Chapter 14  X BALANCE-OF-PAYMENTS ADJUSTMENTS UNDER FIXED EXCHANGE RATES
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Chapter 14 X BALANCE-OF-PAYMENTS ADJUSTMENTS UNDER FIXED EXCHANGE RATES

Course Number: ECON 3400, Summer 2012

College/University: Utah State

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CHAPTER 14 BALANCE-OF-PAYMENTS ADJUSTMENTS UNDER FIXED EXCHANGE RATES MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTIONS 1. Which of the following does not represent an automatic adjustment in balance-of-payments disequilibrium? Variations in: a. Domestic income b. Foreign prices c. Domestic prices d. Foreign par values 2. The balance-of-payments adjustment mechanism developed during the 1700s by the English economist David Hume is the:...

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14 BALANCE-OF-PAYMENTS CHAPTER ADJUSTMENTS UNDER FIXED EXCHANGE RATES MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTIONS 1. Which of the following does not represent an automatic adjustment in balance-of-payments disequilibrium? Variations in: a. Domestic income b. Foreign prices c. Domestic prices d. Foreign par values 2. The balance-of-payments adjustment mechanism developed during the 1700s by the English economist David Hume is the: a. Income-adjustment mechanism b. Flexible-exchange-rate-adjustment mechanism c. Price-adjustment mechanism d. Rank-reserve-adjustment mechanism 3. Which chain of events would promote payments equilibrium for a surplus nation, according to the priceadjustment mechanism? a. Increasing money supply increasing domestic prices rising imports falling exports b. Increasing money supply falling domestic prices rising imports falling exports c. Decreasing money supply increasing domestic prices falling imports rising exports d. Decreasing money supply decreasing domestic prices falling imports rising exports 4. Which chain of events would promote payments equilibrium for a deficit nation, according to the priceadjustment mechanism? a. Increasing money supply increasing domestic prices rising imports falling exports b. Increasing money supply falling domestic prices rising imports falling exports c. Decreasing money supply increasing domestic prices falling imports rising exports d. Decreasing money supply decreasing domestic prices falling imports rising exports 227 228 Test Bank for International Economics, 9e 5. During the gold standard era, central bankers agreed to react positively to international gold flows so as to reinforce the automatic adjustment mechanism. Which of the following best represents the above statement? a. Income-adjustment mechanism b. Price-adjustment mechanism c. Rules of the game d. Discretionary fiscal policy 6. During the gold standard era, the rules of the game suggested that: a. Surplus countries should increase their money supplies b. Deficit countries should increase their money supplies c. Surplus and deficit countries should increase their money supplies d. Surplus and deficit countries should decrease their money supplies 7. Which of the following balance-of-payments adjustment mechanisms is most closely related to the quantity theory of money? a. Income-adjustment mechanism b. Price-adjustment mechanism c. Interest-rate-adjustment mechanism d. Output-adjustment mechanism 8. Under the gold standard, a surplus nation facing a gold inflow and an increase in its money supply would also experience a: a. Rise in its interest rate and a short-term capital inflow b. Rise in its interest rate and a short-term capital outflow c. Fall in its interest rate and a short-term capital inflow d. Fall in its interest rate and a short-term capital outflow 9. Under the gold standard, a deficit nation facing a gold outflow and a decrease in its money supply would also experience a: a. Rise in its interest rate and a short-term capital inflow b. Rise in its interest rate and a short-term capital outflow c. Fall in its interest rate and a short-term capital inflow d. Fall in its interest rate and a short-term capital outflow 10. Assume that Canada initially faces payments equilibrium in its merchandise trade account as well as in its capital account. Now suppose that Canadian interest rates increase to levels higher than those abroad. For Canada, this tends to promote: a. Net capital inflows b. Net capital outflows c. Net merchandise exports d. Net merchandise imports Chapter 14:Balance-of-Payments Adjustments Under Fixed Exchange Rates 229 11. Assume that Canada initially faces payments equilibrium in its merchandise trade account as well as in its capital account. Now suppose that Canadian interest rates fall to levels below those abroad. For Canada, this tends to promote: a. Net capital inflows b. Net capital outflows c. Net merchandise exports d. Net merchandise imports 12. Suppose the United States levies an interest equalization tax, which taxes Americans on dividend and interest income from foreign securities. Such a tax would be intended to: a. Encourage capital movements from the United States to overseas b. Discourage capital movements from the United States to overseas c. Discourage capital movements from overseas to the United States d. None of the above 13. Assume that interest rates on comparable securities are identical in the United States and foreign countries. Now suppose that investors anticipate that in the future the U.S. dollar will appreciate against foreign currencies. Investment