Feb. 15, Biopsychsocial Model
5 Pages

Feb. 15, Biopsychsocial Model

Course Number: PSYC 162, Spring 2011

College/University: UPenn

Word Count: 2059

Rating:

Document Preview

February 15: Biopsychosocial Model Biopsychosocial unified approach - no single aspect can fully explain the complexity of psychological disorders - each causal factor is interacting with the other How did these factors interact to produce THIS disorder in THIS person at THIS time? Example: Judy, a 16-year-old, was referred to an anxiety clinic after increasing episodes of fainting. About 2 years earlier, in her...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> Pennsylvania >> UPenn >> PSYC 162

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

15: February Biopsychosocial Model Biopsychosocial unified approach - no single aspect can fully explain the complexity of psychological disorders - each causal factor is interacting with the other How did these factors interact to produce THIS disorder in THIS person at THIS time? Example: Judy, a 16-year-old, was referred to an anxiety clinic after increasing episodes of fainting. About 2 years earlier, in her biology class, the teacher showed a graphic film of a frog dissection, with vivid images of blood, tissue, and muscle. About halfway through, Judy felt lightheaded and left the room. But the images didnt leave her. She continued to be bothered by them and occasionally felt queasy. She began to avoid situation where she might see blood or injury. She stopped looking at magazines that might have gory pictures, and found it difficult to look at raw meat, or even Band-Aids. It got so ba that she felt lightheaded when her friend exclaimed, Cut it out! She fainted anytime she unavoidably encountered blood. Each time, her parents or friends rushed to her side, but were unable to help. By the time of referral, Judy was fainting 5-10 times a week, often in class. Because her physician could find nothing wrong with her, Judys principal concluded that she was being manipulative and suspended her from school, even though she was an honors student. Multiple, interacting influences that contribute to Judys phobia: Psychological - classical conditioning and stimulus generalization - generalizes her reaction to a US to include anything related to the UShas a conditioned response to anything related to blood - negative thoughts and avoidance maintain fear (negative reinforcement) - she cannot habituate to her fear, so her conditioned response is maintained - fear triggers more intense physiological response Cognitive - a cognitive psychologist would look for some sort of irrational interpretations (such as Judys interpretation of band-aids) - Ellis would say that Judy is having catastrophic thoughts (like Blood will cause me to faint and hit my head and die or It will cause terrible social humiliation) - becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy Psychodynamic - repression or denial of a previous traumatic event, such as a bloody car accident - her mind is naturally protecting her by fainting, so she can avoid dealing with the trauma Social - social attention (positive reinforcer) may increase symptoms, because she likes the attention - rejection and adversity can worsen mental disorders Biological - oversensitive sinoaortic baroreflex archow the body reacts to elevations in blood pressure - the experience of disgust causes her to have a sudden increase in blood pressure, and her body overcompensates activating the parasympathetic nervous system to maintain homeostasisthe overcompensation leads to less blood flow to the brain, so she faints - this oversensitivity seems to be inherited - vasovagal syncope - if medicine solves the problem, then Judy will become dependent on medicineshe never cognitively learns that panic attacks arent going to hurt her - she will relapse if she goes off the medicine - anxiety medications are usually addictive - this is actually avoidance Genetic contributions to psychopathology - our genes provide boundaries to our development February 15: Biopsychosocial Model - ex. 2 people have predispositions for being tall, but we know that malnutrition will cause those people to not grow as tall as they could have - ex. we know that even identical twins (share 100% genes) dont look exactly the same - vulnerabilities to mental disorders are almost always polygenic = caused by many genes - genetic factors account for less than of the explanation of mental disorder - ex. if one identical twin has schizophrenia, there is less than 50% that the other twin will develop schizophrenia as welland schizophrenia is highly inheritable - genetic contributions to mental disorders need to be studies