 25%) = $870,000. 119. b $18,000 $15,000 $20,000 = $17,000 loss. EXERCISES Ex. 17-120Investment in debt securities at premium. On April 1, 2012, West Co. purchased $320,000 of 6% bonds for $332,600 plus accrued interest as an available-for-sale security. Interest is paid on July 1 and January 1 and the bonds mature on July 1, 2017. Instructions (a) Prepare the journal entry on April 1, 2012. (b) The bonds are sold on November 1, 2013 at 103 plus accrued interest. Amortization was recorded when interest was received by the straight-line method (by months and round to the nearest dollar). Prepare all entries required to properly record the sale. Solution 17-120 (a) Debt Investments ........................................................................... Interest Revenue ($320,000 .06 1/4) ....................................... Cash ................................................................................. 332,600 4,800 (b) Interest Revenue ($12,600 4 63) ............................................. Debt Investments.............................................................. 800 Cash ($320,000 .06 1/3) .......................................................... Interest Revenue .............................................................. 6,400 Cash............................................................................................... Gain on Sale of Investments............................................. Debt Investments ............................................................. $332,600 [($12,600 63) 19] 329,600 337,400 800 6,400 800 328,800 Investments 17 - 31 Ex. 17-121Investment in debt securities at a discount. On May 1, 2012, Kirmer Corp. purchased $600,000 of 12% bonds, interest payable on January 1 and July 1, for $562,600 plus accrued interest. The bonds mature on January 1, 2018. Amortization is recorded when interest is received by the straight-line method (by months and round to the nearest dollar). (Assume bonds are available for sale.) Instructions (a) Prepare the entry for May 1, 2012. (b) The bonds are sold on August 1, 2013 for $565,000 plus accrued interest. Prepare all entries required to properly record the sale. Solution 17-121 (a) 562,600 24,000 Debt Investments ($37,400 68 1)............................................ Interest Revenue ............................................................... 550 Cash ($600,000 .12 1/12) ....................................................... Interest Revenue ............................................................... 6,000 Cash.............................................................................................. Loss on Sale of Investments ......................................................... Debt Investments .............................................................. $562,600 + [($37,400 68) 15] (b) Debt Investments .......................................................................... Interest Revenue ($600,000 .12 4/12) .................................... Cash .................................................................................. 565,000 5,850 586,600 550 6,000 570,850 Ex. 17-122Investments in equity securities. Presented below are unrelated cases involving investments in equity securities. Case I. The fair value of the trading securities at the end of last year was 30% below original cost, and this was properly reflected in the accounts. At the end of the current year, the fair value has increased to 20% above cost. Case II. The fair value of an available-for-sale security has declined to less than forty percent of the original cost. The decline in value is considered to be other than temporary. Case III. An equity security, whose fair value is now less than cost, is classified as trading but is reclassified as available-for-sale. Instructions Indicate the accounting required for each case separately. 17 - 32 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition Solution 17-122 Case I. At the end of last year, the company would have recognized an unrealized holding loss and recorded a Fair Value Adjustment (trading). At the end of the current year, the company would record an unrealized holding gain that would be reported in the other revenue and gains section. The adjustment account would now have a debit balance. Solution 17-122 (cont.) Case II. When the decline in value is considered to be other than temporary, the loss should be recognized as if it were realized and earnings will be reduced. The fair value becomes a new cost basis. Case III. The security is transferred at fair value, which is the new cost basis of the security. The Equity