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BY Microsoft PUBLISHED Press A Division of Microsoft Corporation One Microsoft Way Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 Copyright © 2010 by Online Training Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of the contents of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the written permission of the publisher. Library of Congress Control Number: 2010928516 Printed and bound in the United States of America. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 WCT 5 4 3 2 1 0 A CIP catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library. Microsoft Press books are available through booksellers and distributors worldwide. For further information about international editions, contact your local Microsoft Corporation office or contact Microsoft Press International directly at fax (425) 936-7329. Visit our Web site at www.microsoft.com/mspress. Send comments to mspinput@ microsoft.com. Microsoft, Microsoft Press, Access, ActiveX, Excel, Internet Explorer, Outlook, PowerPoint, SharePoint, SkyDrive, SmartArt, SQL Server, Windows, Windows Live, and Windows Vista are either registered trademarks or trademarks of the Microsoft group of companies. Other product and company names mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners. The example companies, organizations, products, domain names, e-mail addresses, logos, people, places, and events depicted herein are fictitious. No association with any real company, organization, product, domain name, e-mail address, logo, person, place, or event is intended or should be inferred. This book expresses the author’s views and opinions. The information contained in this book is provided without any express, statutory, or implied warranties. Neither the authors, Microsoft Corporation, nor its resellers, or distributors will be held liable for any damages caused or alleged to be caused either directly or indirectly by this book. Acquisitions Editor: Juliana Aldous Developmental Editor: Devon Musgrave Project Editor: Joel Panchot Editorial Production: Online Training Solutions, Inc. Cover: Girvin Body Part No. X16-95387 Contents Introducing Microsoft Word 2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix Modifying the Display of the Ribbon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii Features and Conventions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix Using the Practice Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi Getting Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv Part 1 1 Basic Word Documents Explore Word 2010 3 Working in the User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Creating, Entering Text in, and Saving Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Sidebar: Document Compatibility with Earlier Versions of Word . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Opening, Moving Around in, and Closing Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Viewing Documents in Different Ways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 2 Edit and Proofread Text 39 Making Text Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Sidebar: About the Clipboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Finding and Replacing Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Fine-Tuning Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Correcting Spelling and Grammatical Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Sidebar: Viewing Document Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Inserting Saved Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Sidebar: Inserting One Document into Another. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 What do you think of this book? We want to hear from you! Microsoft is interested in hearing your feedback so we can continually improve our books and learning resources for you. To participate in a brief online survey, please visit: microsoft.com/learning/booksurvey iii iv Contents 3 Change the Look of Text 75 Quickly Formatting Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Changing a Document’s Theme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Manually Changing the Look of Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Sidebar: Character Formatting and Case Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Manually Changing the Look of Paragraphs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Sidebar: Finding and Replacing Formatting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106 Creating and Modifying Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106 Sidebar: Formatting Text as You Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113 4 Organize Information in Columns and Tables 115 Presenting Information in Columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Creating Tabbed Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123 Presenting Information in Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125 Sidebar: Performing Calculations in Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134 Sidebar: Other Layout Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Formatting Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136 Sidebar: Quick Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140 Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements 143 Inserting and Modifying Pictures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144 Sidebar: About Clip Art. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150 Changing a Document’s Background. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 Inserting Building Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Sidebar: Drawing Text Boxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Adding WordArt Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 Sidebar: Formatting the First Letter of a Paragraph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 6 Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents 181 Previewing and Adjusting Page Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182 Controlling What Appears on Each Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188 Printing Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 Preparing Documents for Electronic Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200 Contents Part 2 7 v Document Enhancements Insert and Modify Diagrams 203 Creating Diagrams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .203 Modifying Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Creating Picture Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .221 8 Insert and Modify Charts 223 Inserting Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .223 Modifying Charts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .230 Using Existing Data in Charts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 9 Use Other Visual Elements 243 Adding Watermarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 Inserting Symbols and Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 Sidebar: Setting Math AutoCorrect Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .254 Drawing and Modifying Shapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 Inserting Screen Clippings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .263 Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 10 Organize and Arrange Content 267 Reorganizing Document Outlines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .268 Arranging Objects on the Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .273 Using Tables to Control Page Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .282 Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .285 11 Create Documents for Use Outside of Word 287 Saving Files in Different Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .288 Sidebar: Viewing the .docx Format. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .288 Creating and Modifying Web Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .293 Creating and Publishing Blog Posts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .299 Sidebar: Setting Up a Blog Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .300 Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .306 vi Contents Part 3 12 Additional Techniques Explore More Text Techniques 309 Adding Hyperlinks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310 Inserting Fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316 Adding Bookmarks and Cross-References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322 Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .327 13 Use Reference Tools for Longer Documents 329 Sidebar: Adding Footnotes and Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .330 Creating and Modifying Tables of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332 Sidebar: Tables of Figures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .338 Sidebar: Tables of Authorities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339 Creating and Modifying Indexes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .340 Adding Sources and Compiling Bibliographies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .347 Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353 14 Work with Mail Merge 355 Understanding Mail Merge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356 Preparing Data Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356 Sidebar: Using an Outlook Contacts List as a Data Source. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .363 Preparing Main Documents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .363 Merging Main Documents and Data Sources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .367 Sidebar: Printing Envelopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 370 Sending Personalized E-Mail Messages to Multiple Recipients. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 370 Creating and Printing Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374 Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .377 Contents 15 Collaborate on Documents vii 379 Coauthoring Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .380 Sending Documents Directly from Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381 Sidebar: Adding Digital Signatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .384 Adding and Reviewing Comments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .385 Tracking and Managing Document Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .388 Comparing and Merging Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393 Password-Protecting Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .396 Sidebar: Restricting Who Can Do What to Documents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .400 Controlling Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .400 Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .403 16 Work in Word More Efficiently 405 Working with Styles and Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .406 Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .406 Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .409 Sidebar: Switching to a Different Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420 Changing Default Program Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422 Sidebar: Using Add-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .430 Customizing the Ribbon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 431 Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 437 Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .440 Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 441 Keyboard Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 449 Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 471 About the Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 495 What do you think of this book? We want to hear from you! Microsoft is interested in hearing your feedback so we can continually improve our books and learning resources for you. To participate in a brief online survey, please visit: microsoft.com/learning/booksurvey Introducing Microsoft Word 2010 Microsoft Word 2010 is a sophisticated word processing program that helps you quickly and efficiently author and format all the business and personal documents you are ever likely to need. You can use Word to: ● Create professional-looking documents that incorporate impressive graphics such as charts and diagrams. ● Give documents a consistent look by applying styles and themes that control the font, size, color, and effects of text and the page background. ● Store and reuse ready-made content and formatted elements such as cover pages and sidebars. ● Create personalized e-mail messages and mailings to multiple recipients without repetitive typing. ● Make information in long documents accessible by compiling tables of contents, indexes, and bibliographies. ● Safeguard your documents by controlling who can make changes and the types of changes that may be made, as well as by removing personal and confidential information. Word 2010 builds on previous versions to provide powerful tools for all your word processing needs. This introduction provides an overview of new features that we explore throughout the book. New Features If you’re upgrading to Word 2010 from a previous version, you’re probably most interested in the differences between the old and new versions and how they will affect you, as well as how to find out about them in the quickest possible way. The following sections list new features you will want to be aware of, depending on the version of Word you are upgrading from. ix www.FreeDownload.ir x Introducing Microsoft Word 2010 If You Are Upgrading from Word 2007 If you have been using Word 2007, you might be wondering how Microsoft could have improved on what seemed like a pretty comprehensive set of features and tools. The list of new features includes the following: ● The Backstage view Finally, all the tools you need to work with your files, as opposed to their content, really are accessible from one location. You display the Backstage view by clicking the File tab, which replaces the Microsoft Office Button at the left end of the ribbon. ● Customizable ribbon The logical next step in the evolution of the command center introduced with Word 2007: Create your own tabs and groups to suit the way you work. ● Navigation task pane The replacement for the Document Map not only provides a means of navigating to any heading but also to any page or to any search term you enter. ● Unsaved file recovery How many times have you responded No without thinking to the "save changes" message when closing files, only to find that you have discarded work you wanted to keep? Word now preserves your unsaved files for a period of time, allowing you to recover them if you need them. ● Paste preview No more trial and error when moving items to new locations. Preview what an item will look like in each of the available formats, and then pick the one you want. ● Coauthoring A team of authors can now work simultaneously on a document stored on a Microsoft SharePoint 2010 server or in Windows Live SkyDrive. ● Language support These days, more business is conducted internationally across language lines than ever before. Not only can you easily tailor the language of your working environment, but you can also use new translation tools to collaborate with team members in other countries. ● Graphics editing Found the perfect picture, but its colors or style aren't quite right for your document? Now after inserting a picture, you can edit it in new ways. In addition to changing color, brightness, and contrast, you can remove the background and, most exciting of all, apply artistic effects that make it appear like a watercolor, pencil drawing, or pastel sketch. Introducing Microsoft Word 2010 xi ● Text effects WordArt has had a makeover. Not only can WordArt be used to create distinctive headlines but its effects can be used on any text. ● S creenshots You no longer need to go outside of Word when you want to insert a screenshot into a document. This capability is now built into Word. ● Improved SmartArt Graphics tool A whole new category has been added to SmartArt so that you can include pictures as well as text in your diagrams. If You Are Upgrading from Word 2003 In addition to the features listed in the previous section, if you’re upgrading from Word 2003, you’ll want to take note of the new features that were introduced in Word 2007. The 2007 upgrade provided a more efficient working environment and included a long list of new and improved features, including the following: ● The Microsoft Office Fluent Ribbon No more hunting through menus, submenus, and dialog boxes. This new interface organizes all the commands most people use in a new way, making them quickly accessible from tabs at the top of the program window. ● Live Preview See the effect of a formatting option before you apply it. ● Building blocks Think AutoText on steroids! Predefined building blocks include sets of matching cover pages, quote boxes, sidebars, and headers and footers. ● Style sets and document themes Quickly change the look of a document by applying a different style set or theme, previewing its effect before making a selection. ● SmartArt Graphics tool Use this awesome new diagramming tool to create sophis- ticated diagrams with three-dimensional shapes, transparency, drop shadows, and other effects. ● Improved charting Enter data in a linked Microsoft Excel worksheet and watch as your data is instantly plotted in the chart type of your choosing. ● Document cleanup Have Word check for and remove comments, hidden text, and personal information stored as properties before you declare a document final. ● New file format The new Microsoft Office Open XML Formats reduce file size and help avoid loss of data. xii Introducing Microsoft Word 2010 Let’s Get Started! We’ve been working with Word since its debut, and each version has offered something that made daily document creation a little easier. Microsoft Word 2010 is no exception, and we look forward to showing you around. Modifying the Display of the Ribbon The goal of the Microsoft Office working environment is to make working with Office