in interaction with the environment - genotypein any one cell, only some of the genes are expressed - phenotype = our observable, unique combination of expressed genes - ex. identical twins have the same genotypes, but different phenotypes Diathesis-stress model Inherited hits (the diathesis) + environmental hits = expressed disease - a genetic predisposition for a disorder is inherited, but it isnt activated unless something in the environment (like stress) turns it on Ex. Family history of Vasovagal Syncope + exposure to dissection OR puberty = blood-injection phobia - puberty is important because many stressful social, cognitive, and physical changes occur at that time - most psychological disorders experience their onset around puberty or adolescence - recent evidence suggests this additive model may be overly simplistic The revised diathesis-stress model - incorporates the biopsychosocial model - only one of the 3 diathesises is necessary Ex. Say that someone has developed a very repressive coping style and deny/avoid any negative emotions. They learned this at home, because anytime they expressed distress as a child, they were beaten. Their repressive coping is okay if they never experience any life stressorsbut the majority of people are exposed to a traumatic event in their lifetime. Experiencing a traumatic event, in combination with his repressive coping style, could trigger a disorder. Reciprocal gene-environment model - genes and the environment affect each other in a bidirectional way to lead to the development of a disorder Genotype-environment correlations = when a genotype shapes the environmental experience that an individual has Example: Jerry had a genetic predisposition to aggressive behavior. His frequent fist fights at school resulted in peer rejection in the early grades. Such rejection led Jerry to go on to associate with similarly aggressive and delinquent peers in later grades. Increased exposure to peers with delinquent behaviors eventually influenced Jerry to develop a full-blown pattern of delinquency in adolescence. - in adulthood, Jerry may further develop full-blown antisocial personality disorder - because of his peers responses to his predisposition, Jerry had a reaction that led to him being more exposed to his predisposition - this doesnt always have to be negativea child may like the responses they get Ex. An extroverted child seeks the company of others and enhances their own tendencies to be social because their environment was influenced by their predisposition to be social. Genotype-environment interactions - people with different genotypes may be differentially susceptible to their environments, which influences them to develop a disorder February 15: Biopsychosocial Caspis Model Example: research on the serotonin-transporter gene - serotonin neurotransmitters are involved with depression - a gene has been identified that has 2 different alleleslong (l) or short (s) - studies on animals suggest that those with ss tend to have an increased risk for developing depression in response to stress - Caspi studies humans and their environments over many years to see the effects of this gene - the effect of the short alleles depended on the number of stressful events that occurred - those with ss were twice as likely to develop a major depressive disorder after 4 or more major life stressors as compared to those with llthose with ls fell somewhere in between - those with ss and severe maltreatment during childhood were also twice as likely to develop a major depressive disorder as compared to those with ss and a good childhood Beyond genetics: other biological influences Brain structure and function - the first disorders recognized as having a biological component were those associated with brain damage - ex. Phineas Gages prefrontal lobe was destroyed, so his higher cognitive functions (like social etiquette) were affected - most mental disorders are not caused by brain damage, but by hormonal and neurotransmitter abnormalities Hormonal abnormalities - hormones are transported all over our bodies by hormonal glands that interact with each other - ex. the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-crotical axis (HPA axis) is important in our stress response Neurotransmitter abnormalities - has made the largest impact in biological influences and psychiatry Neurotransmitter abnormalities Neurotransmission - neurons (nerve cells) communicate via neurotransmitters - a neuron releases a neurotransmitter into the synaptic gap, where it is picked up by another neuron gives off an electrical charge - depending on the level and type of neurotransmitter, the neuron will either fire or not firecan have