funds would thus be expected to: a. Flow from the United States to foreign countries b. Flow from foreign countries to the United States c. Remain totally in foreign countries d. Not be affected by the expected dollar appreciation 14. Suppose Japan increases its imports from Sweden, leading to a rise in Swedens exports and income level. With a higher income level, Sweden imports more goods from Japan. Thus a change in imports in Japan results in a feedback effect on its exports. This process is best referred to as the: a. Monetary approach to balance-of-payments adjustment b. Discretionary income adjustment process c. Foreign repercussion effect d. Price-specie flow mechanism On the basis of the following information, answer the next three questions. Assume the marginal propensity to consume for U.S. households equals 0.9, and the marginal propensity to import for the United States equals 0.1. Suppose there occurs an increase in investment of $10 billion at each level of income. 15. The value of the multiplier for the United States equals: a. 2 b. 3 c. 4 d. 5 16. The change in the level of U.S. income resulting from the additional investment spending equals: a. $20 billion b. $30 billion c. $40 billion d. $50 billion 230 Test Bank for International Economics, 9e 17. The change in the level of U.S. imports resulting from the rise in U.S. income equals: a. $5 billion b. $10 billion c. $15 billion d. $20 billion 18. The monetary approach to balance-of-payments adjustments suggests that all payments deficits are the result of: a. Too high interest rates in the home country b. Too low interest rates in the home country c. Excess money supply over money demand in the home country d. Excess money demand over money supply in the home country 19. The monetary approach to balance-of-payments adjustments suggests that all payments surpluses are the result of: a. Too high interest rates in the home country b. Too low interest rates in the home country c. Excess money supply over money demand in the home country d. Excess money demand over money supply in the home country 20. Starting from a position where the nations money demand equals the money supply, and its balance of payments is in equilibrium, economic theory suggests that the nations balance of payments would move into a deficit position if there occurred in the nation a (an): a. Decrease in the money supply b. Increase in the money demand c. Decrease in the money demand d. None of the above 21. Which approach to balance-of-payments adjustment suggests that balance-of-payments surpluses are the result of excess money demand in the home country? a. Absorption approach b. Elasticities approach c. Monetary approach d. Purchasing-power-parity approach 22. According to the rules of the game of the gold standard era, a countrys central bank agreed to react to international gold flows so as to: a. Officially devalue a currency during eras of payments surpluses b. Officially revalue a currency during eras of payments deficits c. Offset the automatic-adjustment mechanism (e.g., prices) d. Reinforce the automatic-adjustment mechanism 23. According to the quantity theory of money, a change in the domestic money supply will bring about: a. Inverse and proportionate changes in the price level b. Inverse and less-than-proportionate changes in the price level c. Direct and proportionate changes in the price level d. Direct and less-than-proportionate changes in the price level Chapter 14:Balance-of-Payments Adjustments Under Fixed Exchange Rates 231 24. The formulation of the so-called income adjustment mechanism is associated with: a. Adam Smith b. David Ricardo c. David Hume d. John Maynard Keynes 25. The value of the foreign trade multiplier equals the reciprocal of the sum of the marginal propensities to: a. Save plus import b. Import plus invest c. Consume plus export d. Save plus import 26. Starting from a position where the nations money demand equals the money supply and its balance of payments is in equilibrium, economic theory suggests that the nations balance of payments would move into a deficit position if there occurred in the nation: a. An increase in the money supply b. A decrease in the money supply c. An increase in money demand d. None of the above 27. Starting from a position where the nations money demand equals the money supply and its balance of payments is in equilibrium, economic theory suggests that the nations balance of payments would move into a surplus position if there occurred in the nation: a. A decrease in the money supply b. An increase in the money supply c. A decrease in the money demand d. None of the above 28. Starting from a position where the nations money demand equals the money supply and its balance of payments is in equilibrium, economic theory suggests that the nations balance of payments would move into a surplus position if there occurred in the nation: a. An increase in the money demand b. A decrease in the money demand c. An increase in the money supply d. None of the above 29. Assume identical interest rates on comparable securities in the United States and foreign countries. Suppose investors anticipate that in the future the U.S. dollar will depreciate against foreign currencies. Investment funds would tend to: a. Flow from the United States to foreign countries b. Flow from foreign countries to the United States c. Remain totally in foreign countries d. Remain totally in the