Investigation I How Much Sodium Bicarbonate Is in the Mixture
7 Pages

Investigation I How Much Sodium Bicarbonate Is in the Mixture

Course Number: CHM 113, Spring 2013

College/University: ASU

Word Count: 1181

Rating:

Document Preview

Investigation I How Much Sodium Bicarbonate Is in the Mixture? Purpose The purpose of this lab is to organize my trials of how much sodium bicarbonate and how much sodium chloride is in one mixture. The goal for this lab is to be able to figure out two or more ways to determine percent composition in sodium bicarbonate. The next goal will be carrying out trials to determine just how much NaHCl3 and NaCl is in a...

Unformatted Document Excerpt
Coursehero >> Arizona >> ASU >> CHM 113

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one
below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

Course Hero has millions of student submitted documents similar to the one below including study guides, practice problems, reference materials, practice exams, textbook help and tutor support.

I Investigation How Much Sodium Bicarbonate Is in the Mixture? Purpose The purpose of this lab is to organize my trials of how much sodium bicarbonate and how much sodium chloride is in one mixture. The goal for this lab is to be able to figure out two or more ways to determine percent composition in sodium bicarbonate. The next goal will be carrying out trials to determine just how much NaHCl3 and NaCl is in a mixture. By doing this experiment I hope to get the individual components of what is in a single mixture. It is important to understand the components of a mixture because the purification of material can lead to expenses in different chemical procedures. If we are able to figure out the components of a mixture we can understand if it is impure. When the substance is impure it is cheaper concluding that it is more important to understand the mixture is properly made. Methods & Procedure Materials Sodium chloride, pure Sodium bicarbonate, pure Unknown mixture of sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate 1.0 M hydrochloric acid 250 mL beaker 150 mL beaker 50 mL Graduated Cylinders Evaporating dish Quantitative balances Procedure Experiment A- Heating sodium bicarbonate and sodium chloride 1. Set up an apparatus consisting of the following pieces of equipment: ring stand, ring clamp, triangle, Bunsen burner and hose. 2. Select 2 crucibles out of the lab drawer assigned to your group. Clean and dry each crucible. Once the crucible has been dried always handle the crucible using the crucible tongs for the remainder of the experiment. Always place the crucible on a clean and dry evaporating dish and do not place the crucible directly on the lab bench. It could otherwise pick up moisture or other contaminants off of the lab bench and give you inaccurate data. 3. Use the crucible tongs to carefully place the crucible (uncovered) on the clay triangle on the ring clamp. 4. Check your lab area for any paper or flammable objects. Tie your hair back and check to make sure your goggles are on correctly. 5. Turn on the gas and light the Bunsen burner. Adjust the gas flow in the Bunsen burner to create a flame consisting of an inner blue cone The tip of sharply defined inner blue cone of the flame should almost touch and heat the crucible to redness. 6. Heat the crucible for 2-3 minutes at the maximum flame temperature. 7. Allow the crucible to cool and remove it from the clay triangle and place in on the evaporating dish. 8. Weigh the cooled crucible using the weighing boat and making all weighings to the highest precision possible with the balance available to you. Use the same balance to make all weighings for a given sample. Record this value in the data table. 