Lab 7_ bios105_TerrilynWilson
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Lab 7_ bios105_TerrilynWilson

Course Number: BIOS 105, Spring 2012

College/University: DeVry Cleveland D.

Word Count: 915

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Reproductive System worksheet Name: Terrilyn Wilson Before answering the questions below, log in to ADAM and review the following Clinical Animations about the Reproductive System a. Conception b. Fetal Development c. Formation of twins d. vasectomy Next, view the clinical illustration a. Ectopic Pregnancy Answer the following questions 1. How is a vasectomy performed? Be sure to cite the specific anatomical...

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System Reproductive worksheet Name: Terrilyn Wilson Before answering the questions below, log in to ADAM and review the following Clinical Animations about the Reproductive System a. Conception b. Fetal Development c. Formation of twins d. vasectomy Next, view the clinical illustration a. Ectopic Pregnancy Answer the following questions 1. How is a vasectomy performed? Be sure to cite the specific anatomical structures involved. How does this prevent pregnancy? A vasectomy is usually done in your doctor's office or in an outpatient surgery center. The operation takes about half an hour. You'll be awake during the procedure. The doctor will give you a local anesthetic to numb your scrotum. After you're numb, the doctor will make a very small puncture (hole) on one side of your scrotum and pull out part of the vas deferens on that side. A small section of the vas deferens is removed. The ends of the vas deferens will be sealed with small clamps. The procedure will be done on the same thing on the other side. The puncture is so small that it heals without stitches. Resource: http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/prevention-wellness/sex-birthcontrol/birth-control/vasectomy-what-to-expect.html Vasectomy is a safe and highly effective method of birth control accepted by many couples throughout the world. Vasectomy, a form of permanent contraception, is also known as male sterilization. This procedure can prevent pregnancy by blocking the transport of sperm out of the testes. Those who seek a permanent form of birth control may want to consider the potential benefits of vasectomy. Resource: http://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth/unintendedpregnancy/vasectomy.htm 2. Where does fertilization take place? Fertilization usually occurs in the outer third of the fallopian tube. More specifically the juncture of the ampulla and isthmus (ampullary-isthmic junction). 3. At what stage of fetal development does implantation take place? Implantation takes 3 to 4 days for the zygote to journey to the uterus (where implantation will take place), and during such journey mitotic cell division happens. Floating freely in the uterus for the next 3 to 4 days, the morula (16 to 50 cell bumpy appearances resulting from mitotic cell division) grows to become a blastocyst with tropoblast cells cells (forming placenta and membrane in later development). Therefore, it takes 7 to 8 days from fertilization to implantation. - Implantation occurs at high and posterior portion of the uterus. - On implantation, the structure is called embryo until 5-8 weeks when it begin to be referred to as fetus. - Implantation bleeding (mistaken as menstrual period) results from capillary rupture on implantation. - Endometrium (the inner lining of the uterus) is termed decidua on conception. Resource: http://nursingcrib.com/nursing-notes-reviewer/maternal-child-health/stages-offetal-development/ 4. What is an ectopic pregnancy? An ectopic pregnancy is a pregnancy where the fertilized egg settles grows and outside the inner lining of the uterus (not in the uterus). The uterus is the womb. Most ectopic pregnancies occur in the Fallopian tube - known as a tubular pregnancy - but they can also occur in the cervix (neck of the womb), abdominal cavity and ovary. Slightly over 1% of all pregnancies are ectopic pregnancies. In a normal pregnancy the egg should be fertilized by the sperm in a fallopian tube; the fertilized egg then travels into the uterus (womb) and implants itself in the lining of the uterus. The embryo develops into a fetus and remains in the uterus until the baby is born. An ectopic pregnancy that remains untreated may kill the mother. For example, the fallopian tube can rupture, causing internal abdominal bleeding and serious blood loss. These days, very few ectopic pregnancies result in death. Out of 31,000 ectopic pregnancies that occurred in the UK from 2000 to 2002, eleven women died, or 0.035% of the total (according to The National Health Service, UK). Resource: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/164989.php 5. Distinguish between a identical and non-identical twins. Do all identical twins develop the same way? Identical Twins (also known as Uniovular or Monozygotic twins). During the fertilization process, only one ovum is impregnated by only one spermatozoid, but the egg divides in 2 embryos afterwards. They have exactly the same chromosomes, they have a perfect resemblance and they have the same sex. There are 3 different ways that identical twins can develop and be carried: With the first case there is only one placenta that feeds the babies, but there can be two amniotic sacs (as in the diagram at the side). When there is 1 placenta and 2 amniotic sacs then the pregnancy is referred to as having a "mono-chorial" placenta and is "bi-amniotic". In the second scenario, there is only one amniotic sac. In the case of 1 placenta and 1 amniotic sac then the pregnancy is referred to as having a "mono-chorial" placenta and is "mono-amniotic". The third scenario is where there are two placentae and each embryo has its own amniotic pocket. When there are two placentas and two amniotic pockets like this, then one speaks of a "bi-chorial" pregnancy that is "bi-amniotic". (This last case is an identical situation to fraternal twins as shown below). Non-Identical Twins (also known as Fraternal, Binovular or Dyzygotic twins). When twins are non-identical, then two seperate eggs have been impregnated by 2 separate spermatozoa. They each have a different chromosome make-up, they don't look alike and they can be either the same or different sex. In fact, this is simply two separate pregnancies that just happened to occur at the same time. Each embryo is in its own amniotic sac and has its own placenta. This type of pregnancy is referred to as "bichorial" and "bi-amniotic". Resource: http://www.paternityangel.com/Preg_info_zone/Multiple/Multiple1.htm
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