United States 232 Test Bank for International Economics, 9e 30. Suppose that rising U.S. income leads to higher sales and profits in the United States. This would likely result in: a. Increasing portfolio investment into the United States b. Decreasing portfolio investment into the United States c. Increasing direct investment into the United States d. Decreasing direct investment into the United States 31. Refer to Figure 14.1. Upward movements along U.S. capital-account schedule CA0 would be caused by: a. U.S. interest rates rising relative to foreign interest rates b. U.S. interest rates falling relative to foreign interest rates c. Taxes placed on income earned by U.S. residents from their foreign investments d. Taxes placed on income earned by foreign residents from their U.S. investments Figure 14.1.U.S. Capital Account 32. Refer to Figure 14.1. Downward movements along U.S. capital-account schedule CA 0 would be caused by: a. U.S. interest rates rising relative to foreign interest rates b. U.S. interest rates falling relative to foreign interest rates c. Taxes placed on income earned by U.S. residents from their foreign investments d. Taxes placed on income earned by foreign residents from their U.S. investments Chapter 14:Balance-of-Payments Adjustments Under Fixed Exchange Rates 233 33. Refer to Figure 14.1. The U.S. capital-account schedule would shift upward from CA0 to CA1 if: a. U.S. interest rates exceeded foreign interest rates b. Foreign interest rates exceeded U.S. interest rates c. Taxes were placed on income earned by U.S. residents from their foreign investments d. Taxes were placed on income earned by foreign residents from their U.S. investments 34. Refer to Figure 14.1. The U.S. capital-account schedule would shift upward from CA0 to CA1 if: a. U.S. residents receive subsidies to invest in foreign nations b. U.S. interest rates rise relative to foreign interest rates c. Taxes are reduced on income earned by U.S. residents from their foreign investments d. Expected profits decline on U.S. investments in foreign manufacturing 35. Refer to Figure 14.1. The U.S. capital-account schedule would shift upward from CA0 to CA1 if: a. U.S. political stability improves relative to foreign political stability b. U.S. interest rates rise relative to foreign interest rates c. Taxes are placed on income earned by U.S. residents from foreign investments d. Restrictions are imposed on international loans granted by foreign banks 36. Refer to Figure 14.1. U.S. capital-account schedule CA0 would shift upwards, or downwards, for all of the following reasons except: a. U.S. residents being taxed on income earned from foreign investments b. U.S. banks being restricted on loans that can be made abroad c. U.S. political stability changing relative to foreign political stability d. U.S. interest rates changing relative to foreign interest rates Use the data in Table 14.1 to answer Questions 37 through 42. Table 14.1.Canadas Saving, Investment, Import, and Export Functions (in billions of dollars) Under a System of Fixed Exchange Rates Export Function Investment Function Saving Function Import Function X I S M = = = = 3000 1000 1000 + 0.2Y 500 + 0.25Y 37. Refer to Table 14.1. If Canadas income rises by $200 billion, saving would rise by: a. $10 billion b. $20 billion c. $30 billion d. $40 billion 234 Test Bank for International Economics, 9e 38. Refer to Table 14.1. If Canadas income rises by $200 billion, imports would rise by: a. $50 billion b. $75 billion c. $100 billion d. $125 billion 39. Refer to Table 14.1. Canadas foreign trade multiplier equals: a. 1.75 b. 2.05 c. 2.22 d. 2.64 40. Refer to Table 14.1. Canadas equilibrium level of income is: a. $8,000 billion b. $9,000 billion c. $10,000 billion d. $11,000 billion 41. Refer to Table 14.1. If improved business optimism leads to increases in Canadas planned investment spending from $1,000 billion to $1,200 billion, Canadas equilibrium income rises by approximately: a. $444 billion b. $555 billion c. $666 billion d. $777 billion 42. Refer to Table 14.1. If weak economic conditions abroad result in Canadas exports falling from $3,000 billion to $2,500 billion, Canadas equilibrium income falls by approximately: a. $888 billion b. $990 billion c. $1,110 billion 43. billion d. $1,220 Refer to Figure 14.2. The slope of the (X M) schedule and (S I) schedule indicates that Australias foreign trade multiplier is: a. 0.5 b. 1.0 c. 1.5 d. 2.0 44. Refer to Figure 14.2. Starting at equilibrium income $50 billion, where (S I)0 intersects (X M)0, suppose that improving economic conditions abroad lead to an autonomous increase in Australian exports of $5 billion. Australian income thus __________, which leads to Australias trade account moving to a __________. a. Rises to $60 billion, surplus of $2.5 billion b. Rises to $60 billion, surplus of $5 billion c. Falls to $40 billion, deficit of $2.5 billion d. Falls to $40 billion, deficit of $5 billion Chapter 14:Balance-of-Payments Adjustments Under Fixed Exchange Rates 235 Figure 14.2.Australian Economy Under a Fixed Exchange Rate System 45. Refer to Figure 14.2. Starting at equilibrium income $50 billion, where (S I)0 intersects (X M)0, suppose that worsening economic conditions abroad lead to an autonomous decrease in Australian exports of $5 billion. Australian income thus __________, which leads to Australias trade account moving to a __________. a. Rises to $60 billion, surplus