Investments (available-for-sale) account is recorded at fair value, and the Unrealized Holding LossIncome account is debited for the unrealized loss. The Equity Investments (trading) account is credited for cost. Ex. 17-123Investment in equity securities. Agee Corp. acquired a 30% interest in Trent Co. on January 1, 2013, for $500,000. At that time, Trent had 1,000,000 shares of its $1 par common stock issued and outstanding. During 2013, Trent paid cash dividends of $160,000 and thereafter declared and issued a 5% common stock dividend when the fair value was $2 per share. Trent's net income for 2013 was $360,000. What is the balance in Agees equity investments account at the end of 2013? Solution 17-123 Cost Share of net income (.30 $360,000) Share of dividends (.30 $160,000) Balance in equity investments account $500,000 108,000 (48,000) $560,000 Ex. 17-124Fair value and equity methods. (Essay) Compare the fair value and equity methods of accounting for investments in stocks subsequent to acquisition. Solution 17-124 Under the fair value method, investments are originally recorded at cost and are reported at fair value. Dividends are reported as other revenues and gains. Under the equity method, investments are originally recorded at cost. Subsequently, the investment account is adjusted for the investor's share of the investee's net income or loss and this amount is recognized in the income of the investor. Dividends received from the investee are reductions in the investment account. Investments 17 - 33 Ex. 17-125Fair value and equity methods. Fill in the dollar changes caused in the Investment account and Dividend Revenue or Investment Revenue account by each of the following transactions, assuming Crane Company uses (a) the fair value method and (b) the equity method for accounting for its investments in Hudson Company. (a) Fair Value Method (b) Equity Method Investment Dividend Investment Investment Transaction Account Revenue Account Revenue 1. At the beginning of Year 1, Crane bought 40% of Hudson's common stock at its book value. Total book value of all Hudson's common stock was $800,000 on this date. 2. During Year 1, Hudson reported $60,000 of net income and paid $30,000 of dividends. 3. During Year 2, Hudson reported $30,000 of net income and paid $40,000 of dividends. 4. During Year 3, Hudson reported a net loss of $10,000 and paid $5,000 of dividends. 5. Indicate the Year 3 ending balance in the Investment account, and cumulative totals for Years 1, 2, and 3 for dividend revenue and investment revenue. Solution 17-125 Transaction (a) Fair Value Method (b) Equity Method Investment Dividend Investment Investment Account Revenue Account Revenue 1. 320,000 320,000 2. 12,000 24,000 (12,000) 24,000 3. 16,000 12,000 (16,000) 12,000 4. 2,000 (4,000) (2,000) (4,000) 5. 320,000 30,000 322,000 32,000 17 - 34 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition Ex. 17-126Comprehensive income calculation. The following information is available for Irwin Company for 2013: Net Income Realized gain on sale of available-for-sale securities Unrealized holding gain arising during the period on available-for-sale securities Reclassification adjustment for gains included in net income $120,000 10,000 29,000 8,000 Instructions (1) Determine other comprehensive income for 2013. (2) Compute comprehensive income for 2013. Solution 17-126 (1) 2013 other comprehensive income = $31,000 ($10,000 realized gain + $29,000 unrealized holding gain $8,000 reclassification adjustment). (2) 2013 comprehensive income = $151,000 ($120,000 + $31,000). *Ex. 17-127Fair value hedge. On January 2, 2013, Tylor Co. issued a 4-year, $750,000 note at 6% fixed interest, interest payable semiannually. Tylor now wants to change the note to a variable rate note. As a result, on January 2, 2013, Tylor Co. enters into an interest rate swap where it agrees to receive 6% fixed and pay LIBOR of 5.6% for the first 6 months on $750,000. At each 6-month period, the variable interest rate will be reset. The variable rate is reset to 6.6% on June 30, 2013. Instructions (a) Compute the net interest expense to be reported for this note and related swap transaction as of June 30, 2013. (b) Compute the net interest expense to be reported for this note and related swap transaction as of December 31, 2013. *Solution 17-127 (a) and (b) Fixed-rate debt Fixed rate (6% 2) Semiannual debt payment Swap fixed receipt Net income effect Swap variable rate 5.6% $750,000 6.6% $750,000 Net interest expense 6/30/13 $750,000 3% $ 22,500 22,500 $ 0 12/31/13 $750,000 3% $ 22,500 22,500 $ 0 $ 21,000 0 $ 21,000 $ 24,750 $ 24,750 Investments 17 - 35 *Ex. 17-128Cash flow hedge. On January 2, 2012, Sloan Company issued a 5-year, $6,000,000 note at LIBOR with interest paid annually. The variable rate is reset at the end of each year. The LIBOR rate for the first year is 6.8% Sloan Company decides it prefers fixed-rate financing and wants to lock in a rate of 6%. As a result, Sloan enters into an interest rate swap to pay 7% fixed and receive LIBOR based on $8 million. The variable rate is reset to 7.4% on January 2, 2013. Instructions (a) Compute the net interest expense to be reported for this note and related swap transactions as of December 31, 2012. (b) Compute the net interest expense to be reported for this note and related swap transactions as of December 31, 2013. *Solution 17-128 (a) and (b) Variable-rate debt Variable rate Debt payment 12/31/12 $6,000,000 6.8% $ 408,000 12/31/13 $6,000,000 7.4% $ 444,000 Debt payment Swap receive variable Net income effect Swap payablefixed Net interest expense $ 408,000 (408,000) $ 0 420,000 $ 420,000 $ 444,000 (444,000) $ 0 420,000 $ 420,000 PROBLEMS Pr. 17-129Trading equity securities. Korman Company has the following securities in its portfolio of trading securities on December 31, 2012: Fair Value Cost 5,000 shares of Thomas Corp., Common $159,000 $139,000 10,000 shares of Gant, Common 182,000 190,000 $329,000 $341,000 All of the securities had been purchased in 2012. In 2013, Korman completed the following securities transactions: March 1 April 1 Sold 5,000 shares of Thomas Corp., Common @ $31 less fees of $1,500. Bought 600 shares of Werth Stores, Common @ $45 plus fees of $550. 17 - 36 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition Pr. 17-129 (cont.) The Korman Company portfolio of trading securities appeared as follows on December 31, 2013: Cost Fair Value 10,000 shares of Gant, Common $182,000 $195,500 600 shares of Werth Stores, Common 27,550 25,500 $209,550 $221,000 Instructions Prepare the general journal entries for Korman Company for: (a) the 2012 adjusting entry. (b) the sale of the Thomas Corp. stock. (c) the purchase of the Werth Stores' stock. (d) the 2013 adjusting entry. Solution 17-129 (a) (b) (c) (d) 12-31-12 Unrealized Holding Gain or LossIncome .................................. Fair Value Adjustment (trading) ........................................ ($341,000 $329,000) 12,000 12,000 3-1-13 Cash [(5,000 $31) $1,500]...................................................... Loss on Sale of Investments ........................................................ Equity Investments ........................................................... 153,500 5,500 4-1-13 Equity Investments ....................................................................... Cash [(600 $45) + $550]................................................ 27,550 12-31-13 Fair Value Adjustment (trading).................................................... Unrealized Holding Gain or LossIncome....................... 23,450 159,000 27,550 23,450 Pr. 17-130Trading equity securities. Perez Company began operations in 2011. Since then, it has reported the following gains and losses for its investments in trading securities on the income statement: Gains (losses) from sale of trading securities Unrealized holding losses on valuation of trading securities Unrealized holding gain on valuation of trading securities 2011 $ 15,000 (25,000) At January 1, 2014, Perez owned the following trading securities: BKD Common (15,000 shares) LRF Preferred (2,000 shares) Drake Convertible bonds (100 bonds) Cost $450,000 210,000 115,000 2012 $(20,000) 10,000 2013 $ 14,000 (20,000) Investments 17 - 37 Pr. 17-130 (cont.) During 2014, the following events occurred: 1. Sold 5,000 shares of BKD for $170,000. 2. Acquired 1,000 shares of Horton Common for $40 per share. Brokerage commissions totaled $1,000. At 12/31/14, the fair values for Perez's trading securities were: BKD Common, $28 per share LRF Preferred, $110 per share Drake Bonds, $1,020 per bond Horton Common, $45 per share Instructions (a) Prepare a schedule which shows the balance in the Fair Value Adjustment (trading) account at December 31, 2013 (after the adjusting entry for 2013 is made). (b) Prepare a schedule which shows the aggregate cost and fair values for Perez's trading securities portfolio at 12/31/14. (c) Prepare the necessary adjusting entry based upon your analysis in (b) above. Solution 17-130 (a) Balance 12/31/11 (result of that year's adjusting entry) Deduct unrealized gain for 2012 Add: Unrealized loss for 2013 Balance at 12/31/13 (b) Aggregate cost and fair value for trading securities at 12/31/14 BKD Common 10,000 shares LRF Preferred 