ECON 2105 Syllabus Professor Bulut
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ECON 2105 Syllabus Professor Bulut

Course Number: ECON 2105, Spring 2013

College/University: UGA

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PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS ECON 2105-97132 (2 p.m. Class) March 05, 2013 Instructor: Dr. Levent Bulut Office: Brooks Hall, #506 E-Mail: bulut@uga.edu Phone: 706-542-3488 Lectures: Tue & Thu: 2:00 p.m.-3:15 p.m. Room: Miler LC # 101 Regular Office Hours: Tuesday: 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m. & Thursday: 9:45 a.m.-10:45 a.m. or by appointment. Virtual Office Hours: Thursdays: 10 p.m. 11 p.m. Attention Please:...

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OF PRINCIPLES MACROECONOMICS ECON 2105-97132 (2 p.m. Class) March 05, 2013 Instructor: Dr. Levent Bulut Office: Brooks Hall, #506 E-Mail: bulut@uga.edu Phone: 706-542-3488 Lectures: Tue & Thu: 2:00 p.m.-3:15 p.m. Room: Miler LC # 101 Regular Office Hours: Tuesday: 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m. & Thursday: 9:45 a.m.-10:45 a.m. or by appointment. Virtual Office Hours: Thursdays: 10 p.m. 11 p.m. Attention Please: The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class may be necessary. We will use eLC for syllabus updates, making announcements, distributing course materials, recording and distributing grades, communications, chat, etc. You can access this portal through https://www.elc.uga.edu/ Course Description: Some basic questions we will try to find an answer in this course are: What really does the gross domestic product (GDP) measure? How to measure the cost of living and how it deteriorates through time? What long-run growth is and how it determines a countrys standard of living? Why price stability is preferred to inflation or deflation? Why we have ups and downs in the economy and what role do the policy makers take in stabilizing the economy? How unemployment moves over the business cycle? How economists use aggregate measures to track the performance of the economy? Why policymakers who control aggregate demand face a trade-off between inflation and unemployment? Prerequisite: There is no prerequisite for this course. Main Textbook: Macroeconomics in Modules by Paul Krugman; Robin Wells; Margaret Ray; David A. Anderson. (Second edition, 2012 Worth Publishers). I will follow the book however the material covered in each module can vary depending on the progress of individual class sessions. There might be some updates and changes in the list as we go along. Please refer the syllabus posted on eLC as the last updated one. I will complement the book with additional material, such as lecture notes, slides and data. Additional material will be available on the course web-page on eLC. Below is a list of options you have to get a copy of the textbook. Version Paperback ISBN ISBN-13:978-14292-8729-6 Loose-Leaf ISBN-13:978-14292-8974-0 E-books (A PDF-style e- ISBN-13:978-1Book or a Worth 4292-9072-2 Interactive e-Book) Rent used or new Used textbook Note www.worthpublishers.com or UGA bookstore www.worthpublishers.com or UGA bookstore http://ebooks.bfwpub.com/krugmanwells_ modules_macro.php UGA bookstore various websites Grading: Imaginary Checking Account An imaginary checking account is already opened for each student who registered for this class at an imaginary bank called InYourDream (IYD) Bank. Everyone starts with a balance of $0.00 and throughout the semester your performance in online quizzes, exams, and inclass activities will be rewarded with imaginary class dollars and that money will be deposited to your account. Your end of semester account balance will determine your course grade. Your letter grade will be determined by your end-of-semester account balance in your imaginary account at IYD Bank based on the following overall grading scheme: Grade Item Weight Date Test 1 Test 2 Test 3 Test 4 (Final) 8 of 10 Online Quizzes Class Dollar $57 $57 $57 $57 $48 19% 19% 19% 19% 16% TopHat Monocle Total Balance $24 $300 8% 100% Feb 05 Mar 05 Apr 09 Thurs., May 02, 15:30 - 17:30 Almost every Thursday midnight (See the eLC calendar) In-class activities $280 +: $270-$279.99: $260-$269.99: $250-$259.99: $235-$249.99: A AB+ B B- $225-$234.99: $210-$224.99: $180-$209.99: $151-$179.99 $150 or below: C+ C CD F Exams and Automatic Curving ($228, %76): There are four