of $2.5 billion b. Rises to $60 billion, surplus of $5 billion c. Falls to $40 billion, deficit of $2.5 billion d. Falls to $40 billion, deficit of $5 billion 46. Refer to Figure 14.2. Starting at equilibrium income $50 billion, where (S I)0 intersects (X M)0, suppose that improving profit expectations lead to an autonomous increase in Australian investment of $5 billion. Australian income thus __________, which leads to Australias trade account moving to a __________. a. Rises to $60 billion, deficit of $2.5 billion b. Rises to $60 billion, deficit of $5 billion c. Falls to $40 billion, surplus of $2.5 billion d. Falls to $40 billion, surplus of $5 billion 47. Refer to Figure 14.2. Starting at equilibrium income $50 billion, where (S I)0 intersects (X M)0, suppose that worsening profit expectations lead to an autonomous decrease in Australian investment of $5 billion. Australian income thus __________, which leads to Australias trade account moving to a __________. a. Rises to $60 billion, deficit of $2.5 billion b. Rises to $60 billion, deficit of $5 billion c. Falls to $40 billion, surplus of $2.5 billion d. Falls to $40 billion, surplus of $5 billion 236 Test Bank for International Economics, 9e 48. Refer to Figure 14.2. Starting at equilibrium income $50 billion, where (S I)0 intersects (X M)0, suppose that increased thriftiness leads to an autonomous increase in Australian saving of $5 billion. Australian income thus __________, which leads to Australias trade account moving to a __________. a. Rises to $60 billion, deficit of $2.5 billion b. Rises to $60 billion, deficit of $5 billion c. Falls to $40 billion, surplus of $2.5 billion d. Falls to $40 billion, surplus of $5 billion 49. Refer to Figure 14.2. Starting at equilibrium income $50 billion, where (S I)0 intersects (X M)0, suppose that dwindling thriftiness leads to an autonomous decrease in Australian saving to $5 billion. Australian income thus __________, which leads to Australias trade account moving to a __________. a. Rises to $60 billion, deficit of $2.5 billion b. Rises to $60 billion, deficit of $5 billion c. Falls to $40 billion, surplus of $2.5 billion d. Falls to $40 billion, surplus of $5 billion 50. Refer to Figure 14.2. Starting at equilibrium income $50 billion, where (S I)0 intersects (X M)0, suppose that changing preferences lead to an autonomous increase in Australian imports of $5 billion. Australian income thus __________, which leads to Australias trade account moving to a __________. a. Rises to $60 billion, surplus of $2.5 billion b. Rises to $60 billion, surplus of $5 billion c. Falls to $40 billion, deficit of $2.5 billion d. Falls to $40 billion, deficit of $5 billion 51. Refer to Figure 14.2. Starting at equilibrium income $50 billion, where (S I)0 intersects (X M)0, suppose that changing preferences lead to an autonomous decrease in Australian imports of $5 billion. Australian income thus __________, which leads to Australias trade account moving to a __________. a. Rises to $60 billion, surplus of $2.5 billion b. Rises to $60 billion, surplus of $5 billion c. Falls to $40 billion, deficit of $2.5 billion d. Falls to $40 billion, deficit of $5 billion TRUE-FALSE QUESTIONS T F 1. Under a fixed exchange rate system, adjustment mechanisms work for the automatic return to current-account balance after the initial balance has been disrupted. T F 2. When a countrys current account moves into disequilibrium, automatic adjustments in tariffs and quotas occur which move the current account back into equilibrium. T F 3. Prices, interest rates, and income are the automatic adjustment variables that help restore current-account equilibrium under a system of fixed exchange rates. Chapter 14:Balance-of-Payments Adjustments Under Fixed Exchange Rates 237 T F 4. That the balance of payments could be adjusted by prices and interest rates, under a fixed exchange rate system, originated with Keynesian theory during the 1930s. T F 5. David Humes price-adjustment mechanism supported the mercantilist view that a nation could maintain a trade surplus indefinitely. T F 6. Under the price-adjustment mechanism, a governments efforts to maintain a current-account surplus is self defeating over the long run because a nations current account automatically moves toward equilibrium. T F 7. Under the gold standard of the 1800s, exchange rates were allowed to float freely in the currency markets. T F 8. Under the gold standard, each participating nation defined the mint price of gold in terms of its national currency and was prepared to buy and sell gold at that price. T F 9. Under the gold standard, a nation with a current-account surplus would realize gold outflows, a decrease in its money supply, and a fall in its domestic price level. T F 10. The essence of the classical price-adjustment mechanism is embodied in the quantity theory of money. T F 11. According to the equation of exchange, the total expenditures on final goods equals the monetary value of the final goods sold. T F 12. Regarding the equation of exchange, the classical economists assumed that final output was below its maximum level while the velocity of money was volatile. T F 13. According to the quantity theory of money, a change in the money supply will induce an inverse and less-than-proportionate change in the price level. T F 14. Under the price-adjustment mechanism, a trade-surplus nation would realize gold inflows, an increase in its money supply, and a loss of international competitiveness. T F 15. The price-adjustment mechanisms relevance to the real world has been questioned on the grounds that national output is generally not at the full-employment level and that the velocity of money is not always constant. T F 16. According to the price-adjustment mechanism, trade deficits can occur only in the long run rather than in the short run. T F 17. Under the price-adjustment mechanism, trade-deficit nations realize price inflation and a loss of competitiveness while trade surplus nations realize price deflation and an improvement in competitiveness. 