Simnet Lesson 6 notes
19 Pages

Simnet Lesson 6 notes

Course Number: MGT 218, Spring 2012

College/University: Clemson

Word Count: 4072

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Selecting and formatting chart elements Earlier skills introduced how to create a chart and change the design style and layout. You can also modify the formatting for individual chart elements including a specific data series, the gridlines, the plot area, and the chart area. The plot area is the area of the chart where the data series are plotted. The chart area is the area that encompasses the entire chart...

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and Selecting formatting chart elements Earlier skills introduced how to create a chart and change the design style and layout. You can also modify the formatting for individual chart elements including a specific data series, the gridlines, the plot area, and the chart area. The plot area is the area of the chart where the data series are plotted. The chart area is the area that encompasses the entire chart including the plot area and optional layout elements, such as title, legend, and data table. 1. On the Chart Tools Format tab, in the Current Selection group, expand the Chart Elements list, and select the chart element you want to format. 2. Click the Format Selection button . 3. The options available in the Format dialog vary depending on the chart element you selected. Common options include border and fill colors and styles, line colors and styles, shadow and glow effects, and alignment. As you make selections in the Format dialog, Excel applies the changes to the chart automaticallythere is no OK or Apply button. 4. Click Close to close the Format dialog. To undo the formatting changes, click the Reset to Match Style button . Formatting 3-D chart elements Excel has two types of 3-D charts. Some 3-D chart types, like the 3-D clustered column, display the data series using a 3-D effect. These are not true 3-D charts. A true 3-D chart adds a third dimension showing depth. Use a 3-D chart, like the 3-D column or 3-D cylinder, to compare data across both the horizontal axis (x axis) and depth axis (z axis). 3-D charts include chart elements that other charts do not have: back wall, side wall, floor, floors (to format the back wall and side wall at the same time), and depth (series) axis. You can change the fill, border, and other formatting aspects as you would with other chart elements. From the Format Chart Area dialog, you can modify the overall 3-D appearance of the chart. 1. Use the Chart Elements drop-down list on the Ribbon to select the chart area, or rightclick an empty part of the chart area and select Format Chart Area. 2. Click the 3-D Rotation category. 3. In the Rotation section, increase or decrease the angle of each individual axis to rotate the chart or modify the overall perspective. As you make selections, Excel changes the chart immediately. 4. In the Chart Scale section, use the Depth (% of base) option to control the depth of the chart. Decreasing the depth of the base shortens the chart floor; increasing the depth of base lengthens the chart floor. 5. Notice that as you make selections in the Format Data Series dialog, Excel applies them to the chart. To undo the changes, close the dialog and use the Undo command. For each data series, you can control the 3-D effects to make one series stand out from the others. 1. Select the data series you want to format. Use the Chart Elements drop-down list on the Ribbon to select the series, or right-click a data point in the series and select Format Data Series. 2. In the Format Data Series dialog, click the 3-D Format category. 3. The Bevel section controls the appearance of the top and bottom the data points. A beveled edge appears curved or slanted and enhances the 3-D appearance of an object. 4. The Surface section includes options to control the overall 3-D appearance of the data points. 5. Notice that as you make selections in the Format Data Series dialog, Excel applies them to the chart. To undo the changes, either click the Reset button or close the dialog and use the Undo command. Modifying the appearance of a pie chart Remember that pie charts work best when you want to evaluate data as part of a whole. Each "slice" represents a data point. To emphasize a single data point, you can separate ("explode") that slice from the rest of the pie. To explode a single data point: 1. Click the pie slice once to select all the data points, and then click again to select the single data point. (Do not double-click.) Notice that on the Chart Tools Format tab, in the Current Selection group, the Chart Elements box identifies this specific data point by its value. 2. Click and drag the mouse so the pie slice moves away from the rest of the pie. To control the appearance of the exploded data point more precisely: 1. Confirm that only the single data point is selected. 2. On the Chart Tools Format tab, in the Current Selection group, click the Format 3. 4. 5. 6. Selection button . The Format Data Point dialog opens. In the Series Option section, click and drag the Point Explosion slider to the right. As you drag the slider farther to the right, the percentage of explosion increasesmoving the pie slice farther away from the rest of the pie. You may want to rotate the pie chart so the exploded slice appears exactly where you want it. Click and drag the Angle of first slice slider to the right to rotate the pie clockwise. As with other chart formatting, Excel applies these changes as you make then. If you want to cancel the changes, use the Undo command. Pie charts do not include an x or y axis, so you should include data labels to identify the value for each data point. Use the options from the Chart Tools Format tab, WordArt Styles group, to format the data label text. 1. On the Chart Tools Format tab, in the Current Selection group, expand the Chart Elements drop-down list, and select Series 1 Data Labels. You can also click a single data label to select them all. (Always double-check the Chart Elements box to ensure that the correct chart element is selected.) 