exams during the semester -three in-class exams and the fourth exam administered during the final exam period. Each exam is worth $57 towards your imaginary account at IYD Bank. These four exams will constitute 76% of your overall grade. At the end of the semester, your dollar amount from each test will be re-weighted such that your highest-graded exam is worth 27% (out of 81 ) of your overall grade, your second-highest graded exam is worth 25% and third highest-graded exam is worth 24%, and your lowest-graded exam grade is worth 0% of your overall grade. Let's be more specific on this with an example below: Mr. Incredible Before Curving After the curving Raw class dollar Raw weight Curved dollar Curved amount (out of amount weight 57) Test 1 35 (3rd highest) 19% 44.21 24% nd highest) Test 2 40 ( 2 19% 52.63 25% Test 3 55 (Highest) 19% 78.15 27% Test 4 20 (Lowest) 19% 0 0% Total 150 175 As you can see in the example above, Mr. Incredible is being forgiven for his worst-performed test, the final exam. The weight on the worst test is 0%. So, after the curving, Mr. Incredible got zero out of zero on his worst test. On the other hand, he will be rewarded for his best-performed test (the grade is boosted by around 42%) and also his second and third highest-graded tests will be boosted by 31% and 26%, respectively. WARNING: I hope you dont misinterpret or get confused with these grade boosting. Having seen all these incredible boosts might give you the wrong impression that it is very easy to get a decent grade in this course. At the end of the day, the exams constitute 76% of your overall grade with or without automatic curving. Having a grade of 55 out of 57 (19% of 300 is 57) is exactly the same thing of having 78.15 out of 81(27% of 300 is 81). I strongly suggest everyone to check the GRADE CALCULATOR on eLC to better understand the grading methodology in my class. In the past, I had students who came up with a totally wrong approach to get the automatically curved grades for their test. The GRADE CALCULATOR on the eLC will be the only basis to determine your end of semester letter grade. Since your lowest scored test will be dropped no matter what, you can skip taking your final exam if you are happy with your current grade that is produced by the GRADE calculator on eLC when the final exam grade is assumed to be zero. There is no formal procedure to let me know if you decide to not to take any exam. Just do not show up in class on the exam day. Make-up Exam Policy: It is very simple. There is NO make-up exam in this course. If you miss an exam for whatever reason, you will get zero from that test. But, you will be fine due to automatic curving system. Please, do not ask to have a make-up exam after you miss one test. The answer is a clean NO. If you miss more than one test with legitimate excuses, then you will be asked to provide written documentation for your absences in both exams to be considered for an adjustment on your test weights. Weekly Online Quizzes ($48, 16%): There will be TEN online assignments on eLC each due at 11:59 p.m. on almost every Thursday. Please see the end of the syllabus or the eLC calendar for the assignment dates. Each assignment will be uploaded to eLC by Friday night. You can think of each assignment as an online quiz with multiple-choice type questions and the purpose of them is to test your knowledge on the class and textbook materials, prepare you to the exams and strength your knowledge in each module. You might have failed in submitting your online assignment due to some common technical or non-technical problems such as loss of Internet connection or power outage at the last minute, forgetting about the assignment, sickness, having an accident or having a bad fight with your boy/girlfriend etc. Therefore, out of 10 assignments, two (2) of the lowest graded ones will be dropped, and only the remaining 8 will be used towards your semester grade. I advise you to take the assignments seriously and get prepared for them as they will prepare you to the tests. Late assignments will NOT be accepted for any reason. SINCE THERE IS NO MAKE-UP FOR ONLINE ASSIGNEMENT, PLEASE DO NOT E-MAIL ME TO TAKE THE ONLINE QUIZ AFTER THE DEADLINE. Finally, you are welcome to form a study group to work on the online quiz questions yet everyone will have to submit their responses individually. Class Participations via TopHat Monocle Online