Chemistry Review Answers (Second Half)
8 Pages

Chemistry Review Answers (Second Half)

Course Number: SCIENCE 1515, Spring 2012

College/University: FIU

Word Count: 1475

Rating:

Document Preview

Section 28: Carbohydrates: Functions of Carbohydrates Part A Polymers that contain sugars ... (a) may store hereditary information. (b) may store energy. (c) may protect cells. Both (b) and (c). (a), (b), and (c). Correct Good choice! Polymers that contain sugars do all the named functions and more. For example, they also lubricate the path of roots through soil and they glue plant cells together. Section 32:...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> Florida >> FIU >> SCIENCE 1515

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

28: Section Carbohydrates: Functions of Carbohydrates Part A Polymers that contain sugars ... (a) may store hereditary information. (b) may store energy. (c) may protect cells. Both (b) and (c). (a), (b), and (c). Correct Good choice! Polymers that contain sugars do all the named functions and more. For example, they also lubricate the path of roots through soil and they glue plant cells together. Section 32: Lipids: Functions of Lipids Part A What do fats, steroids, and waxes have in common? (a) Moderate polarity. (b) Low solubility in water. (c) They occur in membranes. Both (a) and (c). Both (b) and (c). Correct Correct! Low water solubility is the trait that defines lipids. Part B Dr. Haxton told one of his students, "To move in the bloodstream, fats need the help of phospholipids." What would a good student say? Yes. Nonpolar molecules aren't compatible with water. Not so. Fats are small enough to travel easily without help. Right. Fats are too polar to travel alone in water. You have it backwards. Fats help phospholipids to travel. Sorry, Dr. Haxton! Help comes from cholesterol, not phospholipids. Correct Good choice! Water rejects nonpolar molecules such as fats, so fats travel inside particles that are coated with polar parts of phospholipids and proteins. Section 36: Proteins: Functions of Proteins Part A Which biological activity does NOT directly involve proteins? Sensing light. Defending cells against viruses. Changing the shape of a cell. Breaking food polymers into smaller molecules. None of the above; proteins are involved in all of them. Correct Right! Proteins have all the listed functions and many more. Section 40: Proteins: Secondary Structure Part A The helical foldings of proteins are stabilized mainly by bonds between ... water molecules. ionic groups. S and S. CO and NH. side chains. Correct Right! Hydrogen bonds between these groups keep the helix coiled. Part B Which of the following is true of pleated sheet foldings within a polypeptide? The side chains are parallel to the plane of the sheet. Its loops are held in place mainly by disulfide bridges. They depend on regular occurrence of CO and NH. They are part of the polypeptide's quaternary structure. All the above. Correct Yes! Occurring at regular intervals along the backbone, these groups stabilize the sheet by forming many hydrogen bonds between neighboring segments of the polypeptide. Part C What will probably be the effect on a protein if you replace the amino acid proline with the amino acid glycine (side chain -H) at several points? The altered protein will have shorter helices than before. The altered protein will have fewer hydrogen bonds than before. There will be less rotation around backbone bonds than before. The primary structure of the altered protein will be shorter than before. The altered protein will have longer helices than before. Correct Great! Helical segments come to an end when they meet a proline residue, because proline grips the backbone in two places. Remove proline, and the helix can continue. Part D The helical foldings in proteins ... are kept folded by hydrogen bonds. are kept folded by base-pairing. are kept folded by forces between side chains on adjacent turns of the helix. are part of the protein's primary structure. None of the above. Correct Yes! The hydrogen bonds form between C=O and N-H groups of the backbone. Section 44: Nucleic Acids: Structure Part A RNA nucleotides contain __________ than DNA nucleotides. different purines more oxygen less oxygen less phosphorus None of the above. Correct Good thinking! RNA uses the sugar ribose, which has one more oxygen atom than the sugar used in DNA (deoxyribose). Part B The orange unit with two linked rings in this diagram represents .... a sugar. a nucleotide. a purine. an amino acid. a pyrimidine. Correct Yes! Purines have two linked rings. Part C How likely is it that the next base, out of sight at the top of this polymer, is uracil? The chances are very good, since the bases are equally common. It's