documents, including Microsoft Word documents, Excel workbooks, PowerPoint presentations, Outlook e-mail messages, and Access database tables, as intuitive as possible. You work with an Office document and its contents by giving commands to the program in which the document is open. All Office 2010 programs organize commands on a horizontal bar called the ribbon, which appears across the top of each program window whether or not there is an active document. Ribbon tabs Ribbon groups A typical program window ribbon. Commands are organized on task-specific tabs of the ribbon, and in feature-specific groups on each tab. Commands generally take the form of buttons and lists. Some appear in galleries. Some groups have related dialog boxes or task panes that contain additional commands. Throughout this book, we discuss the commands and ribbon elements associated with the program feature being discussed. In this topic, we discuss the general appearance of the ribbon, things that affect its appearance, and ways of locating commands that aren’t visible on compact views of the ribbon. See Also  For detailed information about the ribbon in Microsoft Word, see “Working in the User Interface” in Chapter 1, “Explore Word 2010.” Tip Some older commands no longer appear on the ribbon, but are still available in the program. You can make these commands available by adding them to the Quick Access Toolbar. For more information, see “Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar” in Chapter 16, “Work in Word More Efficiently.” xiii xiv Modifying the Display of the Ribbon Dynamic Ribbon Elements The ribbon is dynamic, meaning that the appearance of commands on the ribbon changes as the width of the ribbon changes. A command might be displayed on the ribbon in the form of a large button, a small button, a small labeled button, or a list entry. As the width of the ribbon decreases, the size, shape, and presence of buttons on the ribbon adapt to the available space. For example, when sufficient horizontal space is available, the buttons on the Review tab of the Word program window are spread out and you’re able to see more of the commands available in each group. Drop-down list Small labeled button Large button The Review tab of the Word program window at 1024 pixels wide. If you decrease the width of the ribbon, small button labels disappear and entire groups of buttons hide under one button that represents the group. Click the group button to display a list of the commands available in that group. Group button Small unlabeled buttons The Review tab of the Word program window at 675 pixels wide. When the window becomes too narrow to display all the groups, a scroll arrow appears at its right end. Click the scroll arrow to display hidden groups. Modifying the Display of the Ribbon xv Scroll arrow The Review tab of the Word program window at 340 pixels wide. Changing the Width of the Ribbon The width of the ribbon is dependent on the horizontal space available to it, which depends on these three factors: ● The width of the program window Maximizing the program window provides the most space for ribbon elements. You can resize the program window by clicking the button in its upper-right corner or by dragging the border of a non-maximized window. Tip On a computer running Windows 7, you can maximize the program window by dragging its title bar to the top of the screen. ● Your screen resolution Screen resolution is the size of your screen display expressed as pixels wide × pixels high. The greater the screen resolution, the greater the amount of information that will fit on one screen. Your screen resolution options are dependent on your monitor. At the time of writing, possible screen resolutions range from 800 × 600 to 2048 × 1152. In the case of the ribbon, the greater the number of pixels wide (the first number), the greater the number of buttons that can be shown on the ribbon, and the larger those buttons can be. On a computer running Windows 7, you can change your screen resolution from the Screen Resolution window of Control Panel. xvi Modifying the Display of the Ribbon You set the resolution by dragging the pointer on the slider. ● The density of your screen display You might not be aware that you can change the magnification of everything that appears on your screen by changing the screen magnification setting in Windows. Setting your screen magnification to 125% makes text and user interface elements larger on screen. This increases the legibility of information, but means that less fits onto each screen. On a computer running Windows 7, you can change the screen magnification from the Display window of Control Panel. Modifying the Display of the Ribbon xvii You can choose one of the standard display magnification options, or create another by setting a custom text size. The screen magnification is directly related to the density of the text elements on screen, which is expressed in dots per inch (dpi) or points per inch (ppi). (The terms are interchangeable, and in fact are both used in the Windows dialog box in which you change the setting.) The greater the dpi, the larger the text and user interface elements appear on screen. By default, Windows displays text and screen elements at 96 dpi. Choosing the Medium - 125% display setting changes the dpi of text and screen elements to 120 dpi. You can choose a custom setting of up to 500% magnification, or 480 dpi, in the Custom DPI Setting dialog box. You can choose a magnification of up to 200% from the lists, or choose a greater magnification by dragging across the ruler from left to right. xviii Modifying the Display of the Ribbon See Also  For more information about display settings, refer to Windows 7 Step by Step (Microsoft Press, 2009), Windows Vista Step by Step (Microsoft Press, 2006), or Windows XP Step by Step (Microsoft Press, 2002) by Joan Lambert Preppernau and Joyce Cox. Adapting Exercise Steps The screen images shown in the exercises in this book were captured at a screen resolution of 1024 × 768, at 100% magnification, and the default text size (96 dpi). If any of your settings are different, the ribbon on your screen might not look the same as the one shown in the book. For example, you might see more or fewer buttons in each of the groups, the buttons you see might be represented by larger or smaller icons than those shown, or the group might be represented by a button that you click to display the group’s commands. When we instruct you to give a command from the ribbon in an exercise, we do it in this format: ● On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click the Chart button. If the command is in a list, we give the instruction in this format: ● On the Page Layout tab, in the Page Setup group, click the Breaks button and then, in the list, click Page. The first time we instruct you to click a specific button in each exercise, we display an image of the button in the page margin to the left of the exercise step. If differences between your display settings and ours cause a button on your screen to look different from the one shown in the book, you can easily adapt the steps to locate the command. First, click the specified tab. Then locate the specified group. If a group has been collapsed into a group list or group button, click the list or button to display the group’s commands. Finally, look for a button that features the same icon in a larger or smaller size than that shown in the book. If necessary, point to buttons in the group to display their names in ScreenTips. If you prefer not to have to adapt the steps, set up your screen to match ours while you read and work through the exercises in the book. Features and Conventions of This Book This book has been designed to lead you step by step through all the tasks you’re most likely to want to perform in Microsoft Word 2010. If you start at the beginning and work your way through all the exercises, you will gain enough proficiency to be able to create and work with all the common types of Word documents. However, each topic is self contained. If you have worked with a previous version of Word, or if you completed all the exercises and later need help remembering how to perform a procedure, the following features of this book will help you locate specific information: ● Detailed table of contents Search the listing of the topics and sidebars within each chapter. ● Chapter thumb tabs Easily locate the beginning of the chapter you want. ● Topic-specific running heads Within a chapter, quickly locate the topic you want by looking at the running heads at the top of odd-numbered pages. ● Glossary Look up the meaning of a word or the definition of a concept. ● Keyboard Shortcuts If you prefer to work from the keyboard rather than with a mouse, find all the shortcuts in one place. ● Detailed index Look up specific tasks and features in the index, which has been carefully crafted with the reader in mind. You can save time when reading this book by understanding how the Step by Step series shows exercise instructions, keys to press, buttons to click, and other information. These conventions are listed in the table on the next page. xix xx Features and Conventions Convention Meaning SET UP This paragraph preceding a step-by-step exercise indicates the practice files that you will use when working through the exercise. It also indicates any requirements you should attend to or actions you should take before beginning the exercise. CLEAN UP This paragraph following a step-by-step exercise provides instructions for saving and closing open files or programs before moving on to another topic. It also suggests ways to reverse any changes you made to your computer while working through the exercise. 