Response System: ($24, 8%) The use of TopHat Monocle online response system is required in this course. You need to purchase a term subscription (if not already purchased one for another class) to use this service. If you already purchased a TopHat Monocle subscription for another class, then, there is NO NEED to buy a new subscription for this course as current subscription let you to register for unlimited number of courses at no additional charge. Instructions for subscription to TopHat Monocle: 1. Please, visit https://www.tophatmonocle.com/register/student/ 2. Click on Sign Up under Purchase Subscription 3. If you, on the other hand, purchased a license key at the UGA bookstore, then click Sign Up under Prepaid Subscription. 4. The rest is self-explanatory. Fill in your information: Enter your University of Georgia email address, your first and last name. Make sure you type University of Georgia under School to pick our school. It is very crucial that you correctly write your 810 ID number under Student ID to retrieve your responses through eLC. Please include only the nine digits as indicated in this picture on the left and do not include the extra tenth digit. This will help TopHat identify you and upload your grades to the eLC system. Since, you will send your answers through your cell phone, please include your 10 digit current cell phone number at the registration (Please, no hyphens, parentheses, periods, or a 1 before the area code). Unfortunately, I do not have any coupon code to share with you to get a discount at the registration. Finally, at the payment choices, select your desired subscription term, and then click on the button to agree the terms of service before clicking on Process my Order. 5. In the following page, you will be asked to select your course. If you cannot find our course there, then leave that part empty and click on the Add courses later button, on the right, to make the payment. After the payment, if you receive a confirmation email with your receipt, then you are all set. Once you have an account, you can log in by visiting tophatmonocle.com/login and typing in your username and password. This will take you to the Top Hat Monocle web interface where you will have access to all your course information. Enrolling in our course on TopHat Monocle: If you didnt enroll in our course when you created your account, you can do so by logging into Top Hat Monocle and clicking on the blue plus (+) icon towards the top of the screen. You will then be able to search for our course (Principles of Macroeconomics 2 p.m.) using the course name or for name. How my to respond to in-class questions? We will utilize the TopHat Monocle Online response system to collect your responses to in-class questions. Even though the TopHat Monocle allows you to send your responses through any device that can connect to internet such as your laptops, Ipad, and Mobile Phone, in our class, you will be able to USE ONLY YOUR CELL PHONE to submit your responses. If you are one of those 0.2% of the college students without a mobile device, then see me after the class to get the information on how to get a voucher from TopHat Monocle to buy a prepaid phone to use for this course. Warnings: You will have to be present physically (not necessarily wholeheartedly) in the class to provide your answers to in-class questions. If you think you will have to miss many classes throughout the semester, then forget about getting an A in this class. Maybe, it will be wiser to register to another section of this course. Also, you cannot substitute your cellphone with your IPAD or laptop to respond to the questions for two reasons. One is that submission to the TopHat system through laptops and Ipads will be disabled for our class and the second is that use of IPAD and laptop is not allowed in our class unless you have got the permission from me at the beginning of the semester. If you forgot your cellphone at home, in the car, or at your friends house, you will most probably feel very bad when other students are submitting their responses but you cannot because you dont have your cellphone with you and the professor will not accept any excuse to make up for it. If your cellphone run out of battery, you will most probably be very mad at your (innocent) cellphone, because it failed on you when you need it most, and now you cannot transmit your responses to the system