Chapter 37 Behavioral Ecolo
29 Pages

Chapter 37 Behavioral Ecolo

Course Number: SCIN 13O, Fall 2012

College/University: American Public University

Word Count: 6042

Rating:

Document Preview

Chapter 37 Behavioral Ecology Student: ___________________________________________________________________________ 1. Which of the following about mole rats is not true? A. The queen runs the colony B. They spend part of their lives underground C. The queen is the only female who reproduces D. They are extremely social E. They have little hair 2. Mole rats are excellent diggers because they use sticks as tools to...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> West Virginia >> American Public University >> SCIN 13O

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

37 Chapter Behavioral Ecology Student: ___________________________________________________________________________ 1. Which of the following about mole rats is not true? A. The queen runs the colony B. They spend part of their lives underground C. The queen is the only female who reproduces D. They are extremely social E. They have little hair 2. Mole rats are excellent diggers because they use sticks as tools to help them dig their extensive tunnels. True False 3. Mole rats are excellent diggers because: A. They use tools to dig B. They only modify tunnels made by other animals C. They work effectively as a team D. The queen is large and a very powerful digger E. They work with other species in a mutualistic relationship 4. Behavior is any action which can observed or described. True False 5. If you were studying the nest-building behavior of two populations of birds and hybrid birds you would observe that: A. The nest-building behavior was completely random B. All of the birds began building their nests in the most efficient way C. The hybrids showed a behavior intermediate between the behaviors of the parents D. The hybrid was the best at nest building E. No learning at all occurred with this type of behavior 6. The main result of the experiments with two groups of California garter snakes that varied in habitat and food was: A. The behavior was determined by the environment B. The behavior was imprinted by whatever they ate when they hatched C. The behavior was genetic, and the hybrids had an intermediate response to the food extracts D. The behavior was learned; one group learned to like to eat slugs, the other, fish E. The behavior was general; the snake ate anything that moved 7. A biologist is studying the two organ systems that are involved in producing physiological changes leading to appropriate behavior. Based on this information you would conclude that he or she is studying which two systems? A. The nervous and digestive B. Digestive and urinary C. Nervous and reproductive D. Nervous and endocrine E. Reproductive and digestive 8. The discovery of a gene in Aplysia slugs that results in protein products including an egg-laying hormone is evidence that: A. The egg-laying behavior is innate or hardwired into the slugs' brain B. The egg-laying behavior has absolutely no nervous system involvement C. Genes can control endocrine gland secretions that can control behavior D. This slug could avoid being eaten by garter snakes E. Genes only influence physiology and structure but not behavior 9. Which of the following statements is NOT true for inherited behavior? A. Once the fixed action pattern starts, it can be modified by behavior B. The behavior pattern is stereotyped C. It is a fixed action pattern D. All members of a species perform the exact same sequence E. The fixed action pattern is initiated by a sign stimulus 10. If you were studying a durable change in behavior brought about by experience you would be studying which of the following? A. Instinct B. Learning C. Altruism D. Kin selection E. Associative learning 11. The pecking behavior of gull chicks becomes more accurate with time. This is most likely an example of: A. A fixed action pattern B. Innate behavior C. Learning D. Imprinting E. Altruistic behavior 12. Which statement about behavior is NOT true? A. Inborn behavior is usually inherited B. Innate behavior is triggered by stimulus and does not vary C. Fixed action patterns are sometimes subject to modification by learning D. Animals with simple nervous systems tend to respond to a stimulus with inherited behavior E. All patterns of behavior can be explained as fixed action patterns 13. A digger wasp continues to close its nest even though a researcher has removed the nest's contents. This shows that nest-closing behavior in the digger wasp is: A. A learned behavior B. An imprint behavior C. A fixed action pattern D. An insight learning behavior E. A classical conditioned behavior 14. If you were studying a type of learned behavior that causes a family of baby ducks to follow their mother you would be studying which of the following? A. Imprinting B. Operant conditioning C. Insight learning D. Extinction E. Motivation 15. Imprinting and songbird singing are both examples of: A. Altruism B. Innate but not learned behavior C. A type of courtship ritual D. Behavior that requires some learning E. Kin selection 16. The sensitive period is most closely associated with: A. Operant conditioning B. Insight learning C. Imprinting D. Extinction E. Motivation 17. Fifty days after hatching, a white-crowned sparrow will never be able to sing a normal song if reared in isolation. This is an example of: A. A sensitive period for learning B. A sign stimulus C. An innate behavior D. A fixed action pattern E. Habituation 18. Male birds court females of the correct species because they look like their mother. This is an example of: A. An innate behavior B. A learned behavior C. An altruistic act D. Imprinting E. A fixed action pattern 19. If you were studying a change in behavior that involves a link between two events, you would be studying which of the following? A. Imprint learning B. Fixed action learning C. Associative learning D. Sensitive learning E. Altruistic learning 20. Learning that is reinforced by rewards, and a gradual strengthening of stimulus-response connections, is called: A. Imprinting B. Operant conditioning C. Insight learning D. Motivation E. Extinction 21. Which of the following scientists is best associated with classical conditioning? A. Karl von Frisch B. Niko Tinbergen C. Konrad Lorenz D. John Krebs E. Ivan Pavlov 22. This figure shows an example of classical conditioning. What does "A" represent? A. An unconditioned stimulus B. A conditioned stimulus C. A conditioned response D. An imprinted response E. An unconditioned response 23. This figure shows an example of classical conditioning. What does "C" represent? A. An unconditioned stimulus B. A conditioned stimulus C. A conditioned response D. An imprinted response E. An unconditioned response 24. This figure shows an example of classical conditioning. What does "B" represent? A. An unconditioned stimulus B. A conditioned stimulus C. A conditioned response D. An imprinted response E. An unconditioned response 25. This figure shows an example of classical conditioning. What does "D" represent? A. An unconditioned stimulus B. A conditioned stimulus C. A conditioned response D. An imprinted response E. An unconditioned response 26. If you were studying a type of learning which occurs when an animal solves a problem