Spontaneous
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Spontaneous

Course Number: ECE 351, Summer 2012

College/University: Ashford University

Word Count: 931

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Spontaneous, Guided and Directed Play Stephanie Teal ECE351 Play and Learning for the Young Child Wendy Anderson August 13, 2012 Abstract It has been said and passed down from generation to generation that a child learns through play. Play is a vital part of a childs life. Play is how they children develop physically, emotionally, cognitively, and socially. In this paper I will discuss the importance of...

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Guided Spontaneous, and Directed Play Stephanie Teal ECE351 Play and Learning for the Young Child Wendy Anderson August 13, 2012 Abstract It has been said and passed down from generation to generation that a child learns through play. Play is a vital part of a childs life. Play is how they children develop physically, emotionally, cognitively, and socially. In this paper I will discuss the importance of spontaneous, guided and directed play. I will look at how important a teachers and parents role are in the development of play in a childs life. Children need to have the freedom to explore and play; it is one of the most important parts of their day, in school and at home. Spontaneous, Guided and Directed Play How does play fit into a childs life? Play enables a childs ability to discover and make sense of their world and the people in it. Children possess the natural curiosity to explore and learn. From the time a child is able to see and focus, they long to discover what is surrounding them. They respond to voices and as a parent we know that from the time a child can crawl they will try to search and find new things to explore. As parents and teachers we provide safe and appropriate toys for our children to learn and play with. A childs time is not wasted playing but rather is a time that is spent building new knowledge and developing in all areas of their life. In one article that I researched, from the Encyclopedia of Childrens Health, it states that play is the work of children, through play children learn about themselves, shapes, colors, cause and effect. Play helps build a childs social and psychomotor skills that they will use throughout their lives (Encyclopedia of Childrens Health). We as parents and teachers do not realize that play are a way that children express their feelings like fear, happiness and sometimes anxiety and sorrow. Allow a child to play helps them gain control of their selves, their thoughts, and build their self-esteem. Often in situations where a child has been a victim of abuse or maybe has witnessed a violent crime, police and trained professionals will use play to allow the child to convey what has happened to them or around them without the penalty of fear. Play benefits children in many ways. It helps them develop their fine and gross motor skills. For example: as babies play with their rattles they learn to grasp the rattle then learn how to shale the rattle. Older children learn skills like kicking or throwing a ball. For emotional development a child may play in the dramatic play area of their classroom and role play like being a mommy or daddy. A teacher may facilitate the play by providing the age appropriate area for the dramatic paly like area a pretend kitchen and kitchenware for the children to use. When a parent or teacher interacts with a child through play they build a bond through trust, love and respect. They teach the child the importance of sharing and being a good person. Through play they help a child learn how to communicate and learn self-importance. In another way that children develop is cognitively. There are many are many educational toys that allow a child to learn shapes, colors, texture and size. These include books and puzzles that can be a part of a childs every day play and learning. Flashcards can help a child build their word association and concept of the world. Building a childs social development through play is important for their social skills they will need in life. It teaches those boundaries, how to share; taking turns as well as teamwork. A good point to think on is one presented by Margaret Kernan, Ph, D, for the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment, NCAA, viewing play as a fundamental need and right of all children, and central to their well-being offers a powerful construct with which to =legitimize and secure the place of play in the lives of young children at home and in public settings (M. Kernan 2007). As a parent and teachers we can facilitate a childs learning by offering them age appropriate activities and materials that support their growth and development. We can see paly from different perspectives where a childs play can be one where they choose the activity which is motivated by their own mind and personality. Through a childs eyes we see the world in a totally different light and allowing them to show us the world through paly can show us worlds we as parents and teachers that we never could have imagined. Through play children learn and develop as individuals, and learn how to be members of the world around them. Conclusion Play is how they children develop physically, emotionally, cognitively, and socially. It is our role as teachers and parents to provide safe, learning rich environments so each child can grow and develop in their own way. Throughout this paper we have learned just how important play is to a childs life. It builds their self-esteem, trust of others, and develops healthy boundaries they will use for the rest of their lives. References Kernan, M., Ph. D (2007). Play As a Context for Early Learning and Development. Retrieved on August 13, 2012 from www.ncca.ie/en/Curriculum....Papers/Play_paper.pdf Play- Stages, Definition, Description, Common Problems (2012). Retrieved August 13, 2012 from www.healthof children.com Van Hoorn, J., Nourot, P.M., Scales, B., Alward, K. R. Pearson (2011). Paly At The Center of the Curriculum.

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