and when you offer your professor to write up your answers on a paper, the professor will say NO. Then, you will be mad at your professor, the University administrations, and God knows whom. This negative attitude might make you no fun to be around, it might lead to having fewer friends and a negative outlook, and it might even shorten your life expectancy in the long run as claimed by some studies. So, you will be better off in many aspects if you have enough battery power on your cell phone especially on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Extra Credit Opportunity: The only opportunity to get extra credit is through TopHat Monocle online response system. TopHat Monocle questions make up 8% ($24) of the course grade. But, throughout the semester, I will ask $36 worth of TopHat questions. In other words, additional $12 worth of questions will be provided to students to replace unanswered questions (i.e., in case you missed a class or encountered some technical difficulties when submitting your answers). Any class dollar accumulated above $24 from TopHat Monocle questions will be considered as extra credit and it will be directly deposited to your account. Please do not ask to make up missed TopHat Monocle questions. Attendance Policy: I will not take the attendance as attending lecture is not required in our course. However, you are responsible for all material covered in class. Also, 8% of your overall grade comes from active participation through TopHat Monocle classroom response system. Email etiquette: It is wiser to check the syllabus first before sending an e- mail for general questions about the course. Please identify yourself in every email along with the course you are taking (John Doe from 8 a.m. class or Jane Doe from 2 p.m. class). I am teaching three classes this semester and this little information will help me a lot to quickly respond your e-mails. Computer Use: Using LAPTOPS/IPADS for note taking requires my approval. The students who want to use electronic devices during lecture for academic purposes need to first sign the electronic device usage agreement form. The students who use laptops/Ipads during lecture without signing the electronic device usage agreement or the laptop users who violate the electronic device usage agreement they signed are subject to $5 (class dollar) fee for each incident they get caught( Academic Dishonesty Policy: As a University of Georgia student, you have agreed to abide by the Universitys academic honesty policy, A Culture of Honesty, and the Student Honor Code. All academic work must meet the standards described in A Culture of Honesty found at: www.uga.edu/honesty. Lack of knowledge of the academic honesty policy is not a reasonable explanation for a violation. Questions related to course assignments and the academic honesty policy should be directed to the instructor. Students with Special Needs: If you have a disability and would like to request classroom accommodations, please make an appointment during the office hours. Please keep in mind that, I will provide appropriate accommodations to students who provide the necessary documentation from the DRC. Class Conduct: Each student is expected to help maintain a positive classroom environment conducive to learning. Socializing in class, talking loudly and distracting others are prohibited because they make it harder for me to do my job and make it harder for the students sitting around you to learn the material and pass the exams. I RESERVE THE RIGHT TO WITHDRAW IMAGINARY DOLLAR AMOUNTS FROM YOUR IYD BANK ACCOUNT FOR THE VIOLATIONS OF CLASSROOM RULES LISTED IN THE SYLLABUS. A typical Lecture Day: A typical lecture requires some prior preparations for both the students and me. Students are expected to read that days Module before attending the class. Since the textbook is divided into smaller Modules, it should not take more than 30 minutes of your precious time to finish a standard module in the book. Also, it might be very helpful if students print out and glance through that days lecture slides that were uploaded to eLC at least 24 hours before the class meeting. I would say another 10-15 minutes is enough to go through the slides before the lecture. Also, for some students, note-taking is a lot easier if they are given the lecture slides ahead of time. Most of the time, I will start the lecture with some TopHat questions