ACCT 402 CONNECT CHP 15
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ACCT 402 CONNECT CHP 15

Course: ACCT 402, Spring 2013

School: Liberty

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ACCT 402 CONNECT CHP 15 15-1 A partnership has gone through liquidation and now reports the following account balances: Cash $ Loan from Jones Wayma n, capital Jones, capital Fuller, capital Rogers, capital 16,000 3,000 (2,000) (deficit) (5,000) (deficit) 13,000 7,000 Profits and losses are allocated on the following basis: Wayman, 30 percent; Jones, 20 percent; Fuller, 30 percent; and Rogers, 20 percent. Which...

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402 ACCT CONNECT CHP 15 15-1 A partnership has gone through liquidation and now reports the following account balances: Cash $ Loan from Jones Wayma n, capital Jones, capital Fuller, capital Rogers, capital 16,000 3,000 (2,000) (deficit) (5,000) (deficit) 13,000 7,000 Profits and losses are allocated on the following basis: Wayman, 30 percent; Jones, 20 percent; Fuller, 30 percent; and Rogers, 20 percent. Which of the following events should occur now? (Do not round intermediate calculations.) Jones should receive $3,000 cash because of the loan balance. Jones should receive $3,000, Fuller $8,800, and Rogers $4,200. Fuller should receive $10,600 and Rogers $5,400. Fuller should receive $11,800 and Rogers $4,200. The $16,000 available cash can be distributed but should be done under the assumption that all deficit balances will be total losses. After offsetting Jones' loan against his deficit capital balance, both Jones and Wayman have deficits of $2,000; total $4,000. Fuller and Rogers, the two partners with positive capital balances, share profits in a 30:20 relationship (the equivalent of a 60%:40% ratio). Fuller would absorb $2,400 of the potential $4,000 loss with Rogers being allocated $1,600. The remaining capital balances ($10,600 and $5,400) are safe capital balances and those amounts can be immediately distributed. 15-2 A partnership has the following account balances: Cash, $92,000; Other Assets, $650,000; Liabilities, $317,000; Nixon (50% of profits and losses), $200,000; Cleveland (30%), $140,000; Pierce (20%), $85,000. The company liquidates, and $19,000 becomes available to the partners. Who gets the $19,000? (Leave no cells blank - be certain to enter "0" wherever required.) Nixon Current cash distribution Cleveland $ Pierce $ $ Explanation: Cleveland receives $16,400 and Pierce receives $2,600 Since the partnership currently has total capital of $425,000, the $19,000 that is available would indicate maximum potential losses of $406,000. Nixon Rep orted balan ces Anti cipate d loss ($406 ,000) split on a 5:3:2 basis Pote ntial balan ces Pote ntial loss from Nixon 's defici t (split 3:2) Curr ent cash distri butio n $ Cleve land 200,0 00 $ (203, 000) $ (3,00 ) 0 0 140,0 00 $ (121, 800) $ 18,20 0 $ 16,40 0 85,00 0 (81,2 00) $ (1,80 ) 0 3,000 $ Pierce 3,800 (1,20 ) 0 $ 2,600 15-3 A partnership currently holds three assets: cash, $10,000; land, $35,000; and a building, $50,000. The partners anticipate that expenses required to liquidate their partnership will amount to $5,000. Capital balances are as follows: Ace, capital Ball, capital Eaton, capital Lake, capital $25,000 28,000 20,000 22,000 The partners share profits and losses as follows: Ace (30%), Ball (30%), Eaton (20%), and Lake (20%). If a preliminary distribution of cash is to be made, how much will each partner receive? (Leave no cells blank - be certain to enter "0" wherever required. Do not round intermediate calculations. Round your answers to the nearest dollar amount.) Ace Cash distributions Ball $ Eaton $ Lake $ $ Explanation: Ball gets $143, Eaton gets $1,429, and Lake gets $3,428. Ace Ball Re port ed bala nces M axi mu m loss es on land and buil ding Eat on $ 25,0 00 ($8 5,00 0) split on a 3:3: 2:2 basi s Est imat ed liqu idati on exp ense s $ 28,0 00 $ 20,0 00 $ 22,0 00 (25, 500) $ (25, 500) (17, 000) (17, 000) (1,5 00) ($5, 000 ) split 3:3: 2:2 Po tenti al bala nces Po Lake (1,5 00) (1,0 00) (1,0 00) (2,0 ) 00 2,00 $ 1,00 0 (85) $ 2,00 0 (57) $ 4,00 0 (57) tenti al loss fro m Ace ($2, 000 ) split on a 3:2: 2 basi s Ca sh distr ibut ions 0 $ 7 0 1 $ 143 $ 2 1,42 9 $ 3,42 8 15-4 The following condensed balance sheet is for the partnership of Hardwick, Saunders, and Ferris, who share profits and losses in the ratio of 4:3:3, respectively: Cash Other assets Hardwick, loan Total assets Accounts payable Ferris, loan Hardwick, capital Saunders, capital Ferris, capital $ 86,000 805,000 52,000 Total liabilities and capital $ 943,000 $ 132,000 51,000 310,000 230,000 220,000 $ 943,000 The partners decide to liquidate the partnership. forty percent of the other assets are sold for $185,000. Prepare a proposed schedule of liquidation. (Leave no cells blank - be certain to enter "0" wherever required. Amounts to be deducted should be indicated with a minus sign.) Cash Beginning $ HARDWICK, SAUNDERS, AND FERRIS Proposed Schedule of Liquidation Hardwick, Accounts Payabl Loan Other Assets e and Capital $ $ $ Saunder's Capita l $ Ferris Loan & Capital $ balances Sold assets Assumed: loss on remaining assets Paid liabilities Safe balances $ $ $ $ $ $ Explanation: Of the available $139,000, $10,000 will go to Hardwick, $44,000 to Saunders, and $85,000 to Ferris. 15-4b The following condensed balance sheet is for the partnership of Hardwick, Saunders, and Ferris, who share profits and losses in the ratio of 4:3:3, respectively: Cash Other assets Hardwick, loan Total assets Accounts payable Ferris, loan Hardwick, capital Saunders, capital Ferris, capital $ 86,000 780,000 37,000 $ 47,000 310,000 210,000 200,000 Total liabilities and capital $ 903,000 136,000 $ 903,000 The partners decide to liquidate the partnership. fifty percent of the other assets are sold for $270,000. Prepare a proposed schedule of liquidation. (Leave no cells blank - be certain to enter "0" wherever required. Amounts to be deducted should be indicated with a minus sign.) HARDWICK, SAUNDERS, AND FERRIS Proposed Schedule of Liquidation Hardwick, Accounts Payabl Loan Other Assets e and Capital Cash Beginning balances Sold assets Assumed: loss on remaining assets Paid liabilities Safe balances Saunder's Capita l Ferris Loan & Capital $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Explanation: Of the available $220,000, $69,000 will go to Hardwick, $57,000 to Saunders, and $94,000 to Ferris. 