2. In the WordArt Styles group, select the formatting options you want. To change the font color, click the Text Fill button arrow and select a color. To apply a border around each text letter or number, click the Text Outline button arrow and select a color. To apply a text effect such as shadow, reflection, or glow, click the Text Effects button and select an option. To apply a preset combination of fill, outline, and text effects, expand the WordArt Styles gallery and select a style. Saving and using a chart template If you find yourself making the same chart formatting changes over and over again, consider saving the chart as a chart template. When you create a new chart using your chart template, all the formatting will be applied automatically. To create a chart template: 1. Select the chart you want to use as a template. 2. On the Chart Tools Design tab, in the Type group, click the Save as Template button 3. 4. 5. 6. . The Save Chart Template dialog opens. Excel automatically sets the location to the correct folder and the file type to .crtx. The Save as type box displays Chart Template Files (*.crtx). Type the file name in the File name box. Click Save. To use the chart template: 1. Select the data you want to visualize in the chart. 2. On the Insert tab, in the Charts group, click the Create Chart dialog launcher. 3. In the Insert Chart dialog, click Templates. 4. Click the template you want to use. 5. Click OK. One way to analyze data is to add a trendline to your chart to help you visualize the relationship between data points. Trendlines show the line along which data points would be expected based on different statistical growth patterns. Finding the trendline that best fits your data may help you predict future values. To create a trendline: 1. Click the chart once to select it. 2. Click the Chart Tools Layout tab. 3. In the Analysis group, click the Trendline button. (You may need to click the Analysis button to expand the group.) 4. Select the type of trendline you want. a. If your chart has more than one data series, the Add Trendline dialog will open. b. Click the series you want to add the trendline to, and click Close. Once you have added a trendline, you can extend it, thereby forecasting future values: 1. Right-click the trendline and select Format Trendline... 2. In the Format Trendline dialog, in the Forecast section, enter a value for the number of periods you want to forecast forward or backward. 3. Click Close. To remove the trendline: Right-click the trendline, and select Delete. Customizing sparklines When cells containing Sparklines are selected, the Sparkline Tools Design contextual tab becomes active. From this tab, you can customize the look of the Sparklines, including emphasizing high or low points, changing the type of Sparkline used, and changing colors. To customize the Sparklines: 1. Click one of the cells containing Sparklines to activate the Sparkline Tools Design tab. If necessary, click the tab. 2. To change the Sparkline type, click the Line, Column, or Win/Loss button in the Type group. 3. To add data point markers to the Sparklines, click the check boxes in the Show group for the markers you want. If you want markers for every data point, click the Markers check box. 4. To modify the look of the Sparklines, select a preset style from the Style group, or click the Sparkline Color and Marker Color buttons and make color selections for individual Sparkline elements. Inserting and formatting a picture Charts are not the only graphic elements you can add to your workbook. From the Insert tab, you can add pictures, clip art, drawing shapes, and SmartArt diagrams. These images are embedded objects, meaning they become part of the workbook. To insert a picture from a file: 1. Click the Insert tab. 2. In the Illustrations group, click the Insert Picture from File button . 3. The Insert Picture dialog box opens. 4. Navigate to the file location, select the file, and click Insert. Once you have added a picture, there are a number of ways you can work with it: To resize a picture, click a resize handle ( or ), and drag toward the center of the image to make it smaller or away from the center of the image to make it larger. To rotate a picture, click the rotate handle ,and drag your mouse to the right to rotate the image clockwise or to the left to rotate the image counterclockwise. To move a picture, point to the image, and when the cursor changes to the move cursor , click and drag the image to the new location. You can modify the picture through the Picture Tools Format tab. Use the tools in the Adjust group to color correct the image, add colorization, and apply a variety of artistic effects. From the Picture Styles group, you can apply preset styles, add a border, and apply effects like shadows and 3-D rotations. If you have multiple pictures in your worksheet, use the tools in the Arrange group to control which image appears on top and group images together so they can be manipulated as a single object. From the Size group, you can control the size of the image and crop it (remove part of the image). To remove formatting and return the image to its original state, from the Picture Tools Format tab, in the Adjust group, click the Reset Picture button. Adding a graphic to a header When you create a header for a worksheet, you may find that you want to add a graphic element, such as a logo, to the top of the printed worksheet. Page Layout view