1 2 Blue numbered steps guide you through hands-on exercises in each topic. 1 Black numbered steps guide you through procedures in sidebars and expository text. 2 See Also This paragraph directs you to more information about a topic in this book or elsewhere. Troubleshooting This paragraph alerts you to a common problem and provides guidance for fixing it. Tip This paragraph provides a helpful hint or shortcut that makes working through a task easier. Important This paragraph points out information that you need to know to complete a procedure. Keyboard Shortcut This paragraph provides information about an available keyboard shortcut for the preceding task. Ctrl+B A plus sign (+) between two keys means that you must press those keys at the same time. For example, “Press Ctrl+B” means that you should hold down the Ctrl key while you press the B key. Pictures of buttons appear in the margin the first time the button is used in a chapter. Black bold In exercises that begin with SET UP information, the names of program elements, such as buttons, commands, windows, and dialog boxes, as well as files, folders, or text that you interact with in the steps, are shown in black, bold type. Blue bold In exercises that begin with SET UP information, text that you should type is shown in blue bold type. Using the Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this book, you need to copy the book’s practice files to your computer. These practice files, and other information, can be downloaded from the book’s detail page, located at: go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=192147 Display the detail page in your Web browser and follow the instructions for downloading the files. Important The Microsoft Word 2010 program is not available from this Web site. You should purchase and install that program before using this book. The following table lists the practice files for this book. Chapter File Chapter 1: Explore Word 2010 Prices_start.docx Procedures_start.docx Rules_start.docx Chapter 2: Edit and Proofread Bamboo_start.docx Brochure_start.docx Letter_start.docx Orientation_start.docx RulesRegulations_start.docx Chapter 3: Change the Look of Text AgendaA_start.docx AgendaB_start.docx Information_start.docx OrientationDraft_start.docx RulesDraft_start.docx Chapter 4: Organize Information in Columns and Tables ConsultationA_start.docx ConsultationB_start.docx RepairCosts_start.docx RoomPlanner_start.docx (continued) xxi xxii Using the Practice Files Chapter File Chapter 5: Add Simple Graphic Elements Announcement_start.docx Authors_start.docx Flyer_start.docx Joan.jpg Joyce.jpg MarbleFloor.jpg OTSI-Logo.png Chapter 6: Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents InfoSheetA_start.docx InfoSheetB_start.docx InfosheetC_start.docx OfficeInfo_start.docx Chapter 7: Insert and Modify Diagrams Garden.jpg Park.jpg Pond.jpg ServiceA_start.docx ServiceB_start.docx Woods.jpg Chapter 8: Insert and Modify Charts CottageA_start.docx CottageB_start.docx CottageC_start.docx Temperature.xlsx Chapter 9: Use Other Visual Elements AgendaDraft_start.docx AuthorsDraft_start.docx OTSI-Logo.jpg Welcome_start.docx Chapter 10: Organize and Arrange Content BambooInfo_start.docx DeliveryTruckPurchase.docx Loan.xlsx LoanComparisons_start.docx OfficeProcedures_start.docx Using the Practice Files Chapter File Chapter 11: Create Documents for Use Outside of Word BlogPost.docx ParkingRules_start.docx RoomPlannerWeb_start.docx Chapter 12: Explore More Text Techniques Conductors.docx ProceduresFields_start.docx RulesBookmarks_start.docx VisitorGuide_start.docx Chapter 13: Use Reference Tools for Longer Documents AllAboutBamboo_start.docx BambooBibliography_start.docx ProceduresContents_start.docx RulesIndex_start.docx Chapter 14: Work with Mail Merge AnniversaryLetter_start.docx CustomerList_start.xlsx ThankYouEmail_start.docx Chapter 15: Collaborate on Documents CompetitiveAnalysisA_start.docx CompetitiveAnalysisB_start.docx InfoSheetReviewA_start.docx InfoSheetReviewB_start.docx InfoSheetReviewC_start.docx LoansProtected_start.docx ProceduresRestricted_start.docx ServiceCP_start.docx ServiceSH_start.docx ServiceTA_start.docx Chapter 16: Work in Word More Efficiently AgendaSH_start.docx AuthorsTemplate_start.docx ProceduresEdited_start.docx xxiii Getting Help Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this book. If you do run into problems, please contact the sources listed in the following sections. Getting Help with This Book If your question or issue concerns the content of this book or its practice files, please first consult the book’s errata page, which can be accessed at: go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=192147 This page provides information about known errors and corrections to the book. If you do not find your answer on the errata page, send your question or comment to Microsoft Press Technical Support at: mspinput@microsoft.com Getting Help with Word 2010 If your question is about Microsoft Word 2010, and not about the content of this book, your first recourse is the Word Help system. This system is a combination of tools and files stored on your computer when you installed Word and, if your computer is connected to the Internet, information available from Office.com. You can find general or specific Help information in the following ways: ● To find out about an item on the screen, you can display a ScreenTip. For example, to display a ScreenTip for a button, point to the button without clicking it. The ScreenTip gives the button’s name, the associated keyboard shortcut if there is one, and unless you specify otherwise, a description of what the button does when you click it. ● In the Word program window, you can click the Microsoft Word Help button (a question mark in a blue circle) at the right end of the ribbon to display the Word Help window. ● After opening a dialog box, you can click the Help button (also a question mark) at the right end of the dialog box title bar to display the Word Help window. Sometimes, topics related to the functions of that dialog box are already identified in the window. xxv xxvi Getting Help To practice getting help, you can work through the following exercise. SET UP You don’t need any practice files to complete this exercise. Start Word, and then follow the steps. 1. At the right end of the ribbon, click the Microsoft Word Help button. The Word Help window opens. You can maximize the window or adjust its size by dragging the handle in the lower-right corner. You can change the size of the font by clicking the Change Font Size button on the toolbar. If you are connected to the Internet, clicking any of the buttons below the Microsoft Office banner (Products, Support, Images, and Templates) takes you to a corresponding page of the Office Web site. 2. Below the bulleted list under Browse Word 2010 support, click see all. The window changes to display a list of help topics. 3. In the list of topics, click Activating Word. Getting Help xxvii Word Help displays a list of topics related to activating Microsoft Office programs. You can click any topic to display the corresponding information. 4. On the toolbar, click the Show Table of Contents button. The window expands to accommodate two panes. The Table Of Contents pane appears on the left. Like the table of contents in a book, it is organized in sections. If you’re connected to the Internet, Word displays sections, topics, and training available from the Office Online Web site as well as those stored on your computer. Clicking any section (represented by a book icon) displays that section’s topics (represented by help icons). 5. In the Table of Contents pane, click a few sections and topics. Then click the Back and Forward buttons to move among the topics you have already viewed. 6. At the right end of the Table of Contents title bar, click the Close button. 7. At the top of the Word Help window, click the Type words to search for box, type saving, and then press the Enter key. The Word Help window displays topics related to the word you typed. xxviii Getting Help Next and Back buttons appear to make it easier to search for the topic you want. 8. In the results list, click the Recover earlier versions of a file in Office 2010 topic. The selected topic appears in the Word Help window. 