9. While the crucible is still in the weighing boat, use a chem. Scoop to add a mass of approximately 5.0g of sodium chloride to the crucible. Place a crucible cover on top of the crucible. Record this value in the data table. Use the crucible tongs to remove the crucible and cover from the weighing boat then place it back on the evaporating dish. 10. Heat the crucible gently for 8 minutes with tip of the inner-blue cone of the flame and 6 to 8 cm (about 2.5 to 3 in) below the crucible bottom. The carefully lower the crucible until the tip of the sharply defined inner-blue cone just touches the bottom of the crucible, and heat for an additional 10 minutes. The bottom of the crucible should be heated to a dull red color during this period. 11. Grasp the crucible just below the cover with the concave part of the tongs and very carefully transfer it to a evaporating dish. Allow to cool (about 10 minutes), use the crucible tongs weigh the crucible. 12. After weighing, heat the sample for an additional 6 minutes at the maximum flame temperature (bottom of the crucible heated to a dull red color); cool and reweigh and record. The last two weighings should be in agreement. If the mass decreased more than 0.05 grams between the first and second weighings, heat the sample a third time, cool and reweigh and record. Experiment B- Reacting hydrochloric acid with sodium bicarbonate and sodium chloride. 1. Select a 250mL beaker out of the lab drawer assigned to your group. Clean and dry this beaker. Once the beaker has been dried always handle the beaker using the beaker tongs for the remainder of the experiment. Always place the beaker on a clean and dry evaporating dish and do not place the beaker directly on the lab bench. It could otherwise pick up moisture or other contaminants off of the lab bench and cause inaccurate data. 2. Weigh the beaker using the weighing boat and make all weighings to the highest precision possible with the balance available to you. Use the same balance to make all weighings for a given sample. Record this value in the data table. Use the beaker tongs to remove the beaker from the weighing boat and place it back on the evaporating dish. 3. Clean and dry a 50mL graduated cylinder. Go to the hood and measure 40.0ml of 1.0 M of hydrochloric acid (HCl) in the graduated cylinder. 4. Carefully pour the 40.0mL into a 250mL beaker. Take the mass of the beaker and 40.0mL of hydrochloric acid. (Please be sure to use a weighing boat and carefully handle the beaker with acid when using the balance.) Record the mass of the beaker with the acid on the data table. 5. Using a weighing boat and chem. Scoop weigh out approximately 5.0 g of sodium chloride and record the exact mass. 6. Take the weighing boat containing sodium chloride and the beaker containing the hydrochloric acid to your lab station. 7. Carefully pour the sodium chloride into the beaker containing the acid hydrochloric and record any observations. 8. Once the reaction has finished or 10 minutes has passed weigh the beaker with the hydrochloric acid and sodium chloride mixture and record this mass in the data table. 9. Pour the contents of the beaker in the waste bottle in the hood. 10. Repeats steps 1 through 9 using sodium bicarbonate instead of sodium chloride. Data Determining Mass Loss During Reaction of HCl with Unknown #6 Data Table Sample 1 Sample 2 Sample 3 Sample 4 150 mL beaker Mass of beaker 102.4 g 102.2 g 102.4 g 76.6 g Volume of acid used 38.8 mL 39.2 mL 41.1 mL 42.3 mL Mass of beaker + acid 141.24 g 140.16 g 142.34 g 121.45 g Mass of unknown 5.002 g 5.018 g 5.009 g 5.000 g 42.806 g 40.821 g 43.930 g 50.950 g 42.628 g 40.650 g 43.770 g 50.670 g Loss of mass .124 g .171 g .160 g .280 g Percent Composition 23.6% 33% 31% 53% Percent Error -41% -18.5% -23.75% 33.5% Total mass of all reactant before reaction Total mass after reaction Calculations & Analysis: D NaCl noRXN 2 NaHCO3 D CO2 + H 2O + Na2CO3 NaCl + HCl noRXN NaHCO3 + HCl CO2 + H 2O + NaCl Mass of all reactants before reaction Sample 1 145.206 g 102.4 g = 42.806 g Sample 2 143.021 g 102.2 g = 40.821 g Sample 3 146.33 g 102.4 g = 43.93 g Sample 4 (150 mL beaker) 127.55 g 76.6 g = 50.95 g Mass Lost Sample 1 145.206 g 145.082 g = .124 gCO2 Sample 2 143.021 g 142.850 g = .171gCO2 Sample 3 146.33 g 146.17 g = .160gCO2 Sample 4 (150 mL beaker) 127.55 g 127.27 g = .280gCO2 Grams of