238 Test Bank for International Economics, 9e T F 18. Under the classical gold standard, adjustments in domestic prices and short-term interest rates automatically promoted balance-of-payments equilibrium over the long run. T F 19. Under the classical gold standard, a trade surplus nation would realize gold inflows, an increase in its money supply, rising interest rates, and net investment inflows. T F 20. The gold standards rules of the game required central bankers in a surplus country to initiate contractionary monetary policies which lead to higher interest rates and net investment inflows. T F 21. The gold standards rules of the game required central bankers in a trade deficit nation to expand the money supply, leading to falling interest rates and net investment outflows. T F 22. The rules of the game served to reinforce and speed up the interest-rate-adjustment mechanism under a system of fixed exchange rates. T F 23. Refer to Figure 14.3. As U.S. interest rates rise relative to foreign interest rates, the U.S. slides upward along schedule CA0, thus moving towards capital-account surplus. Figure 14.3.U.S. Capital Account Under a Fixed Exchange Rate System T F 24. Refer to Figure 14.3. Decreases in U.S. interest rates relative to foreign interest rates would shift U.S. capital-account schedule CA0 downward toward CA1, resulting in net capital outflows from the United States. Chapter 14:Balance-of-Payments Adjustments Under Fixed Exchange Rates 239 T F 25. Refer to Figure 14.3. Falling investment profitability in the United States, relative to investment profitability abroad, would shift the U.S. capital-account schedule downward from CA0 to CA1, resulting in net capital outflows from the United States. T F 26. Refer to Figure 14.3. As the U.S. government decreases taxes on income earned by U.S. residents from foreign investments, the U.S. capital-account schedule shifts downward from CA0 to CA1 and the United States realizes net capital outflows. T F 27. Refer to Figure 14.3. If the political and economic stability of foreign countries worsens relative to that of the United States, the U.S. capital-account schedule would shift downward from CA0 to CA1, resulting in net capital outflows from the United States. T F 28. According to the Keynesian income-adjustment mechanism, income differentials among nations guarantee current-account equilibrium in a world of fixed exchange rates. T F 29. Keynesian theory asserts that, under a system of fixed exchange rates, the influence of income changes in surplus and deficit countries will automatically promote current-account equilibrium. T F 30. The Keynesian income-adjustment mechanism contends that a trade-surplus nation tends to realize falling income and falling imports, thus accentuating the trade surplus. T F 31. The foreign-trade multiplier equals the sum of the marginal propensity to import and the marginal propensity to save. T F 32. If the marginal propensity to save equals 0.2 and the marginal propensity to import equals 0.3, the foreign-trade multiplier equal 2.0. T F 33. For an open economy subject to international trade, equilibrium income occurs where saving plus investment equals imports plus exports. T F 34. If the marginal propensity to save equals 0.1 and the marginal propensity to import equals 0.3, an autonomous increase in exports of $1,000 would expand domestic income by $2,500 which leads to an increase in imports of $750. T F 35. If the marginal propensity to save equals 0.2 and the marginal propensity to import equals 0.3, an autonomous decrease in investment spending of $1 million leads to a $2 million decrease in domestic income and a $600,000 decrease in imports. T F 36. For the income adjustment mechanism to reverse a trade deficit, economic policymakers must be willing to permit domestic income to increase which leads to rising imports. T F 37. Reliance on an automatic adjustment process tends to be unacceptable in trade-deficit nations since it requires them to accept price deflation and/or falling income as a cost of reducing imports. 240 Test Bank for International Economics, 9e T F 38. An automatic adjustment mechanism would require a trade-surplus nation to accept price deflation and/or falling income as the cost of increasing imports. T F 39. Refer to Figure 14.4. Canadas marginal propensity to save equals 0.25 and marginal propensity to import equal 0.5. Figure 14.4.Canadian Economy Under a Fixed Exchange Rate System T F 40. Refer to Figure 14.4. Canadas foreign-trade multiplier equals 2.0. T F 41. Refer to Figure 14.4. Starting at equilibrium income $100 billion, where (S I)0 intersects (X M)0, an autonomous decrease in Canadian imports of $10 billion leads to a $20 billion decrease in income and a trade deficit of $5 billion. T F 42. Refer to Figure 14.4. Starting at equilibrium income $100 billion, where (S I)0 intersects (X M)0, an autonomous increase in Canadian investment of $10 billion leads to a $20 billion increase in income and no change in the countrys trade account. T F 43. Refer to Figure 14.4. Starting at equilibrium income $100 billion, where (S I)0 intersects (X M)0, an autonomous decrease in saving of $10 billion leads to a $20 billion increase in income and a trade deficit of $5 billion. T F 44. Refer to Figure 14.4. Starting at equilibrium income $100 billion, where (S I)0 intersects (X M)0, an autonomous decrease in Canadian exports of $10 billion leads to a $20 decrease in income and a trade deficit of $5 billion. 