Chapter 11 Review Questions
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Chapter 11 Review Questions

Course Number: BIO 307, Spring 2013

College/University: Hartwick

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eiling of an elevator by a spring. When the elevator is at rest, the period is T. What happens to the period when the elevator is accelerating upward? 1) period will increase 2) period will not change 3) period will decrease ConcepTest 11.7b Spring in an Elevator II ConcepTest A mass is suspended from the ceiling of an elevator by a spring. When the elevator is at rest, the period is T. What happens to the...

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of eiling an elevator by a spring. When the elevator is at rest, the period is T. What happens to the period when the elevator is accelerating upward? 1) period will increase 2) period will not change 3) period will decrease ConcepTest 11.7b Spring in an Elevator II ConcepTest A mass is suspended from the ceiling of an elevator by a spring. When the elevator is at rest, the period is T. What happens to the period when the elevator is accelerating upward? 1) period will increase 2) period will not change 3) period will decrease When the elevator accelerates upward, the hanging mass feels heavier and the spring will stretch a bit more. Thus, the equilibrium elongation of the spring will increase. However, the period of simple harmonic motion does not depend upon the elongation of the spring it only depends on the mass and the spring constant, and neither one of them has changed. ConcepTest 11.7c Spring on the Moon A mass oscillates on a vertical spring with period T. If the whole setup is taken to the Moon, how does the period change? 1) period will increase 2) period will not change 3) period will decrease ConcepTest 11.7c Spring on the Moon ConcepTest A mass oscillates on a vertical spring with period T. If the whole setup is taken to the Moon, how does the period change? 1) period will increase 2) period will not change 3) period will decrease The period of simple harmonic motion only depends on the mass and the spring constant and does not depend on the acceleration to due gravity. By going to the Moon, the value of g has been reduced, but that does not affect the period of the oscillating mass-spring system. ConcepTest 11.8a Period of a Pendulum I Two pendula have the same length, but different masses attached to the string. How do their periods compare? 1) period is greater for the greater mass 2) period is the same for both cases 3) period is greater for the smaller mass ConcepTest 11.8a Period of a Pendulum I Two pendula have the same length, but different masses attached to the string. How do their periods compare? 1) period is greater for the greater mass 2) period is the same for both cases 3) period is greater for the smaller mass The period of a pendulum depends on the length and the acceleration due to gravity, but it does not depend on the mass of the bob. T = 2 ((L/g) T = 2 L/ g ) Follow-up: What happens if the amplitude is doubled? ConcepTest 11.8b Period of a Pendulum II Two pendula have different lengths: one has length L and the other has length 4L. How do their periods compare? 1) period of 4L is four times that of L 2) period of 4L is two times that of L 3) period of 4L is the same as that of L 4) period of 4L is one-half that of L 5) period of 4L is one-quarter that of L ConcepTest 11.8b Period of a Pendulum II Two pendula have different lengths: one has length L and the other has length 4L. How do their periods compare? 1) period of 4L is four times that of L 2) period of 4L is two times that of L 3) peri

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