from the materials that will be discussed on that day. Since the students already read the Module and read through the lecture slides before, it wouldnt be an issue for many students. I strongly recommend students to be in class on time to be able to submit their responses to questions through TopHat system. It might be too late even if you are just 5 minutes late for the lecture. I expect you to familiarize yourself with the information beforehand so that we can spend the class time efficiently. I will present the main economic concepts and try to answer your questions that might arise while you were reading the material at home. Please, do not expect me to present the all materials from the scratch. It would be both inefficient and boring to do so. Instead, come to the class with some questions in your mind. It would be even better if you can send me your questions before the class so that I can modify my lecture accordingly. Most of the time, I will end the lecture with some TopHat questions from the materials mostly covered on that days class. But, the questions might be relatively harder than the ones that were asked at the beginning. Hence, it might be wiser to participate to the class discussion and ask question if you have any. ASKECON.COM: I own a website, www.askecon.com, to create an online platform for students to ask anonymous questions to me or their peers and get timely responses. You will also have the chance to see my answers to others questions as well. Please, take advantage of this opportunity and try to utilize it for your benefit. TENTATIVE COURSE OUTLINE* 08-Jan First class meeting 10-Jan Module 5 Supply and Demand: Introduction and Demand 15- Jan Module 6 Supply and Demand: Supply and Equilibrium 17-Jan Module 7 Supply and Demand: Changes in Equilibrium 22-Jan Module 10 The Circular Flow and Gross Domestic Product 24-Jan Module 11 Interpreting Real Gross Domestic Product 29-Jan Review Practice Session on Modules 10 & 11 31-Jan Module 12 The Meaning and Calculation of Unemployment 05-Feb Test 1 covering Modules 5, 6, 7, 10, 11 &12. 07-Feb Module 14 Inflation: An Overview 12-Feb Module 15 The Measurement and Calculation of Inflation 14-Feb Module 16 Income and Expenditure 19-Feb Module 16 Income and Expenditure 21-Feb Module 17 Aggregate Demand: Introduction and Determinants 26-Feb Module 18 Aggregate Supply: Introduction and Determinants 28-Feb Review Practice Session on Modules 17 & 18 05-Mar Test 2 covering Modules 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18. 07-Mar Module 19 12-Mar & 14-Mar No class meeting (Spring Break) 19-Mar Module 20 Economic Policy and the Aggregate Demand Aggregate Supply Model 21-Mar Module 23 Definition and Measurement of Money 26-Mar Module 25 Banking and Money Creation 28-Mar Module 25 Banking and Money Creation Equilibrium in the Aggregate DemandAggregate Supply Model 02-Apr Module 27 The Federal Reserve SystemMonetary Policy 04-Apr Module 28 The Money Market 09-Apr Test 3 covering Modules 19, 20, 23, 25 and 27. 11-Apr Module 29 The Market for Loanable Funds 16-Apr Module 31 Monetary Policy and the Interest Rate 18-Apr Module 32 Money, Output, and Prices in the Long Run 23-Apr Module 34 Inflation and Unemployment: The Phillips Curve 25-Apr Module 42 The Foreign Exchange Market Thurs, May 02, 15:30 - 17:30 a.m. Final Exam covering modules 28, 29, 31, 32, 34 and 42. Check the eLC regularly for announcements. Changes and updates to the syllabus will be posted there. This calendar does not include all assignments. You must check the eLC for a complete list of requirements and the most updated syllabus. Please, add the following dates to your calendar Jan-17 Jan-24 Jan-31 Feb-05 Feb-14 Feb-21 Feb-28 Mar-05 Mar-12& Mar-14 Mar-21 Mar-21 Apr-04 Apr-09 Apr 18 Apr-25 Thurs, May 02, 15:30 - 17:30 Online Quiz 1 (Modules # 5 & 6) Online Quiz 2 (Modules # 7 & 10) Online Quiz 3 (Module #11) Test 1 covering Modules 5, 6, 7, 10, 11 & 12. Online Quiz 4 (Modules # 12,14 & 15) Online Quiz 5 (Module # 16) Online Quiz 6 (Modules #17 & 18) Test 2 covering Modules 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18. No class (Spring Break) Withdrawal Deadline Online Quiz 7 (Modules # 19 & 20) Online Quiz 8 (Modules # 23 & 25) Test 3 covering Modules 19, 20, 23, 25 and 27. Online Quiz 9 (Modules # 27, 28 & 29) Online Quiz 10 (Modules # 31, 32& 34) Final exam covering modules 28, 29, 31, 32, 34 & 42.