shows you exactly how the header and footer will appear when you print the worksheet. The header area has three sections: left, right, and center. When you click a header area, the contextual tab Header & Footer Tools Design appears. This tab contains commands for working the with header and footer, including adding a picture. To add a graphic to a header from Page Layout view: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Switch to Page Layout view by clicking the Page Layout button on the status bar . Click the text Click to add header to activate one of the header sections. In the Header & Footer Elements group, click the Picture button. The Insert Picture dialog box opens. Navigate to the file location, select the file, and click Insert. When you are finished adding the image to the header, click anywhere in the worksheet and then switch back to Normal view. Inserting and formatting a shape A shape is a drawing object that you can quickly add to your spreadsheet to call attention to a cell or group of cells. Excel comes with a number of shapes for you to choose from, including lines, block arrows, callouts, and such basic shapes as rectangles and circles. To add a shape: 1. Click the Insert tab. 2. In the Illustrations group, click the Shapes button the Shapes gallery. and select an option from 3. The cursor changes to a crosshair . 4. Click and drag the cursor anywhere on the spreadsheet to add the shape. Once you have added a shape, there are a number of ways you can work with it: To resize a shape, click a resize handle ( or ), and drag toward the center of the image to make it smaller or away from the center of the image to make it larger. To rotate a shape, click the rotate handle ,and drag your mouse to the right to rotate the image clockwise or to the left to rotate the image counterclockwise. To move a shape, point to the shape, and when the cursor changes to the move cursor , click and drag the image to the new location. From the Shape Styles group, you can apply preset styles, add a border, and apply effects like shadows and 3-D rotations. To make the shape appear transparent, click the Shape Fill button and select No Fill. If you have multiple shapes in your worksheet, use the tools in the Arrange group to control which image appears on top and group shapes together so they can be manipulated as a single object. From the Size group, you can control the size of the image precisely. Adding a background graphic to a worksheet If you want to add visual appeal to your worksheet, try adding an image as a background. Excel will tile the image to fill the worksheet background (show multiple copies of the image across and down). To add a background image to your workbook: 1. Click the Page Layout tab. 2. In the Page Setup group, click the Background button 3. Browse to find the image you want to use. 4. Click the image file name, and then click the Insert button. . When you add a background image to your worksheet, the Background button changes to Delete Background. To remove a background image: 1. Click the Page Layout tab. 2. In the Page Setup group, click the Delete Background button. Capturing a screenshot in excel A screenshot captures the image from the computer screen (such as an open application window or a Web page) and creates an image which can then be inserted and formatted like any other drawing object or picture. With previous versions of Excel, you had to use another application to create the screenshot and then insert the picture into Excel. In Excel 2010, you can now use the Insert Screenshot command to capture and insert screenshots into spreadsheets directly from the Excel interface. To add a screenshot to a worksheet: 1. Click the Insert tab. 2. In the Illustrations group, click the Screenshot button. 3. The Available Windows section of the Screenshot gallery displays a thumbnail of each of the currently open windows. Click a thumbnail to add the entire screenshot of that window to the worksheet. To insert a screenshot of only part of a window or a screenshot of the entire desktop, select creen Clipping from the bottom of the Screenshot gallery. The Screen Clipping tool minimizes Excel. Click and drag to select part of the desktop or open window that you want to insert. When you release the mouse button, the Excel interface becomes active again. Converting data to columns After you've entered data in your workbook, you may find that you need to sort it in a way that isn't possible because you included too much information in a column. For example, if you need to sort a list of names by last name but included both the first name and the last name in a single column, you can split the data into two columnsone for the first name and one for the last name. Excel gives you a way to split data in cells into separate columns, as long as there is a consistent character at which Excel can split the data (the delimiter). To split data from one column into separate columns: 1. Ensure that there are enough empty cells to the right of the selected cells to hold the new columns. 2. Select the data in the column you want to split. 3. On the Data tab, in the Data Tools group, click the Text to Columns button. 4. The Convert Text to Columns Wizard opens. 5. If the data are separated by a common delimiter such as a tab, space, or comma, click the Next button to go to Step 2. 6. Click the check box for one of the common delimiter characters (tab, semicolon, comma, or space), or click the Other check box and enter the delimiter character in the box. Click Next. 7. If necessary, select the correct data format for each column. 