NaHCO3 Sample 1 .124 gCO2 x 1molCO2 1molNaHCO3 84.01gNaHCO3 x x = .236 gNaHCO3 44.09 gCO2 1molCO2 1molNaHCO3 Sample 2 .171gCO2 x 1molCO2 1molNaHCO3 84.01gNaHCO3 x x = .326 gNaHCO3 44.09 gCO2 1molCO2 1molNaHCO3 Sample 3 .160 gCO2 x 1molCO2 1molNaHCO3 84.01gNaHCO3 x x = .305 gNaHCO3 44.09 gCO2 1molCO2 1molNaHCO3 Sample 4 .280 gCO2 x 1molCO2 1molNaHCO3 84.01gNaHCO3 x x = .534 gNaHCO3 44.09 gCO2 1molCO2 1molNaHCO3 Percent Composition Sample 1 .236 NaHCO3 x100% = 23.6% Sample 2 .326 NaHCO3 x100% = 32.6% Sample 3 .305 NaHCO3 x100% = 30.5% Sample 4 .534 NaHCO3 x100% = 53.4% Percent Error Sample 1 .236 gNaHCO3 - .40 gNaHCO3 x100 = - 41% .40 gNaHCO3 Sample 2 .326 gNaHCO3 - .40 gNaHCO3 x100 = - 18.5% .40 gNaHCO3 Sample 3 .305 gNaHCO3 - .40 gNaHCO3 x100 = - 23.75% .40 gNaHCO3 Sample 4 .534 gNaHCO3 - .40 gNaHCO3 x100 = 33.5% .40 gNaHCO3 It is important to add enough HCl to the mixture because it is such an essential component that too much will make the percent composition go up, and to little can make the percent composition incorrect compared to the accurate unknown percent composition. If the HCl goes over by .1 g it will not be a significant as if you were to go over by 1.0 g or higher. When the reagent has been added you can tell there is enough by a reaction occurring, but measurements guide you to make the perfect experiment. If you add to much reagent the calculations and data will be faulty and your answers will not be accurate. The acid solutions are a mixture of different substances. The substance that is greatest abundance in HCl in my opinion is hydrogen. Discussion The purpose of the investigation is to find how much sodium bicarbonate is in the mixture. It is not just about separating the two mixtures but to titrate a solution with HCl. What we were hoping to achieve was the concentration of the unknown and to prove the percent composition and percent error were accurate. The reason behind why we did this experiment was to give us the skills to take this technique into our future careers. In the beginning our goals were to figure the different ways of percent composition and as previously stated the amount of substances in our mixture. As it has been determine we performed the lab to the best of our ability and by proceeding with certain calculations discovered numbers for the investigation. From our findings the numbers seem to be a little off from what is actual. The unknown mixture six is not purity by any means. I actually believe the sodium bicarbonate is lower than it should be. From observing my experiment in the lab and according to my calculations salt is superior to the bicarbonate. My recommendation for the company would be to balance the mixture so they are not selling an inadequate mixture. This was my first lab report that I have ever perform and I learned a lot about what it takes to construct a report as well as how I can use this information in the real world. The one thing I learned from this investigation is recording your numbers is crucial because one small error can make all of your calculations incorrect. The way we can use this technique in real life is by finding out the real composition of a generic versus a name brand. Pharmaceutical companies make drugs exactly similar to the generic brand, raising the price of their drug, and making consumers believe the wrong information. The information that we could investigate ourselves with different drugs could save millions of consumers hundreds of dollars a year. In sample four we used a 150 mL beaker, which gave our calculations an abnormal observation compared to our additional results when using the 250 mL beaker. Being a human, human error is common in any experiment that is conducted in the lab. When it came down to it having the correct amount of HCl and unknown is very crucial in trying to get the correct answer. I would have done the procedure and lab a lot more accurate and been more exact with our measurements. I would also take back using the 150 mL beaker, but we were rushed for time and used the resources we could.