15-5 The following condensed balance sheet is for the partnership of Miller, Tyson, and Watson, who share profits and losses in the ratio of 6:2:2, respectively: Cash Other assets Total assets $ 49,000 149,000 $198,000 Liabilities Miller, capital Tyson, capital Watson, capital Total liabilities and capital $ 53,000 63,000 63,000 19,000 $198,000 For how much money must the other assets be sold so that each partner receives some amount of cash in a liquidation? (Input the amount as a positive value.) Other assets must be sold for an amount over $ . Explanation: Watson is the partner most vulnerable to a loss. A loss of only $95,000 would completely eliminate Watson's capital balance: Miller $63,000/60%=$ 105,000 loss to eliminate capital Tyson $63,000/20%=$ 315,000 loss to eliminate capital Watson $19,000/20%=$ 95,000 loss to eliminate capital Thus, if the loss on disposal is less than $95,000, all partners will retain positive capital balances and receive some cash in liquidation. Because of this, since "other assets" are $149,000, they must be sold for any amount over $54,000 for all partners to get cash. 15-5b The following condensed balance sheet is for the partnership of Miller, Tyson, and Watson, who share profits and losses in the ratio of 6:2:2, respectively: Cash Other assets Total assets $ 51,000 151,000 $202,000 Liabilities Miller, capital Tyson, capital Watson, capital Total liabilities and capital $ 49,000 66,000 66,000 21,000 $202,000 For how much money must the other assets be sold so that each partner receives some amount of cash in a liquidation? (Input the amount as a positive value.) Other assets must be sold for an amount over $ . Explanation: Watson is the partner most vulnerable to a loss. A loss of only $105,000 would completely eliminate Watson's capital balance: Miller $66,000/60%=$ 110,000 loss to eliminate capital Tyson $66,000/20%=$ 330,000 loss to eliminate capital Watson $21,000/20%=$ 105,000 loss to eliminate capital Thus, if the loss on disposal is less than $105,000, all partners will retain positive capital balances and receive some cash in liquidation. Because of this, since "other assets" are $151,000, they must be sold for any amount over $46,000 for all partners to get cash. 15-6 A partnership has liquidated all assets but still reports the following account balances: Loan from White Black, capital White, capital Green, capital Brown, capital Blue, capital $ 6,000 3,000 (9,000) (deficit) (3,000) (deficit) 15,000 (12,000) (deficit) The partners split profits and losses as follows: Black, 30 percent; White, 30 percent; Green, 10 percent; Brown, 20 percent; and Blue, 10 percent. Assuming that all partners are personally insolvent except for Green and Brown, how much cash must Green now contribute to this partnership? (Do not round intermediate calculations.) Green's contribution $ Explanation: White and Blue are both insolvent and have negative capital balances (after offsetting the loan from White) totaling $15,000. Absorption by the other partners of these losses would be as follows (on a 30:10:20 basis): Shar Par e of tner Loss Bla 30/6 ck 0 Gre 10/6 en 0 Bro 20/6 New Capital Balance $15, = 000 $15, = 000 $15, = $7,5 00 $2,5 00 $5,0 (4,50 ) 0 (5,50 $ ) 0 $ 10,0 $ wn 0 000 00 00 Black, who is also insolvent, now has a deficit capital of $4,500 that would have to be absorbed by Green and Brown (on a 10:20 basis): Share Partn of er Loss Gree 10/30 n Bro 20/30 wn $4,50 0 $4,50 0 New Capital Balance $1,50 $(7,00 = 0 0) $3,00 $ 7,00 = 00 Thus, Green must contribute $7,000 that will go to Brown. 15-7 The following partnership is being liquidated: Cash Noncash assets $ 36,000 Liabilities $50,000 174,000 Able, loan 10,000 Able, capital (20%) Moon, capital (30%) Yerkl, capital (50%) 40,000 60,000 50,000 a. Liquidation expenses are estimated to be $12,000. Prepare a predistribution schedule to guide the distribution of cash. First ABLE, MOON, AND YERKL Predistribution Plan $ Liabilities Liquidation expenses $ Next Able Next Able Moon % % Able % Moon Yerkl % % All remaining cash b. Liquidation expenses are estimated to be $12,000. Assume that assets costing $28,000 are sold for $40,000. How is the available cash to be divided? First ABLE, MOON, AND YERKL Distribution of Available Cash $ Liabilities $ Liquidation expenses Next Able All remaining cash Able % Moon % Explanation: a. Maximum losses that can be absorbed Partner Able* Moon Capital Balance/ Loss Allocation $50,000/0.2 $60,000/0.3 Yerkl Maximum Loss That Can Be Absorbed $250,000 200,000 $50,000/0.5 (most vulnerable to losses) 100,000 *Able's balance includes capital and the loan to the partnership. The assumption is made that a $100,000 loss occurs. Reported balances Assumed loss ($100,000) split on a 2:3:5 basis Adjusted balances Able $ 50,000 Moon $ 60,000 Yerkl $ 50,000 (20,000) (30,000) (50,000) $ 30,000 $ 30,000 $ Maximum losses that can now be absorbed Partner Able Maximum Loss Capital Balance/ That Can Loss Allocation Be Absorbed $30,000/0.4 $75,000 Moon $30,000/0.6 50,000 (most vulnerable to losses) The assumption is made that a $50,000 loss occurs. Reported balances Assumed loss ($50,000) split on a 2:3 basis Adjusted balances Able $ 30,000 Moon $ 30,000 (20,000) (30,000) $ 10,000 $ 0 0 Predistribution plan The first $62,000 will go to pay liquidation expenses ($12,000) and liabilities ($50,000). The next $10,000 goes entirely to Able (to pay off loan). The next $50,000 is split between Able and Moon based on a 2:3 basis, respectively. All remaining cash will be divided among the partners according to their profit and loss ratio. b. After this sale, the partnership has $76,000 in cash. The first $62,000 should be held for the liabilities and the liquidation expenses. The next $10,000 goes to Able. The remaining $4,000 is divided between Able ($1,600 or 40%) and Moon ($2,400 or 60%). 15-8 The following information concerns two different partnerships. These problems should be viewed as independent situations. (Do not round intermediate calculations. Round your final answers to the nearest whole dollar amount.) Part A The partnership of Ross, Milburn, and Thomas has the following account balances: Liabiliti $ 52,000 $ 46,000 es Noncash Ross, 120,000 54,000 assets capital Milburn (20,000) , capital Thomas 92,000 , capital Cash (deficit) This partnership is being liquidated. Ross and Milburn are each entitled to 30 percent of all profits and losses with the remaining 40 percent to Thomas. a. What is the maximum amount that Milburn might have to contribute to this partnership because of the deficit capital balance? Maximum amount $ b. To whom should the $6,000 cash that is presently available in excess of liabilities be distributed? Thomas c. If the noncash assets are sold for a total of $56,000, what is the minimum amount of cash that Thomas could receive? Minimum amount $ Part B The partnership of Sampson, Klingon, Carton, and