HD 1150 ch 7
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HD 1150 ch 7

Course Number: HD 1150, Fall 2012

College/University: Cornell

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Berk, Ch 7, pp. 246-285: Be able to name and describe the first two stages in Eriksons psychosocial theory and the ages to which they apply. Basic Trust vs. Mistrust: infancy- When the balance of care is sympathetic and loving, the psychological conflict of the first year- basic trust versus mistrust- is resolved on the positive side. If the trusting infant feels confident about venturing out and exploring it,...

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Ch Berk, 7, pp. 246-285: Be able to name and describe the first two stages in Eriksons psychosocial theory and the ages to which they apply. Basic Trust vs. Mistrust: infancy- When the balance of care is sympathetic and loving, the psychological conflict of the first year- basic trust versus mistrust- is resolved on the positive side. If the trusting infant feels confident about venturing out and exploring it, he emerges from this stage well-prepared for toddlerhood. Autonomy vs. Shame and Doubt: toddlerhood- This conflict is resolved favorably when parents provide young children with suitable guidance and reasonable choices. Toddlers do best when they are not attacked for failing at new skills, like toilet training and putting away toys, and when his parents meet his assertions of independence with tolerance and understanding (ex: giving him an extra five minutes to finish playing before leaving for the grocery store). Both basic trust and autonomy grow out of warm, sensitive parenting and reasonable expectations for impulse control starting in the second year. If a child emerges from these stages without trust in caregivers and a sense of individuality, adjustment problems may occur later in life. When do infants begin social smiling; when do they begin laughing? Social smiling: between 6 and 10 weeks Laughing: 3-4 months What do we know about the development of the four basic emotions of happiness, anger, sadness, and fear in infants? The basic emotions are universal in humans and other primates and have a long evolutionary history of promoting survival. Sensitive, contingent caregiver communication helps infants construct emotional expressions. Around 6 months, face, gaze, voice, and posture form organized patterns that vary meaningfully with environmental events. By the middle of the first year, emotional expressions are well-organized and specific. What is stranger anxiety? Stranger Anxiety: A fear of unknown adults- the most frequent expression of fear What is social referencing? Social referencing: actively seeking emotional information from a trusted person in an uncertain situation. What are the self-conscious emotions and when do they begin to appear? Self-conscious emotions: a second, higher-order set of feelings, including guilt, shame, embarrassment, envy and pride. They are called self-conscious emotions because each involves injury to or enhancement of our sense of self. They appear in the middle of the second year (18-24 months) What is emotional self-regulation? Emotional self-regulation: the strategies we use to adjust our emotional state to a comfortable level of intensity so we can accomplish our goals. (ex: reminding yourself that an anxiety-provoking situation will be over soon) Provide some examples of how infants manage self-regulation. Babies can shift their attention away from unpleasant events or engage in selfsoothing. Crawling and walking babies can physically move away from an unpleasant situation or towards a more pleasant one. What is temperament? Temperament: Early-appearing, stable individual differences in reactivity and selfregulation. Reactivity refers to quickness and intensity of emotional arousal, attention, and motor activity. Self-regulation, as we have seen, refers to strategies that modify that reactivity. Effortful control is regarded as a major dimension of temperament . Describe the three types of childrens temperaments identified by Thomas and Chess. 1. The easy child (40% of the sample) quickly establishes regular routines in infancy, is generally cheerful, and adapts easily to new experiences. 2. The difficult child (10% of the sample) is irregular in daily routines, is slow to accept new experiences, and tends to react negatively and intensely. 3. The slow-to-warm-up child (15% of the sample) is inactive, shows mild, low-key reactions to environmental stimuli, is negative in mood, and adjusts slowly to new experiences. What does research indicate about the stability of temperament? The overall stability of temperament is low in infancy and toddlerhood and only moderate from the preschool years on. What about the heritability of temperament? Studies suggest there is a moderate role for genetic factors in temperament and personality. About half of individual differences have been attributed to differences to genetic makeup. Influences vary with the temperamental trait and the ages being studied. Hereditability estimates are higher for expressions of negative emotion than for positive emotion. The role of heredity strengthens when the child gets older and temperament becomes more stable. How do child-rearing practices interact with temperament in emotionally reactive babies? Warm, supportive parenting reduces shy infants and preschoolers intense physiological reaction to novelty, whereas cold, intrusive parenting heightens anxiety. Parents who make appropriate demands tfor their child to approach new experiences help shy youngsters overcome fear. What is goodness of fit and how does it relate to temperament, child-rearing practices