as likely as any of the bases; about one chance in four. Not a chance, if it's a finished molecule with no errors. It's sure to be uracil, since A, C, and G are already present. Since RNA has five bases, there is one chance in five. Correct Good thinking! The sugars tell you this is DNA, which doesn't have uracil. Part D Which statement helps to explain how DNA stores information? DNA hereditary contains four kinds of nitrogenous bases. DNA contains 20 kinds of amino acids. DNA binds a master copy of each kind of protein. DNA is made from thousands of kinds of monomers. DNA is a self-replicating type of protein. Correct Correct! Information is stored in the sequence of nitrogenous bases along the DNA polymer. The bases include two kinds of pyrimidines and two kinds of purines. Part E DNA and mRNA differ with respect to ... Both (a) and (b). (c) how many kinds of nucleotides are used to make the polymer. (a) the kind of sugar they contain. (d) the ability to make a double helix. (b) the kinds of purines they contain. Correct Right! RNA uses ribose; DNA uses deoxyribose. The polymer names reflect this difference: RNA is short for Ribonucleic acid; DNA is short for deoxyribonucleic acid. Section 48: Enzymes & Pathways: Enzyme Action Part A Which statement is true of enzymes? (a) Enzymes can be either proteins or RNA molecules. (b) When a cell makes an enzyme, it makes many copies. (c) Their substrate specificity involves matching of shapes. Both (a) and (b). (a), (b), and (c). Correct Good choice! There are many copies of each enzyme; they're usually proteins but sometimes they are RNA; and they only attack substrates that fit the shape and charge of the active site. Part B What's false? (1) Enzymes may change shape when they bind substrates; (2) Enzymes provide no energy for the reaction, except collision energy; (3) Enzymes may release substrates. None of the statements is false. Statement 1 is false. Statement 2 is false. Statement 3 is false. All three statements are false. Correct Great! Enzymes do all these things. Part C How can induced fit influence the specificity of an enzyme? (a) It can not influence the specificity of an enzyme. (b) It moves the reactive portion of the enzyme closer to the substrate. (c) The enzyme's active site changes shape to fit the correct substrate but not other molecules. Both (b) and (c). None of the above. Correct Correct! The active site of the enzyme will change shape to make a better fit with only the appropriate substrate, which can bring the reactive portion of the enzyme closer to the substrate. Part D Enzymes speed reactions mainly by ... providing activation energy. lowering EA. raising the kinetic energy of the reactants. protecting the catalysts. None of the above. Correct Yes! Enzymes always lower EA, though they may have other effects as well. With a lower EA, more collisions can produce the transition state. Part E Which fact is most important in explaining how enzymes speed reactions? High-energy collisions are less common than low-energy collisions. Large molecules collide more energetically than small molecules. It takes less energy to break a hydrogen bond than a covalent bond. Very low potential energy tends to make molecules unstable. Every reaction step adds to the time required for the overall reaction. Correct Good choice! Enzymes provide reaction pathways that have low activation energy requirements. This allows low-energy collisions to cause reactions. Part F In an experiment with an enzyme, the 58th amino acid seems to form a covalent bond with a substrate molecule as part of the catalytic process. What would you say? There must be an error. Enzymes don't make covalent bonds with substrates. At some point the bond between the amino acid and the substrate must break. It couldn't happen. Catalysis doesn't alter the enzyme. This is probably a case where the enzyme changes the position of equilibrium. This is possible in theory, but it's never been observed. Correct Right! To work repeatedly, the enzyme must return to its original state at the end of each catalytic cycle. Some steps may form bonds or break bonds between the enzyme and substrate. Part G Dr. Haxton thinks a certain enzyme works by the steps shown in the animation below. What would a good student say about the proposed mechanism? If he's right, it's a first-an enzyme that donates atoms to a substrate! It has too many steps to be realistic. Enzymes simplify reactions. It's unlikely. Enzymes don't make covalent bonds with their substrates. It's unrealistic because it could run in reverse. Enzymes do the kinds of things that are shown here; it's possible. Correct Right! Enzymes may give and take atoms and form temporary covalent bonds with substrates as they catalyze reactions.