without any prior experience with that problem you would be studying which of the following? A. Conditioned learning B. Imprint learning C. Unconditioned learning D. Insight learning E. Fixed action learning 27. A fixed action pattern occurs when an animal no longer responds to a repeated stimulus. True False 28. Fitness of an animal is best judged by the: A. Strength of an animal B. Health of an animal C. Ability of an animal to survive and reproduce D. Courtship rituals E. Feeding behavior 29. A biologist is studying an adaptive change in males and females that leads to an increased ability to secure a mate. Based on this information you would conclude that he or she is studying which of the following? A. Conditioned selection B. Fixed action selection C. Unconditioned selection D. Reciprocal selection E. Sexual selection 30. Which of the following statements is NOT true about courtship rituals? A. It prepares an animal to copulate B. It helps males and females of the same species to recognize each other C. It has evolved as a way for males to make a choice among females D. Females at times may be responsible for controlling the selection of male attributes E. It is common in many birds and mammals 31. Adaptive behavior has probably been selected by evolutionary processes mainly because it: A. Makes the animal smartest B. Allows the animal to live the longest C. Allows the animal to live in the widest variety of environments D. Allows the animal to produce the largest number of viable offspring E. Allows the animal to become the largest 32. Sexual dimorphism means that the male instead of the female makes the selection with respect to mating. True False 33. ___________ is a system in which animals arrange themselves in a pecking order, where the animal above takes precedence over the one below. A. Imprinting B. Inclusive fitness C. Dominance hierarchy D. Altruism E. Circadian rhythm 34. A biologist is studying what determines dominance ranking in animals. After her research, she has determined that it is mostly established through: A. Age B. Size C. Confrontations D. Parentage E. Intelligence 35. An example of territoriality is: A. Barnacles attached to the bottom of a boat B. A red-winged blackbird singing to ward off other males and attract a female to his nest C. A cloud of moths attracted to a light D. A swarm of mosquitoes hovering around a sweaty person E. A herd of zebras grazing in a field 36. A scientist who is studying the application of the principles of evolutionary biology to the study of the social behavior of animals would be referred to as a: A. Sociobiologist B. Behavioral psychologist C. Neuroendocrinologist D. Zoopsychologist E. Ethologist 37. Which of the following is NOT an advantage to group living? A. Increased predator avoidance B. Help with the rearing of offspring C. Help with finding food D. Competition for mates E. Division of labor 38. If you were studying unselfish acts that help others in a group so that they, and the individual, increase their chances of surviving and reproducing, you would be studying: A. Altruistic behavior B. Selfish behavior C. Natural selection D. Inclusive fitness E. Sexual selection 39. The ability of kin to survive and reproduce is called: A. Altruistic behavior B. Selfish behavior C. Natural selection D. Sexual selection E. Inclusive fitness 40. Direct selection is adaptation to the environment due to the reproductive success of an individual. True False 41. A biologist is studying the adaptation to the environment due to the reproductive success of the individual's relatives. Based on this information you would conclude that he or she is studying which of the following? A. Direct selection B. Selfish selection C. Kin selection D. Reciprocal selection E. Imprint selection 42. Altruistic behavior between closely related animals is selected for because it: A. Reduces fights between species B. Ensures the survival of the altruistic individual C. Increases the frequency of the altruistic individual's genes in the next generation D. Forces the individuals to cooperate with one another E. It only increases the survival of the non-altruistic individual 43. Ants follow a trail to the sugar bowl in your kitchen left by secretions of the tail glands of other ants in the colony. They are doing so because of: A. Chance alone B. A dance done by an ant in the anthill C. A learned response about where the sugar is D. An innate knowledge of where the sugar is E. A pheromone pathway 44. ___________ is defined as the transmission of a signal from one animal to another such that the sender benefits on average from the response of the recipient. A. Imprinting B. Dominance hierarchy C. Circadian rhythm D. Communication E. Operant conditioning 45. If you were studying a very rapid kind of communication that works even at a distance and in the dark you would be studying which of the following? A. Chemical communication B. Auditory communication C. Visual communication D. Tactile communication E. Pheromone communication 46. Which of the following would be used by species active only during the day as a way to identify members of the same species to avoid conflict and can only be used over a relatively short distance? A. Visual communication B. Tactile communication C. Auditory communication D. Chemical communication E. Pheromone communication 47. Which type of communication occurs when one animal touches another? A. Chemical communication B. Visual communication C. Tactile communication D. Auditory communication E. Pheromone communication 48. The waggle dance helps bees: A. Feed their offspring B. Reproduce C. Perfect predator avoidance D. Communicate the location of a food source E. Sound an alarm to protect the hive when invaded 49. Which of the following is the best evidence to suggest that animals other than humans have emotions? A. Mating calls B. Courtship rituals C. Altruistic behavior D. Chemical communication E. Body language Chapter 37 Behavioral Ecology Key 1. Which of the following about mole rats is not true? A. The queen runs the colony B. They spend part of their lives underground C. The queen is the only female who reproduces D. They are extremely social E. They have little hair Undrstand the behavior of naked mole rats Blooms Level: 1. Remember Mader - Chapter 37 #1 Topic: Ecology 2. Mole rats are excellent diggers because they use sticks as tools to help them dig their extensive tunnels. FALSE Understand the behavior of naked mole rats Blooms Level: 1. Remember Mader - Chapter 37 #2 Topic: Ecology 3. Mole rats are excellent diggers because: A. They use tools to dig B. They only modify tunnels made by other animals C. They work effectively as a team D. The queen is large and a very powerful digger E. They work with other species in a mutualistic relationship Understand the behavior of naked mole rats Blooms Level: 1. Remember Mader - Chapter 37 #3 Topic: Ecology 4. Behavior is any action which can observed or described. TRUE Behavior encompasses any action that can be observed and described. Blooms Level: 1. Remember Learning Outcome: 37.01.01 Describe data that suggest behavior is inherited and some that show behavior is inherited. Mader - Chapter 37 #4 Section: 37.01 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 5. If you were studying the nest-building behavior of two populations of birds and