241 Chapter 14:Balance-of-Payments Adjustments Under Fixed Exchange Rates T F 45. According to the monetary approach, balance-of-payments disequilibriums are the result of imbalances in a countrys money supply and money demand. T F 46. The monetary approach contends that, under a fixed exchange rate system, an excess supply of money leads to a trade surplus. T F 47. The monetary approach contends that, under a fixed exchange rate system, an excess demand for money leads to a trade deficit. T F 48. The monetary approach contends that, under a fixed exchange rate system, policies that increase the supply of money relative to the demand for money lead to a trade surplus. ANSWERS Answers to Multiple-Choice Questions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. d c a d c a b d a a b 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. b b c d d a c d c c d 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. c d a a a a a c a b c 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. d a d d a c c a c d a 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. c a c c a c a 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. F T T F T T F F T F 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. F T F T T F T F F T 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. F F T T T F F F Answers to True-False Questions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. T F T F F T F T F T 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. T F F T T F F T F F

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Chapter 3 Homework Problem Solutions3.6 Cash Collections from customers = sales - bad debt exp - change in accts receivables= $30,251 - $4,321 = $25,9303.7 Cash payment to suppliers = COGS - change in inventory + change in accts payable= -24,165 - 139
UNO - FIN - 252
GTI Inc.Statement of Cash Flows(000's)Year 9 Year 8Cash flow from operationsNet incomeDepreciationAmortizationAccounts ReceivabeInventoriesPrepaymentsAccounts PayableOther Current LiabilitiesDeferred TaxesNet cash provided/used in operations
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GTI, INC.WORKSHEET FOR STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWSYEAR 8 (000'S)CASHACC/RECINVENTORIESPREPAYMENTSP,P & E netOTHER ASSETSTOTAL ASSETSACCOUNTS PAYABLENOTES PAYABLEOTHER CURRENT LIAB.LONG-TERM DEBTDEFERRED TAXESPREFERRED STOCKCOMMON STOCKPAID-IN
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XYZ Statement of Cash FlowsIndirect MethodCash flow from operations:Net incomeDepreciationAmortizationGain on sale of landChange in receivablesChange in inventoryChange in accounts payableWages payableInterest payableTaxes payableDeferred tax
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FNBK 3000 Financial Reporting & AnalysisReview sheet 2nd examProfitability and Risk AnalysisDefinitions: Trend Analysis, Benchmarking, Common SizeCalculate and analyze all major ratios as given in class according to:Internal liquidity:Current ratio
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Financial statementAn overviewFinancial statements are potentially both MAP and MAZEMap: Help its user reach the desired goal through clarity of representation. Form basis for understanding the financial position of a firm Allow users to assess hist
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Percentage of Completion MethodReed ConstructionContract price5,000,000initial total cost estimate4,000,000Actual%WorkGrossYearCostsCompletedRevenueProfit15%750,000150,0001600,00050%2,500,000500,00022,000,0001,750,000350,00031,4
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A firm has the following balance sheet accounts:Cash20Marketable securities15Accounts receivable40Inventory75Current assets150Current liabilities1041. What is the firm's current ratio?1.44232. What is the firm's quick ratio?0.72123. What
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Chapters7and8MaterialsRevenueRecognitionInventoryDepreciationRevenueRecognitionIntroRevenueRecognitionIntroAccrualBasisofAccounting WelearnedinChapter4thatatimingproblemoftenarisesbecausethecashreceivedfromaparticularoperatingactivitymayoccurinad
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Profitability and Risk AnalysisIf current ratio > 1: A decrease of equal to CA + CL will cause CR toincrease.An increase of equal amount will cause CR to decrease.If current ratio < 1: A decrease of equal amounts to both CA + CL willcause CR to decre
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
BASIC PROBABILITYERCAN KARADASContents1. Probability PostulatesIn the previous section we have seen how to dene the sample space for anexperiment, and we have talked about what we mean by an event dened on asample space . In this section, we will be
