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P A R T I I Be Creative W hat is the greatest difficulty people have in thinking about problems and issues? The standard answer is the difficulty of evaluating the various solutions and choos- ing the best one. In some cases, this may be true. But two other difficulties are equally troublesome: identifying problems and issues before they become crises, and getting beyond com- mon, unoriginal solutions to creative ones. The first chapter in this part introduces the creative process. The other chapters expand this introduction, showing you how to search for challenges, express and investigate problems and issues, and produce many and varied solu- tions. By the end of Part II, you will have developed a proac- tive approach to problems and issues and learned how to stimulate your imagination. ISBN 1-256-46689-1 The Art of Thinking: A Guide to Critical and Creative Thought , Tenth Edition, by Vincent Ryan Ruggiero. Published by Pearson. Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc. ISBN 1-256-46689-1 The Art of Thinking: A Guide to Critical and Creative Thought , Tenth Edition, by Vincent Ryan Ruggiero. Published by Pearson. Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc. C H A P T E R 5 The Creative Process Have you heard any of these sayings: Creativity cant be learned, The way to be creative is to ignore traditional ways of doing things, It takes a high IQ to be creative, Taking drugs enhances a persons creativity, or Creativity is related to mental illness? Theyve all been around for a long time. But guess what? Theyre all wrong. This chapter sets the record straight about creativity. It also details the characteristics of creative people, provides an overview of the creative process, and offers a strategy you can use to develop and apply your untapped creative potential. T he human mind, as we have seen, has two phases. It both produces ideas and judges them. These phases are intertwined; that is, we move back and forth between them many times in the course of dealing with a problem, some- times several times in the span of a few seconds. To study the art of thinking in its most dynamic form would be difficult at best. It is much easier to study each part separately. For this reason, we will focus first on the production of ideas (Chapters 5 through 9) and then turn to the judgment of ideas.* Although everyone produces and judges ideas, the quality of the effort varies greatly from person to person. One individual produces a single common or shallow idea for each problem or issue and approves it uncritically, whereas another produces an assortment of ideas, some of them original and profound, and examines them critically, refining the best ones to make them even better.... View Full Document

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