2,000 shares Horton Common, 1,000 shares Drake Bonds, 100 bonds Total (c) $(25,000) 10,000 (20,000) $(35,000) Cost $300,000 210,000 41,000 115,000 $666,000 Adjusting entry at 12/31/14: Fair Value Adjustment (trading) .................................................... Unrealized Holding Gain or LossIncome ....................... (Balance at 1/1/14 $35,000 Balance needed at 12/31/14 19,000 Recovery $16,000) Fair Value $280,000 220,000 45,000 102,000 $647,000 16,000 16,000 17 - 38 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition Pr. 17-131Available-for-sale equity securities. During the course of your examination of the financial statements of Doppler Corporation for the year ended December 31, 2013, you found a new account, "Investments." Your examination revealed that during 2013, Doppler began a program of investments, and all investment-related transactions were entered in this account. Your analysis of this account for 2013 follows: Doppler Corporation Analysis of Investments For the Year Ended December 31, 2013 Date2013 Debit Credit (a) Harmon Company Common Stock Feb. 14 Purchased 4,000 shares @ $55 per share. $220,000 July 26 Received 400 shares of Harmon Company common stock as a stock dividend. (Memorandum entry in general ledger.) Sept. 28 Sold the 400 shares of Harmon Company common stock received July 26 @ $65 per share. $26,000 (b) Debit Apr. Oct. Taber Inc., Common Stock 30 Purchased 20,000 shares @ $40 per share. 28 Received dividend of $1.20 per share. Credit $800,000 $24,000 Additional information: 1. The fair value for each security as of the 2013 date of each transaction follow: Security Feb. 14 Apr. 30 July 26 Sept. 28 Harmon Co. $55 $62 $70 Taber Inc. $40 Doppler Corp. 25 28 30 33 Dec. 31 $74 33 35 2. All of the investments of Doppler are nominal in respect to percentage of ownership (5% or less). 3. Each investment is considered by Dopplers management to be available-for-sale. Instructions (1) Prepare any necessary correcting journal entries related to investments (a) and (b). (2) Prepare the entry, if necessary, to record the proper valuation of the available-for-sale equity security portfolio as of December 31, 2013. Solution 17-131 (1) (a) Harmon original purchase stock dividend total holding 4,000 shares 400 shares 4,400 shares Total cost of $220,000 Total shares of 4,400 = $50 cost per share Investments 17 - 39 Solution 17-131 (cont.) Sold 100 shares Correct entry: Cash (400 $65) ....................................................................... Equity Investments ......................................................... Gain on Sale of Investments .......................................... 26,000 Entry made: Cash........................................................................................... Equity Investments ......................................................... 26,000 Correction: Equity Investments..................................................................... Gain on Sale of Investments .......................................... 6,000 20,000 6,000 26,000 6,000 (b) Tabershould record cash dividend as dividend income. Correct entry: Cash........................................................................................... Dividend Revenue .......................................................... 24,000 Entry made: Cash........................................................................................... Equity Investments ......................................................... 24,000 Correction: Equity Investments..................................................................... Dividend Revenue .......................................................... (To properly record dividends under fair value method) 24,000 24,000 24,000 24,000 (2) Valuation at End of Year: Harmon Taber Quantity 4,000 shares 20,000 shares Cost $ 200,000 800,000 $1,000,000 Increase (Decrease) $ 96,000 (140,000) $( 44,000) Fair Value $296,000 660,000 $956,000 Year-end Adjustment: Unrealized Holding Gain or LossEquity........................................ Fair Value Adjustment (available-for-sale) ........................ 