hybrid birds you would observe that: A. The nest-building behavior was completely random B. All of the birds began building their nests in the most efficient way C. The hybrids showed a behavior intermediate between the behaviors of the parents D. The hybrid was the best at nest building E. No learning at all occurred with this type of behavior Researchers hypothesized that if the behavior for obtaining and carrying nesting material is inherited, hybrid lovebirds might show intermediate behavior. Blooms Level: 1. Remember Learning Outcome: 37.01.01 Describe data that suggest behavior is inherited and some that show behavior is inherited. Mader - Chapter 37 #5 Section: 37.01 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 6. The main result of the experiments with two groups of California garter snakes that varied in habitat and food was: A. The behavior was determined by the environment B. The behavior was imprinted by whatever they ate when they hatched C. The behavior was genetic, and the hybrids had an intermediate response to the food extracts D. The behavior was learned; one group learned to like to eat slugs, the other, fish E. The behavior was general; the snake ate anything that moved Inland populations were aquatic and commonly fed underwater on frogs and fish. Coastal populations were terrestrial and fed mainly on slugs. In the laboratory, inland adult snakes refused to eat slugs while coastal populations readily did so. Matings between the two populations resulted in offspring with an intermediate incidence of slug acceptance. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.01.01 Describe data that suggest behavior is inherited and some that show behavior is inherited. Mader - Chapter 37 #6 Section: 37.01 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 7. A biologist is studying the two organ systems that are involved in producing physiological changes leading to appropriate behavior. Based on this information you would conclude that he or she is studying which two systems? A. The nervous and digestive B. Digestive and urinary C. Nervous and reproductive D. Nervous and endocrine E. Reproductive and digestive Two organ systems working together involving animal behavior Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.01.01 Describe data that suggest behavior is inherited and some that show behavior is inherited. Mader - Chapter 37 #7 Section: 37.01 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 8. The discovery of a gene in Aplysia slugs that results in protein products including an egg-laying hormone is evidence that: A. The egg-laying behavior is innate or hardwired into the slugs' brain B. The egg-laying behavior has absolutely no nervous system involvement C. Genes can control endocrine gland secretions that can control behavior D. This slug could avoid being eaten by garter snakes E. Genes only influence physiology and structure but not behavior The egg-laying behavior of marine snail involves a sequence of movements which suggests a genetic basis Blooms Level: 3. Apply Learning Outcome: 37.01.01 Describe data that suggest behavior is inherited and some that show behavior is inherited. Mader - Chapter 37 #8 Section: 37.01 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 9. Which of the following statements is NOT true for inherited behavior? A. Once the fixed action pattern starts, it can be modified by behavior B. The behavior pattern is stereotyped C. It is a fixed action pattern D. All members of a species perform the exact same sequence E. The fixed action pattern is initiated by a sign stimulus Understand the genetic basis of animal behavior Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.02.01 Describe data showing that behavior can be learned. Mader - Chapter 37 #9 Section: 37.02 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 10. If you were studying a durable change in behavior brought about by experience you would be studying which of the following? A. Instinct B. Learning C. Altruism D. Kin selection E. Associative learning Learning is defined as a duration change in behavior brought about by experience Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.02.01 Describe data showing that behavior can be learned. Mader - Chapter 37 #10 Section: 37.02 Topic: Ecology 11. The pecking behavior of gull chicks becomes more accurate with time. This is most likely an example of: A. A fixed action pattern B. Innate behavior C. Learning D. Imprinting E. Altruistic behavior Learning is a durable change in behavior brought about by experience Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.02.01 Describe data showing that behavior can be learned. Mader - Chapter 37 #11 Section: 37.02 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 12. Which statement about behavior is NOT true? A. Inborn behavior is usually inherited B. Innate behavior is triggered by stimulus and does not vary C. Fixed action patterns are sometimes subject to modification by learning D. Animals with simple nervous systems tend to respond to a stimulus with inherited behavior E. All patterns of behavior can be explained as fixed action patterns Behavior emcompasses any action that can be observed and described Blooms Level: 1. Remember Learning Outcome: 37.02.01 Describe data showing that behavior can be learned. Mader - Chapter 37 #12 Section: 37.02 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 13. A digger wasp continues to close its nest even though a researcher has removed the nest's contents. This shows that nest-closing behavior in the digger wasp is: A. A learned behavior B. An imprint behavior C. A fixed action pattern D. An insight learning behavior E. A classical conditioned behavior A fixed action pattern is elicted by a sign stimulus Blooms Level: 3. Apply Learning Outcome: 37.02.01 Describe data showing that behavior can be learned. Mader - Chapter 37 #13 Section: 37.02 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 14. If you were studying a type of learned behavior that causes a family of baby ducks to follow their mother you would be studying which of the following? A. Imprinting B. Operant conditioning C. Insight learning D. Extinction E. Motivation Imprinting is a form of learning. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.02.01 Describe data showing that behavior can be learned. Mader - Chapter 37 #14 Section: 37.02 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 15. Imprinting and songbird singing are both examples of: A. Altruism B. Innate but learned not behavior C. A type of courtship ritual D. Behavior that requires some learning E. Kin selection Learning is a durable change in behavior brought about by experience. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.02.01 Describe data showing that behavior can be learned. Mader - Chapter 37 #15 Section: 37.02 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 16. The sensitive period is most closely associated with: A. Operant conditioning B. Insight learning C. Imprinting D. Extinction E. Motivation Sensitve period means that the behavior develops only during this time. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.02.01 Describe data showing that behavior can be learned. Mader - Chapter 37 #16 Section: 37.02 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 17. Fifty days after hatching, a white-crowned sparrow will never be able to sing a normal song if reared in isolation. This is an example of: A. A sensitive period for learning B. A sign stimulus C. An innate behavior D. A fixed action pattern E. Habituation Sensitve period means that the behavior develops only during this time. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.02.01 Describe data showing that behavior can be learned. Mader - Chapter 37 #17 Section: 37.02 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 18. Male birds court females of the correct species because they look like their mother. This is an example of: A. An innate behavior B. A learned behavior C. An altruistic act D. Imprinting E. A fixed action pattern Imprinting is considered a form of learning. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.02.01 Describe data showing that behavior can be learned. Mader - Chapter 37 #18 Section: 37.02 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 19. If you were studying a change in behavior that involves a link between two events, you would be studying which of the following? A. Imprint learning B. Fixed action learning C. Associative learning D. Sensitive learning E. Altruistic learning Associated learning is a change in behavior that involves an association between two events. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.03.01 Distinguish between classical conditioning, operant conditioning, insight learning, and habituation. Mader - Chapter 37 #19 Section: 37.03 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 20. Learning that is reinforced by rewards, and a gradual strengthening of stimulus-response connections, is called: A. Imprinting B. Operant conditioning C. Insight learning D. Motivation E. Extinction Operant conditioning happens when a stimulus-response connection is strengthened. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.03.01 Distinguish between classical conditioning, operant conditioning, insight learning, and habituation. Mader - Chapter 37 #20 Section: 37.03 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 21. Which of the following scientists is best associated with classical conditioning? A. Karl von Frisch B. Niko Tinbergen C. Konrad Lorenz D. John Krebs E. Ivan Pavlov Ivan Pavlov first studied classical conditioning. Blooms Level: 1. Remember Learning Outcome: 37.03.01 Distinguish between classical conditioning, operant conditioning, insight learning, and habituation. Mader - Chapter 37 #21 Section: 37.03 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology Mader - Chapter 37 22. This figure shows an example of classical conditioning. What does "A" represent? A. An unconditioned stimulus B. A conditioned stimulus C. A conditioned response D. An imprinted response E. An unconditioned response Classical conditioning is the presentation of two different types of stimuli at the same time causing an animal to form an association between them. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Figure: 37.03 Learning Outcome: 37.03.01 Distinguish between classical conditioning, operant conditioning, insight learning, and habituation. Mader - Chapter 37 #22 Section: 37.03 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 23. This figure shows an example of classical conditioning. What does "C" represent? A. An unconditioned stimulus B. A conditioned stimulus C. A conditioned response D. An imprinted response E. An unconditioned response Classical conditioning is the presentation of two different types of stimuli at the same time causing an animal to form an association between them. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Figure: 37.03 Learning Outcome: 37.03.01 Distinguish between classical conditioning, operant conditioning, insight learning, and habituation. Mader - Chapter 37 #23 Section: 37.03 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 24. This figure shows an example of classical conditioning. What does "B" represent? A. An unconditioned stimulus B. A conditioned stimulus C. A conditioned response D. An imprinted response E. An unconditioned response Classical conditioning is the presentation of two different types of stimuli at the same time causing an animal to form an association between them. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Figure: 37.03 Learning Outcome: 37.03.01 Distinguish between classical conditioning, operant conditioning, insight learning, and habituation. Mader - Chapter 37 #24 Section: 37.03 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 25. This figure shows an example of classical conditioning. What does "D" represent? A. An unconditioned stimulus B. A conditioned stimulus C. A conditioned response D. An imprinted response E. An unconditioned response Classical conditioning is the presentation of two different types of stimuli at the same time causing an animal to form an association between them them. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Figure: 37.03 Learning Outcome: 37.03.01 Distinguish between classical conditioning, operant conditioning, insight learning, and habituation. Mader - Chapter 37 #25 Section: 37.03 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 26. If you were studying a type of learning which occurs when an animal solves a problem without any prior experience with that problem you would be studying which of the following? A. Conditioned learning B. Imprint learning C. Unconditioned learning D. Insight learning E. Fixed action learning Insight learning occurs when an animal suddenly solves a problem without any prior experience to solving the problem. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.03.01 Distinguish between classical conditioning, operant conditioning, insight learning, and habituation. Mader - Chapter 37 #26 Section: 37.03 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 27. A fixed action pattern occurs when an animal no longer responds to a repeated stimulus. FALSE A fixed action pattern is elicted from a sign stimulus. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.02.01 Describe data showing that behavior can be learned. Mader - Chapter 37 #27 Section: 37.02 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 28. Fitness of an animal is best judged by the: A. Strength of an animal B. Health of an animal C. Ability of an animal to survive and reproduce D. Courtship rituals E. Feeding behavior Fitness is the life-long reproductive success of an individual. Blooms Level: 1. Remember Learning Outcome: 37.04.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. Mader - Chapter 37 #28 Section: 37.04 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 29. A biologist is studying an adaptive change in males and females that leads to an increased ability to secure a mate. Based on this information you would conclude that he or she is studying which of the following? A. Conditioned selection B. Fixed action selection C. Unconditioned selection D. Reciprocal selection E. Sexual selection Sexual selection is a form of natural selection favoring features that increase an animal's chances of mating. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.04.