an excitory or an inhibitory response on the next neuron - this is an all-or-nothing response - afterwards, the neurotransmitters dont just float around in the synapse - the remaining neurotransmitters are deactivated through reuptake = the presynaptic neuron takes back the neurotransmitters through its axon terminal - or, the presynaptic neuron releases an enzyme into the synapse to degrade the neurotransmitters February 15: Biopsychosocial Model - if the neurotransmitters float around in the synapse for too long, they may cause an unintended response in the postsynaptic neuron Problems arise when - excess production and release into the synapses - caused by either too little or too much of either reuptake or degradation - dysfunction in neurotransmitter deactivation (such as problems with reuptake) - problems with receptors in the postsynaptic neuron - receptors might be too sensitive or not sensitive enough 4 neurotransmitters are most associated with psychopathology: 1. Serotonin - important in the regulation of mood, emotions, and impulses - important in the way that we think and process info from our environment - implicated in emotional depression and anxiety disorders - in some areas, too little serotonin causes depressionin other areas, too much serotonin causes depression - we originally thought a lack of serotonin was associated with depression - amino-oxidase inhibits serotonin to reduce symptoms of depression 2. Norepinephrine (similar to adrenaline) - responsible for emergency responses that cause the fight-or-flight response) - helps the body respond to a stressful or dangerous situation - implicated in anxiety and depression - important in attention, orienting, and basic motives - cocaine and amphetamines prolong the action of norepinephrine in the synapse, so people continue to feel a high and feel on edge and full of energy - a lack of norepinephrine, therefore, is associated with depression and a lack of energy 3. GABA (gamma aminobutyric acid) - an inhibitory neurotransmitter - involved in reducing anxiety and mania - reduces excitement caused by the increased firing of neurons (this increased firing leads us to have strong reactions) - present in anticonvulsive drugs for seizures - present in alcohol, which makes us sedated 4. Dopamine - regulates reinforcments and rewards - important in cognitive processing, muscle systems, and pleasure systems - ADD is helped by increasing dopamine levels Impact of changing dopamine levels Too much dopamine hallucinations, paranoia What increases dopamine? schizophrenia, cocaine, speed, nicotine, Ritalin Too little dopamine slow movements, trouble initiating movements, tremors, low mood - looks like Parkinsons disease Drug therapies and mechanisms Drug class Antidepressants Symptoms targeted Depression Examples MAOIs Tricyclics SSRIs SNRIs NDRIs Hypothesized action INC serotonin INC norepinephrine INC dopamine February 15: Biopsychosocial Model Mood stabilizers Mania Depression Lithium Anticonvulsants Anxiolytics Anxiety Insomnia Neuroleptics Psychosis Benzodiazapines SSRIs Typicals Haldol Atypicals Zyprexa INC serotonin DEC norepinephrine INC GABA ? Glutamate INC serotonin INC GABA DEC dopamine Antidepressants MAOIs if you eat too much dairy, you get dangerous side effects (like a spike in blood pressure) Tricyclics target all 3 neurotransmitters, so it has strong side effects like blurred vision and risk of overdose SSRIs, SNRIs, and NDRIs most modern, as effective as tricyclics but have fewer side effects because they one target one or 2 neurotransmitters Mood stabilizers - usually target mania Lithium a natural substance that we accidentally learned is helpful in regulating mood - were uncertain about the mechanisms of how lithium works - an overdose is possible and its difficult to maintain a balance of lithium in the body - those taking lithium must have the lithium levels checked frequently - kidney malfunction is a side effect of having weird levels of lithium Anxiolytics - associated with relaxation and sedation - used as a sleep agent for insomnia SSRIs also helpful for treating anxiety, which shows the comorbidity between anxiety and depression; also help with bulimia Neuroleptics - antipsychotics Typicals early antipsychotic that reduced dopamine and had severe side effects Atypicals more modern and reduced side effects (especially one condition in which the patient experienced uncontrollable facial and tongue movements) Why do you think the idea of a chemical imbalance causing mental disorders has become so popular in our culture? - led to a lot of revolutionized medical treatments - for many of the disorders, drugs only help some of the symptoms but not all of them