44,000 44,000 17 - 40 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition *Pr. 17-132Derivative financial instrument. Hummel Co. purchased a put option on Olney common shares on July 7, 2012, for $100. The put option is for 200 shares, and the strike price is $30. The option expires on January 31, 2013. The following data are available with respect to the put option: Date September 30, 2012 December 31, 2012 January 31, 2013 Market Price of Olney Shares $32 per share $31 per share $33 per share Time Value of Put Option $55 21 0 Instructions Prepare the journal entries for Hummel Co. for the following dates: (a) July 7, 2012Investment in put option on Olney shares. (b) September 30, 2012 Hummel prepares financial statements. (c) December 31, 2012 Hummel prepares financial statements. (d) January 31, 2013Put option expires. *Solution 17-132 (a) (b) (c) (d) July 7, 2012 Put Option..................................................................................... Cash ................................................................................. 100 September 30, 2012 Unrealized Holding Gain or LossIncome .................................. Put Option ($100 $55) ................................................... 45 December 31, 2012 Unrealized Holding Gain or LossIncome .................................. Put Option ($55 $21) ..................................................... 34 January 31, 2013 Loss on Settlement of Put Option................................................. Put Option ($21 $0) ....................................................... 21 100 45 34 21 *Pr. 17-133Free-standing derivative. Welch Co. purchased a put option on Reese common shares on January 7, 2013, for $215. The put option is for 300 shares, and the strike price is $51. The option expires on July 31, 2013. The following data are available with respect to the put option: Date March 31, 2013 June 30, 2013 July 6, 2013 Market Price of Reese Shares $47 per share $50 per share $46 per share Time Value of Put Option $120 56 16 Investments 17 - 41 *Pr. 17-133 (cont.) Instructions Prepare the journal entries for Welch Co. for the following dates: (a) January 7, 2013Investment in put option on Reese shares. (c) March 31, 2013 Welch prepares financial statements. (d) June 30, 2013 Welch prepares financial statements. (e) July 6, 2013 Welch settles the call option on the Reese shares. *Solution 17-133 (a) (b) January 7, 2013 Put Option ..................................................................................... Cash .................................................................................. 215 March 31, 2013 Put Option ..................................................................................... Unrealized Holding Gain or LossIncome ($4 300)...... 1,200 Unrealized Holding Gain or LossIncome ................................... Put Option ($215 $120) .................................................. (c) June 30, 2013 Unrealized Holding Gain or LossIncome ................................... Put Option ($3 300) ........................................................ Unrealized Holding Gain or LossIncome ................................... Put Option ($120 $56) .................................................... (d) July 6, 2013 Unrealized Holding Gain or LossIncome ................................... Put Option ($56 $16) ...................................................... Cash (300 $5) ............................................................................ Gain on Settlement of Put Option...................................... Put Option* ........................................................................ *Value of Put Option settlement: Put Option 215 1,200 316 95 900 64 40 215 1,200 95 95 900 900 64 64 40 40 1,500 1,184 316 17 - 42 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition IFRS QUESTIONS True/False 1. IFRS requires that gains and losses on non-trading investments be reported directly in equity. 2. Under IFRS, impairment charges related to debt investments may be reversed, but impairment charges related to equity investments may not be reversed. 3. Reclassification in and out of trading securities is permitted under IFRS, although this type of reclassification should be rare. 4. IFRS requires that Company A consolidate Company B when it controls and owns at least 50% of Company B. 5. Under IFRS, both the investor and the associate company should follow the same accounting practices, requiring adjustments be made to the investors books in order to prepare financial information. Answers to True/False 1. True 2. True 3. False 4. True 5. False Multiple Choice 1. Match the approach and location where gains and losses from non-trading investments are reported: Location where gains/ Approach losses reported_ __ a. GAAP Equity b. IFRS Equity c. GAAP Income d. IFRS Comprehensive income Investments 17 - 43 Use the following information for questions 2 and 3 Rushia Company has a non-trading investment in the 10%, 10-year bonds of Pear Co. The investments carrying value is $3,200,000 at December 31, 2012. On January 9, 2013, Rushia learns that Pear Co. has lost its primary manufacturing facility in an uninsured fire. As a result, Rushia determines that the investment is impaired and now has a fair value of $2,300,000. In June, 2014, Pear Co. has succeeded in rebuilding its manufacturing facility, and its prospects have improved as a result. 