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. Mader - Chapter 37 #29 Section: 37.04 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 30. Which of the following statements is NOT true about courtship rituals? A. It prepares an animal to copulate B. It helps males and females of the same species to recognize each other C. It has evolved as a way for males to make a choice among females D. Females at times may be responsible for controlling the selection of male attributes E. It is common in many birds and mammals Sexual selection is a form of natural selection favoring features that increase an animal's chances of mating. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.04.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. Mader - Chapter 37 #30 Section: 37.04 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 31. (p. 37.04.01) Adaptive behavior has probably been selected by evolutionary processes mainly because it: A. Makes the animal smartest B. Allows the animal to live the longest C. Allows the animal to live in the widest variety of environments D. Allows the animal to produce the largest number of viable offspring E. Allows the animal to become the largest Adaptative behavior increases the chances of offsprings of parents with that adaptation of passing it to the next generation. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.04.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. Mader - Chapter 37 #31 Section: 37.04 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 32. Sexual dimorphism means that the male instead of the female makes the selection with respect to mating. FALSE Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.04.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. Mader - Chapter 37 #32 Section: 37.04 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 33. ___________ is a system in which animals arrange themselves in a pecking order, where the animal above takes precedence over the one below. A. Imprinting B. Inclusive fitness C. Dominance hierarchy D. Altruism E. Circadian rhythm A dominance hierarchy is when an animal with a higher rank receives a benefit before a lower ranking individual. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.05.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. Mader - Chapter 37 #33 Section: 37.05 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 34. A biologist is studying what determines dominance ranking in animals. After her research, she has determined that it is mostly established through: A. Age B. Size C. Confrontations D. Parentage E. Intelligence A dominance hierarchy is when an animal with a higher rank receives a benefit before a lower ranking individual. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.05.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. Mader - Chapter 37 #34 Section: 37.05 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 35. An example of territoriality is: A. Barnacles attached to the bottom of a boat B. A red-winged blackbird singing to ward off other males and attract a female to his nest C. A cloud of moths attracted to a light D. A swarm of mosquitoes hovering around a sweaty person E. A herd of zebras grazing in a field Territoriality is the behavior exhibited within a territory. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.04.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. Mader - Chapter 37 #35 Section: 37.04 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 36. A scientist who is studying the application of the principles of evolutionary biology to the study of the social behavior of animals would be referred to as a: A. Sociobiologist B. Behavioral psychologist C. Neuroendocrinologist D. Zoopsychologist E. Ethologist Sociobiology is the study of social behavior in animals. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.05.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. Mader - Chapter 37 #36 Section: 37.05 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 37. Which of the following is NOT an advantage to group living? A. Increased predator avoidance B. Help with the rearing of offspring C. Help with finding food D. Competition for mates E. Division of labor Understand the advantages and disadvantages of living in a group. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.05.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. Mader - Chapter 37 #37 Section: 37.05 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 38. If you were studying unselfish acts that help others in a group so that they, and the individual, increase their chances of surviving and reproducing, you would be studying: A. Altruistic behavior B. Selfish behavior C. Natural selection D. Inclusive fitness E. Sexual selection Altruism is a behavior that has the potential to decrease the fitness of an individual while benefitting the other menbers of the group. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.05.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. Mader - Chapter 37 #38 Section: 37.05 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 39. The ability of kin to survive and reproduce is called: A. Altruistic behavior B. Selfish behavior C. Natural selection D. Sexual selection E. Inclusive fitness Inclusive fitness includes direct offspring and the offspring of relatives. Blooms Level: 1. Remember Learning Outcome: 37.05.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. Mader - Chapter 37 #39 Section: 37.05 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 40. Direct selection is adaptation to the environment due to the reproductive success of an individual. TRUE Direct selection is adaptive as it refers to the reproductive success of an individual. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.05.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. Mader - Chapter 37 #40 Section: 37.05 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 41. A biologist is studying the adaptation to the environment due to the reproductive success of the individual's relatives. Based on this information you would conclude that he or she is studying which of the following? A. Direct selection B. Selfish selection C. Kin selection D. Reciprocal selection E. Imprint selection Kin selection, also known as indirect selection, is adaptive due to the reproductive sucess of an individual's relatives. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.05.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. Mader - Chapter 37 #41 Section: 37.05 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 42. Altruistic behavior between closely related animals is selected for because it: A. Reduces fights between species B. Ensures the survival of the altruistic individual C. Increases the frequency of the altruistic individual's genes in the next generation D. Forces the individuals to cooperate with one another E. It only increases the survival of the non-altruistic individual Altruism is the behavior that has the potential to decrease the fitness of an individual while benefitting the reproductive success of other members of the species. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.05.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. Mader - Chapter 37 #42 Section: 37.05 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 43. Ants follow a trail to the sugar bowl in your kitchen left by secretions of the tail glands of other ants in the colony. They are doing so because of: A. Chance alone B. A dance done by an ant in the anthill C. A learned response about where the sugar is D. An innate knowledge of where the sugar is E. A pheromone pathway Animal communication can involve the use of chemicals. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.06.01 Give examples of the different types of communication, and state possible advantages and disadvantages of each type. Mader - Chapter 37 #43 Section: 37.06 Topic: Animals Topic: Chemistry Topic: Ecology 44. ___________ is defined as the transmission of a signal from one animal to another such that the sender benefits on average from the response of the recipient. A. Imprinting B. Dominance hierarchy C. Circadian rhythm D. Communication E. Operant conditioning Communication is an action by which a sender may influence the behavior of the receiver. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.06.01 Give examples of the different types of communication, and state possible advantages and disadvantages of each type. Mader - Chapter 37 #44 Section: 37.06 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 45. If you were studying a very rapid kind of communication that works even at a distance and in the dark you would be studying which of the following? A. Chemical communication B. Auditory communication C. Visual communication D. Tactile communication E. Pheromone communication Auditory communication is faster than chemical communication and effective day and night. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.06.01 Give examples of the different types of communication, and state possible advantages and disadvantages of each type. Mader - Chapter 37 #45 Section: 37.06 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 46. Which of the following would be used by species active only during the day as a way to identify members of the same species to avoid conflict and can only be used over a relatively short distance? A. Visual communication B. Tactile communication C. Auditory communication D. Chemical communication E. Pheromone communication Visual communications are most common among animals that are active during the day. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.06.01 Give examples of the different types of communication, and state possible advantages and disadvantages of each type. Mader - Chapter 37 #46 Section: 37.06 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 47. Which type of communication occurs when one animal touches another? A. Chemical communication B. Visual communication C. Tactile communication D. Auditory communication E. Pheromone communication Tactile communication occurs when one animal touches another animal. Blooms Level: 1. Remember Learning Outcome: 37.06.01 Give examples of the different types of communication, and state possible advantages and disadvantages of each type. Mader - Chapter 37 #47 Section: 37.06 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 48. The waggle dance helps bees: A. Feed their offspring B. Reproduce C. Perfect predator avoidance D. Communicate the location of a food source E. Sound an alarm to protect the hive when invaded Waggle dances are preformed by honey bees to communicate the direction and distance to a food source. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.06.01 Give examples of the different types of communication, and state possible advantages and disadvantages of each type. Mader - Chapter 37 #48 Section: 37.06 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology 49. Which of the following is the best evidence to suggest that animals other than humans have emotions? A. Mating calls B. Courtship rituals C. Altruistic behavior D. Chemical communication E. Body language Understand the importance of body language to the expression of emotions. Blooms Level: 2. Understand Learning Outcome: 37.06.01 Give examples of the different types of communication, and state possible advantages and disadvantages of each type. Mader - Chapter 37 #49 Section: 37.06 Topic: Animals Topic: Ecology Chapter 37 Behavioral Ecology Summary # of Questio ns Category 10 Blooms Level: 1. Remember 37 Blooms Level: 2. Understand 2 Blooms Level: 3. Apply 4 Figure: 37.03 5 Learning Outcome: 37.01.01 Describe data that suggest behavior is inherited and some that show behavior is inherited. 11 Learning Outcome: 37.02.01 Describe data showing that behavior can be learned. 8 Learning Outcome: 37.03.01 Distinguish between classical conditioning, operant conditioning, insight learning, and habituation. 6 Learning Outcome: 37.04.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. 9 Learning Outcome: 37.05.01 Explain how territoriality, foraging for food, and living in a society can increase fitness. 7 Learning Outcome: 37.06.01 Give examples of the different types of communication, and state possible advantages and disadvanta ges of each type. 50 Mader - Chapter 37 5 Section: 37.01 11 Section: 37.02 8 Section: 37.03 6 Section: 37.04 9 Section: 37.05 7 Section: 37.06 45 Topic: Animals 1 Topic: Chemistry 49 Topic: Ecology

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

American Public University - SCIN - 13O
Chapter 38 Community and Ecosystem EcologyStudent: _1. Organisms that recycle nutrients within ecosystems are primarily known as:A. AutotrophsB. ConsumersC. DecomposersD. ScavengersE. Producers2. Which organisms feed on the remains of dead animals
American Public University - SCIN - 13O
Chapter 39 Major Ecosystems of the BiosphereStudent: _1. Which of the following was not a problem encountered by the Biosphere 2 project?A. Oxygen levels droppedB. Conflicts broke out between biospheriansC. Carbon dioxide levels increasedD. They ran
American Public University - SCIN - 13O
Chapter 40 Conservation BiologyStudent: _1. Which of the following is not a conservation problem being experienced in Hawaii?A. PollutionB. Damage by feral pigsC. The introduction of alien speciesD. Land subsidenceE. Depletion of natural resources
Auburn - ISMN - 3140
Capability Maturity Model:1. Initial-chaotic2. Repeatable-start to track some things3. defined-uses standards/documentation4. Managed-detailed measures5. Optimized- continuous improvement10. What is the purpose of systems investigation?-to identify
Auburn - ISMN - 3140
Last part of Chapter 6: Telecommunications and Networks1. Know the different distributed computing architectures (Terminal-to-host, client-server, peer-topeer), howthey work, pros and cons.Terminal-to-host: Dumb terminal (thin client/network computer)
Auburn - ISMN - 3140
Chapter 7: Internet, Intranet, and Extranet1. Know the following terms: Internet, Internet2, HTTP, URL, HTML, TCP, IP, IP addresses, DNS,WWW,VPN, tunneling, FTP, telnet, JAVA, Applets, other terms*Refer to slide 29 for web address technical termsInte
Auburn - ISMN - 3140
Chapter 8: eCommerce1. Know the following terms: EDI, market segmentation, technology-enabled relationshipmanagement,electronic exchange, electronic bill presentment, digital certificate, certificate authority, SSLprotocol, DigitalWallets, intellectu
Auburn - ISMN - 3140
Chapter 9: Enterprise systems - TPS and ERPKnow the following terms:+Batch processing - Data processed in batches+OLTP (On-line transaction processing) - Immediate processing+business continuity planning- same as disaster recovery+disaster recovery-
Auburn - ISMN - 3140