9. Below the title at the top of the topic, click Show All. Word displays any hidden auxiliary information available in the topic and changes the Show All button to Hide All. You can jump to related information by clicking hyperlinks identified by blue text. Tip You can click the Print button on the toolbar to print a topic. Only the displayed information is printed. CLEAN UP Click the Close button at the right end of the Word Help window. Getting Help xxix More Information If your question is about Microsoft Word 2010 or another Microsoft software product and you cannot find the answer in the product’s Help system, please search the appropriate product solution center or the Microsoft Knowledge Base at: support.microsoft.com In the United States, Microsoft software product support issues not covered by the Microsoft Knowledge Base are addressed by Microsoft Product Support Services. Location-specific software support options are available from: support.microsoft.com/gp/selfoverview/ Part 1 Basic Word Documents 1 Explore Word 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2 Edit and Proofread Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 3 Change the Look of Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 4 Organize Information in Columns and Tables. . . . .115 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143 6 Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents. . . . . . . .181 1 Chapter at a Glance Work in the user interface, page 4 View documents in different ways, page 29 Create, enter text in, and save documents, page 16 Open, move around in, and close documents, page 23 1 Explore Word 2010 In this chapter, you will learn how to ✔ Work in the user interface. ✔ Create, enter text in, and save documents. ✔ Open, move around in, and close documents. ✔ View documents in different ways. When you use a computer program to create, edit, and produce text documents, you are performing a task known as word processing. Microsoft Word 2010 is one of the most sophisticated word-processing programs available. With Word 2010, it is easy to efficiently create a wide range of business and personal documents, from the simplest letter to the most complex report. Word includes many desktop publishing features that you can use to enhance the appearance of documents so that they are visually appealing and easy to read. Even novice users will be able to work productively in Word after only a brief introduction to the program. For many people, Word is the first—or possibly the only—Microsoft Office program they will use. All the Office 2010 programs share a common working environment, called the user interface, so you can apply basic techniques that you learn in Word, such as those for creating and working with files, to other Office programs. In this chapter, you’ll first familiarize yourself with the Word working environment. Next you’ll create and save a document and then save an existing document in a different location. Then you’ll open an existing Word document, learn ways of moving around in it, and close it. Finally, you’ll explore various ways of viewing documents so that you know which view to use for different tasks and how to tailor the program window to meet your needs. Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this chapter, you need to copy the book's practice files to your computer. The practice files you’ll use to complete the exercises in this chapter are in the Chapter01 practice file folder. A complete list of practice files is provided in "Using the Practice Files" at the beginning of this book. 3 4 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 Working in the User Interface As with all programs in Office 2010, the most common way to start Word is from the Start menu displayed when you click the Start button at the left end of the Windows Taskbar. The Word 2010 program window. When you start Word without opening a specific document, the program window appears, displaying a new blank document. The program window contains the following elements: ● The title bar displays the name of the active document. At the left end of the title bar is the Word icon, which you click to display commands to move, size, and close the program window. At the right end of the title bar are three buttons that control the window. You can temporarily hide the program window by clicking the Minimize button, adjust the size of the window by clicking the Restore Down/Maximize button, and close the active document or exit Word by clicking the Close button. These three buttons serve the same function in all Windows programs. Working in the User Interface 5 Tip Windows 7 introduced many fun and efficient new window-management techniques. For information about ways to work with the Word program window on a Windows 7 computer, refer to Windows 7 Step by Step by Joan Lambert Preppernau and Joyce Cox (Microsoft Press, 2009). ● By default, the Quick Access Toolbar appears to the right of the Word icon at the left end of the title bar, and displays the Save, Undo, and Redo buttons. You can change the location of the Quick Access Toolbar and customize it to include any command that you use frequently. The default buttons on the Quick Access Toolbar. Tip If you create and work with complicated documents, you might achieve greater efficiency if you add all the commands you use frequently to the Quick Access Toolbar and display it below the ribbon, directly above the workspace. For information, see “Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar” in Chapter 16, “Work in Word More Efficiently.” ● Below the title bar is the ribbon. All the commands for working with your Word document content are available from this central location so that you can work efficiently with the program. The ribbon. Troubleshooting The appearance of buttons and groups on the ribbon changes depending on the width of the program window. For information about changing the appearance of the ribbon to match our images, see “Modifying the Display of the Ribbon” at the beginning of this book. ● Across the top of the ribbon is a set of tabs. Clicking a tab displays an associated set of commands. ● Commands related to managing Word and Word documents (rather than document content) are gathered together in the Backstage view, which you display by clicking the colored File tab located at the left end of the ribbon. You access commands in the Backstage view from the left pane. Simple file-management commands that interact with the Windows operating system—Save, Save As, Open, and Close—are available at the top of the pane. Two program management commands—Options and Exit— are available at the bottom of the pane. Commands related to managing Word documents are organized on pages, which you display by clicking the tabs in the pane. 6 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 Clicking the File tab displays the Backstage view, where you can manage files and customize the program. ● Commands related to working with document content are represented as buttons on the remaining tabs. The Home tab is active by default. Tip Don't be alarmed if your ribbon has tabs not shown in our screens. You might have installed programs that add their own tabs to the Word ribbon. ● On each tab, buttons are organized into named groups. Tip You might find that obscure commands you used in the past are not available from the ribbon. However, these legacy commands are still available. You can make legacy commands accessible by adding them to the Quick Access Toolbar. For more information, see “Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar” in Chapter 16, “Work in Word More Efficiently.” ● If a button label isn’t visible, you can display the command, a description of its function, and its keyboard shortcut (if it has one) in a ScreenTip by pointing to the button. Tip You can control the display of ScreenTips and of feature descriptions in ScreenTips. Simply display the Backstage view, click Options to open the Word Options dialog box, and change settings in the User Interface Options area of the General page. You can also change the language of ScreenTip content on the Language page and control the display of keyboard shortcuts in ScreenTips in the Display area of the Advanced page. For more information, see "Changing Default Program Options" in Chapter 16, "Work in Word More Efficiently." Working in the User Interface 7 ● Related but less common commands are not represented as buttons in a group. Instead they are available in a dialog box or task pane, which you display by clicking the dialog box launcher located in the lower-right corner of the group. ● Some buttons include an integrated or separate arrow. To determine whether a button and arrow are integrated, point to the button or arrow to display its border. If a button and its arrow are integrated within one border, clicking the button will display options for refining the action of the button. If the button and arrow have separate borders, clicking the button will carry out the default action indicated by the button’s current icon. You can change the default action of the button by clicking the arrow and then clicking the action you want. The arrow of the Change Styles button is integrated, and the arrow of the Paste button is separate. ● To the right of the ribbon tab names, below the Minimize/Maximize/Close buttons, is the Minimize The Ribbon button. Clicking this button hides the commands but leaves the tab names visible. You can then click any tab name to temporarily display its commands. Clicking anywhere other than the ribbon hides the commands again. When the full ribbon is temporarily visible, you can click the button at its right end, shaped like a pushpin, to make the display permanent. When the full ribbon is hidden, you can click the Expand The Ribbon button to redisplay it. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+F1 to minimize or expand the ribbon. See Also To see a complete list of keyboard shortcuts, see “Keyboard Shortcuts” at the end of this book. ● Clicking the Word Help button at the right end of the ribbon displays the Word Help window in which you can use standard techniques to find information. Keyboard Shortcut Press F1 to display the Word Help window. See Also For information about the Word Help system, see “Getting Help” at the beginning of this book. ● Across the bottom of the program window, the status bar displays information about the current document and provides access to certain program functions. You can control the contents of the status bar by right-clicking it to display the Customize Status Bar menu, on which you can click any item to display or hide it. 8 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 You can specify which items you want to display on the status bar. ● At the right end of the status bar are the View Shortcuts toolbar, the Zoom Level button, and the Zoom Slider. These tools provide you with convenient methods for adjusting the display of document content. You can change the document view by clicking buttons on the View Shortcuts toolbar and change the magnification by clicking the Zoom Level button or adjusting the Zoom slider. See Also For information about changing the document view, see “Viewing Documents in Different Ways” later in this chapter. Working in the User Interface 9 The goal of all these features of the Word environment is to make working on a document as intuitive as possible. Commands for tasks you perform often are readily available, and even those you might use infrequently are easy to find. For example, when a formatting option has several choices available, they are often displayed in a gallery of thumbnails. These galleries give you an at-a-glance picture of each choice. If you point to a thumbnail in a gallery, the Live Preview feature shows you what that choice will look like if you apply it to your document. Live Preview shows the effect on the document of clicking the thumbnail you are pointing to. In this exercise, you’ll start Word and explore the tabs and groups on the ribbon. Along the way, you’ll get a glimpse of galleries and Live Preview. SET UP You don’t need any practice files to complete this exercise; just follow the steps. 1. On the Start menu, click All Programs, click Microsoft Office, and then click Microsoft Word 2010. Tip If this is the first time you have started an Office 2010 program, Office prompts you to enter your full name and initials. The programs in the Office 2010 use this information when tracking changes, responding to messages, and so on. Next, Office prompts you to select the type of information you want to share over the Internet, and offers the option of signing up for automatic program updates from the Microsoft Update service. None of these options places you at risk, and all can be quite useful. The Word program window opens in Print Layout view, displaying a blank document. On the ribbon, the Home tab is active. Buttons related to working with 10 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 document content are organized on this tab in five groups: Clipboard, Font, Paragraph, Styles, and Editing. 2. Point to each button on the Home tab. Word displays information about the button in a ScreenTip. The ScreenTip for the Format Painter button displays the button’s name, its keyboard shortcut, and its function. Tip A button representing a command that cannot be performed on the selected document element is inactive (gray), but pointing to it still displays its ScreenTip. 3. Click the Insert tab, and then explore its buttons. Buttons related to all the items you can insert into a document are organized on this tab in seven groups: Pages, Tables, Illustrations, Links, Header & Footer, Text, and Symbols. The Insert tab of the ribbon. 4. Click the Page Layout tab, and then explore its buttons. Buttons related to the appearance of your document are organized on this tab in five groups: Themes, Page Setup, Page Background, Paragraph, and Arrange. Working in the User Interface The Page Layout tab of the ribbon. 5. In the Page Setup group, display the ScreenTip for the Margins button. The ScreenTip tells you how you can adjust the margins of the document. 6. In the lower-right corner of the Page Setup group, click the Page Setup dialog box launcher. The Page Setup dialog box opens. In this dialog box, you can specify several page layout options in one location. Across the top of this dialog box are three tabs: Margins, Paper, and Layout. Clicking a tab displays a page of related options. See Also For information about the Page Setup dialog box, see "Previewing and Adjusting Page Layout" in Chapter 6, "Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents. 11 12 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 7. Click Cancel to close the dialog box. 8. In the Themes group, click the Themes button. A gallery of the available themes appears. The theme controls the color scheme, fonts, and special effects applied to the text of a document. 9. Press the Esc key to close the gallery without making a selection. 10. In the Page Background group, click the Page Color button, and when a color palette appears, point to each box in the top row under Theme Colors. The blank document page shows a live preview of what it will look like if you click the color you are pointing to. You can see the effect of the selection without actually applying it. 11. Press Esc to close the palette without making a selection. 12. Click the References tab, and then explore its buttons. Working in the User Interface 13 Buttons related to items you can add to documents are organized on this tab in six groups: Table Of Contents, Footnotes, Citations & Bibliography, Captions, Index, and Table Of Authorities. You will usually add these items to longer documents, such as reports. The References tab of the ribbon. 13. Click the Mailings tab, and then explore its buttons. Buttons related to creating mass mailings are organized on this tab in five groups: Create, Start Mail Merge, Write & Insert Fields, Preview Results, and Finish. The Mailings tab of the ribbon. 14. Click the Review tab, and then explore its buttons. Buttons related to proofreading documents, working in other languages, adding comments, tracking and resolving document changes, and protecting documents are organized on this tab in seven groups: Proofing, Language, Comments, Tracking, Changes, Compare, and Protect. The Review tab of the ribbon. 15. Click the View tab, and then explore its buttons. Buttons related to changing the view and other aspects of the display are organized on this tab in five groups: Document Views, Show, Zoom, Window, and Macros. The View tab of the ribbon. 14 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 16. On the ribbon, click the File tab, which is color-coded to match the color assigned by Microsoft to the Word program. The Backstage view of Word 2010 is displayed. Commands related to managing documents (rather than document content) are available in this view. 17. If the Info page is not already displayed in the Backstage view, click Info in the left pane. On the Info page of the Backstage view, the middle pane provides commands for controlling who can work on the document, removing properties (associated information), and accessing versions of the document automatically saved by Word. The right pane displays the associated properties, as well as dates of modification, creation, and printing, and who created and edited the document. The Info page of the Backstage view provides commands for changing the information attached to a document. See Also For information about working with properties, see “Preparing Documents for Electronic Distribution” in Chapter 6, “Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents.” 18. In the left pane, click Recent. The Recent page displays the names of the documents you recently worked on. By default a maximum of 20 names is displayed. You can change this number on the Advanced page of the Word Options dialog box. See Also For information about the Word Options dialog box, see “Changing Default Program Options” in Chapter 16, “Work in Word More Efficiently.” Working in the User Interface 15 19. In the left pane, click New. The New page displays all the templates on which you can base a new document. See Also For information about creating documents, see the next topic, “Creating, Entering Text in, and Saving Documents.” 