2. If Rushia Company determines that the fair value of the investment is now $3,900,000 and is using U.S. GAAP for its external financial reporting, which of the following is true? a. Rushia is prohibited from recording the recovery in value of the impaired investment. b. Rushia may record a recovery of $900,000. c. Rushia may record a recovery of $700,000. d. Rushia may record a recovery of $1,600,000. 3. If Rushia Company determines that the fair value of the investment is now $2,900,000 and is using IFRS for its external financial reporting, which of the following is true? a. Rushia is prohibited from recording the recovery in value of the impaired investment. b. Rushia may record a recovery of $600,000. c. Rushia may record a recovery of $900,000. d. Rushia may record a recovery, but is limited to 80% of the value of the recovery. Answers to multiple choice 1. b 2. a 3. b Short Answer: 1. Briefly describe some of the similarities and differences between U.S. GAAP and IFRS with respect to the accounting for investments. 1. The accounting and reporting under IFRS and U.S. GAAP are for the most part very similar, although the criteria used to determine the accounting is often different. For example, among the notable similarities are: (1) the accounting for trading, availablefor-sale, and held-to-maturity securities is essentially the same between IFRS and U.S. GAAP; (2) both IFRS and U.S. GAAP use the same test to determine whether the equity method of accounting should be used that is, significant influence with a general guide of over 20% ownership. IFRS uses the term associate investment rather than equity investment to describe its investment under the equity method; (3) reclassifications of securities from one category to another generally follow the same accounting under the two GAAP systems. Reclassification in and out of trading securities is prohibited under IFRS. It is not prohibited under U.S. GAAP, but this type of reclassification should be rare. 17 - 44 Test Bank for Intermediate Accounting, Fourteenth Edition Differences include: (1) Gains and losses related to available-for-sale securities are reported in other comprehensive income under U.S. GAAP. Under IFRS, these gains and losses are reported directly in equity; (2) under IFRS, both the investor and an associate company should follow the same accounting policies. As a result, in order to prepare financial information, adjustments are made to the associates policies to conform to the investors books; (3) the basis for consolidation under IFRS is control. Under U.S. GAAP, a bipolar approach is used which is a risk-and-reward model (often referred to as a variable-entity approach) and a voting-interest approach. However, under both systems, for consolidation to occur, the investor company must generally own 50% of another company; (4) U.S. GAAP does not permit the reversal of an impairment charge related to available-for-sale debt and equity investments. IFRS follows the same approach for non-trading equity investments but permits reversal for non-trading debt investments and held-for-collection securities. 2. Ramirez Company has an available-for-sale (non-trading) investment in the 6%, 20-year bonds of Soto Company. The investment was originally purchased for $1,200,000 in 2009. Early in 2012, Ramirez recorded an impairment of $200,000 on the Soto investment, due to Sotos financial distress. In 2013, Soto returned to profitability and the Soto investment was no longer impaired. What entry does Ramirez make in 2013 under (a) U.S. GAAP and (b) IFRS? 2. Under U.S. GAAP, Ramirez makes no entry, because impaired investments may not be written up if they recover in value. Under IFRS, Ramirez makes the following entry: Debt Investments 200,000 Recovery of Impairment Loss .. 200,000

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Utah State - ACCT - 3420
CHAPTER 18REVENUE RECOGNITIONIFRS questions are available at the end of this chapter.TRUE-FALSEConceptualAnswerFTTFTFTTFFTFFTFFTTFTNo.Description1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.11.12.13.14.15.16.17.18.19.20.Recognition
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Checkpoint: International Staffing Companies today are becoming aware of how competitive the environment that they work within is. As the markets expand in today's economy, national boundaries disappear. Major multinational corporations are now coming up