Romulan is being liquidated. It currently holds cash of $25,000 but no other assets. Liabilities amount to $33,000. The capital balances are as follows: Samp son Kling on Carto n Romu lan $ 25,000 (28,00 ) 0 16,000 (21,00 ) 0 Profits and losses are allocated on the following basis: Sampson, 30 percent, Klingon, 30 percent, Carton, 20 percent, and Romulan, 20 percent. a. If both Klingon and Romulan are personally insolvent, how much money must Carton contribute to this partnership? Carton's contribution $ b-1. If only Romulan is personally insolvent, how much money must Klingon contribute? Klingon's contribution $ b-2. If only Romulan is personally insolvent, how will Klingon's contribution (funds) be disbursed? Creditors Sampson Carton $ $ $ c. If only Klingon is personally insolvent, how much money should Sampson receive from the liquidation? Sampson should receive $ Explanation: Part A Partner with deficit capital balance a. $56,000. Maximum losses of $120,000 on the noncash assets would increase Milburn's deficit balance by $36,000 (or 30%). Maximum losses would not create any other deficit balances. b. All $6,000 should go to Thomas. As Ross and Thomas view the current situation, maximum potential losses total $140,000: $120,000 on the noncash assets and $20,000 on Milburn's deficit balance. In determining safe capital balances, these assumed losses would be allocated on a 3:4 basis or $60,000 to Ross and $80,000 to Thomas. Since such a loss would entirely eliminate Ross' capital account, only Thomas has a safe capital balance at the current time. c. The minimum cash payment to Thomas would be $44,000 ($6,000 + $38,000). As shown in (b) above, the available $6,000 is distributed to Thomas, thus reducing that partner's capital balance to $86,000. A loss of $64,000 on the noncash assets would further reduce this partner's balance by $25,600 ($64,000 40%) to $60,400. That same loss would reduce Ross' capital to $34,800 and Milburn's deficit to ($39,200). The minimum cash amount would be caused by Milburn's failure to contribute this $39,200 so that it has to be absorbed by Ross (3/7 or $16,800) and Thomas (4/7 or $22,400). The remaining safe capital balance of $38,000 would be paid to Thomas. Part B Partners with deficit capital balances; insolvent partner a. Carton will have to contribute $3,600. The $49,000 in deficits will have to be absorbed by Sampson and Carton on a 3:2 basis. Thus, Carton will be allocated $19,600 of this amount which creates a deficit of $3,600. b. Klingon will have to contribute $35,875 [$28,000 + (30/80 $21,000)] that will be distributed as follows: Credito rs Sampso n Carton $ 8,000 $ 17,125 $ 10,750 Since Romulan is insolvent, the remaining partners will have to absorb the $21,000 deficit on a 3:3:2 basis. This allocation increases Klingon's deficit by 3/8 of $21,000 or $7,875. Klingon must contribute an amount equal to the new deficit balance of $35,875. The first $8,000 will go to the creditors that remain after the $25,000 in partnership cash is distributed. The remaining $27,875 is distributed to the two partners in accordance with their remaining positive capital balances after absorbing Romulan's loss, 3/8 to Sampson and 2/8 to Carton. Sampson has a positive capital balance of $17,125 [$25,000 ($21,000 3/8)] and Carton has a positive capital balance of $10,750 [$16,000 ($21,000 2/8)]. c. Sampson should receive $13,000. If Klingon is insolvent, the $28,000 deficit balance will have to be absorbed by the remaining three partners on a 3:2:2 basis. This loss would decrease Sampson's capital balance by $12,000 (3/7) to $13,000. 15-8b The following information concerns two different partnerships. These problems should be viewed as independent situations. (Do not round intermediate calculations. Round your final answers to the nearest whole dollar amount.) Part A The partnership of Ross, Milburn, and Thomas has the following account balances: Liabiliti $ 51,000 $ 15,000 es Noncash Ross, 114,000 84,000 assets capital Milburn (24,000) , capital Thomas 90,000 , capital Cash (deficit) This partnership is being liquidated. Ross and Milburn are each entitled to 40 percent of all profits and losses with the remaining 20 percent to Thomas. a. What is the maximum amount that Milburn might have to contribute to this partnership because of the deficit capital balance? Maximum amount $ b. To whom should the $36,000 cash that is presently available in excess of liabilities be distributed? Thomas c. If the noncash assets are sold for a total of $51,000, what is the minimum amount of cash that Thomas could receive? Minimum amount $ Part B The partnership of Sampson, Klingon, Carton, and Romulan is being liquidated. It currently holds cash of $24,000 but no other assets. Liabilities amount to $46,000. The capital balances are as follows: Samp son Kling on Carto n Romu lan $ 24,00 0 (35,00 ) 0 16,000 (27,00 ) 0 Profits and losses are allocated on the following basis: Sampson, 30 percent, Klingon, 30 percent, Carton, 20 percent, and Romulan, 20 percent. a. If both Klingon and Romulan are personally insolvent, how much money must Carton contribute to this partnership? Carton's contribution $ b-1. If only Romulan is personally insolvent, how much money must Klingon contribute? Klingon's contribution $ b-2. If only Romulan is personally insolvent, how will Klingon's contribution (funds) be disbursed? Creditors Sampson Carton $ $ $ c. If only Klingon is personally insolvent, how much money should Sampson receive from the liquidation? Sampson should receive $ Explanation: Part A Partner with deficit capital balance a. $69,600. Maximum losses of $114,000 on the noncash assets would increase Milburn's deficit balance by $45,600 (or 40%). Maximum losses would not create any other deficit $36,000 balances. b. All should go to Thomas. As Ross and Thomas view the current situation, maximum potential losses total $138,000: $114,000 on the noncash assets and $24,000 on Milburn's deficit balance. In determining safe capital balances, these assumed losses would be allocated on a 4:2 basis or $92,000 to Ross and $46,000 to Thomas. Since such a loss would entirely eliminate Ross' capital account, only Thomas has a safe capital balance at the current time. c. The minimum cash payment to Thomas would be $61,000 ($36,000 + $25,000). As shown in (b) above, the available $36,000 is distributed to Thomas, thus reducing that partner's capital balance to $54,000. A loss of $63,000 on the noncash assets would further reduce this partner's balance by $12,600 ($63,000 20%) to $41,400. That same loss would reduce Ross' capital to $58,800 and Milburn's deficit to ($49,200). The minimum cash amount would be