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
PROBLEM SET 1ERCAN KARADAS(To be handed in at the beginning of the class, July 9)(1) Suppose that you have data on Education and annual Family Income of 10individuals:(a) Show the data in a scatter-plot chart.(b) Calculate variance for both Educatio
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PROBLEM SET 2ERCAN KARADAS(To be handed in at the beginning of the class, July 16.Randomly chosen two problem will be graded)(1) Consider the following experiment: Suppose that I brought a dart board tothe class, and I started to play with one you th
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PROBLEM SET 3ERCAN KARADAS(To be handed in at the beginning of the class, July 23.Randomly chosen two problem will be graded)(1) A contractor estimates the probabilities for the number of days required tocomplete a certain type of construction projec
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
PROBLEM SET 3ERCAN KARADAS(To be left to the box in front of my oce at or before 5pm, Friday-July 20. Myoce is at 19 West 4th, 7th oor, room 717.Randomly chosen two problem will be graded)(1) A contractor estimates the probabilities for the number of
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
PROBLEM SET 4ERCAN KARADASTo be handed in at the beginning of the class, July 30.(Randomly chosen two problem will be graded)(1) It is estimated that the time that a well-known rock band, the LivingIngrates, spends on stage at its concerts follow a n
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PROBLEM SET 5ERCAN KARADASTo be handed in at the beginning of the class, August 6.(Randomly chosen two problem will be graded)(1) (7.3) A random sample of 10 economists produced the following forecastsfor percentage growth in real domestic product in
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
PROBLEM SET 1SOLUTIONSERCAN KARADAS(To be handed in at the beginning of the class, July 9)(1) Suppose that you have data on Education and annual Family Income of 10individuals:(a) Show the data in a scatter-plot chart.(b) Calculate variance for bot
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
PROBLEM SET 2SOLUTIONSERCAN KARADAS(To be handed in at the beginning of the class, July 16.Randomly chosen two problem will be graded)(1) Sample space for a dart game with 10 possible scores.In this type of questions it is useful rst try to give an
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
PROBLEM SET 3SOLUTIONSERCAN KARADAS(To be left to the box in front of my oce at or before 5pm, Friday-July 20. Myoce is at 19 West 4th, 7th oor, room 717.Randomly chosen two problem will be graded)(1) Let us dene a random variable X as the number of
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
SOLVED PROBLEMSERCAN KARADAS(1) Three distinct integers are chosen at random from the rst 20 positiveintegers. Compute the probability that(a) their sum is even(b) their product is evenSolution(a) Sum of three integers is even if and only if all of
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ALGEBRA OF SETSERCAN KARADASRemember we discussed in the rst lecture that one of the main goal in statistics is to draw conclusions about a populations of objects by looking at someappropriately chosen sample. The process of obtaining information from
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
GEOMETRIC MEANERCAN KARADASConsider the following question:What is the average growth rate of sales if sales have grown 25% over the last 5years.You might tempt to say the answer is 5% simply by dividing total increase insales to the number of years
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
Math 361, Problem Set 2September 17, 2010Due: 9/13/101. (1.3.11) A bowl contains 16 chips, of which 6 are red, 7 are white and 3 are blue.If four chips are taken at random and without replacement, find the probabilitythat(a) each of the 4 chips is r
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
Math 361, Problem Set 2September 17, 2010Due: 9/13/101. (1.3.11) A bowl contains 16 chips, of which 6 are red, 7 are white and 3are blue. If four chips are taken at random and without replacement, ndthe probability that(a) each of the 4 chips is red
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
Danny SantanaStatistics Summer 2012Problem Set #2Ercan Karadas1A.) S = cfw_ (x1, y1), (x2,y2), , (x5,y5) : xi,yi cfw_1, 2, , 10; i = 1, 2, , 5.1B.) A1 = cfw_ (2,4), (5,6), (7,4), (4,4), (9,8) ; A2 = cfw_ (2,4), (5,6), (7,4), (4,4), (9,8),(3,5), (2,6
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
Chapter 3:Probability3.1A is the complement of event A and contains all of the samples pointsthat are not in event A. Therefore, A = (E2, E4, E5, E7, E8, E10)3.2a. A intersection B contains the sample points that are in both A and B.The intersectio
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
PROBLEM SET 2ERCAN KARADAS(To b e handed in at the beginning of the class, July 16.Randomly chosen two problem will be graded)(1) Consider the following exp eriment: Suppose that I brought a dart board to the class,and I started to play with one you
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
Chapter 1:Describing Data: Graphical1.1 a. Numerical discrete. The number comes from a counting process. b. Numerical discrete. Since the response is an actual cost, it is discrete because the value comes from a counting process. c. Numerical discrete.