University of Phoenix - HCR 210 - 101
CheckPoint: Describing CPT Coding Categories What are CPT codes and why are they important to the medical community? CPT is short for "Current Procedure Terminology" most of the time these code are five digits long and they fall in different categories an
University of Phoenix - HCR 210 - 101
CheckPoint: Comparing Cost Control Strategies Employer-sponsored Medical Insurance The human resource department of employees selects health care benefits along with the health care plan then offers them to the employees. Riders, which are also called opt
DeVry Chicago - MANAGEMENT - 404
MS Project - Lesson #7 - Tracking Project ProgressReview QuestionsName: Answer the following questions: 1) Why is it best not to enter a percentage (%) completion?2) According to your Project Summary, is this project on schedule? Will you be over or un
DeVry Chicago - BUS - 206
Week 1 Aligning Operations Management and Strategy OM strategy changes during a product's life cycle: During the introduction stage, issues such as product design and development are critical, then during the growth stage the emphasis changes to product a
University of Phoenix - ACC - 375
1 Sarbanes-Oxley Act Training Manual Sarbanes-Oxley Act Training Manual ACT 375 Joseph Kronewitter March 7, 20112 Sarbanes-Oxley Act Training Manual Sarbanes-Oxley Act Training Manual The Sarbanes-Oxley Act is a regulation for any public company and must
University of Phoenix - ACC - 375
Fraudulent Schemes Report Fraudulent Schemes Report ACT 375 Joseph Kronewitter March 14, 20111Fraudulent Schemes Report Fraudulent Schemes Report According to the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, organizations loose about five percent of its an
University of Phoenix - ACC - 375
Unethical Behavior Memo ACT 375 Joseph Kronewitter March 14, 2011XYZ Manufacturing Company1320 17th Avenue Honolulu, HI 96816 Phone: (808) 772-6851 E-Mail: bmurobayashi@gmail.commemoTo: From: CC: Date: Re: Management Brandi Murobayashi, Controller Bra
University of Phoenix - ACC - 375
1 Code of Conduct and Ethics Report Code of Conduct and Ethics Report ACT 375 Joseph Kronewitter March 28, 20112 Code of Conduct and Ethics Report Code of Conduct and Ethics Report Introduction Code of Conduct is the set of anticipated behavior that inco
FIU - ECO2013 - 101
Final Exam Study Guide for Macroeconomics (ECO 2013) In preparation for Final Exam and Post-Test, be able to answer the following questions, as well as the questions on the Mid-Term Study Guide, and provide examples. This guide is for your benefit and is
University of Texas - GRG - 301C
September 15, 2011 ATMOSPHERIC AND OCEANIC CIRCULATIONS Local Winds o Do not correspond precisely to atmospheric pressure belts, high/low pressure systems Land-Sea Breezes and Specific Heat of Land vs. Water o Specific Heat Defined as the amount of heat t
University of Texas - UGS - 303
October 4, 2011 Book review: o Orient your reader somehow o Don't have to focus on the entire book Can focus on one specific chapterTHE RISE OF THE AZTECS Valley of Anahuac ("near the water")-Valley of Mexico After the fall of Tula in the 12th century: o
SUNY Buffalo - KJALJS - 212
SteakBeef has a rep as a diet buster, but eating it may help you peel off pounds. In a study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, women on a diet that included red meat lost more weight than those eating equal calories but little beef
SUNY Buffalo - KJALJS - 212
Self Recipies: Guacamole con FrutasServes 4INGREDIENTS 1 avocado (preferably Hass), diced 1/2 tablespoon minced red onion 1 teaspoon minced serrano chile 12 black or red grapes, halved 1/2 cup diced peaches (or mangoes) Pomegranate seeds (optional) PREP
SUNY Buffalo - KJALJS - 212
It is absurd that a man should rule others, who cannot rule himself. (Absurdum est ut alios regat, qui seipsum regere nescit.) Let him who would be moved to convince others, be first moved to convince himself There is only one successto be able to spend y
S.F. State - ACCT - 508
Chapter 9Business-Type (Proprietary) ActivitiesChapter 9Granof-5e1Thought to Ponder: Chapter 9"Nobody wants a landfill sited anywhere nearthem, including in rural areas. We've come to this realization that landfill is valuable and we can't bury thi
S.F. State - ACCT - 508
Chapter 11Issues of Reporting, Disclosure, and Financial AnalysisChapter 11Granof-5e1Learning Objectives Conversion of Fund Statements to Government-wide Why the make-up of a government's or not-for-profit's reporting entity is an issue The criteria
S.F. State - ACCT - 508
