Psychotherapy
2 Pages

Psychotherapy

Course Number: PSYCH 340, Spring 2012

College/University: Emory

Word Count: 367

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Psych 340 Dr. Brennan Spring 2012 Book Notes Psychotherapy refers to a set of procedures or techniques used to help individuals or groups alter their maladaptive behavior, develop adaptive behavior or both. The behavior must be considered maladaptive by the individual however. Most Psychotherapies try to change cognitive constructs about ourselves, others, or both. Behavior Therapy refers to learning-conditioning...

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340 Dr. Psych Brennan Spring 2012 Book Notes Psychotherapy refers to a set of procedures or techniques used to help individuals or groups alter their maladaptive behavior, develop adaptive behavior or both. The behavior must be considered maladaptive by the individual however. Most Psychotherapies try to change cognitive constructs about ourselves, others, or both. Behavior Therapy refers to learning-conditioning principles which derived from wellcontrolled laboratory environments. Behavior therapy has a number of advantages. Its been shown to be highly effective in changing and developing specific behaviors under controlled, experimental conditions. It is also economical as it does not require expensive professionals and can be immediately beneficial for controlling unmanageable behavior. Behavior therapy also has a number of problems because it requires sophistication on the part of the therapist, firm environmental control, and a high degree of cooperation and commitment from those even remotely involved in the program. Transferring behavior techniques from the controlled psychological laboratory to the correctional institution, where there are bound to be numerous constraints, is an extremely difficult task. The prison system makes treatment and rehabilitation because difficult of criminalization and prisonization . Criminalization, inmates exchange and support each other's beliefs which creates a deviant culture. Prisonization is the process whereby inmates learn specific rules, general culture, and expectation of the prison community. These two learning processes are often in conflict with society. Cognitive Therapy, reality therapy a form of self-control therapy developed by psychiatrist William Glasser (1965) and still commonly used in corrections today. Reality therapy is based on perspective that offenders must face reality no matter what happened to them in the past and take full responsibility for their behavior now. The main focus is on the irresponsible nature of crime and delinquency, rather than viewing them as the result of psychological sickness or disorder. Constructive Therapy has emerged as a viable, rapidly growing approach across a wide area of cognitive therapies. The main idea is that individuals do not formulate static templates through which ongoing experience is filtered, but rather develop more dynamic constructs that are always subject to change as a result of new experiences, Zen meditation "the art of living in the now" may be of interest as a supplemental or alternative therapy.

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---EEARN |Coef.Std. Err.tP>|t|[95% Conf. Interval]------------+---------------------------------------------------------------ES |2.678125.233432511.470.0002.2195743.136676_cons |8.10e-09.55502840.001.000-1.0902881.090288---------
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Psych 340Dr. BrennanSpring 2012Book NotesBoth the Positivist and Classical Schools take a consensus view of crime that a crimeis an act that violates the basic values and beliefs of society. Those values and beliefs aremanifested as laws that societ
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Psych 340Dr. BrennanSpring 2012Book NotesDeviance is concerned with the process whereby actions, beliefs or conditions (ABC)come to be viewed as deviant by others.Deviance can be observed by the negative, stigmatizing social reaction of others towar
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Psych 340Dr. BrennanSpring 2012Book NotesBecker's theory acknowledged that a society could not eradicate crime beneath a certainlevel.For example, if 25% of a supermarket's products were stolen, it would be very easy toreduce this rate to 15%, quit
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Psych 340Dr. BrennanSpring 2012Book NotesSymbolic interactionism draws on the phenomenology of Edmund Husserl and GeorgeHerbert Mead, as well as subcultural theory and conflict theory.This school of thought focused on the relationship between the po
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Psych 340Dr. BrennanSpring 2012Book NotesRational choice theory is based on the utilitarian, classical school philosophies of CesareBeccaria, which were popularized by Jeremy Bentham.They argued that punishment, if certain, swift, and proportionate
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Psych 340Dr. BrennanSpring 2012Book NotesFollowing on from the Chicago school and Strain Theory, and also drawing on EdwinSutherland's idea of differential association, subcultural theorists focused on smallcultural groups fragmenting away from the
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Psych 340Dr. BrennanSpring 2012Book NotesThis theory is applied to a variety of approaches within criminology in particular and insociology more generally as a conflict theory or structural conflict perspective insociology and sociology of crime.As
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Psych 353Dr. NeillSpring 2012Book NotesCerebellar granule cells, in contrast to Purkinje cells, are among the smallest neurons inthe brain.They are also easily the most numerous neurons in the brain:In humans, estimates of their total number averag
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