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

FIU - SCIENCE - 1515
2.Atoms & Molecules: IonsPart AA cation with two units of charge has 10 neutrons and 8 protons. The ion also has .6 electrons.Part BWhich statement is true of the molecule shown here?It's both a cation and an anion.Part CThe atoms shown here will
FIU - SCIENCE - 1515
Chemistry Review by Arelys RodriguezSections: 3,6,9,12,19,23,27,31,35,39,43,47,51Section 3 Atoms & Molecules: MoleculePart A (question 1)Answer: Structural FormulaSection 6 Atoms & Molecules: ElectronegativityPart A (question 1)Answer: O, N, C, HP
FIU - SCIENCE - 1515
Mastering Biology Chemistry ReviewVictoria EncaladaSection1-Atoms&Moles: Atomic StructuresA. C-8 neutrons in the nucleusB. D-Electrons determine the atom's sizeC. D-the first shell shouldn't have 3 electronsD. C-The valence shell has higher energy t
FIU - ENGLISH - 607
Victoria EncaladaAP English LangP-108/22/12Funny, sarcastic, and truthful, isnt that what humorists are? They play an important role,that not everyone can play, thus the perks. There is no hesitation about the fact that they can saywhatever they fee
Ashford University - ECON - 101
Global PopulationSCI207Jacqueline PooleBrcope4328Oct. 1, 2012Contemporary interdisciplinary research on human-induced global environmental changerecognizes two broad and overlapping fields of study. That of industrial metabolism investigatesthe flo
Ashford University - ECON - 101
Brooke CopleyBrcope4328Laboratory: Population BiologyComplete the Population Biology Lab found at:http:/www.mhhe.com/biosci/genbio/virtual_labs/BL_04/BL_04.html. This lab gives you theopportunity to explore the affects of competition on population gr
Ashford University - ECON - 101
PurposeThe purpose of this lab is to learn more about how connected you are to the ecosystems andbiosphere that you inhabit. You will learn how your everyday choices contribute to the humanimpacts on our environment youve been learning about. Most impo
Ashford University - ECON - 101
PURPOSEOverviewAs you learned in Chapter 1, ecosystems are a complex and delicate balancing game. Theaddition or removal of any species affects many other species that might compete for or providefood. These interspecific interactions are further infl
Ashford University - ECON - 101
Stereotypes and FallaciesPHI:103Informal LogicInstructor: Danika NovakBrcope4328Sep. 10, 2012Stereotyping happens to everyone. Peope aways have an opinion and think they are "experts". Ihave encountered a number of stereotyping while sadly at the s
Ashford University - ECON - 101
Should abortion be legal?PHI103:Informal LogicInstructor: Danika NovakBrcope4328Sep. 1, 2012The issue of Abortion is very controversial in todays society, even in this years presidentialelection. Although many people think it should be legalized, th
Universidade de Coimbra - EEE - 101
Useful Formulas1 of 3http:/www.elec-toolbox.com/Formulas/Useful/formulas.htmHere are some common formulas that are frequently used in the field.Options:- Motor Formulas- Transformer FormulasE = Voltage/ I = Amps/W = Watts / PF =Power Factor/ Ef
University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign - PHYS - 225
Midterm Exam: Formulae from Weeks 1 - 7!"!"t = (t x/c)x = (x t c)y = yz = zvc11# $2'$)%$&!" # ))0)(0x ! (ct , x, y, z )0 0*,0 0,1 0,,0 1+%$&$00t = (t + x/c)x = (x + t c)y = yz = zdt"ud! =dx !"= $ u c, u x , u y , uzd
East Carolina - ENG - 1200
Abigail SandersZachary PerkinsonEnglish 1200 0572/28/10Destination 360There are many different places on college campuses all around America to eat at. EastCarolina has five, soon to be six, different buildings with numerous styles of food mixed tog
East Carolina - ENG - 1200
Abigail SandersZachary PerkinsonEnglish 1200 0575/3/2010Annotated BibliographyAlder, James. Super Bowl 1. About. n.d Web. 14 Apr 2010http:/football.about.com/cs/superbowl/a/bl_superbowl1.htmThis article discusses the very first Super Bowl in 1967.
East Carolina - ENG - 1200
Abigail SandersZachary PerkinsonEnglish 1200 0574/23/2010What could these shoes tell?On April 1st 1967 CSM Paul Meyers walked onto the fields of Vietnam in his own pair ofarmy boots. While he was serving his country a lot of things around him change
East Carolina - ENG - 3420
The story of the Hour by Kat Chopin was a very interesting short story sampling because whenyou started to read it you thought it would be about a lady that would be heart broken anddepressed about her husbands sudden death, because that is what you exp