caused by Milburn's failure to contribute this $49,200 so that it has to be absorbed by Ross (4/6 or $32,800) and Thomas (2/6 or $16,400). The remaining safe capital balance of $25,000 would be paid to Thomas. Part B Partners with deficit capital balances; insolvent partner a. Carton will have to contribute $8,800. The $62,000 in deficits will have to be absorbed by Sampson and Carton on a 3:2 basis. Thus, Carton will be allocated $24,800 of this amount which creates a deficit of $8,800. b. Klingon will have to contribute $45,125 [$35,000 + (30/80 $27,000)] that will be distributed as follows: Credito rs Sampso n Carton $ 22,000 $ 13,875 $ 9,250 Since Romulan is insolvent, the remaining partners will have to absorb the $27,000 deficit on a 3:3:2 basis. This allocation increases Klingon's deficit by 3/8 of $27,000 or $10,125. Klingon must contribute an amount equal to the new deficit balance of $45,125. The first $22,000 will go to the creditors that remain after the $24,000 in partnership cash is distributed. The remaining $23,125 is distributed to the two partners in accordance with their remaining positive capital balances after absorbing Romulan's loss, 3/8 to Sampson and 2/8 to Carton. Sampson has a positive capital balance of $13,875 [$24,000 ($27,000 3/8)] and Carton has a positive capital balance of $9,250 [$16,000 ($27,000 2/8)]. c. Sampson should receive $9,000. If Klingon is insolvent, the $35,000 deficit balance will have to be absorbed by the remaining three partners on a 3:2:2 basis. This loss would decrease Sampson's capital balance by $15,000 (3/7) to $9,000. 15-9 March, April, and May have been in partnership for a number of years. The partners allocate all profits and losses on a 2:3:1 basis, respectively. Recently, each partner has become personally insolvent and, thus, the partners have decided to liquidate the business in hopes of remedying their personal financial problems. As of September 1, the partnerships balance sheet is as follows: Cash Accounts receivable $ Inventory Land, building, and equipment (net) Total assets 23,000 Liabilities March, 108,000 capital April, 98,000 capital 50,000 $ $ 97,000 37,000 87,000 May, capital 58,000 Total 279,000 liabilities and capital $ 279,000 Prepare journal entries for the following transactions: (Do not round intermediate calculations.) a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. Sold all inventory for $68,000 cash. Paid $11,100 in liquidation expenses. Paid $52,000 of the partnerships liabilities. Collected $59,000 of the accounts receivable. Distributed safe cash balances; the partners anticipate no further liquidation expenses. Sold remaining accounts receivable for 25 percent of face value. Sold land, building, and equipment for $29,000. Paid all remaining liabilities of the partnership. Distributed cash held by the business to the partners. Event a. General Journal Cash March, Capital April, Capital May, Capital Inventory b. March, Capital April, Capital May, Capital Cash c. Liabilities Cash Debit Credit d. Cash Accounts Receivable e. April, Capital May, Capital Cash f. Cash March, Capital April, Capital May, Capital Accounts Receivable g. Cash March, Capital April, Capital May, Capital Land, Building and Equipment h. Liabilities Cash i. March, Capital April, Capital May, Capital Cash Explanation: a. March, capital (2/6 of loss) = $10,000 April, capital (3/6) = $15,000 May, capital (1/6) = $5,000 b. March, capital (2/6 of expenses) = $3,700 April, capital (3/6) = $5,550 May, capital (1/6) = $1,850 e. Partner Current Capital Adjusted March $23,300 Share of Maximum Loss* 2/6 $99,000 = $33,000 April $66,450 May $51,150 Potential Capital $ (9,700) 3/6 $99,000 = $49,500 $ 16,950 1/6 $99,000 = $16,500 $ 34,650 *Maximum losses could be suffered on the remaining $49,000 in accounts receivable and the $50,000 in land, building, and equipment. Based on the above potential losses, March would have a deficit capital balance of $9,700 which in turn has to be allocated to the two partners having positive capital balances: Partner Potential Capital (above) April $16,950 Share of March's Deficit 3/4 $9,700 = $7,275$ May $34,650 1/4 $9,700 = $2,425$ Potential Capital 9,675 32,225 f. Cash (25%) = $12,250 March, capital (2/6 of loss) = $12,250 April, capital (3/6) = $18,375 May, capital (1/6) = $6,125 g. March, capital (2/6 of loss) = $7,000 April, capital (3/6) = $10,500 May, capital (1/6) = $3,500 i. Since $41,250 cash remains and each partner has a positive capital balance, the money left can be distributed based on these ending capital balances. 15-9b March, April, and May have been in partnership for a number of years. The partners allocate all profits and losses on a 2:3:1 basis, respectively. Recently, each partner has become personally insolvent and, thus, the partners have decided to liquidate the business in hopes of remedying their personal financial problems. As of September 1, the partnerships balance sheet is as follows: Cash Accounts receivable $ Inventory Land, building, and equipment (net) Total assets 13,000 Liabilities March, 88,000 capital April, 82,000 capital 40,000 $ $ 29,000 77,000 May, capital Total 223,000 liabilities and capital 69,000 48,000 $ 223,000 Prepare journal entries for the following transactions: (Do not round intermediate calculations.) a. b. c. d. Sold all inventory for $58,000 cash. Paid $8,100 in liquidation expenses. Paid $42,000 of the partnerships liabilities. Collected $47,000 of the accounts receivable. e. f. g. h. i. Distributed safe cash balances; the partners anticipate no further liquidation expenses. Sold remaining accounts receivable for 25 percent of face value. Sold land, building, and equipment for $19,000. Paid all remaining liabilities of the partnership. Distributed cash held by the business to the partners. Event a. General Journal Cash March, Capital April, Capital May, Capital Inventory b. March, Capital April, Capital May, Capital Cash c. Liabilities Cash d. Cash Accounts Receivable e. April, Capital May, Capital Cash f. Cash March, Capital April, Capital May, Capital Accounts Receivable g. Cash March, Capital April, Capital May, Capital Land, Building and Equipment h. Liabilities Cash i. March, Capital April, Capital May, Capital Cash Explanation: a. March, capital (2/6 of loss) = $8,000 April, capital (3/6) = $12,000 May, capital (1/6) = $4,000 b. March, capital (2/6 of expenses) = $2,700 April, capital (3/6) = $4,050 Debit Credit May, capital (1/6) = $1,350 e. Partner Current Capital Adjusted March $18,300 Share of Maximum Loss* 2/6 $81,000 = $27,000 April $60,950 $42,650 May Potential Capital $ (8,700) 3/6 $81,000 = $40,500 $ 20,450 1/6 $81,000 = $13,500 $ 29,150 *Maximum losses could be suffered on the remaining $41,000 in accounts receivable and the $40,000 in land, building, and equipment. Based on the above potential losses, March would have a deficit capital balance of $8,700 which in turn has to be allocated to the two partners having positive capital balances: Partner Potential Capital (above) April $20,450 Share of March's Deficit 3/4 $8,700 = $6,525$ $29,150 1/4 $8,700 = $2,175$ May Potential Capital 13,925 26,975 f. Cash (25%) = $10,250 March, capital (2/6 of loss) = $10,250 April, capital (3/6) = $15,375 May, capital (1/6) = $5,125 g. March, capital (2/6 of loss) = $7,000 April, capital (3/6) = $10,500 May, capital (1/6) = $3,500 i. Since $29,250 cash remains and each partner has a positive capital balance, the money left can be distributed based on these ending capital balances. 