Chapter 10: MIS and DSS1. Some terms: non-programmed and programmed decisions, optimization model, satisficing model,heuristics, RFM Analysis, model base, dialogue manager, GDSS, ESS, and others2. Know the different components of decision making and pr
Auburn - ISMN - 3140
Chapter 11Knowledge Management: is an organized collection of people, procedures, software, databases,and devices used tocreate, store, share, and use the organizations knowledge and experience.Tacit Knowledge: hard to measure and document, subjective
Auburn - ISMN - 3140
Chapter 121.RAD: a systems development approach that employs tools, techniques, and methodologiesdesigned to speedapplication development.JAD: a process for data collection and requirements analysis in which users, stakeholders, and ISprofessionals
Auburn - ISMN - 3140
Chapter 131. Logical design: a description of the functional requirements of a system. Conceptualizes whatthe system will doto solve the problems and identified through earlier analysis. What the system must do to solve the problem Technology-indepen
Auburn - ISMN - 3140
Chapters 141) Terms all in the study guide2) Establishing policies and proceduresImplementing policies and proceduresMonitoring policies and proceduresReviewing policies and procedures3) Different types of crimes that the computer is the tool1) Dat
Auburn - PHYS - 1620
FORMULA SHEETv = v o + atv22= vo+ 2a ( x x o )x xo = vo t +1 at 22x = A cos( t + )y = yo sin( k x t + )12 o = o t + t 2 = o + t2v ox = vo cosv oy = vo sin 2= o=v y = v oy gt2v 2 = v oy 2 g ( y yo )yy y o = voy t 12gt 2P. E .
Auburn - PHYS - 1620
T ( K ) = T (C) + 273PV1 P2V21=T1T2PV = NkTPV = nRTW = PdVV W = nRT ln 2 V1 Q = mcT ; Q = mLE = Q + WE = CV T3CV = 2 nR ; C P = CV + nRTe = 1 CTHWe=QHW = QH QCQS =TTS B S A = CV ln BTAxv = vo + at ; v =t2v 2 = vo + 2ax1
Auburn - PHYS - 1620
Name: _ Section: _PHYS 1610Quiz 1Must show working to get credit.F k1q1qor2; F qo EA metallic object holds a charge of 3.8 106 C. What total number of electrons does thisrepresent? (e = 1.6 1019 C is the magnitude of the electronic charge.)a. 4
Auburn - PHYS - 1620
Name: _ Section: _PHYS 1610 Quiz 2:Fkq1q 2r1.2k dqr2; EdA Qino; k 9.0 10 9 Nm2 C 2 ; 8.85 10 12 C 2 / Nm262 pC53 pC44 pC71 pC16 pCCharges q and Q are placed on the x axis at x = 0 and x = 2.0 m, respectively.If q = 40 pC and Q = +30 pC
Auburn - PHYS - 1620
Name: _ Section: _PHYS 1610 Quiz 3:dV E . dr ; E Must show working for full credit.kqV1;V ; U qV ; U mv 2xr21. A proton (+1.6 1019 C) moves 10 cm along the direction of an electric field of strength 3.0 N/C.The electrical potential difference
Auburn - PHYS - 1620
Name: _ Section: _PHYS 1610 Quiz 4:R1.LA0.20 A0.30 A0.10 A0.26 A0.60 A0.75 A0.00 A0.25 A0.50 A1.00 AWhat is the potential difference VB VA when I = 1.5 A in the circuit segment below?a.b.c.d.e.4.; V IRWhat is the magnitude of the c
Auburn - PHYS - 1620
Name: _ Section: _QUIZ 5Must show working to get full credit.Fmv 2FB qv B ; FB qvB sin ; FB I l B ; FB IlB sin ; E ; Fc ;qR1 eV = 1.602 x 10 -19 J ; mass of electron = 9.11 x 10 -31 kg1 mv 22 qV; mass of proton = 1.67 x 10 -27 kg1. An electr
Auburn - PHYS - 1620
Name: _ Section: _QUIZ 6Must show working to get full credit.V IR ;P IV; m NBA cos ; 2 f t ; dmdt; B nI1. A flat coil of wire consisting of 20 turns, each with an area of 50 cm2, is positioned perpendicularlyto a uniform magnetic field that incr
Auburn - PHYS - 1620
Name: _ Section: _QUIZ 7Must show working to get full credit.n1sin 1 = n2sin 2 ; + = 1.A virtual image is:a.b.c.d.2.Light is refracted through a diamond. If the angle of incidence is 30, and the angle of refractionis 12, what is the index of r
Auburn - PHYS - 1620
Name: _ Section: _QUIZ 8Must show working to get full credit.d sin mn ; n 1.3.472.151.751.252.0 cm4.2 mm1.1 cm2.0 mm102179541A helium-neon laser ( = 632.8 nm) is used to calibrate a diffraction grating. If the first-order maximumoccurs a
Auburn - MATH - 1610
MATH 1610PRACTICE FINAL EXAMCalculators are not allowed!1. Find the derivative of y = x 1 x2 .c)x21x21 x2d)x2 + x 12.x4 x2 + 7x + 122. Evaluate lim3. Evaluatesin x csc2 x dxc) cos x cot x + C4. Evaluatea)ddx3x2x32ln 3x ln 2x1x2
Auburn - MATH - 1610
MATH 1610PRACTICE FINAL EXAM 2Calculators are not allowed!1. Find the derivative of y = sin x(1 + cos x)4 .a) cos x(1 + cos x)4 4 sin2 x(1 + cos x)3b) sin x 4 cos3 x sin xd) 4 sin x(1 + cos x)3 + cos x(1 + cos x)44 x2.x2 x2 3x + 22. Evaluate lim
Auburn - MATH - 1610
MATH 1610PRACTICE FINAL EXAM 3Calculators are not allowed!1. Find the derivative of y = x2 (x3 + 1)4 .c) 8x(x3 + 1)3d) 2x(x3 + 1)4 + 12x4 (x3 + 1)3x2 + x 6.2. Evaluate lim 2x2+ x 6x + 83. Evaluatea) 24x3 (x3 + 1)3a) 52d) tan x cos x + Cd0
Auburn - MATH - 1610
MATH 1610PRACTICE FINAL EXAM 4Calculators are not allowed!1. Find the derivative of y = x3 ln x at x = 1.x2 4x 5.x1 x2 x 22. Evaluate lim3. Evaluatea) 1/6exddxc) 3d) 421c) 323d) 1 2e)2 c) 3e) 5d) 4f)00e) 5f) 6g) DNE312l
Auburn - MATH - 1610
MATH 1610PRACTICE FINAL EXAM 5Calculators are not allowed!1. Find the derivative of y = (x + 1)(x3 + 1)2/3 at x = 0.a) 0b) 1c) 2d) 3e) 4x2 + 2x + 3.2. Evaluate lim 2x3 x 4x + 3f) 5a) 2b) 1c) 0d) 1e) 2f)00g) DNE /23. Evaluatecsc2 x
Auburn - MATH - 1610
MATH 1610PRACTICE FINAL EXAM 6Calculators are not allowed!1. Find the derivative of y = x2 cos (x2 ) at x = .a) 2 b) c) 0d) 1 e) 2 2. Evaluate limx43. Evaluatea) 0b) /3/6x2 + x 20.x2 5x + 4a) 1b) 2c) 3d) 4e) 5f)00g) DNEsec x ta
Auburn - MATH - 1610
MATH 1610PRACTICE MIDTERM EXAMDNE means Does Not ExistCalculators are Not Allowed1. Evaluate lim x csc(3x).x0a) 0b) DNEc)13d) 3e) f) g) 12. The displacement of a particle moving in a straight line is given by s = t2 + t. Find theaverage ve
Auburn - MATH - 1610
MATH 1610PRACTICE MIDTERM EXAM 2DNE means Does Not ExistCalculators are Not Allowed1. Evaluate lim x2 cot(x).a) 0x0b) DNEc)12d) 2e) f) g) 12. The displacement of a particle moving in a straight line is given by s = t2 + 2t. Find theaverage
Auburn - MATH - 1610
MATH 1610PRACTICE MIDTERM EXAM 3DNE means Does Not ExistCalculators are Not Allowed1. Evaluate lim 3x cot(5x).a) 0x0b) DNEc)35d) 3e) f) g)532. The displacement of a particle moving in a straight line is given by s = t3 2t + 1. Find thein
Auburn - MATH - 1610
MATH 1610PRACTICE MIDTERM EXAM 4DNE means Does Not ExistCalculators are Not Allowed1. Evaluate lim x2 csc(x2 ).a) 0x0b) DNEc)12d) 2e) f) g) 12. The displacement of a particle moving in a straight line is given by s = t2 t. Find theaverage
Auburn - MATH - 1610
MATH 1610PRACTICE MIDTERM EXAM 5DNE means Does Not ExistCalculators are Not Allowed1. Evaluate lim x2 csc(3x).a) 0x0b) DNEc)12d) 2e) f) g) 12. The displacement of a particle moving in a straight line is given by s = t2 + 2t + 1. Find thein
Auburn - MATH - 1610
MATH 1610PRACTICE MIDTERM EXAM 6DNE means Does Not ExistCalculators are Not Allowed1. Evaluate lim x2 cot2 (x).a) 0x0b) DNEc)12d) 2e) f) g) 12. The displacement of a particle moving in a straight line is given by s = 2t2 t. Find theaverage
Auburn - MATH - 1610
MATH 1610PRACTICE MIDTERM EXAM 7DNE means Does Not ExistCalculators are Not Allowed1. Evaluate limx0tan(2x).xa) 0b) DNEc)12d) 2e) f) g) 12. The displacement of a particle moving in a straight line is given by s = t3 3t + 1. Find thespee
Auburn - MATH - 1610
MATH 1610PRACTICE MIDTERM EXAM 8DNE means Does Not ExistCalculators are Not Allowed1. Evaluate lim x csc(4x).x0(a) 0(b) DNE(c)14(d) 4(e) (f) (g) 12. A particle in motion has position s = t2 t. Find its average velocity from t = 1 to t = 4.