Chapter 10 Fiduciary Funds and Permanent FundsTRUE/FALSE (CHAPTER 10) 1. Per GASB Statement No. 34, permanent funds are classified as fiduciary funds. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. In accounting for permanent funds only the income can be spent; the principal must be pr
Bucks Community College - ACCT - 250
Michelle Panzano Accounting 250 - Auditing Chapter 16 Graded Homework Assignment List any deficiencies in the Javlin Corporation report. 1. Wrong date in audit report- should be March 13, 2008 2. No title for report 3. In the first sentence, "examined" sh
UNSW - ACCT - 1511
Week 8 Cash Flow Statement (Indirect Method) (Chapter 13; two readings)Learning objectives Understand the difference between cash and accrual measures of performanceReconcile the difference between net profit and cash from operationsAssumptions for Cas
UNSW - ACCT - 1511
Week 8 Decision Usefulness of Cash Flows (Chapter 13; two readings)Learning objectives Why cash flow information is important? Measuring financial flexibility Cash flow patterns and bankruptcy risk Clarification of Direct Method vs. Indirect MethodWoul
UNSW - ACCT - 1511
Week 9 Financial Statement Analysis (Chapter 14.1-14.9)Learning objectives: What is financial statement analysis (FSA)? Which FSA tools should you choose? Calculate and interpret a variety of ratios Impact of a transaction on ratios Pricing and valuati
UNSW - ACCT - 1511
Week 10 Accounting policy choice (Chapter 15)Learning Objective What is accounting policy choice? Management incentives Why do choices exist? Accounting policy disclosure Things to consider ExamplesAccounting Policy Choice - A decision that is made in
UNSW - ACCT - 1511
Week 11 Costing (Trotman & Gibbins MA Supplement Chapter 17 (pp. 58 88)Learning Objectives: Demonstrate what a budget is and why and how it is used within the organisation. Understand the importance of behavioural considerations in budget design. Descr
UNSW - ACCT - 2542
Week 1 Introduction [Mowen (Ch 1 p. 1-13; Ch10 p. 368-371 & 375-379) & BDMM Chapter 2] Understand the role of management accounting practice in sustaining and creating value within organisations Appreciate how new management accounting techniques have be
UNSW - ACCT - 2542
Week 2 Cost Basics [Mowen Ch 2; 3; 4(p.124-126); LS et al 09 Appendix 3] What are costs? What does `different costs for different purposes' mean? Understand and apply various classification of costs. Understand cost drivers and the role of cost driver ana
UNSW - ACCT - 2542
WEEK 3 MANAGING COSTS I OVERHEA COSTS [Mowen Ch 3 p.34-35; Ch 4 p.107-112 & Ch 7] Explain the nature of overhead costs & other indirect costs Describe the general principles for assigning overhead costs Assign overhead costs to products using different ov
UNSW - ACCT - 2542
WEEK 4 MANAGING COSTS II ACTIVITY BASED ACCOUNTING [Mowen Ch.4]Learning Objectives Discuss the importance of unit costs. Describe functional-based costing (FBC) approach. Explain why functional-based costing approach may produce distorted costs. Explain
UNSW - ACCT - 2542
WEEK 5 STANDARD COSTS AND VARIANCE ANALYSIS [Mowen Ch 9]Learning objectives Explain how standard costing can be used to help control and manage resources Describe and understand how to set standards Understand the difference between ideal and currently a
UNSW - ACCT - 2542
WEEK 6 COSTING AND TACTICAL DECISIONS [Mowen Ch 10 P.386-389; Ch 16 P.642-660]Learning objectives Managing costs Extension of costing to: Life-cycle costing Target costing Tactical Decisions Understand the decision-making process decision Recognise what
UNSW - ACCT - 2542
Week 7 TRANSFER PRICING [Mowen Ch 10: p368-374 Ch 13: p508-513; p523-535.]Learning Objectives Explain the benefits and costs of decentralisation Explain the benefits of transfer pricing systems Understand the differences between the types of responsibi
UNSW - ACCT - 2542
Week 8 Managing Quality [Chapter 11 p.421-437]Learning Objectives 1. Define quality & appreciate its role in creating & maintaining customer value 2. Be able to identify quality issues and apply measurement toolsa) Cost of Quality Report b) Hidden Costs
UNSW - ACCT - 2542
Week 9: Managing Time: The Theory of Constraints [pp.741-2 & 755-61. BDMM Chapter 5. "A Little TOC Goes a Long Way" .Smith, F. MSI August 2003.]Learning Objectives: 1. Understand concept of "time-based management" 2. Understand the Theory of Constraints
LSU - CMST - 2010
Chapter 6: There is a difference between listening and hearing Dynamic transaction process Listening can be learned1) Understanding Listening fidelity: the melding of what the communicator is trying to say and what the listener understands Low fidel