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

NYU - ECON - 0001
WHAT WILL NATIONS TRADE?THE DETERMINANTS AND EFFECTS OF TRADEH-O-S FACTOR THEORY OF TRADE Heckscher-Ohlin-Samuelson theory says thatcountries will export those goods, which make relatively intensive use of factors (land, labor, etc) in which they are
Maryland - HISP - 200
The author suggests for each classrealize the biases that do exist across classes. He argues that if one does this, it ispossible for classes to be tolerant of each other’s varying perspectives.“Thus professionals, including preservationists,
University of Phoenix - PSY - 211
Testing Intelligence Pg.1Robert RidelTesting IntelligenceLisa AllenPsy/211April 10, 2011Robert RidelTesting Intelligence Pg.2Robert RidelThis week we were asked to take an I.Q. test and answer the question stated on oursyllabus. I will answer th
Cornell - CS - 2110
value appears as NaN. If it is involved in arithmetic, the result is NaN.Imagine, instead, a square root method that requires a nonnegative argument. Let’s treat the passing of a negative number to the method as a programming mistake and throw a r
UPenn - PSYC - 162
February 22: Posttraumatic Stress DisorderVulnerability-stress modelTodays class- review common reactions to and the prevalence of trauma exposure- discuss the historical evolution of the diagnosis of PTSD- introduce comorbidities of PTSD and risk fa
UPenn - PSYC - 162
Panic Disorders IIOverviewPanic- panic attacks- panic disorder- panic disorder with agoraphobiaPhobias- specific phobias- social phobiasLearning objectives1) Identify and give examples of the 4 types of symptoms that constitute anxiety2) Know t
UPenn - PSYC - 162
February 24: Panic Disorders and PhobiasSeth J. Gillihan, Ph. D.Learning objectivesTo be able to identify:- key features of panic disorder and agoraphobia- criteria for specific phobias- criteria for social phobia- commonalities and unique features
UPenn - PSYC - 162
January 18: Defining Abnormality IIElements of abnormalityFacets of the behavior that we use to decide whether it is abnormal:- is the behavior deviant?- does the behavior violate social standards?- is the person in distress?- is the behavior dysfun
UPenn - PSYC - 162
January 20: Causes of AbnormalityTheoretical viewpoints and the causes of abnormal behaviorAdvantages- helps organize observations- provides a system of thought in which to place observed data- suggests areas of focus for research and treatment- ex.
UPenn - PSYC - 162
January 25: Behavioral and Cognitive ApproachBehavioral perspective- views behavior as the result of environmental experience- learning = the process whereby behavior changes in response to the environment- strong reaction to Freuds focus on the uncon
UPenn - PSYC - 162
March 1: Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)Todays class- define obsessions and compulsions- consider onset, course, and impact of OCD- discuss causal models of OCD and related treatments- introduce GAD- discus
UPenn - PSYC - 162
March 3: Dissociative DisordersTodays class:- introduce the dissociative disorders- describe the clinical features of dissociative identity disorder (DID)- consider the challenges of accurate assessment and diagnosis of DID- review the history of DID
UPenn - PSYC - 162
March 17: Bipolar Disorder and SuicideTodays class:- describe the clinical features of a manic episode- introduce the bipolar mood disorder and compare bipolar and unipolar depression- review the epidemiology, course, and causes of bipolar disorders-
UPenn - PSYC - 162
March 22: Positive PsychologyPositive psychology (PP) = the scientific study of positive experience, positive individual traits, and the institutionsand practices that facilitate their developmentHistory of PP- about 10 years ago, Marty Seligman, as p
UPenn - PSYC - 162
March 29: Eating DisordersTodays class- describe the clinical features of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa- use a continuum model of eating disorders to distinguish BN, AN, and binge-eating disorders- review the epidemiology, course, and outcome o
UPenn - PSYC - 162
April 5: Substance DisordersSubstance use terminology- substance use = ingestion of a psychoactive substance in moderate amounts that does not significantly interferewith functioning- substance intoxication = physiological reaction to an ingested subs
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Water and Nutrient Transport (Nov. 10)Transport in the xylem is only upwards in the plant.xylem transports water and dissolved nutrientswater is absorbed through the rootswater travels up the plant to the leaveswater leaves the plant through the leav
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Mineral Nutrition and Mycorrhizzae (Nov. 12)Important points from the Cryptantha research (Nov.10 lecture)theres a change in root design as the plants developlarge, adult plants rely on lateral roots more than small, juvenile plants dolateral roots ac
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Plant Response to Environmental Stimuli (Nov. 22)The ability to sense the environment and to modify the plant in response to the environment is critical.animals can respond by running away, but plants cant do thatplants must deal with the environment t
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Plant Response to Environmental Stimuli II (Nov. 29)Animal products in alcoholalbumin egg whitecasein protein in milkchitin from shells of crabs, lobstersgelatin from bones and connective tissueisinglass from fish bladdersClasses of hormones (the f
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Herbivores and Pathogens (Dec. 1)Genetically modified foods found in labNature valley granola barChewy granola barSunchipsTostitosFrito lay corn chipsKelloggs corn flakesFruit loopsUtz pretzelsMorningstar veggie bacon (bacon made of soy products