East Carolina - ENG - 3420
For the story by Alexie called " The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfighting inHeaven" it was meant to be a ironical name because he was not actually alone ranger that fought people with his fists. He was just alone in the worldbecause he would push everyon
East Carolina - ENG - 3420
Julians mother is uncomfortable with the changes that are happeningaround her and he sees her as a child and how children are usuallyoblivious to changes happening around them by how she is so openingracists and talks about the two hundred slaves that
East Carolina - ENG - 3420
The narrator Heroine and her husband John rented the Colonial Mansion because John thinksthat living in this estate will help her with her disorder. The Heroine believes that there issomething queer about the place that the place and is questioning why
East Carolina - ENG - 3420
The story Sonnys Blues is narrated by Sonnys older brother, the story was about how the olderbrother felt when he found out that his brother was a heroin addicted and needed to go to rehab.The way that he described it; Sonny has been on the wrong path f
East Carolina - NUTR - 2105
Diet Analysis ProjectAbigail SandersNUTR 2105Ms. Alexis BrileyApril 12, 20101Nutrient/RDA/Intake (type% ofHow can you improve your intake (list 3 different foods*calorieAIintake inRDA/you should increase or decrease, use to indicateAIwhet
East Carolina - NUTR - 2105
Review Sheet Exam 3Signs and types of eating disorders and who is most likely at risk for them?-Anorexia- extreme weight loss, disordered body image, fear of weight gain; Girlsbetween 12-18 they have a false body temp and finds security in control; abn
East Carolina - NUTR - 2105
Study Guide for Quiz 12Food Safety/HungerBe able to name two of the groups who are at risk for foodborne illness. (fbi = foodborne illness)-Pregnant women and elderlyKnow the reasons why fbis are more of concern to us than it was to your grandmother-
East Carolina - NUTR - 2105
Study Guide for Exam 2Spring 2010Need to know:Best absorbed sources of amino acids -ProteinsCharacteristics of an essential amino acid Indispensable and must be supplied infoodDenaturation The uncoiling of protein that changes its ability to functio
East Carolina - NUTR - 2105
Vitamin Study SheetWater- Soluble VitaminThiaminPrimary Function-Necessary for CHOdigestion-Easily destroyed byheatBEST Food Source-Pork, whole grains,fortified bread/cerceal,green beans, milk, organmeats, peanuts,beans/seedsThiaminase found
UT Chattanooga - ENGR - 1040
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Marketing Ch. 1 lecture notesOne concept all successful companies have in common is that they arestrongly customer focused; they try to satisfy customer needs and build lastingcustomer relations.Marketing, more than any other business function, deals
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Accounting ILecture Notes/Observations Chapter 1 day number 1 last revised 8/11In class today, I discussed the following items, in the hope that I can help build contextthat will explain accounting concepts throughout the semester:Why study Accounting
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Chapter 1 - Chapter ReviewAccounting Defined1.(S.O. 1) Accounting is an information system that identifies, records, andcommunicates the economic events of an organization to interested users.a. The first part of the process, identifying, involves se
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Chapter 1 - Lecture OutlineA.What Accounting Is.1. Identifying economic events involves selecting the economicactivities relevant to a particular organization.2. Once identified, economic events are recorded to provide ahistory of the organizations
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Chapter 1 - Study Objectives1. EXPLAIN WHAT ACCOUNTING IS.2. IDENTIFYTHEACCOUNTING.USERSANDUSESOF3. UNDERSTAND WHY ETHICS IS A FUNDAMENTALBUSINESS CONCEPT.4. EXPLAIN THE MEANING OF GENERALLYACCEPTED ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES AND THECOST PRINCIPLE
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Chapter 1 - Study ObjectivesACCOUNTING is.Accounting is an information system that identifies, records, and communicates the economicevents of an organization to interested users.The first part of the process, identifying, involves selecting those eve