Find millions of documents on Course Hero - Study Guides, Lecture Notes, Reference Materials, Practice Exams and more. Course Hero has millions of course specific materials providing students with the best way to expand their education.

Below is a small sample set of documents:

FIT - BUSINESS - BUS5480
Netflix istaking? What type of competitive advantage is Netflix trying to achieve?Netflix’s strategy is built around utilizing its proprietary CineMatch software technology and its quickdelivery capabilities to differentiate itself from rival
Denison - FYS - 101
er’s clothes, so frozen, it is possible to separate themonly by force” (140). Melanie thinks she wants to include herself in nature, and she gets herwish and becomes a part of nature, but this is not what she had in mind. Melanie’s bodyinter
Princeton - COS - 226
s are in the -transition digraph.2→52→62→72→83→43→53→63→74→34→44→54→65→65→75→85→98→28→38→78→910COS 226 FINAL, SPRING 2012119. Ternary search tries. (6 points)Su
ASU - CHM - 113
Lab Report 1: Absorption of Nuclear RadiationAbstractThe purpose for this experiment was to find the attenuation factor of beta radiation. Thereare three radiation that present different qualities, alpha ray which were not observed arepositively charg
ASU - CHM - 113
Lab Report 2: Electric Field PlottingAbstractThe purpose for this experiment was to use charged electrodes on a flat sheet ofconducting paper to discover an electric field. On the construction paper there were severallocations identified and connected
ASU - CHM - 113
Map Quiz 1 Study QuestionsUse this to study for Map Quiz 1. You do not need to turn these study questions in.Use Goodes World Atlas, 22nd edition. This set of study questions assumes you already knowsome geographic basics-such as the locations of count
ASU - CHM - 113
Map Quiz 2 Study QuestionsUse this to study for Map Quiz 2. You do not need to turn these study questions in.Use Goodes World Atlas, 22nd edition. This set of study questions assumes you already knowsome geographic basics-such as the locations of count
ASU - CHM - 113
Map Quiz 3 Study QuestionsUse this to study for Map Quiz 3. You do not need to turn these study questions in.Use Goodes World Atlas, 22nd edition. This set of study questions assumes you already knowsome geographic basics-such as the locations of count
ASU - CHM - 113
Map Quiz 4 Study QuestionsUse this to study for Map Quiz 4. You do not need to turn these study questions in.Use Goodes World Atlas, 22nd edition. This set of study questions assumes you already knowsome geographic basics-such as the locations of count
ASU - CHM - 113
Map Quiz 5 Study QuestionsUse this to study for Map Quiz 5. You do not need to turn these study questions in.Use Goodes World Atlas, 22nd edition. This set of study questions assumes you already knowsome geographic basics-such as the locations of count
ASU - CHM - 113
Map Quiz 6 Study QuestionsUse this to study for Map Quiz 6. You do not need to turn these study questions in.Use Goodes World Atlas, 22nd edition. This set of study questions assumes you already knowsome geographic basics-such as the locations of count
ASU - CHM - 113
Method and Material PaperBiology LabFebruary 11, 2011Biologically Important Molecules: Carbohydrates, Proteins, Lipids, and Nucleic AcidsMaterial & MethodProcedure 1- Benedicts TestThe purpose for this test is to observe the reducing sugars in a sol
ASU - CHM - 113
Obermiller - Bio 340Problem Set 21) Consider the following:a. A triplet of nucleotides in the DNA coding strand of a gene has the sequence CCG.Write all of the DNA and corresponding RNA codons that can be made from this by asingle transversion in the
ASU - CHM - 113
Answer Key - Exam 1 - Summer 20131) B2) B3) D4) E5) C6) B7) C8) A9) D10) A11) D12) B13) E14) E15) E16) B17) C18) A19) B20) D21) A22) C23) B24) D25) D26) B27) C28) E29) E30) E31) C32) B33) C34) A35) D36) C37) E38) C39
ASU - CHM - 113
Obermiller - Bio340 - Summer 2013 - Problem Set #1Answer Key1) The drawing below shows a section of double-stranded DNA from the E. colichromosome. (6 pts. ttl.; 3 pts. ea.)a. Box A shows the transcribed area of a particular gene. RNA polymerase moves
ASU - CHM - 113
