1AA3E Course Outline Sept 2012
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1AA3E Course Outline Sept 2012

Course Number: ANTHRO 1AA3, Spring 2013

College/University: McMaster

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Anthropology 1AA3 Introduction to Anthropology Sex, Food, and Death Lectures: Tuesday 7:00 10:00 Location: TSH 120 Instructor: Dr. K. Slonim Office: CNH 428 Office Hours: Tuesday 10:00 am 12:00 pm Anthropology Main Office: Chester New Hall, 524 Graduate Teaching Assistants: office hours and contact information TBA Course Description: This course will introduce students to the field of Anthropology and its...

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1AA3 Introduction Anthropology to Anthropology Sex, Food, and Death Lectures: Tuesday 7:00 10:00 Location: TSH 120 Instructor: Dr. K. Slonim Office: CNH 428 Office Hours: Tuesday 10:00 am 12:00 pm Anthropology Main Office: Chester New Hall, 524 Graduate Teaching Assistants: office hours and contact information TBA Course Description: This course will introduce students to the field of Anthropology and its sub-disciplines through the discussion of some of the big questions that anthropologists investigate in contemporary and past societies. Some of the issues explored in this course include; sex, gender, food, illness, and death from archaeological, biological, cultural and linguistic perspectives. Through this course you will develop an understanding of how the anthropological approach can be used to better understand the human condition, past and present. Learning Objectives: Through this course, you will: - Discover the diversity of research in the sub-disciplines of anthropology related to specific themes - Understand the theories, methods, and techniques used by anthropologists - Develop an understanding of the human place in nature from an anthropological perspective 1 - Appreciate the relevance of anthropological knowledge and practices to society as a whole Think critically about contemporary issues and debates Enhance your comparative, analytic, and critical thinking skills through reading and written assignments Required Text: Sex, Food and Death Anthropology 1AA3. Custom Edition for McMaster University. Assessment - Course grades will be assigned based on the following: Midterm Exam Critical Thinking First Draft Critical Thinking Final Draft Final Exam 30% 10% 25% 35% 100% Critical Thinking Assignments this is a short written assignment designed to help develop your skills in critical thinking aptitude, editorial skills, and ability to produce a well-written, concise argument. Your first draft will be graded for completion rather than content1 whereas the grade for your final draft will reflect the strength of your argument as well as the level to which you incorporated the suggested changes put forth by your teaching assistant. It is important that you retain your first draft as you will be required to submit the original assignment along with your final draft on November 20. Policy on the Submission of Assignments Assignments submitted by e-mail will not be accepted. Assignments are due on the due date. No extensions will be given unless written certification, approved by your Faculty office, is provided. Please note that policies concerning the use of MSAFs (McMaster Student Absence Forms) have changed (see http://www.mcmaster.ca/msaf/). Missed Exams Students are responsible for arranging make-up exams/assignments with the instructor. Please note make-up exams will be in essay format. Late assignments without appropriate documentation will be penalized 10% per day late. LECTURE SCHEDULE* 1 It is important that you submit your best possible work for the first draft. The more effort you put into your draft the better the feedback you will receive and ultimately a better grade on your assignment. Completion does not simply reflect the fact that you meet the minimum page number requirement but rather grasped the purpose of the assignment and completed it to the best of your ability. 2 Week Dates Topics Required Readings 1 Sept 11 Topic 1 - What is anthropology? What do anthropologists do? How is Anthropology unique among the social sciences? Chp 1 pp. 1-34 2 Sept 18 3 Sept 25 Chp 2 pp. 40-47 (up to Gender Roles and Relations) Chp 2 pp. 47-81 4 Oct 02 Topic 2 - Sex and Gender How are men & women different (or are they)? What is the difference between sex & gender? Does sex/gender affect our roles in society? How do we investigate gender in the archaeological record? Critical thinking topics assigned (Avenue to Learn) Topic 3 - Food and Nutrition Why do we eat what we eat? Cross-cultural perspectives on food. 5 Oct 09 6 Oct 16 7 Oct 23 8 Oct 30 9 Nov 06 10 Nov 13 11 Nov 20 12 Nov 27 13 Dec 04 What are the different ways that humans acquire food? Why does hunger still exist? Oct 5 - Critical thinking Draft First (10%) When and where did humans start producing food? How do we know what people ate in the past? Oct 18 Midterm Exam (30%) Chapters 1 - 3 Topic 4 Illness and Death How do different cultures/medical systems deal with illness? What are different cultural attitudes towards illness? Do humans have the same diseases now as they did in the past? How can Anthropology help with worldwide health problems? How do different cultures deal with death? What constitutes death? What happens to bodies after death? How did people deal with the dead in the past? Nov 13 - Critical thinking assignment Final Draft Due (25%) Topic 5 Humans and the Environment What is the earliest evidence for humans? How and when did humans start to intentionally change the environment? How are humans still transforming the earth? What are cross cultural perspectives on the environment and our relationship with nature? 3 Chp. 3 pp. 97-110 (up to Understanding Human Subsistence Patterns) Chp 3 pp. 110-130 (up to Agriculture & Animal Domestication) Chp 3 pp. 131-150 Chp 4 pp. 166-178 (up to Globalization and Change) Chp 4 pp. 178-185 Chp 4 pp. 186-194 (up to Human Osteology and Skeletal Biology) Chp 4 pp. 194-210 Chp 5 pp. 223 247 (up to Archaeology and Subsistence Agriculture) Chp. 5 pp. 247-282 * The instructor and university reserve the right to modify elements of the course during the term. The university may change the dates and deadlines for any or all courses in extreme circumstances. If either type of modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. It is the responsibility of the student to check their McMaster email and course websites weekly during the term and to note any changes. Course Materials and Avenue to Learn (ATL) Lectures will be presented using Power Point, an abbreviated version of which will be posted weekly on ATL. You must be registered in the course to have access to the 1AA3 site. Please familiarize yourself with the Avenue to Learn system. You can access ATL at: http://avenue.mcmaster.ca/?logout=1 Special Accommodations Any student with special learning needs should contact Dr. Slonim by the end of the 2nd week of classes at the latest. You must have written confirmation from Student Accessibility Services (formerly the Center for Student Development). Students can contact SAS to arrange assistance in the completion of exams. http://sas.mcmaster.ca/ FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES E-MAIL COMMUNICATION POLICY Effective September 1, 2010, it is the policy of the Faculty of Social Sciences that all e-mail communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from the students own McMaster University e-mail account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student. It is the students responsibility to ensure that communication is sent to the university from a McMaster account. If an instructor becomes aware that a communication has come from an alternate address, the instructor may not reply at his or her discretion. Email Forwarding in MUGSI: http://www.mcmaster.ca/uts/support/email/emailforward.html *Forwarding will take effect 24-hours after students complete the process at the above link ACADEMIC DISHONESTY Academic dishonesty consists of misrepresentation by deception or by other fraudulent means and can result in serious consequences, e.g., the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university. It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various kinds of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, Appendix 3, www.mcmaster.ca/senate/academic/ac integrity.htm The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty: 1. Plagiarism, e.g., the submission of work that is not ones own for which other credit has been obtained. 2. Improper collaboration in group work. 3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations. 4

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