8. Click Finish. Formatting tables When you are working with a table, use the Table Tools Design tab to format your table. This contextual tab is available when you select any cell in the table. From the Table Styles gallery, you can apply a visual style to the table that includes font colors, fill colors, and banding options. Banding applies a fill color to alternating rows or columns, making the table easier to read. If you want to add more formatting to your table, use one of the premade table styles: 1. Click anywhere in the table. 2. Click the Table Tools Design tab. 3. Depending on the width of your window, you may see some of the Quick Styles displayed as part of the Ribbon in the Table Styles group. If the style you want is not visible, click the More button to display the full Table Styles gallery. 4. Click a style to apply it to the table. 5. Use the check boxes in the Table Style Options group to hide or show header and total rows and hide or show banding for rows or columns. Removing duplicate rows If you have a large table, it may be difficult to identify rows with duplicate data. Excel includes a tool to find and remove duplicate rows. A "duplicate" can be an exact match, where every cell in the row contains the same data, or you can specify matching data for certain columns only. To remove duplicate rows from a table: 1. Select any cell in the table. 2. On Table Tools Design tab, in the Tools group, click the Remove Duplicates button . 3. By default, all the columns are selected in the Remove Duplicates dialog. When all the columns are selected, Excel will only remove duplicates where both rows are 100 percent identical. To identify duplicate rows where only some of the columns have duplicate data, click the check boxes to uncheck column names. Now Excel will identify rows as duplicates only when the checked columns have the same data. 4. Click OK to remove duplicate rows from the table. 5. Excel displays a message box, telling you how many duplicate rows were deleted. Click OK to dismiss the message box. Sorting data on multiple criteria Recall that sorting rearranges the rows in your worksheet by the data in a column. If the data have identical values in a column, you can specify additional sort criteria to control the sort order precisely. For example, if you have a list of sales figures, you can sort by date and then by sales amount. To sort data on multiple criteria: 1. Select any cell in the data range. 2. On Data tab, in the Sort & Filter group, click the Sort button . 3. If your data include a header row, Excel will usually identify that for you and automatically check the My data has headers check box. 4. In the Sort dialog, expand the Sort by list, and select the column you want to use for the first sort level. If necessary, change the selections in the Sort On and Order lists. 5. Click the Add Level button. 6. Expand the Then by list, and select the column you want for the next sort level. 7. Continue adding levels and building the sort criteria until you are finished. 8. Click OK. Using advanced filter Excel's Advanced Filter feature allows you to filter data for criteria in multiple columns using multiple criteria with logical AND and OR operators. If you are familiar with creating queries in Access, using Advanced Filter will seem familiar. To use Advanced Filter: 1. First, create the criteria range. If necessary, insert a few blank rows above the data you want to filter. There should be at least one blank row between the criteria range and the list data. Copy the data label row to the first row of the criteria range. 2. In the criteria range, type the criteria you want to filter for. a. If you type criteria in the same row, Excel will use the logical operator AND in the filterdata must meet both criteria. b. If you type criteria in separate rows, Excel will apply the logical operator OR data must meet either criterion. 3. Click anywhere in the data list. 4. To open the Advanced Filter dialog, click the Data tab. In the Sort & Filter group, click 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. the Advanced button . Select an action: Filter the list, or Copy to another location. If necessary, enter the appropriate cell references in the List range box. (Excel may insert the list range for you.) If necessary, click in the Criteria range box and enter the cell references or the name for the criteria range, including the label row. Be careful that your criteria range does not include blank rows. If you selected Copy the filtered records to another location, in the Copy to box, enter the cell reference for the upper left corner of the range where you want Excel to paste a copy of the data labels and the records that meet the criteria. Click OK. 10. To clear the filter from the data, click the Clear button Filtering and sorting using cell attributes . Excel's sorting and filtering options work well with Excel's data visualization tools. You can sort or filter data based on cell attributes such as font color, cell color, or by icons that were applied with conditional formatting. To sort data by cell attribute: 1. If necessary, on the Data tab, in the Sort & Filter group, click the Filter button to display the AutoFilter arrows at the top of each column. 2. Click the AutoFilter arrow at the top of the column that includes the formatting option you want to sort by. 3. Point to Sort by Color, and click the option you want to sort by. Excel automatically displays the options available for that particular column: Sort by Cell Color, Sort by Font Color, and Sort by Cell Icon. To filter data by cell attribute: 1. Click the AutoFilter arrow at the top of the column that includes the formatting option you want to sort by. 2. Point to Filter by Color, and click the option you want to sort by. Excel automatically displays the options available for that particular column: Filter by Cell Color, Filter by Font Color, and Filter by Cell Icon.
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