Result PaperBiology LabFebruary 26, 2011Spectrophotometry: Identifying Solutes and Determining Their ConcentrationResultsProcedure 1Determine the absorption of spectrum ofDate: February 24, 2011Absorbance for (50mg/mL)Line GraphFigure 1.1 repres
ASU - CHM - 113
Study guide for test 1.WestBIO 181ASUSpring 2011Which of the following arent parts of an atom?A. NeutronsB. ProtonsC. ElectronsD. Subatomic particlesTwo or more atoms held together by covalent bonds are.A. MoleculeB. Covalent BondC. Polar Bon
ASU - CHM - 113
Study guide for test 3BIO 181Fall 2011ASU WestDr. SweatWhat are the similarities and differences between meiosis and mitosis?Mitosis- cell division, alteration of generationMeiosisWhat are the two sources of variation in meiosis?Independent assort
Miami Dade - BUSINESS - MAN490
SYLLABUSCapstoneMAN 49002011-14 creditsProfessor: Dr. RogersSchool of Business6319-38Phone: 305-237-2469crogers@mdc.eduProfessor David Calldcall@mdc.eduThere are no specific text books for this class, you should use all of the resources youha
Georgia State - BIOL - 4451
Urban RunoffChapter 5Urban runoff is recognized as a major source of nonpoint pollution for many rivers andestuarieso National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is responsible forrecognizing thesePrincipal Sources of Water PollutionDis
Georgia State - BIOL - 4451
Physical Factors Affecting ProductionChapter 3Two Key Physical Properties of Water:o Maximum density at 4Co High heat capacityWater Column Stability and Overturningo Column of water is resistant to vertical mixing if the density of the waterincreas
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
6/16/2013 : meem3700_Lect_19_notes_Su13 JPDjdeclerckPanel 9Page 10 of 416/16/2013 : meem3700_Lect_19_notes_Su13 JPDjdeclerckPanel 10Page 11 of 416/16/2013 : meem3700_Lect_19_notes_Su13 JPDjdeclerckPanel 11Page 12 of 416/16/2013 : meem3700_Lect
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
5/28/2013 : May 28 MEEM3700jdeclerckPanel 1Page 1 of 125/28/2013 : May 28 MEEM3700jdeclerckPanel 2Page 2 of 125/28/2013 : May 28 MEEM3700jdeclerckPanel 3Page 3 of 125/28/2013 : May 28 MEEM3700jdeclerckPanel 4Page 4 of 125/28/2013 : May 28
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
5/29/2013 : May 29 MEEM3700jdeclerckPanel 1Page 1 of 105/29/2013 : May 29 MEEM3700jdeclerckPanel 2Page 2 of 105/29/2013 : May 29 MEEM3700jdeclerckPanel 3Page 3 of 105/29/2013 : May 29 MEEM3700jdeclerckPanel 4Page 4 of 105/29/2013 : May 29
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
5/30/2013 : May 30 MEEM3700jdeclerckPanel 1Page 1 of 125/30/2013 : May 30 MEEM3700jdeclerckPanel 2Page 2 of 125/30/2013 : May 30 MEEM3700jdeclerckPanel 3Page 3 of 125/30/2013 : May 30 MEEM3700jdeclerckPanel 4Page 4 of 125/30/2013 : May 30
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM 3700Mechanical VibrationsChuck Van KarsenWilliam ShaptonMechanical Engineering-Engineering MechanicsMichigan Technological UniversityCopyright 2007MEEM 3700Lecture 21 of 22= C sin(2 ft + )x(t )AmplitudeHarmonic Function1.51CPeriodam
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM 3700Mechanical VibrationsChuck Van KarsenMechanical Engineering-Engineering MechanicsMichigan Technological UniversityCopyright 2008Lecture 3Summer 20131Lecture 3Summer 20132Element of Vibrating SystemsTranslationalmKCInertia (kineti
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM 3700Mechanical VibrationsChuck Van KarsenMechanical Engineering-Engineering MechanicsMichigan Technological UniversityCopyright 2008Lecture 4MEEM37001kkmKey Points: System is un-damped No external forces Only vertical motionmxxmDe
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM 3700Mechanical VibrationsMohan D. RaoChuck Van KarsenMechanical Engineering-Engineering MechanicsMichigan Technological UniversityCopyright 2003Lecture 5 Solving SDOF EOMMEEM37001kkmKey Points: System is un-damped No external forces O
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM 3700Mechanical VibrationsMohan D. RaoChuck Van KarsenMechanical Engineering-Engineering MechanicsMichigan Technological UniversityCopyright 2003Lecture 6 Solving SDOF EOMMEEM37001Lecture 6 Solving SDOF EOMMEEM37002Lecture 6 Solving SDOF