15-10 Following is a series of independent cases. In each situation, indicate the cash distribution to be made at the end of the liquidation process. Unless otherwise stated, assume that all solvent partners will reimburse the partnership for their deficit capital balances. a. The Simon, Haynes, and Jackson partnership presently reports the following accounts. Jackson is personally insolvent and can contribute only an additional $2,000 to the partnership. Simon is also insolvent and has no available funds. (Leave no cells blank - be certain to enter "0" wherever required. Negative amounts and amounts to be deducted should be indicated with a minus sign.) Cash Liabilities Haynes, loan Simon, capital (40%) Haynes, capital (20%) Jackson, capital (40%) $ 43,000 35,000 36,000 29,000 (19,000) (38,000) Haynes, Loan and Capital Simon, Capital Jackson, Capital Beginning balances Contribution by Jackson $ $ $ Capital balances Elimination of Jackson's deficit $ $ $ $ $ $ Final distribution b. Hough, Luck, and Cummings operate a local accounting firm as a partnership. After working together for several years, they have decided to liquidate the partnerships property. The partners have prepared the following balance sheet: Cash Hough, loan Noncash assets Total assets $ 33,000 21,000 Liabilities Luck, loan Hough, capital 188,000 (50%) Luck, capital (40%) Cummings, capital (10%) Total $242,000 liabilities and capital $ 29,000 26,000 129,000 25,000 33,000 $242,000 The firm sells the noncash assets for $93,000; it will use $34,000 of this amount to pay liquidation expenses. All three of these partners are personally insolvent. (Leave no cells blank - be certain to enter "0" wherever required. Negative amounts and amounts to be deducted should be indicated with a minus sign.) Hough, Loan and Capital Beginning balances Loss on disposal Liquidation Luck, Loan and Capital $ Cummings, Capital $ $ expenses Capital balances Allocation of Luck's deficit Final distribution $ $ $ c. Hough, Luck, and Cummings operate a local accounting firm as a partnership. After working together for several years, they have decided to liquidate the partnerships property. The partners have prepared the following balance sheet: Cash Hough, loan Noncash assets $ 33,000 21,000 188,000 Liabilities Luck, loan $ 29,000 26,000 Hough, capital Luck, capital Cummings, capital Total assets Total $242,000 liabilities and capital 129,000 25,000 33,000 $242,000 Assume that the profits and losses are split 2:4:4 to Hough, Luck, and Cummings, respectively, and that liquidation expenses are only $19,000. The firm sells the noncash assets for $93,000; All three of these partners are personally insolvent. (Leave no cells blank - be certain to enter "0" wherever required. Do not round intermediate calculations. Round your answers to the nearest dollar amount. Negative amounts and amounts to be deducted should be indicated with a minus sign.) Hough, Loan and Capital Beginning balances Loss on disposal Liquidation expenses Luck, Loan and Capital $ Cummings, Capital $ $ Capital balances Allocation of Cummings' deficit balance $ Capital balances Allocation of Luck's deficit balance $ $ $ $ $ $ Final distribution d. Following the liquidation of all noncash assets, the partnership of Redmond, Ledbetter, Watson, and Sandridge has the following account balances: Liabilities Redmond, loan Redmond, capital (20%) Ledbetter, capital (10%) Watson, capital (30%) Sandridge, capital (40%) $ 41,000 18,000 (47,000) (43,000) 9,000 28,000 Redmond is personally insolvent. (Leave no cells blank - be certain to enter "0" wherever required. Negative amounts and amounts to be deducted should be indicated with a minus sign.) Redmond, Loan and Capital Ledbetter, Capital Watson, Capital Sandridge, Capital Beginning balances Allocation of Redmond's deficit balance $ $ $ $ Capital balances Contribution by Ledbetter and Watson $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Final distribution Explanation: a. Simon, Capital Elimination of Jackson's deficit (40:20 basis) Haynes, Loan and Capital $ (24,000) Jackson, Capital $ (12,000) $ 36,000 b. Hough, Loan and Capital $95,000 loss on disposal (allocated on a 50:40:10 basis) Liquidation expenses (50:40:10 basis) Allocation of Luck's deficit (50:10 basis) Luck, Loan and Capital Cummings, Capital $ (47,500) $ (38,000) $ (9,500) (17,000) (13,600) (3,400) (500) 600 (100) c. Hough, Loan and Capital $95,000 loss on disposal (allocated on a 2:4:4 basis) Liquidation expenses (2:4:4 basis) Allocation of Cummings' deficit balance (2:4 basis) Luck, Loan and Capital Cummings, Capital $ (19,000) $ (38,000) $ (38,000) (3,800) (7,600) (7,600) (4,200) (8,400) 12,600 d. Redmond, Loan and Capital Allocation of Redmond's deficit balance (10:30:40 basis) $46,625 contribution by Ledbetter and $1,875 contribution by Watson Ledbetter, Capital Watson, Capital $ 29,000 $ (3,625) $ (10,875) $ (14,500) 0 46,625 1,875 0 Remaining $35,000 ($46,625 + $1,875 $13,500) is used to pay liabilities. 