20. In the left pane, click Print. The Print page gathers together all print-related commands and provides a pane for previewing the current document as it will appear when printed. See Also For information about printing, see Chapter 6, “Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents.” 21. In the left pane, click Save & Send. The Save & Send page displays all the commands related to making the current document available to other people. See Also For information about working with other people on documents, see Chapter 15, “Collaborate on Documents.” 22. In the left pane, click Help. The Help page displays all the ways you can get help and support for Word. The right pane of the Help page displays your Office edition, its version number, and your product ID, which you will need if you contact Microsoft Product Support. 23. On the Help page, under Tools for Working With Office, click Options. The Word Options dialog box opens. In this dialog box are program settings that control the way the program looks and behaves. 16 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 You can also display this dialog box by clicking Options in the left pane of the Backstage view. See Also For information about the Word Options dialog box, see “Changing Default Program Options” in Chapter 16, “Work in Word More Efficiently.” 24. At the bottom of the Word Options dialog box, click Cancel. You return to the current document with the Home tab active on the ribbon. Creating, Entering Text in, and Saving Documents When you start Word without opening a specific document, a blank document is displayed, and you can simply type your content. The blinking cursor shows where the next character you type will appear. When the cursor reaches the right margin, the word you are typing moves to the next line. You press the Enter key only to start a new paragraph, not a new line. If you want to create a document during a Word session, you display the Backstage view by clicking the File tab on the ribbon, and then click New. Creating, Entering Text in, and Saving Documents 17 The New page displays icons for the different types of documents you can create. Troubleshooting Because more types of documents are constantly being added to the list of those available, your New page might be different from ours. The documents listed on the New page are based on templates, which are sets of formats that have been saved in such a way that you can use them as a pattern for new documents. The icons in the top row are: ● Blank document This type of document is selected by default. ● Blog post Clicking this icon opens a document suitable for posting to a blog. ● Recent templates Clicking this icon displays a page with icons for the last few templates you have used. Tip Clicking the Back button or the Home button takes you back to the New page. ● Sample templates Clicking this icon displays a page with the icons of sample documents that come with Word. ● My templates Clicking this icon displays a dialog box in which you can select a template you have created as the basis for a new document. ● New from existing Clicking this icon displays a dialog box in which you can select an existing document as the basis for a new document. 18 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 The icons in the Office.com Templates section represent categories of common types of documents. Clicking one of these icons displays the templates available from the Office.com Web site. You can also search for specific documents by entering the type you want in the Search Office.com For Templates box and clicking the Start Searching button. See Also For information about templates, see “Working with Styles and Templates” in Chapter 16, “Work in Word More Efficiently.” When you find a template you might want to use as the basis for your new document, clicking its icon displays a preview of that type of document in the right pane. You can then click the Create button in the right pane to create the document. Tip Double-clicking an icon creates that type of document without first displaying it in the preview pane. Each document you create is temporary unless you save it as a file with a unique name or location. To save a document for the first time, you click the Save button on the Quick Access Toolbar or click Save in the Backstage view. Either action displays the Save As dialog box, where you can assign the name and storage location. The Save As dialog box. Creating, Entering Text in, and Saving Documents 19 Troubleshooting This graphic shows the Save As dialog box as it appears when Word is running on Windows 7. If you are using a different version of the Windows operating system, your dialog box will look different but the functionality will be similar. Troubleshooting If you don’t see the Navigation pane and toolbar, click Organize on the toolbar, click Layout, and then click Navigation Pane. If you want to save the document in a folder other than the one shown in the Address bar at the top of the dialog box, you can click the arrow or chevrons in the Address bar or click locations in the Navigation pane on the left to display the folder you want. If you want to create a folder in which to store the document, you can click the New Folder button on the toolbar. After you save a document the first time, you can save changes simply by clicking the Save button. The new version of the document then overwrites the previous version. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+S to save the current document. If you want to keep both the new version and the previous version, click Save As in the Backstage view, and then save the new version with a different name in the same location or with the same name in a different location. (You cannot store two files of the same type with the same name in the same folder.) Tip By default, Word periodically saves the document you are working on in case the program stops responding or you lose electrical power. To adjust the time interval between automatic saves, display the Backstage view, click Options, click Save in the left pane of the Word Options dialog box, and specify the period of time in the box to the right of the Save AutoRecover Information Every check box. Then click OK. In this exercise, you’ll create a blank document, enter text, and save the document in a folder that you create. SET UP You don’t need any practice files to complete this exercise; just follow the steps. 1. On the ribbon, click the File tab. Then in the left pane of the Backstage view, click New. 2. On the New page, double-click Blank document. Word creates a blank document temporarily called Document2 and displays it in its own program window in Print Layout view. Document1 is still open, but its window is hidden by the Document2 window. See Also For information about switching between open windows, see “Viewing Documents in Different Ways” later in this chapter. 3. With the cursor at the beginning of the new document, type Parks Appreciation Day, and then press the Enter key. The text appears in the new document. 20 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 4. Type Help beautify our city by participating in the annual cleanup of Log Park, Swamp Creek Park, and Linkwood Park. This is a lot of fun! Volunteers receive a free T-shirt and barbeque lunch. Bring your own gardening tools and gloves. (Include the period.) Notice that you did not need to press Enter when the cursor reached the right margin because the text wrapped to the next line. You press Enter at the end of each paragraph; the Word Wrap feature takes care of wrapping each line. Tip If a red wavy line appears under a word or phrase, Word is flagging a possible error. For now, ignore any errors. 5. Press Enter, and then type The Service Committee is coordinating groups to participate in this event. If you are interested in spending time outdoors with your family and friends while improving the quality of our parks, contact Paul Shen at paul@treyresearch.net. 6. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Save button. The Save As dialog box opens, displaying the contents of the Documents library. In the File Name box, Word suggests the first words of the document as a possible name. 7. Using standard Windows techniques, navigate to the location where you have stored the practice files for this book. Then double-click your Chapter01 practice file folder. 8. On the dialog box’s toolbar, click the New folder button, type My New Documents as the name of the new folder, and press Enter. Then double-click the My New Documents folder. 