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Accounting ILecture Notes/Observations Chapter 1 day number 2 last revised 8/11In class today I lectured from and reviewed PowerPoint slides from Chapter 1. Here aresome of the highlights:Accounting is an information system that: Identifies Records
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Chapter 2 - Chapter ReviewThe Account1.(S.O. 1) An account is an individual accounting record of increases and decreases ina specific asset, liability, or owner's equity item.2.In its simplest form, an account consists of (a) the title of the accoun
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Chapter 2 - Lecture OutlineA.The Account.An account is an individual accounting record of increases anddecreases in a specific asset, liability, or owners equity item.An account consists of three parts:1. The title of the account.2. A left or debit
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Chapter 2 - Study Objectives1. EXPLAIN WHAT AN ACCOUNT IS AND HOW ITHELPS IN THE RECORDING PROCESS.2. DEFINE DEBITS AND CREDITS AND EXPLAINHOW THEY ARE USED TO RECORDBUSINESS TRANSACTIONS.3. IDENTIFY THE BASICRECORDING PROCESS.STEPSINTHE4. EXPL
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Accounting ILecture Notes/Observations Chapter 1 - day number 6 last updated 8/11Today in class we reviewed the assigned homework P2A and P3A (part a only). Following aresome comments on these problems.In P2A, you placed the listed transactions into t
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Accounting ILecture Notes/Observations Chapter 2 - day number 8 last updated 8/11Today in class I used PowerPoint (PPT) slides 1-17 to lecture on Chapter 2. Here is arecap.TWe were introduced to the visual representation of an account called aaccoun
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Accounting ILecture Notes/Observations Chapter 2 - day number 11 last updated 8/11We reviewed the following homework in class today that dealt with journalizingtransactions in the general journal.Before I review the journalizing process, I want to sho
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Accounting ILecture Notes/Observations Chapter 2 day number 12 last revised 8/11We again reviewed how to journalize transactions by completing Problem 3A (part bonly) in class. Look back to Day 11 for a review of journalizing.We also reviewed financia
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Accounting ILecture Notes/Observations on Chapter 3 day number 19 last revised 8/11Today we went through some of the supplemental adjusting entry problems (assigned in week #6). Iwill comment on these and will place each of them into the category of ad
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Accounting ILecture Notes/Observations on Chapter 3 days 14-18 last revised 8/11We started Chapter 3 by first reviewing why we have to adjust the accounts that we properlyjournalized in the form of Transaction Journal Entries, in Chapters 1 & 2. The pr
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Accounting ILecture Notes/Observations Chapter 5 - second dayToday, lets review all the entries (and there really arent that many) for maintainingperpetual inventory, merchandise inventory (MI for short) records my numbering is inthe order the entries
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Accounting ILecture Notes/Observations Chapter 5 third dayAdditional Chapter 5 material of interest is a follows:Multiple-Step Income Statemento The format for our income statement has now evolved into a morecomplex beast all because we are now invol
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Accounting Procedures I On Line Course IntroductionWelcome to the world of Accounting Procedures I. There are a number of items posted onMoodle for your use during class and here is some guidance on utilizing this information.Refer to the posted syllab
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Accounting ILecture Notes/Observations Chapter 1 day number 3 last revised 8/11Today in class, we reviewed the assigned homework BE3,4,5 and E6. BE3 is a funny little exercise that shows the interaction of changing parts of theaccounting equation (rem