Auburn - MATH - 1610
MATH 1610 Practice Midterm 95 tan x.x06x1. Evaluate lim2. The displacement of a particle moving in a straight line is given by s = t3 3t + 4. Find theaverage velocity from t = 2 to t = 4, the velocity when t = 3, and the acceleration whent = 4.3.
Auburn - SOCY - 1000
Chapter 1 Sociological Imagination: An Introduction What Is Sociology? Sociology is the study of human society. The Sociological Imagination Coined by C. Wright Mills, this tool helps us to: connect our personal experiences to society at large and g
Auburn - SOCY - 1000
Chapter 2MethodsResearch MethodsResearch methods are standard rules that social scientists follow when trying toestablish a causal relationship between social elements. Approaches to Research A deductive approach to research:1)starts with a theory
Auburn - SOCY - 1000
Chapter 3 Part 2Deviance and Social ControlPunitive justice is focused on making the violator suffer and thus defining theboundaries of acceptable behavior. Rehabilitative justice examines the specific circumstances of an individualtransgressor and a
Auburn - SOCY - 1000
Chapter 3Culture and MediaWhat Is Culture?Culture can be loosely defined as a set of beliefs, traditions, and practices.What Is Culture?The concept of culture has evolved and expanded throughout history.The oldest understandings of culture focus on
Auburn - SOCY - 1000
Chapter 9RaceThe Myth of RaceRace can be defined as a group of people who share a set of characteristics usually physical ones and are said to share a common bloodline. Racism is the belief that members of separate races possess different and unequal
Auburn - SOCY - 1000
Chapter 11Global HealthHealth disparities between groups within the United States are dwarfed by thedisparities that exist between the United States and developing countries. Many developing countries are still struggling to provide their citizens wit
Auburn - SOCY - 1000
Chapter 11Health and SocietyThe Rise (and Fall?) of the Medical ProfessionDoctors have a great amount of social power, political power, and prestige for avariety of reasons: They offer a universally valued producthealth and longevity. There is a lim
Auburn - SOCY - 1000
Chapter 12The Chore WarsWomen today have two jobs: paid labor outside the home and unpaid labor insidethe home. Second shift refers to unpaid labor inside the home that is often expected of womenafter they get home from working at paid labor outside
Auburn - SOCY - 1000
Chapter 12FamilyFamily Forms and ChangesOur choice of a romantic or life partner doesnt depend solely on our attraction tosomeone, how well we get along with him or her, or our shared life goals.Whether we realize it or not, there are also legal and
Auburn - SOCY - 1000
Chapter 131.Inequalities in SchoolingSocioeconomic class, race, and ethnicity are often intertwined and clearly affecteducational outcomes.Concept QuizWhat are the two primary functions of schools?a)b)c)d)teach basic skills and impart knowledge
Auburn - SOCY - 1000
Chapter 13EducationWhat Is Education?Education is the process through which academic, social, and cultural ideas andtools are developed.Unfortunately, not all students emerge successfully from this system.What Is Education?Some problems include: f
Auburn - ENGL - 2217
Chris LooneyDr. Carrie SpellENGL 221712 April 2011A Tempest Response #2Cesaire continues to expose the ideals of many movers in the civil rights era through hischaracters Ariel and Caliban. Ariel closely resembles Martin Luther King Jr. in her conve
Auburn - ENGL - 2217
Chris LooneyDr. Carrie SpellENGL 221714 April 2011A Tempest Response #3The conversation between Caliban, Trinculo, and Stephano seemed to me almost like areference to the civil war in a way, since they were going to fight for Calibans freedom. Chant
Auburn - ENGL - 2217
Chris LooneyDr. Carrie SpellENGL 221717 April 2011A Tempest Response #4In the final section of A Tempest Caliban finally summons enough courage to faceProspero head on. Singing chants to the Yoruban god of thunder and lightning, Shango, heprepares
Auburn - ENGL - 2217
Chris LooneyDr. Carrie SpellENGL 22179 April 2011A Tempest ResponseAfter reading of Aime Cesaires trials in the political realm I am starting to see the pointshe was trying to get across in his writing. Echoes of freedom can already be heard through
Auburn - ENGL - 2217
Chris LooneyDr. Carrie SpellENGL 221724 March 2011Beauty and the Beast ResponseBeauty and the Beast begins with many of the common characteristics of a fairy tale of itstime: a young girl who is the most beautiful of her siblings, a household with n
Auburn - ENGL - 2217
Chris LooneyDr. Carrie SpellENGL 221726 January 2011Candide Response #2The last few chapters of Candide include a considerable amount of interesting situationsthat Voltaire may have been using to reference humanity in its various states. Comparethe
Auburn - ENGL - 2217
Chris LooneyCandide ResponseVoltaires Candide is a book highlighting the enigmatic life of a young man who grew upin a seemingly perfect world in which he learned how to be extremely optimistic. He learns themost about optimism from his mentor Panglos
Auburn - ENGL - 2217
Chris LooneyDr. Carrie SpellENGL 221719 April 2011The Grasshopper and the Bell Cricket ResponseThe main thing that struck me throughout this short story was the imagery used toexpress certain points in the story. Kawabata referenced the lanterns qui
Auburn - ENGL - 2217
Chris LooneyDr. Carrie SpellENGL 221722 March 2011TCFT Hansel and Gretel ResponseHaving read Hansel and Gretel at some point in my life, it did not occur to me beforehandthat such a story could interpreted in such a manner. The fact that this fairy
Auburn - ENGL - 2217
Chris LooneyDr. Carrie SpellENGL 22173 April 2011The Hunger Artist responseA man making a living by denying himself lifes basic necessity, the hunger artist wasone individual with many peculiarities about him. He was a person that enjoyed being test
Auburn - ENGL - 2217
Chris LooneyDr. Carrie SpellENGL 221727 March 2011The Tigers Bride ResponseAn interesting take on The Beauty and the Beast, The Tigers shows the personal thoughtsand reactions of the Russian beauty. Through her eyes many of the travesties of life as
Auburn - ENGL - 2217
Chris LooneyDr. Carrie SpellENGL 221729 March 2011The Yellow Wallpaper responseI really did not have many pre-conceived ideas about this story before the reading.Originally I believed it to be some type of dark horror tale, not a story of a strange