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Chapter 2:Describing Data: Numerical2.1 Cruise agency number of weekly specials to the Caribbean: 20, 73, 75, 80, 82 a. Compute the mean, median and mode x 330 x = i = = 66 n 5 median = middlemost observation = 75 mode = no unique mode exists b. The med
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
Chapter 3:Probability3.1 3.2A is the complement of event A and contains all of the samples points that are not in event A. Therefore, A = (E2, E4, E5, E7, E8, E10) a. A intersection B contains the sample points that are in both A and B. The intersectio
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Chapter 4:Discrete Random Variables and Probability Distributions4.1 Daily computer sales is a discrete random variable that can take on no more than a countable number of values 4.2 The number of defective parts produced in daily production is a discre
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Chapter 5:Continuous Random Variables and Probability Distributions5.1 P(1.4 < X < 1.8) = F(1.8) F(1.4) = (.5)(1.8) (.5)(1.4) = 0.20 5.2 P(1.0 < X < 1.9) = F(1.9) F(1.0) = (.5)(1.9) (.5)(1.0) = 0.45 5.3 P(X < 1.4) = F(1.4) = (.5)(1.4) = 0.7 5.4 P(X > 1.
NYU - ECON - Econ UA-18
Chapter 6:Sampling and Sampling Distributions6.1a. Probability distribution for one die: Die outcome 1 2 3 4 5 6Probability 1/6 1/6 1/6 1/6 1/6 1/6b. Sampling distribution of the sample means from rolling a pair of dice: x Total Sample Prob. of x 2 1
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Chapter 7:Estimation: Single Population7.1a. Check for nonnormalityThe distribution shows no significant evidence of nonnormality. b. Point estimate of the population mean that is unbiased, efficient and consistent. X 560 Unbiased point estimator is t
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Chapter 8:Estimation: Additional Topics8.1a. Find the 95% confidence interval for the difference in means s 2.8 d tn 1, 2 d = 25.4 2.145 = 23.8493 up to 26.9507 nd 15 b. Find the margin of error for a 95% confidence interval s 2.8 ME = tn 1, 2 d = ME =
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Chapter 9:Hypothesis Testing: Single Population9.1 9.2H : p .2; H : p < .2;0 1H H: No change in interest rates is warranted : Reduce interest rates to stimulate the economy 10 0 A9.3H :pp pB: There is no difference in the percentage of underfi
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Chapter 10:Hypothesis Testing: Additional Topics10.1 n = 25 paired observations with sample means of 50 and 60 for populations 1 and 2. Can you reject the null hypothesis at an alpha of .05 if a. sd = 20, H 0 : 1 2 = 0; H 1 : 1 2 > 0; 10 0 t= = 2.500, p
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Chapter 11:Simple Regression11.1a. Prepare a scatter plot.Cov ( x, y ) 3.25 = = 0.65 2 5 sx c. Compute b0 = y b1 x = 7 0.65(4) = 4.4 b. Compute b1 = xi1 3 4 5 7 20y i ( xi x ) ( xi x ) 2 ( y i y ) ( y i y ) 2 ( xi x ) ( y i y )5 7 6 8 9 35 -3 -1 0
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Chapter 12:Multiple Regression 12.1 Given the following estimated linear model: y = 10 + 3 x1 + 2 x2 + 4 x3 a. y = 10 + 3(20) + 2(11) + 4(10) = 132 b. y = 10 + 3(15) + 2(14) + 4(20) = 163 c. y = 10 + 3(35) + 2(19) + 4(25) = 253 d. y = 10 + 3(10) + 2(17)
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Chapter 13:Additional Topics in Regression Analysis13.1Yi = 0 + 1 X 1i + 2 X 2i + 3 X 3i + 4 X 4i + i where Yi = College GPA X1 = SAT score X2 = 1 for sophomore, 0 otherwise X3 = 1 for junior, 0 otherwise X4 = 1 for senior, 0 otherwise The excluded cat
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Chapter 14:Analysis of Categorical Data14.1 H 0 : first preferences are evenly distributed across the three books. H1 : otherwiseBook Observed Number Probability (Ho) Expected Number Chi-square calculation Made Easy 17 0.333 20 0.45 Without Tears Profi
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Chapter 15:Analysis of Variance15.1Given the Analysis of Variance table, compute mean squares for between and for within groups. Compute the F ratio and test the hypothesis that the group means are equal. H 0 : 1 = 2 = 3 = 4 = 5 , H1 : otherwise SSG SS