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM 3700Mechanical VibrationsMohan D. RaoChuck Van KarsenMechanical Engineering-Engineering MechanicsMichigan Technological UniversityCopyright 2003Lecture 7 Forced ResponseMEEM37001Single Degree of Freedom Forced VibrationFree Body Diagramk
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM 3700Mechanical VibrationsMohan D. RaoChuck Van KarsenMechanical Engineering-Engineering MechanicsMichigan Technological UniversityCopyright 2003Lecture 8 Rotating ImballanceMEEM37001Unbalance in rotating machinery isone of the main causes
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM 3700Mechanical VibrationsMohan D. RaoChuck Van KarsenMechanical Engineering-Engineering MechanicsMichigan Technological UniversityCopyright 2003Lecture 11-09- SDOF- PeriodicInput, Fourier SeriesMEEM 37001Response Under a General Periodic F
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM 3700Mechanical VibrationsMohan D. RaoChuck Van KarsenMechanical Engineering-Engineering MechanicsMichigan Technological UniversityCopyright 2003Lecture 18- Two DOF-InitialConditionMEEM 370012 DOF Free VibrationK1M1K2X1M2K3X2Given:
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM 3700Mechanical VibrationsMohan D. RaoChuck Van KarsenMechanical Engineering-Engineering MechanicsMichigan Technological UniversityCopyright 2003Lecture 20 Multi-DOF systemsMEEM37001Lecture 20 Multi-DOF systemsMEEM37002MKLecture 20 Mult
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
6/11/2013 : meem3700_Lect_21_notes_Su13jdeclerckPanel 1Page 1 of 166/11/2013 : meem3700_Lect_21_notes_Su13jdeclerckPanel 2Page 2 of 166/11/2013 : meem3700_Lect_21_notes_Su13jdeclerckPanel 3Page 3 of 166/11/2013 : meem3700_Lect_21_notes_Su13jd
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM 3700Mechanical VibrationsMohan D. RaoChuck Van KarsenMechanical Engineering-Engineering MechanicsMichigan Technological UniversityCopyright 2003Lecture 22 Tuned Vibration AbsorbersMEEM37001Vibration Absorbers (Chapter 9, section 10)Excessi
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM 3700Mechanical VibrationsMohan D. RaoChuck Van KarsenMechanical Engineering-Engineering MechanicsMichigan Technological UniversityCopyright 2003Lecture 21 & 22MEEM 37001Multiple Degree of Freedom Systems(Chapter: 6 Sections: 1, 2, 3, 9, 10
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
Magnification Factor XK/F1 o2101FU-q(1_r2)2+(2Q)2><frequency ratio rDisplacement Transmissibility X1Y1 o2101XCUC)Coa)o10UJ1+(2Cr)2>-10.100.51.522.5frequency ratioDisplacement Transmissibility -Relative Motion (ZN)io2zeta.02
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM 3700Exam #1Instructor: Passerello,Spring 2009Van KarsenName:Closed Book, Closed NotesProblem 1:The differential equation of motion for a single degree of freedom system is given as:10 x + 5 x + 5000 x = 0x ( 0 ) = 0.1mx ( 0 ) = 0.1m / sec
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
Name_Instructor:DeClerckPasserelloMEEM3700Test1Spring20101. Usetheenergymethodtofindtheequationofmotionandnaturalfrequencyforthesystemshownbelow.Thewheelrollswithoutslipping.2. Thexversustimegraphshown,wasrecordedwhena70kgmanjumpedontoa25kgplatform
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM 3700 Spring 2009 Exam 2Name:.Problem #1A rooftop air conditioning unit is supported by a suspension system that has an effectivestiffness of 220,900 N/m and an effective viscous damping coefficient of 100 N-s/m. Themass of the unit is 100 kg. A
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
Name_Instructor:DeClerckPasserelloMEEM3700Test2Spring20101. Thefigurerepresentsaperiodicforcingfunction,f(t).2.5f(t) Newtons)21.510.50-0.5012345time (seconds)67a) Solve for the Fourier coefficient ao.b) Write (do not solve) the equ
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
Final Exam MEEM3700Instructor: PasserelloSpring 2009Name:_Van KarsenProblem #1For the system shown, determine:a. Equation of motion:_b. Natural Frequency:_c. Damping Ratio:_d. Damped Natural Frequency:_Mass of bar = 0.2 kgViscous Damping Eleme
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
Name_Instructor:DeClerckPasserelloMEEM3700FinalExamSpring20101) Forthetorsionalsystemshown:a) Usetheenergymethodtofindtheequationofmotionintermsofthemassposition,Xb) DetermineanexpressionforthesystemnaturalfrequencyThesystemisinequilibriumatX=0.