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Chapter 3 - Chapter ReviewTime-Period Assumption1.(S.O. 1) The time period (or periodicity) assumption assumes that the economic life ofa business can be divided into artificial time periods.2.Accounting time periods are generally a month, a quarter
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Chapter 3 - Lecture OutlineA.Time Period Assumption.1. The assumption that the economic life of a business can bedivided into artificial time periods.2. Monthly and quarterly time periods are called interim periods.3. An accounting time period that
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Chapter 3 - Study Objectives1. EXPLAIN THE TIME PERIOD ASSUMPTION.2. EXPLAIN THE ACCRUAL BASIS OF ACCOUNTING.3. EXPLAIN WHY ADJUSTING ENTRIES ARE NEEDED.4. IDENTIFY THE MAJOR TYPES OF ADJUSTINGENTRIES.5. PREPAREADJUSTINGPREPAYMENTS.ENTRIESFOR6.
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Accounting ILecture Notes/Observations Chapter 1 day number 4, last revised 8/11Today in class we reviewed the assigned homework. Just a few comments (some repeated, butthey bear repeating) on the homework: I hand pick homework to assign, so you dont
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Chapter 4 - Chapter ReviewPreparing a Worksheet1.(S.O. 1) The steps in preparing a work sheet are:a. Prepare a trial balance on the work sheet.b. Enter the adjustments in the adjustments columns.c. Enter adjusted balances in the adjusted trial balan
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Chapter 4 - Lecture OutlineA.Using a Work Sheet.1. A work sheet is a multiple-column form that may be used in theadjustment process and in financial statement preparation.2. The steps in the preparation of a work sheet:a.Step 1:Prepare a trial bal
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Chapter 4 - Study Objectives1. PREPARE A WORK SHEET.2. EXPLAINBOOKS.THEPROCESSOFCLOSINGTHE3. DESCRIBE THE CONTENT AND PURPOSE OF APOST-CLOSING TRIAL BALANCE.4. STATETHEREQUIREDACCOUNTING CYCLE.STEPSINTHE5. EXPLAIN THE APPROACHES TO PREPA
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Chapter 5 - Lecture OutlineA. Merchandising Operations.1. The primary source of revenues is the sale of merchandise, or salesrevenue.2. Expenses for a merchandiser are divided into two categories:a. Cost of goods sold is the total cost of merchandise
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Chapter 5 - Chapter ReviewMeasuring Net Income1.(S.O. 1) A merchandiser is an enterprise that buys and sells goods to earn a profit.Merchandisers that purchase and sell directly to consumers are retailers, and those thatsell to retailers are known as
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Chapter 5 - Study Objectives1. IDENTIFY THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ASERVICE ENTERPRISE AND A MERCHANDISER.2. EXPLAIN THE ENTRIES FOR PURCHASES UNDERA PERPETUAL INVENTORY SYSTEM.3. EXPLAIN THE ENTRIES FOR SALES REVENUESUNDER A PERPETUAL INVENTORY SYSTEM
Berkeley - CS - 194
#include<iostream>using namespace std;const int MAXN=999999;int prime[80000],size=0,size2=1,num[80000],final[80000],point,tmp[80000];bool flag[MAXN+1];int len(int a[])cfw_int i;for(i=80000;i>0;i-) if(a[i-1]!=0) return i;return 0;void produce()
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Accounting ILecture Notes/Observations day number 20 last revised 8/11Today, we finished up dealing with Chapter 3 adjusting entries. I will not post anythingelse on this subject refer back to the lecture notes from last time for an exhaustivereview o
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Accounting IAdjusting Entries Supplemental Problems Chapter 31. On 2/1, I purchased a 2-year insurance policy for $6,300.a) 2/1 transaction journal entry2/1 Prepaid InsuranceCashb) 2/28 adjusting entry2/283/316,3006,300Insurance Expense262.52
Berkeley - CS - 194
#include<iostream>using namespace std;const int MAXN=999999;int prime[80000],size=0,size2=1,num[80000],final[80000],point,tmp[80000];bool flag[MAXN+1];int len(int a[])cfw_int i;for(i=80000;i>0;i-) if(a[i-1]!=0) return i;return 0;void produce()
Montana - ACCOUNTING - 101
Accounting IAdjusting Entries Supplemental Problems Chapter 3 Answer Sheet1. On 2/1, I purchased a 2-year insurance policy for $6,300.a) 2/1 transaction journal entryDebit prepaid insurance for 6,300Credit cash for 6,300b) 2/28 adjusting entryDebit