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Plant Diversity I (Dec. 3)Land plants, thought to have evolved from green algae, share:the same photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and carotenoids)the same food storage molecule (starch)because of these chemical similarities, we fi
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Gymnosperms (Dec. 6)Wood can be used to replace bone.researchers recently discovered that wood can be used to replace bone instead of metalbecause wood is porous, the remaining bone will eventually grow into the wood, making structure more stableSeed
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Pollination (Dec. 10)Angiospermsthe gametophytic portion of the life cycle is even more reduced than it was in the gymnosperm life cyclemale gametophyte = pollenfemale gametophyte = embryo sac (has 7 cells and 8 nuclei)the female gametophyte is much
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 1: Themes in the Study of LifeInquiring about the world of life- biology: scientific study of lifeProperties of life:1. Order2. Regulation3. Energy processing4. Evolutionary adaptation5. Response to the environment6. Growth and developmen
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 2: The Chemical Context of LifeMatter consists of chemical elements in pure form and in compounds- matter: anything that has mass and takes up spaceElements and compounds- elements: any substance that cannot be broken down to other substances
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 3: Water and the Fitness of the EnvironmentThe polarity of water molecules results in hydrogen bonding- the slightly positive hydrogen of one water molecule is attracted to the slightly negativeoxygen of another water molecule4 emergent proper
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 4: Carbon and the Molecular Diversity of Life- living organisms made of chemicals based on carbon- plants, which are consumed by other organism, use solar energy to create CO2Organic chemistry is the study of carbon compounds- vitalism: belief
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 5: The Structure and Function of Large Biological MoleculesThe molecules of life- macromolecules: huge molecules of all living things (carbohydrates, proteins, andnucleic acids)Macromolecules are polymers built from monomers- polymer: long mo
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 6: A Tour of the CellMicroscopy- light microscope (LM): visible light is passed through the specimen and then thoughglass lenses, which refract/bend the light- can go 1,000x the actual size of a specimen- magnification: ratio of the objects i
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 7: Membrane Structure and FunctionCellular membranes are fluid mosaics of lipids and proteins- membranes made of phospholipids, proteins, and carbohydrates- phospholipid: amphipathetic molecule- amphipathetic: has both a hydrophilic and a hydr
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 8: An Introduction to MetabolismAn organisms metabolism transforms matter and energy- metabolism: totality of an organisms chemical reactionsMetabolic pathways- metabolic pathway: begins with a specific molecule, which is altered in a series o
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 9: Cellular RespirationCatabolic pathways and production of ATP- fermentation: partial degradation of sugars that occurs without using oxygen- aerobic respiration: oxygen is consumed as a reactant along with the organic fuel- most common- ana
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 10: PhotosynthesisThe process that feeds the biosphere6 CO2 + 12H2O + light energy C6H12O6 + 6O2 + 6H2O- photosynthesis: converting light energy into chemical energy- autotrophs/producers: make their own food- photoauthotrophs: make their own
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 11: Cell CommunicationExternal signals are converted to responses within cellEvolution of call signaling- one type of cell conversion is sex (ex. yeast)- yeast has 2 sexes, a and alpha- a cells secrete a signaling molecule called a factor, wh
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 12: The Cell CycleThe key roles of cell division- Virchow said that all cells come from other cells- cell division: reproduction of cells- cell cycle: the life of a cell form the time it is first formed from a dividing parent cell untilits ow
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 13: Meiosis and Sexual Life CyclesVariations on a theme- heredity/inheritance: the transmission of traits from one generation to the next- variation: offspring is not an identical copy of either parent or of sibliings- genetics: study of hered
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 14: Mendel and the Gene IdeaDrawing from the deck of genes- the blending hypothesis said that genetic materials contributed by 2 parents blendtogether in their offspring- the particulate hypothesis of inheritance = the gene idea- said that pa
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 15: The Chromosomal Basis of InheritanceMendelian inheritance has its physical basis in the behavior of chromosomes- chromosome theory of inheritance: Mendelian genes have specific loci alongchromosomes, and it is the chromosomes that undergo s
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 16: The Molecular Basis of InheritanceDNA is the genetic material- debate over whether protein or nucleic acids carried the genetic materialEvidence that DNA can transform bacteria (Griffith and Avery)- Griffith has 2 strains of the bacteria t
