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th07.07 T The 3rd Conjugation Now its time to review 3rd conjugation! First, fill in the following chart. These verbs will be used in the translation sentences below. Cedunt has been given to you as an example. ***The key to determining the verb conjugation (the first column) is knowing the first two principal parts. You can find a verbs principal parts in the dictionary or your vocabulary lists. For the first conjugation the first principal part ends in -o and the second principal ends in -are. So the sign of the first conjugation is o, -are. For the second conjugation the first principal part ends in -eo and the second principal ends in -ere. So the sign of the second conjugation is -eo, -ere. For the third conjugation the first principal part ends in -o and the second principal ends in -ere. So the sign of the third conjugation is -o, -ere For The fourth conjugation the first principal part ends in -o and the second principal ends in -ire. So the sign of the fourth conjugation is -o, -ire curo, curare, curavi, curatus --- to watch over, look after neglego, neglegere, neglexi, neglectus --- to neglect eligo, eligere, elegi, electus --- to select, to choose disco, discere, didici (no 4th part) --- to learn pingo, pingere pinxi, pictus --- to paint, to sketch doceo, docere, docui, doctus --- to teach Verb Conj. cedunt 3 curant 1 neglegunt 3 eligent 3 discimus 3 pinxit 3 docet 2 discetis 3 docebunt 2 neglexerunt 3 Person Number 3rd P 3rd plural 3rd plural 3rd plural 1st plural 3rd singular 3rd singular 2nd plural 3rd plural 3rd plural Voice Active active active active active active active active active active Tense Translation Present (they) yield present they watch over present neglect future they they will select present we learn perfect I painted present they teach future you(pl) will learn future they will teach perfect they neglected pingit 3 3rd singular active present he paints Now, translate each Latin sentence and type your translation in the brackets provided. These are quotes from ancient Latin. Look carefully at the noun endings to determine the order of the sentence. Be sure to use the word definitions we give you below each sentence, and your answers on the verb chart above to help you translate. 1. Stoicism and the gods. Magna di curant, parva neglegunt. ( Cicero, De Natura Deorum) magna, orum n. great things di is nominative plural of the noun deus curo, curare, curavi, curatus to watch over, look after parva, parvorum n. little things neglego, neglegere, neglexi, neglectum to neglect Type your translation between the brackets [The gods watch over great things, they neglect little things ] 2. A Roman proverb animo virum pudicae non oculo eligent. (Publius Syrus, Sententiae) pudica, pudicae f. a prudent woman eligo, eligere, elegi, electus to select, to choose Type your translation between the brackets [A prudent woman will choose a man by spirit not by eye. ] 3. Pragmatic philosophy and education non vitae, sed scholae, discimus. (Seneca) vitae = for life sed but scholae = for school disco, discere, didici to learn Type your translation between the brackets [We learn not for life, but for school. ] 4. Graffiti found on a street corner of Pompeii Lucius pinxit hoc. (Ancient child) Lucius, Lucii m. Lucius pingo, pingere pinxi, pictus to paint, to sketch hoc = this Type your translation between the brackets [Lucius painted this.] ... View Full Document

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