and culture? The goodness of fit model explains how temperament and environment can together produce favorable outcomes. Goodness of fit involves creating child-rearing environments that recognize each childs temperament while simultaneously encouraging more adaptive functioning. It reminds us that babies have unique dispositions that adults must accept. Example: When a child is crying and upset getting a shot at the doctors office, the mothers calm, soothing manner will help her child learn to regulate intense emotional reactions. Cultural values also affect the fit between parenting and child temperament. Example: shy babies in China were evaluated positively, but when the market economy expanded and people needed to be assertive and sociable, this correlation reversed. What is attachment? Attachment is the strong affectionate tie we have for special people in our lives that leads us to experience pleasure and joy when we interact with them and to be comforted by their nearness in times of stress. How did Harlows research demonstrate that hunger was not the primary drive behind attachment? Baby monkeys reared with surrogate mothers preferred to cling to a soft terry-cloth mother instead of a wire-mesh mother, even though the wire-mesh mother held a bottle and infants had to climb on the wire-mesh mother to be fed. Describe Bowlbys ethological theory of attachment. The ethological theory of attachment recognizes the infants emotional tie to the caregiver as an evolved response that promotes survival. Bowlby believed that the human infant is endowed with a set of built-in behaviors that keep the parent nearby to protect the infant from danger and to provide support for exploring and mastering the environment. He believed that quality of attachment to the caregiver has profound implications for the childs feelings of security and capacity to form trusting relationships. According to Bowlby what are the four phases in the development of attachment? 1) Preattachment phase (birth to 6 weeks) built-in signals (grasping, smiling, crying, and gazing into the adults eyes) help bring newborn babies into close contact with other humans who comfort them. Babies of this age recognize their own mothers smell, voice, and face, but are not yet attached since they dont mind being left with an unfamiliar adult. 2) Attachment in the making phase (6 weeks to 6 to 8 months) Infants respond differently to a familiar caregiver than to a stranger. For example, at 4 months, Timmy smiled, laughed and babbled more freely when interacting with his mother and quieted more quickly when she picked him up. As infants learn that their own actions affect the behavior of those around them, they begin to develop a sense of trust, the expectation that the caregiver will respond when signaled, but they still do not protest when separated from her. 3) Clear-cut Attachment phase (6 to 8 months- 18 months to 2 years) Now attachment to the familiar caregiver is evident. Babies display separation anxiety (does not always occur, depends on infant temperament and current situation) But in many cultures, separation anxiety increases between 6 and 15 months, suggesting infants that have developed a clear understanding that the caregiver continues to exist when not in view. Besides protesting the parents departure, older infants and toddlers try hard to maintain her presence. They approach, follow, and climb on her in preference to others. And they use the familiar caregiver as a secure base from which to explore. 4) Formation of a reciprocal relationship (18 months to 2 years- on) By the end of the second year, rapid growth in representation and language enables toddlers to understand some of the factors that influence the parents coming and going and to predict her return. As a result, separation protest declines. Now children negotiate with the caregiver, using requests and persuasion to alter her goals. For example, at age 2, Caitlin asked Carolyn and David to read her a story before leaving her with a babysitter. The extra time with her parents, along with a better understanding of where they were going and when they would be back, helped Caitlin withstand her parents absence. Be able to describe separation anxiety, a secure base, and an internal working model. -separation anxiety becoming upset when their trusted caregiver leaves -secure base trust the parent will be there for support and can explore -internal working model set of expectations about the availability of attachment figures, their likelihood of providing support during times of stress, and the selfs interaction with those figures. The internal working model becomes a vital part of personality, serving as a guide for all future close relationships. How does the Strange Situation measure the quality of attachment in one- to twoyear-olds? Strange Situation is a widely used laboratory technique for assessing the quality of attachment between 1 and 2 years of age. In designing it, Mary Ainsworth and her colleagues reasoned that securely attached infants and toddlers should use the parent as a secure base from which to explore in an unfamiliar playroom. In addition, when the parent leaves, an unfamiliar adult should be less comforting than the parent. The Strange Situation takes the baby through eight short episodes in which brief separations from and reunions with the parent occur. The infants responses to these episodes help classify them into four different attachment patterns: one secure attachment pattern and three insecure attachment patterns. Although separation anxiety varies among the groups, the babys reunion responses largely define attachment quality. Who developed the Strange Situation? Mary Ainsworth