15-10b Following is a series of independent cases. In each situation, indicate the cash distribution to be made at the end of the liquidation process. Unless otherwise stated, assume that all solvent partners will reimburse the partnership for their deficit capital balances. a. The Simon, Haynes, and Jackson partnership presently reports the following accounts. Jackson is personally insolvent and can contribute only an additional $7,000 to the partnership. Simon is also insolvent and has no available funds. (Leave no cells blank - be certain to enter "0" wherever required. Negative amounts and amounts to be deducted should be indicated with a minus sign.) Cash Liabilities Haynes, loan Simon, capital (40%) Haynes, capital (20%) Jackson, capital (40%) $ 35,000 27,000 20,000 21,000 (11,000) (22,000) Haynes, Loan and Capital Simon, Capital Beginning balances Contribution by Sandridge, Capital $ Jackson, Capital $ $ Jackson Capital balances Elimination of Jackson's deficit $ $ $ Final distribution $ $ $ b. Hough, Luck, and Cummings operate a local accounting firm as a partnership. After working together for several years, they have decided to liquidate the partnerships property. The partners have prepared the following balance sheet: Cash Hough, loan Noncash assets Total assets $ 25,000 13,000 Liabilities Luck, loan Hough, capital 172,000 (50%) Luck, capital (40%) Cummings, capital (10%) Total $210,000 liabilities and capital $ 38,000 16,000 105,000 28,000 23,000 $210,000 The firm sells the noncash assets for $85,000; it will use $26,000 of this amount to pay liquidation expenses. All three of these partners are personally insolvent. (Leave no cells blank - be certain to enter "0" wherever required. Negative amounts and amounts to be deducted should be indicated with a minus sign.) Hough, Loan and Capital Beginning balances Loss on disposal Liquidation expenses Luck, Loan and Capital Cummings, Capital $ $ $ $ $ $ Capital balances Allocation of Luck's deficit Final distribution c. Hough, Luck, and Cummings operate a local accounting firm as a partnership. After working together for several years, they have decided to liquidate the partnerships property. The partners have prepared the following balance sheet: Cash Hough, loan Noncash assets $ 25,000 13,000 172,000 Liabilities Luck, loan $ 38,000 16,000 Hough, capital Luck, capital Cummings, capital Total assets Total $210,000 liabilities and capital 105,000 28,000 23,000 $210,000 Assume that the profits and losses are split 2:4:4 to Hough, Luck, and Cummings, respectively, and that liquidation expenses are only $11,000. The firm sells the noncash assets for $85,000; All three of these partners are personally insolvent. (Leave no cells blank - be certain to enter "0" wherever required. Do not round intermediate calculations. Round your answers to the nearest dollar amount. Negative amounts and amounts to be deducted should be indicated with a minus sign.) Hough, Loan and Capital Beginning balances Loss on disposal Liquidation expenses Luck, Loan and Capital $ Cummings, Capital $ $ Capital balances Allocation of Cummings' deficit balance $ Capital balances Allocation of Luck's deficit balance $ $ $ $ $ $ Final distribution d. Following the liquidation of all noncash assets, the partnership of Redmond, Ledbetter, Watson, and Sandridge has the following account balances: Liabilities Redmond, loan Redmond, capital (20%) Ledbetter, capital (10%) Watson, capital (30%) Sandridge, capital (40%) $ 33,000 10,000 (31,000) (35,000) 7,000 20,000 Redmond is personally insolvent. (Leave no cells blank - be certain to enter "0" wherever required. Negative amounts and amounts to be deducted should be indicated with a minus sign.) Redmond, Loan and Capital Ledbetter, Capital Watson, Capital Sandridge, Capital Beginning balances Allocation of Redmond's deficit balance $ $ $ $ Capital balances Contribution by Ledbetter and Watson $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Final distribution Explanation: a. Haynes, Loan and Capital Simon, Capital Elimination of Jackson's deficit (40:20 basis) $ (10,000) Jackson, Capital $ (5,000) $ 15,000 b. Hough, Loan and Capital $87,000 loss on disposal (allocated on a 50:40:10 basis) Liquidation expenses (50:40:10 basis) Allocation of Luck's deficit (50:10 basis) Luck, Loan and Capital Cummings, Capital $ (43,500) $ (34,800) $ (8,700) (13,000) (10,400) (2,600) (1,000) 1,200 (200) c. Hough, Loan and Capital $87,000 loss on disposal (allocated on a 2:4:4 basis) Liquidation expenses (2:4:4 basis) Allocation of Cummings' deficit balance (2:4 basis) Luck, Loan and Capital Cummings, Capital $ (17,400) $ (34,800) $ (34,800) (2,200) (4,400) (4,400) (5,400) (10,800) 16,200 d. Redmond, Loan and Capital Allocation of Redmond's deficit balance (10:30:40 basis) $37,625 contribution by Ledbetter and $875 contribution by Watson Ledbetter, Capital Watson, Capital Sandridge, Capital $ 21,000 $ (2,625) $ (7,875) $ (10,500) 0 37,625 875 0 Remaining $29,000 ($37,625 + $875 $9,500) is used to pay liabilities.

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William Mason High School - GEOMETRY - 1
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University of Saskatchewan - EVSC - 110
Concentration of contaminants collect in tissues of animals1. Higher order animals have increasing concentrations of contaminant• Ex. Crustacean<Perch<Seaflows<Eagle•Endosulfan• BCF: (wet weight)1. Arctic char 16902 . Salmon 72803. A
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XDistribution of X under the null hypothesisH0:  =0 is true (standard deviation taken asgiven)2.5%0–4sd 0–3sd 0–2sd 0–sd2.5%00+sd 0+2sd 0+3sd 0+4sdXFor example, we might choose to reject the nu
Delaware Valley - LA - 1060
irst piece worth watching to. It’s almost as if I was trying toempathize and really understand where he was coming from. As for the second piece “SiegmundheiBich” there was a lot of emotion there to. From the performance I saw a lot of anger
Liberty - ACCT - 402
CH 16 Excel CaseThe City of Bainland has been undergoing financial difficulties because of adecrease in its tax base caused by corporations leaving the area.On January 1, 2013, the city has a fund balance of only $400,000 in itsgovernment funds. In 20
Liberty - ACCT - 403
ACCT 403 CONNECT CHP 161Which of the following statements is true?There are three different types of proprietary funds.There are five different types of fiduciary funds. There are five different types of governmental funds.There are three different
Liberty - ACCT - 403
ACCT 403 CONNECT CHP 171A city government holds a six-year capital lease for property being used within the GeneralFund. Minimum lease payments total $70,000 starting next year but have a current present valueof $49,000. What is the total amount of ot
Liberty - ACCT - 403
ACCT 403 CONNECT CHP 181A private not-for-profit organization receives two gifts. One is $80,000 and is restricted forpaying salaries of teachers who help children learn to read. The other is $110,000, which isrestricted for purchasing playground equi
Liberty - ACCT - 412
ACCT 412 CONNECT CHP 1515-1Evon would like to organize SHO as either an LLC or as a C corporation generating an 7 percentannual before-tax return on a $485,000 investment. Assume individual and corporate tax ratesare both 30 percent and individual cap
Liberty - ACCT - 412
ACCT 412 CONNECT CHP 1616-1LNS corporation reports book income of $2,330,000. Included in the $2,330,000 is $32,250 oftax-exempt interest income. LNS reports $1,357,500 in ordinary and necessary businessexpenses.What is LNS corporations taxable incom