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Interpersonal CommunicationTwo person, face to face interaction, aka dyadic communicationCharacteristics of interpersonal/dyadic communication directness personal immediate spontaneous informaldevelopmental approach to interpersonal/dyadic communi
University of Michigan - COMM - 111
Luke Sullivan "parent/child relationship radiolike a parent speaking to a child, is talking to an audience that isn't listeningluke sullivan "radio as a canvas"theater of the mind. you can do impossible things that would be beyond your budgetcliches t
University of Michigan - COMM - 111
Rhetoric Study of communicationWhere and when did rhetoric1st receive attention?Athens 335 B.C.Lyceum Academy from Aristotle, studied rhetoricpathos emotionsethos characterlogos logicsophists speech teachers, taught tricks of rhetoric5canons of
University of Michigan - COMM - 111
Sound distinctionsphonemes significantdiscourseunit of language longer than a sentence ( 1 way)conversationcommunication between people evenlylow contextexplains everythinghigh contextassumes things7 characteristics of nonverbal communicationun
University of Michigan - COMM - 111
Study of Touchhapticsstudy of touch, conveys feelings/emotions, statussomatype endomorph, mesomorph, ectomorphendomorph- short, round fatmesomorph-averageectomorph-tall thin frailobject language displays material things reflects on our selfacc
University of Michigan - COMM - 111
Terms of Rhetoricpersonification the attribution of a personal nature or human characteristics to somethingnonhuman the representation of an abstract quality in human formhyperbole exaggerated statements or claims not meant to be taken literallyiro
University of Michigan - COMM - 211
Simple Random Sampling- a type of probability sampling where the units composing a population are assignednumbersSystematic Sampling- a type of probability sampling in which every kth unit in a list is selected for inclusionin a sample- example:eve
University of Michigan - COMM - 211
Type 1 ErrorFalse positiveIncorrectly rejecting the null hypothesis in favor of the alternative hypothesis, when the nullhypothesis is trueEx:Ho= innocentHa= not innocent=>innocent person goes to jail*worseType 2 ErrorFalse negativeIncorrectly ac
University of Michigan - COMM - 211
Inflection Changesrising or upward inflection when you vocalize, moving from a lower pitch to a higher pitch on acontinuous vocalizationwhat is rising inflection used for?1. to stress a syllable in a word or the most important word in a sentence2. to
University of Michigan - COMM - 211
Internal ValidityWhat is internal validity?The extent to which a study (usually an experiment) can be attributed to the treatment(manipulation) rather than to flaws in the research design.The degree to which one can draw valid conclusions about the ca
University of Michigan - COMM - 211
Non-probability SamplingNot using randomizationSelecting InformantsTalking to an individual who is knowledgeable about a specific groupEX:President of Student Democrat/Republican Club(biases)Snowball SamplingTalking to one person who introduces yo
University of Michigan - COMM - 211
Rating a TV anchor1. voice and speech: pleasant and good use of grammar2. professional and personality attributes3. knowledge of subject, intelligence, level of awareness about events, good analytical ability4. a demeanor of warmth and concern5. appe
University of Michigan - COMM - 211
Reliability TestTest to determine whether a particular technique, applied repeatedly to the same object,yields the same result each time. *reliability does not ensure accuracyTest-retest MethodMaking the same measurement more than once (ex. follow up
University of Michigan - COMM - 211
TV ratingsNielson Co.ArbitronMajor News SourcesAmong Adults3% internet4% public TV9% radio news12% newspapers28% cable news networks43% broadcast TV newsmethods of TV research1. media diaries2. house meters3. people meters4. audience survey
University of Michigan - COMM - 211
Validity Teststhe extent to which an empirical measure adequately reflects the real meaning of theconcept under considerationFace validities"on its face" whether or not it's adequateCriterion-related validitypredictive validity, based on some exampl
University of Michigan - COMM - 211
Voicepassive voicesomething was done by the subjectany form of verb (is am are was were be being been)ex: The flute was played by John.active voicealways use active voicethe subject is doing something, NOT something was done by the subjectex: John
UGA - CHFD - 3700
CHFD 37001/22/13Impact of Early or Late Maturation for Femaleso Early Maturingo Advantaged?o In Grade School Often self conscious/embarrassed about bodily changeso Once in middle school Adult like bodies afford them a new prestige More popular wi
UGA - CHFD - 3700
CHFD 37001/24/13These are the two slides from the beginning of the power point that I didnt have before1. Previous belief that brain development completed in early childhood2. New Research using advanced imaging (fMRI, DTI) continues throughadolescen
UGA - CHFD - 3700
CHFD37001/29/13 PhysicalHealthandHealthcareinAdolescenceo Adolescenthealthcareneedsfromthoseofchildrenandadultso Mosthealthproblemsarepreventableo Fieldofadolescenthealthhasshifted Awayfromtraditionalmedicalmodel(diagnosesand treatment) Towardmore