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 17: From Gene to ProteinThe flow of genetic information- gene expression: process by which DNA directs the synthesis of proteins (or in somecases, just RNAs)Genes specify proteins via transcription and translationEvidence from the study of me
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 18: Regulation of Gene ExpressionBacteria often respond to environmental change by regulating transcription- natural selection favors bacteria that express only the genes needed by the cellExample: E.coli in the colon needs the amino acid trypt
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 19: VirusesA borrowed life- viruses are smaller and simpler than prokaryotes- viruses are not technically alive, but are somewhere between life-forms and chemicalsA virus consists of a nucleic acid surrounded by a protein coatStructure of vir
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 20: Biotechnology (pgs. 421-422)Agricultural applications- farmers use DNA technology to improve agricultural productivityAnimal husbandry- animal husbandry = selective breeding of livestock- DNA technology allows scientists to produce transg
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 30: Plant Diversity II, the Evolution of Seed Plants (pgs. 630-633)Angiosperm diversity- monocots: species with one cotyledon- dicots: species with 2 cotyledons- monocots form a clade- but dicots are polyphyletic (developed from different anc
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 37: Soil and Plant NutritionThe nation that destroys its soil destroys itself- one of the worst soil disasters in history, called the Dust Bowl, occurred in the GreatPlains. Wind caused soil to rain down on many cities.- healthy soil improves
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 38: Angiosperm Reproduction and Biotechnology (pgs. 812-819)Flowering plants reproduce sexually, asexually, or both- asexual reproduction: offspring as derived from a single parent without geneticrecombination; results in a cloneMechanisms of
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Chapter 35: Plant Structure, Growth, and Development (pgs. 738-745, 755-761)Pgs. 738-745Plastic plants?- developmental plasticity: ability to alter its form in response to environment- through natural selection, plant species have accumulated variatio
UPenn - BIOL - 101
Nov. 30 Biology Discussion- roots grow towards gravity- shoots grow away from gravity- tropism = a response towards an external stimulus (either toward or away)- plants never grow away from light- signal-transduction pathway occurs in both plant and
UPenn - ANTH - 123
9/9Culture- set of principles used to interpret the world and the actions within it- interpreting the world includes interpreting both the social world (social interactions)and the natural world (animals)Norms and values- principles that are essenti
UPenn - ANTH - 123
9/14Communication and culture- culture involves groups in society-culture involves models of appropriate conduct (communication is a type of conduct)- almost all social interaction is communicative in nature- we cannot study communication without the
UPenn - ANTH - 123
9/16The Speech Event by JacobsonThe Reflective Practice of Speech and Language by Finnegan- communicative act act in which all of the following variables play a role:1. medium/channel of communication (ex. air and sound), phatic2. notion of a code (B
UPenn - ANTH - 123
9/21- no person knows all the models of communication- no one in this room knows enough medical terms to pass off a doctor. You needschooling to fit into the social category of doctors.- social domain of the model people who know the model and think i
UPenn - ANTH - 123
9/23- models of communication: beliefs linked to forms of human conduct, beliefs about howto communicate- need to figure out what beliefs link together society- ideology: an idea about something that is not scientifically tested- need to get past ide
UPenn - ANTH - 123
9/28Middle eastern culture- language is not just a medium of communication, but a means by which we can assignsignificance to other types of behavior, like veiling- nudist camps perceived as an attack on norms of modesty- nudist movement was about go
UPenn - ANTH - 123
9/30Participation framework- footing changes: the way someone changes alignment of communication with otherpeople- sign: any perceivable thing-Movie about television- people emphasize the roles they relate to- TV sends messages about the types of p
UPenn - ANTH - 123
10/51. I speak clearly and get along with people2. I have strong interpersonal and communication skills- standard English is one dialect among many- standard against which all other dialects are compared- talking to your grandmother in college slang
UPenn - ANTH - 123
10/7The Rise of Yuppie Coffees and the Re-imagination of Class in the US by Rosebury- coffee became known to the world because of Middle-Eastern traders- coffee originally linked to prayer and spirituality, because alcohol was forbidden inIslam- mark
UPenn - ANTH - 123
10/14Aboriginal Art by Murphy- art wasnt considered art until the 1940s- how does an object go from being trash to art without physically changing the objectitself?- narrative of the object changes- narrative is not in the physical object- coffee i
UPenn - ANTH - 123
10/19Aboriginal Art by Murphy- many forms of interpreting something are similar- what is the source narrative that gets played during these separate construals?- the same pictorial form, under different narratives, has different meanings- what are th
UPenn - ANTH - 123
10/21Aboriginal Art by Murphy- sometimes following social norms is a form of communication, and sometimes notfollowing social norms is a form of communication (especially in art)- in Tailenders, trust and authenticity associated with native language-