Liberty - ACCT - 412
ACCT 412 CONNECT CHP 1717-1Woodward Corporation reported pretax book income of $1,507,500. Included in thecomputation were favorable temporary differences of $297,500, unfavorable temporarydifferences of $64,500, and favorable permanent differences of
Liberty - BUSI - 320
1Frantic Fast Foods had earnings after taxes of $1,320,000 in the year 2009 with 304,000 sharesoutstanding. On January 1, 2010, the firm issued 10,000 new shares. Because of the proceedsfrom these new shares and other operating improvements, earnings a
Liberty - BUSI - 320
Connect BUSI 3201Philip Morris is excited because sales for his clothing company are expected to double from$510,000 to $1,020,000 next year. Philip notes that net assets (Assets Liabilities) will remainat 55 percent of Sales. His clothing firm will e
Liberty - ACCT - 301
Check Figuresto accompanyINTEMEDIATE ACCOUNTINGFourth EditionSpiceland, Sepe, and TomassiniChapter 1BE 1-1Net income, $208,000BE 1-2b. AICPABE 1-32. AssetsBE 1-44. Matching principleBE 1-53. Economic entity assumptionBE 1-62. Disagree, Ma
Liberty - ACCT - 301
Check Figuresto accompanyINTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTINGSixth EditionSpiceland, Sepe and NelsonChapter 1BE 1-1Net income, $208,000BE 1-21. LiabilitiesBE 1-32. The economic entity assumptionBE 1-41.The matching principleBE 1-53. Disagree, matching p
Liberty - ACCT - 301
15-1At the beginning of its fiscal year, Caf Med leased restaurant space from Crescent Corporationunder a nine-year lease agreement. The contract calls for annual lease payments of $27,000 eachat the end of each year. The building was acquired recently
Liberty - ACCT - 301
Final Question 10 out of 2 pointsIn reconciling net income to taxable income, interest earned on municipal bonds is:AnswerSelected Answer:A reversing difference. Question 22 out of 2 pointsWhich of the following causes a permanent difference betw
Liberty - ACCT - 301
Midterm Question 12 out of 2 pointsThe fair value of debt securities not regularly traded can be most reasonablyapproximated by:AnswerSelectedAnswer:Calculating the discounted present value of the principal and interestpayments. Question 20 out
Liberty - ACCT - 301
INTERMEDIATE ACCT CHP 4Brief Exercise 4-4 Multiple-step income statement [LO1, 3]The following is a partial year-end adjusted trial balance.Account TitleSales revenueLoss on sale ofinvestmentsInterest revenueLoss from flooddamage (unusual andinf
Liberty - ACCT - 301
INTERMEDIATE ACCT CHP 5Brief Exercise 5-1 Point of delivery recognition [LO1]On July 1, 2011, Apache Company sold a parcel of undeveloped land to a construction companyfor $3,140,000. The book value of the land on Apaches books was $1,250,000. Terms of
Liberty - ACCT - 301
INTERMEDIATE ACCT CHP 6Exercise 6-1 Future value; single amount [LO2]Determine the future value of the following single amounts (Use Table 1) (Round "FVFactor" to 5 decimal places and final answers to the nearest dollar amount. Omit the "$"sign in you
Liberty - ACCT - 301
INTERMEDIATE ACCT CHP 77-1Brief Exercise 7-8 Uncollectible accounts; income statement approach [LO5, 6]The following information relates to a companys accounts receivable: accounts receivablebalance at the beginning of the year, $316,000; allowance for
Liberty - ACCT - 301
INTERMEDIATE ACCT CHP 88-1Brief Exercise 8-1 Determining ending inventory; periodic system [LO1]A company began its fiscal year with inventory of $200,000. Purchases and cost of goods soldfor the year were $953,000 and $982,200, respectively.What was
Liberty - ACCT - 301
INTERMEDIATE ACCT CHP 99-1Brief Exercise 9-1 Lower of cost or market [LO1]Ross Electronics has one product in its ending inventory. Per unit data consist of the following:cost, $56; replacement cost, $54; selling price, $66; disposal costs, $4. The nor
Liberty - ACCT - 301
INTERMEDIATE ACCT CHP 1010-1Brief Exercise 10-2 Acquisition cost; land and building [LO1]Fullerton Waste Management purchased land and a warehouse for $617,000. In addition to thepurchase price, Fullerton made the following expenditures related to the
Liberty - ACCT - 301
INTERMEDIATE ACCT CHP 1111-1Brief Exercise 11-2 Depreciation methods [LO2]On January 1, 2011, Canseco Plumbing Fixtures purchased equipment for $40,000. Residualvalue at the end of an estimated four-year service life is expected to be $3,100. The compa
Liberty - ACCT - 301
Question 12 out of 2 pointsWhen a magazine sells subscriptions to customers, it is an example of:AnswerSelected Answer:An unearned revenue transaction. Question 22 out of 2 pointsGains or losses result, respectively, from the disposition of busin
Liberty - PHIL - 201
Question 110 out of 10 pointsScarcityAnswerSelected Answer:exists in all human societies.Correct Answer:exists in all human societies.Question 210 out of 10 pointsThe study of how a particular firm might choose to maximize its profits would fal
Liberty - PHIL - 201
PHILOSOPHY PHIL 201 TEST ANSWERSW hen complete certainty cannot be had investigating a philosophical truth, no view is any better orworse than its competitors.Selected Answer: FalseThe fallacy that occurs by assessing the value of a view or practice o
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
HW1Problem 1 Assume a simple circuit requires 10,000 MOS transistors on a die and that alltransistors are minimum sized. If the transistors are fabricated in a 32nm CMOS processand the spacing overhead for the transistors is a factor of 10, determine t
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
HW2 solutionProblem 1. Extrapolating the data from Figure 1.4, predict the transistor count of a microprocessorin 2016.Solution6 to 12 billionProblem 2. Sketch a transistor-level schematic for CMOS 4-input NOR gate.SolutionABCDYABCDProblem
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
EE 330Homework Assignment 2Spring 2012Note: On this and subsequent HW assignments there will be problems that require aVerilog or VHDL solution. It will be assumed that students either have a background inVerilog or VHDL or that they will study what
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
EE 330Homework Assignment 3 SolutionsSpring 2012Problem 1 Problem 1.6 of WH parts b) and c). Modify this problem to design of these functionsusing both the compound gate approach and the static CMOS gate approach. Compare the number oflevels of logic
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
Spring 2012 HW 5 SolutionsProblem 1 Design an 8K resistor in the ON 0.5u CMOS process. Use Poly 1 for the resistor. The widthlength ratio of an imaginary box contacting on 4 sides but enclosing the resistor should have a W/L ratioof between 1:2 and 2:1.
