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Part-1 1. What does the transport layer do? The transport layer performs three functions: Establishing end-end connections: linking the application layer to the network. Addressing: finding the address of the ultimate destination computer. Packetizing: breaking long messages into smaller packets for transmission. 2. What does the network layer do? The network layer performs two functions: Routing: determining the next computer to which the message should be sent to reach the final destination Addressing: finding the address of that next computer. 3. What are the parts of TCP/IP and what do they do? Who is the primary user of TCP/IP? As the name implies, TCP/IP has tow parts. TCP is the transport layer protocol that links the application layer to the network layer. It performs packetizing: breaking the data into smaller packets, numbering them, ensuring each packet is reliably delivered, and putting them in the proper order at the destination. IP is the network layer protocol and performs addressing and routing. IP software used at each of the intervening computers through which the message passes; it is IP that routes the message to the final destination. The TCP/IP was developed for the U .S. Department of Defenses Advanced Research Project Agency network (ARPANET). TCP/IP is the transport/network layer protocol used on the Internet. It is also the worlds popular network layer protocol, used by almost 80 percent of all BNs, MANs. In 1998, TCP/IP moved past IPX/SPX as the most common protocol used on LANs. 6. Why is TCP/IP the most popular protocol? TCP/IP is the worlds popular network layer protocol, used by almost 80 percent of all BNs, MANs. In 1998, TCP/IP moved past IPX/SPX as the most common protocol used on LANs. TCP/IP allows reasonably efficient and error-free transmission. Because it performs error checking, it can send large files across sometimes-unreliable networks with great assurance that the data will arrive uncorrupted. TCP/IP is compatible with a variety of data link protocols, arrive uncorrupted.... View Full Document

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