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM3700Summer 201325 pointsHW Assignment Number 1 Due Monday, May 20, 2013.1)Solve the following differential equation and plot thesolution using MATLAB. Properly label the plot3 + 12 x + 75 x = 0xx(0) = 2x(0) = 0J.P. De Clerck2Summer 2013M
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM3700Summer 201325 pointsHW Assignment Number 3 Due Thursday, May 30, 2013.For story problems, clearly indicate:KnownsUnknownsAssumptionsAnalysis (must include free body diagrams)Results (must include units)Interpretation or verification of r
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM3700Summer 201325 pointsHW Assignment Number 4 Due Monday, June 10, 2013.A single degree of freedom system with mass m=10 kg, stiffness k=1000N/m and damping coefficient c=10 N-sec/m, is subjected to a periodicseries of force pulses. The force p
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM3700Summer 201325 pointsHW Assignment Number 5 Due Monday, June 17, 2013.1.A single degree of freedom system with mass m=10 kg, stiffness k=1000N/m and damping coefficient c=10 N/m/s, is subjected to a periodic seriesof force pulses. The force
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM3700Summer 201325 pointsHW Assignment Number 6 Due Thursday, June 20, 2013.1. For the system below, the disk is held in the equilibrium position while the mass isdisplaced 2 mm. The system is then released from rest.a) Determine the natural freq
Mich Tech - MEEM - 3700
MEEM3700Summer 201225 pointsHW Assignment Number 2 Due Tuesday, May 28, 2013.1) A bungee cord of length 50 meters and stiffness 1800 N/mis used by a jumper whose mass id 65 kg. Determine theequation of motion (and initial conditions) for the person
BU - BIOLOGY - BI105
Phagocytic Cells that provide innate defense against pathogens:1. Neutrophils: phagocytes and most abundant leukocytes. Found in blood and entertissue during inflammation.2. Eosinophils: found in the blood and mucosal surfaces- lining of thegastrointe
BU - PSYCHOLOGY - PS101
PS101E5DiscussionMeredithElkinselkinsr@bu.eduOfficeHours:8:309:30Sept.28firstexamchapterson1,3,5Researchnecessaryforallpsych101studentsPsychologicalPerspectives:PsychodynamicPerspective:Whatdrivesouremotions,behavior,personality,motives?Unconscio
BU - PSYCHOLOGY - PS101
PS101 Lecture18:59Psychology: The scientific study of mind and behaviorBehavior: Actions and responses directly observable and measurableMind: Internal states. Must be inferredFive Main Goals in Psychology:DescribeUnderstandPredictInfluenceApply
BU - PSYCHOLOGY - PS101
Review For Psychology 101 Exam 19/28/12He is known as the father of psych: Wilhelm VundtSomatic Nervous System- Voluntary MovementWernickes Area- Speech ComprehensionParkinsons Disease- Low levels of dopamineHippocampus- Long-term memoryConcordance
BU - SH - 531
SAR531 Speech Language and Hearing Sciences Final ReviewSpeaking involves the interaction of respiratory, laryngeal, and articulatory structures, allgoverned by the nervous system.Superior: toward the topPosterior: toward the backMedial: toward the m
BU - AR - 101
HumanSkeletalAnalysisAR10117:57Bones: The Archaeologist in the CocoonHuman Skeletal Analysis:206 bones in the human bodyAxial and appendicular skeleton (axial is central, appendicular is arms, legs, pelvis)Anatomical orientation (planes of the body
WPUNJ - CS - 280
CS 2800-60Computer/Assembler LanguageHomework Assignment 5Due March 5Spring 2013I. Assume that the contents of the memory location at address DS:0400 is 34 12 CD EF,and the contents of registers before the execution of the instructions are given as
Southern New Orleans - TAX - 655
Chapter C:1Tax ResearchDiscussion QuestionsC:1-1 In a closed-fact situation, the facts have occurred, and the tax advisors task is to analyzethem to determine the appropriate tax treatment. In an open-fact situation, by contrast, the facts havenot ye
Southern New Orleans - TAX - 655
Chapter C:2Corporate Formations and Capital StructureDiscussion QuestionsC:2-1 Various. A new business can be conducted as a sole proprietorship, partnership, C corporation,S corporation, LLC, or LLP. Each form has tax and nontax advantages and disadv