and colleagues Describe the four patterns of attachment identified by the Strange Situation. Secure Attachment: These infants use the parent as a secure base. When separated, they may or may not cry, but if they do, it is because the parent is absent and they prefer her to the stranger. When the parent returns, they actively seek contact, and their crying is reduced immediately. About 60% of North American infants in middle-SES families show this pattern. Avoidant Attachment: These infants seem unresponsive to the parent when she is present. When she leaves, they usually are not distressed, and they react to the stranger in much the same way as to the parent. During reunion, they avoid or are slow to greet the parent, and when picked up, they often fail to cling. About 15% of North American infants in middle-SES families show this pattern. Resistant Attachment: Before separation, these infants seek closeness o the parent and often fail to explore. When the parent leaves, they are usually distressed, and on her return, they combine clinginess with angry, resistive behavior, struggling when held and sometimes hitting and pushing. Many continue to cry after being picked up and cannot be comforted easily. About 10% of North American infants in middle-SES families show this pattern. Disorganized/disoriented attachment: This pattern reflects the greatest insecurity. At reunion, these infants show confused, contradictory behaviors- for example, looking away while the parent is holding them or approach the parent with flat, depressed emotion. Most display a dazed facial expression, and a few cry out unexpectedly after having calmed down or display odd, frozen, postures. About 15% of North American infants in middle-SES families show this pattern. What does research indicate about the stability of attachment? In some studies, 70-90% of children remain the same in their reactions to parents; in others only 30-40% do. Quality of attachment is usually secure and stable for middleSES babies experiencing favorable life conditions. Infants who move from insecurity to security typically have well-adjusted mothers with positive family and friendship ties. In contrast, in low-SES families with many daily stresses and little social support, attachment generally moves away from security or changes from one insecure pattern to another. Securely attached babies more often maintain their attachment status than insecure babies. The exception is disorganized/disoriented attachment- nearly 70% retain this classification over time. What is the most common attachment classification in all societies. Secure Attachment Using Germany, Japan, Israeli kibbutzim, and the U.S. as examples, describe cultural variations in attachment. German infants show considerably more avoidant attachment than American babies do, but German parents value independence and encourage their infants to be nonclingy, so the babys behavior may be an intended outcome of cultural beliefs and practices. Japanese infants rarely show avoidant attachment. Rather, many are resistantly attached, but this reaction may not represent true insecurity. Japanese mothers rarely leave their babies in others care, so the Strange Situation probably induces greater stress in them than in infants who frequently experience maternal separations. Many Japanese mothers view the attention-seeking that is part of resistant attachment as a normal indicator of infants efforts to satisfy dependence and security needs. Infants in Israeli kibbutzim frequently show resistant attachment. For these babies, who can sense the fear of unfamiliar people that is pervasive in their communities, the Strange Situation probably induces unusual distress. (Main point: A high percentage of German babies seem avoidantly attached, whereas a substantial number of Japanese and Israeli kibbutz infants appear resistantly attached. These responses may not reflect true insecurity, but are probably due to cultural differences in child-rearing practices.) What are four factors that affect attachment security? 1) Early availability of a consistent caregiver 2) Quality of caregiver 3) The babys characteristics 4) Family context, including parents internal working models How is childcare in infancy related to attachment security? Research suggests that infants placed in full-time childcare before 12 months of age are more likely than infants who remain at home to display insecure attachmentespecially avoidance- in the Strange Situation. Still, the relationship between childcare and emotional well being depends on both family and child-care experiences. These findings should not be used to justify a reduction in infant childcare services. Instead, it makes sense to increase availability of high-quality child care, where professional caregivers have good relationships with infants, caregiver-child ratios are generous, group sizes are small, and caregivers are educated about child development and child rearing. How is fathers warmth related to childrens development? Fathers warmth and sensitive caregiving predicts attachment security. Faterhs warmth contributes greatly to childrens long-term favorable development. Fathers sustained affectionate involvement predicted later cognitive, emotional, and social competence as strongly as did mothers warmth. At what age do children begin to show signs of empathy? Older toddlers who have experienced sensitive caregiving and emotionally available parents begin to show empathy. (as a result of self-awareness) At what age do they show signs of self-control? These capacities emerge between 12 and 18 months, when toddlers first become capable of compliance.

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