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| Help Logout HOME MY COURSEWORK TAKE NOTES LISTENING GUIDES COMMUNITY SETTINGS DOWNLOAD Review the Items Asked On the Exam Harmony Assessment Printed below are the questions that were asked on this exam, along with any answers you gave and any feedback you received. You may return to the syllabus at any time. Section 1, Question 1 The following excerpt represents melody with harmonic accompaniment. Play True False Answer Answer False Feedback Sorry. This is an example of melody with harmonic accompaniment. If you would like to make a comment regarding this item, type your comment into this box: Click the Comment button to record this comment. Comment Section 1, Question 2 Two simultaneous pitches of the same letter name and pitch (e.g., C, G, or D) constitute a harmony. True False Answer Answer False Feedback (e.g., C, G, or D) do not constitute a harmony; they are said to be in unison. If you would like to make a comment regarding this item, type your comment into this box: Correct! Two simultaneous pitches of the same letter name and pitch Click the Comment button to record this comment. Comment Section 1, Question 3 The following excerpt represents a melody without harmonic accompaniment. Play True False Answer Answer True Feedback Correct. This is an example of melody without harmonic accompaniment. accompaniment. If you would like to make a comment regarding this item, type your comment into this box: Click the Comment button to record this comment. Comment Section 1, Question 4 Consonant harmonies usually provide a feeling of tension. True False Answer Answer False Feedback Correct! Consonant harmonies do not provide a feeling of tension. They usually provide a feeling of stability and rest. If you would like to make a comment regarding this item, type your comment into this box: Click the Comment button to record this comment. Comment Section 1, Question 5 The following excerpt is dissonant. Play True False Answer Answer False Feedback Correct! The harmony is consonant. If you would like to make a comment regarding this item, type your comment into this box: Click the Comment button to record this comment. Comment Section 1, Question 6 The following excerpt accompaniment. Play True False Answer represents melody by itself without harmonic Answer False Feedback Correct! That excerpt did not represent melody by itself. In this example the melody had a harmonic accompaniment. If you would like to make a comment regarding this item, type your comment into this box: Click the Comment button to record this comment. Comment Section 1, Question 7 This music example illustrates a chord played one note after another. This is called: Play Sliding Arpeggio Plucking Bowing Answer Answer Choice number 2: Arpeggio Feedback than all at once, the result is called an arpeggio, as in the guitar example you just heard. If you would like to make a comment regarding this item, type your comment into this box: Correct! If the notes of a chord are played one after rather Click another the Comment button to record this comment. Comment Section 1, Question 8 The following excerpt represents melody with harmonic accompaniment. Play True False Answer Answer False Feedback Correct! This is an example of melody without harmonic accompaniment. If you would like to make a comment regarding this item, type your comment into this box: Click the Comment button to record this comment. Comment Section 1, Question 9 The term harmony refers to the horizontal aspect of music. True False Answer Answer False Feedback music. To the contrary, it represents the vertical aspect of music, that is, tones of different pitch that are sounded together. If you would like to make a comment regarding this item, type your comment into this box: Correct! The term harmony does not refer to the horizontal aspect of Click the Comment button to record this comment. Comment Section 1, Question 10 The following excerpt represents: Play Melody with harmonic accompaniment Melody alone Neither A or B Answer Answer Choice number 1: Melody with harmonic accompaniment Feedback Correct! This is an example of melody with harmonic accompaniment. If you would like to make a comment regarding this item, type your comment into this box: Click the Comment button to record this comment. Comment Section 1, Question 11 The following excerpt is consonant. Play True False Answer Answer True Feedback Correct! The harmony is consonant. If you would like to make a comment regarding this item, type your comment into this box: Click the Comment button to record this comment. Comment Section 1, Question 12 This excerpt demonstrates: Play Consonant harmonies that give a feeling of stability throughout How dissonant harmonies create tension and instability throughout Mainly consonant harmonies disrupted by dissonance at the beginning of the passage Dissonant harmonies at the end of the passage Answer Answer Feedback Choice number 2: How dissonant harmonies create tension and instability throughout Correct! This excerpt demonstrates how dissonant harmonies create tension and instability. If you would like to make a comment regarding this item, type your comment into this box: Click the Comment button to record this comment. Comment Section 1, Question 13 Although the violin is mostly a single melody instrument, violinists can also play chords using an instrumental technique known as: Play Pizzicato Vibrato Double stops Unison Answer Answer Choice number 3: Double stops Feedback also play chords using an instrumental technique known as double stops. If you would like to make a comment regarding this item, type your comment into this box: Correct! Although it is mostly a single melody instrument, violinists can Click the Comment button to record this comment. Comment Return to the syllabus OnMusic Copyright 2012 Connect For Education Inc., Reston, Virginia. All rights reserved. Music Glossary courtesy of Virginia Tech Multimedia Music Dictionary. Music provided by Naxos. ... View Full Document

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