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
EE 330Homework 5Spring 2012 (Due Friday Feb. 10)If parameters are needed for process characterization, use the measured parameters from theON (formerly AMI) T6AU process run that is attached. On those problems that involvethe design of passive compon
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
Spring 2012 HW 6 SolutionsProblem 1 Size an n-channel transistor in the AMI 0.5u CMOS process so that the impedance in theswitch-level model is 1000 when operating with a 3.5V power supply.Repeat for an n-channel transistor in the IBM 0.13u CMOS proces
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
EE 330Homework 6Spring 2012Solve Problem 12 (weighted as two problems) and 8 of the remaining problems. Due at11:00 a.m. on Friday Feb. 17If parameters are needed for process characterization beyond what is specified in aproblem, use as indicated th
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
Spring 2012 HW 7 SolutionsProblem 1 Determine the output voltage for the following circuitProblem 1 Solution:Assume Vt = kT/q = 0.0259VVBE = .5349VIB == 1.866 10-5AIC = IB = 1.866 10-3AVOUT = 8 IC 3k = 2.4VProblem 2 Determine the currents labeled
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
EE 330Homework 7Spring 2012 Due Friday Feb 24Unless specified to the contrary, assume all n-channel MOS transistors have modelparameters nCOX = 100A/V2 and VTn = 1V, all p-channel transistors have modelparameters pCOX = 33A/V2 and VTp= -1V. Correspon
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
Spring 2012 HW 8 SolutionsProblem 1 A circuit using an SCR that is rated at current levels of 10A is shown below. Relevantparameters from the datasheet for this device are appended at the end to this assignment. Assume thevoltage VCC is fixed at 50V an
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
EE 330Homework 8Spring 2012Each problem is worth 10 pts except for Problem 13 which is worth 20pts. Solve anysubset of these problems with a point total of 100 pts. If you chose to do more problemswith a maximum point total beyond 100 pts, please ind
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
Spring 2012 HW 9 SolutionsProblem 1 Assume the capacitors are very large.a) Draw the small signal equivalent circuit for the amplifier shownb) Determine the quiescent value of VC and VOUTc) Obtain the small-signal voltage gaind) Determine the small-s
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
EE 330Homework 9Spring 2012Each problem is worth 10 points except Problem 20 which is worth 20 points. Solve anysubset of these problems with a total point value of 100 points. If you chose toadditional problems with a maximum point total in excess o
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
Spring 2012 HW 10 SolutionsProblem 1 Determine the voltages indicated with a ? Assume C1 and C2 are large.VBE 0.6V8 0.6 0.04625mA80 K I BQ 4.625mAI BQ I CQVc 0VCQ 8 I c *4 K 10.5V 0;VBC 0;So that the BJT is not in forward Bias region:VCQ 0.2V
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
EE 330Spring 2012Assignment 10Unless specified to the contrary, assume in the following problems that bipolar devicesare from processes with JS at 300K of 0.25fA/2, n=100, p=25,VAF=100V and allMOS devices are from a process with nCOX=100 A/V2, VTn=0.
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
EE330 HW11 SolutionsProblem 1 Solution:Problem 2 Solution:I(R) = 50A 4 = 200AVOUT = 8V 20k 200A = 4VProblem 3 Solution:IOUT = 50A 4 2 = 400AProblem 4 Solution:I(R) = 50A 4 = 200AVOUT = 5V 15k 200A = 2VProblem 5 Solution:Problem 6 Solution:
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
EE 330Homework 11Due Wed. Mar 28 at 2:00 p.m.Solve any 5 of the following problems. Unless stated to the contrary in a specificproblem, assume MOS transistors have model parameters nCOX=100A/V2 , VTn=1V,VTp= -1V, n/ p =3 and all BJT transistors have
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
Spring 2012 EE330 HW12 SolutionsProblem 1 Design an noninverting amplifier with a gain of 30 (10%) that has an input impedancethat is larger than 100K that can drive a 1K resistive load using bipolar transistors. Verify yourdesign analytically and wit
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
EE 330Assignment 12Spring 2012If references to a semiconductor processes are needed beyond what is given in a specificproblem or question, assume a CMOS process is available with the following key processparameters; nCOX=100A/v2 pCOX=nCOX/3 ,VTNO=0.5
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
Spring 2012 HW 13 SolutionsProblem 1 Solution:fProblem 2 Solution:AV = -gm1/go1 = -(ICQ/Vt)/(ICQ/VAF) = -VAF/Vt = -3,861Problem 3 Solution:AV = -(gm1/go1)(/2) = -193,050Problem 4 Solution:VOUT = 1V AV = -.193VWith such a large gain the input must
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
EE 330Assignment 13Spring 2013If references to a semiconductor processes are needed beyond what is given in a specificproblem or question, assume a CMOS process is available with the following key processparameters; nCOX=100A/v2 pCOX=nCOX/3 ,VTNO=0.5
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
Spring 2012 HW14 SolutionsProblem 1 Solution:Problem 2 Solution:Problem 3 Solution:Problem 4 Solution:Problem 5 Solution:Problem 6 Solution:Problem 7 Solution:Problem 8 Solution:Problem 9 Solution:Problem 10 Solution:Another Solution:Problem 1
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
EE 330Assignments 14Spring 2012Please solve any 6 problems. These will be due at the beginning of class on Wednesdayof this week but will be accepted without penalty up until 5:00 p.m. Solutions will beposted shortly thereafter.If references to a se
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
Spring 2012 HW15 SolutionsProblem 1 Solution:Problem 2 Solution:Problem 3 Solution:Problem 4 Solution:Problem 5 Solution:Problem 6 Solution:Problem 7 Solution:Problem 8 Solution:Problem 9 Solution:Problem 10 Solution:We have 3 inverters, two ha
Iowa State - EE - ee 330
EE 330Assignments 15Spring 2012This assignment will not be collected or graded. Even though the problems will not becollected, students are advised to work enough of them to have mastery of the materialprior to looking at the posted solutions.If ref
Iowa State - CPRE - cpre 288
Full NameCprE 288 HW1Due May 20, 2011Question 1 (8 pts)The purpose of this question is to refresh your understanding of numeric representation from the prerequisite courses.Complete the table below. Assume ASCII encoding of characters, and a 2s compl
Iowa State - CPRE - cpre 288
CprE 288 HW1Question 1 (8 pts)The purpose of this question is to refresh your understanding of numeric representation from thepre-requisite courses.Complete the table below. Assume ASCII encoding of characters, and a 2s complimentencoding of negative
Iowa State - CPRE - cpre 288
CprE 288 HW2Question 1 (4 points)Note: A high bit value is 1, a low bit value is 0.Let x be an 8-bit variable (of type char). The following exercises test your knowledge of bit masking.For the following, write a single line of C code that represents t
Iowa State - CPRE - cpre 288
CprE 288 HW2Question 1 (4 points)Note: A high bit value is 1, a low bit value is 0.Let x be an 8-bit variable (of type char). The following exercises test your knowledge of bitmasking. For the following, write a single line of C code that represents t