9. In the File name box, click anywhere in Parks Appreciation Day to select it, and then replace this name by typing My Announcement. Important Programs that run on the Windows operating systems use file name extensions to identify different types of files. For example, the extension .docx identifies Word 2010 documents. Windows 7 does not display these extensions by default, and you shouldn’t type them in the Save As dialog box. When you save a file, Word automatically adds whatever extension is associated with the type of file selected in the Save As Type box. Creating, Entering Text in, and Saving Documents 21 10. Click Save. The Save As dialog box closes, Word saves the My Announcement document in the My New Documents folder, and the name of the document, My Announcement, appears on the program window’s title bar. 11. Display the Backstage view, and then click Save As. The Save As dialog box opens. The dialog box displays the contents of the My New Documents folder, because that is the last folder you worked with. 12. In the Address bar of the Save As dialog box, to the left of My New Documents, click Chapter01. The dialog box now displays the contents of the Chapter01 folder, which is the folder that contains the My New Documents folder. See Also For information about saving a document in a different file format, see “Saving Files in Different Formats” in Chapter 11, “Create Documents for Use Outside of Word.” For information about working with the file properties that appear at the bottom of the Save As dialog box, see “Preparing Documents for Electronic Distribution” in Chapter 6, “Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents.” 22 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 13. Click Save. Word saves the My Announcement document in the Chapter01 folder. You now have two versions of the document saved with the same name but in different folders. CLEAN UP At the right end of the title bar, click the Close button (the X) to close the My Announcement document, leaving Document1 open for the next topic. Document Compatibility with Earlier Versions of Word The Microsoft Office 2010 programs use file formats based on XML, called the Microsoft Office Open XML Formats, that were introduced with Microsoft Office 2007. By default, Word 2010 files are saved in the .docx format, which is the Word variation of this file format. The .docx format provides the following benefits: ● File size is smaller because files are compressed when saved, decreasing the amount of disk space needed to store the file, and the amount of bandwidth needed to send files in e-mail, over a network, or across the Internet. ● Recovering at least some of the content of damaged files is possible because XML files can be opened in a text program such as Notepad. ● Security is greater because .docx files cannot contain macros, and personal data can be detected and removed from the file. (Word 2010 and Word 2007 provide a different file format—.docm—for documents that contain macros.) You can open a .doc document created with earlier Word versions in Word 2010, but the new features of Word 2010 will not be available. The document name appears in the title bar with [Compatibility Mode] to its right. You can work in Compatibility mode, or you can convert the document to the .docx format by displaying the Backstage view, clicking Info, and clicking the Convert button in the Compatibility Mode section. You can also click Save As in the Backstage view to save the document as a different file in the .docx format. If you work with people who are using a version of Word earlier than 2007, you can save your documents in a format that they will be able to open and use. If your colleagues regularly receive .docx files, they might want to download the Microsoft Office Compatibility Pack For Word, Excel, And PowerPoint 2007 File Formats from the office.microsoft.com Web site so that they can open .docx files in their version of Word. See Also For information about saving files in other formats, see “Saving Files in Different Formats” in Chapter 11 “Create Documents for Use Outside of Word.” Opening, Moving Around in, and Closing Documents 23 Opening, Moving Around in, and Closing Documents If Word isn’t already running, you can start the program and simultaneously open an existing Word document from Windows Explorer by double-clicking the document’s file name. While Word is running, you can open an existing document from the Backstage view. If you have recently worked on the document you want to open, you can display the Recent page and simply click the document you want in the list. If the document is not available on the Recent page, clicking Open in the left pane displays the Open dialog box. The Open dialog box, displaying the contents of the Chapter01 practice file folder. The first time you use this command, the dialog box displays your Documents library. If you display the dialog box again in the same Word session, it displays the contents of whatever folder you last used. To see the contents of a different folder, you use standard Windows navigation techniques. After you locate the document you want to work with, you can click its file name and then click Open in the lower-right corner of the dialog box, or you can simply double-click the file name. 24 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 Tip Clicking a file name and then clicking the Open arrow displays a list of alternative ways in which you can open the document. To look through the document without making any inadvertent changes, you can open it as read-only, or you can open an independent copy of the document. After a computer crash or similar incident, you can tell Word to open the document and attempt to repair any damage. And you can display the file in other versions and formats, discussion of which is beyond the scope of this book. If you open a document that is too long to fit entirely on the screen, you can bring off-screen content into view without changing the location of the cursor by using the vertical scroll bar. ● Click the scroll arrows to move up or down by one line. ● Click above or below the scroll box to move up or down one windowful. ● Drag the scroll box on the scroll bar to display the part of the document corre- sponding to the location of the scroll box. For example, dragging the scroll box to the middle of the scroll bar displays the middle of the document. If the document is too wide to fit on the screen, Word displays a horizontal scroll bar that you can use in similar ways to move from side to side. You can also move around in a document by moving the cursor. To place the cursor in a specific location, you simply click there. To move the cursor one page backward or forward, you click the Previous Page and Next Page buttons below the vertical scroll bar. You can also press a keyboard shortcut on the keyboard to move the cursor. For example, pressing the Home key moves the cursor to the left end of a line, and pressing Ctrl+Home moves it to the beginning of the document. Tip The location of the cursor is displayed on the status bar. By default, the status bar tells you which page the cursor is on, but you can also display its location by section, line, and column, and in inches from the top of the page. Simply right-click the status bar and click the option you want to display. Opening, Moving Around in, and Closing Documents 25 The following table lists ways to use your keyboard to move the cursor. Cursor movement Key or keyboard shortcut Left one character Left Arrow Right one character Right Arrow Down one line Down Arrow Up one line Up Arrow Left one word Ctrl+Left Arrow Right one word Ctrl+Right Arrow To the beginning of the current line Home To the end of the current line End To the beginning of the document Ctrl+Home To the end of the document Ctrl+End Up one screen Page Up Down one screen Page Down To the beginning of the previous page Ctrl+Page Up To the beginning of the next page Ctrl+Page Down In a long document, you might want to move quickly among elements of a certain type; for example, from graphic to graphic. Clicking the Select Browse Object button at the bottom of the vertical scroll bar displays a gallery of browsing options, such as Browse By Page and Browse By Graphic. (These options are also available on the Go To page of the Find And Replace dialog box, which you display by clicking the Find arrow in the Editing group of the Home tab and then clicking Go To.) You can also display the Navigation task pane and move from heading to heading or page to page. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+G to display the Go To page of the Find And Replace dialog box. See Also For information about using the Navigation task pane to search for specific content in a document, see “Finding and Replacing Text” in Chapter 2, “Edit and Proofread Text.” If more than one document is open, you can close the active document without exiting Word by clicking the Close button at the right end of the title bar. If only one document is open, clicking the Close button closes the document and also exits Word. If you want to close that document but leave Word running, you must click Close in the Backstage view. 26 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 In this exercise, you’ll open an existing document and explore various ways of moving around in it. Then you’ll close the document. SET UP You need the Rules_start document located in your Chapter01 practice file folder to complete this exercise. 1. With Document1 open, display the Backstage view, and then click Open. The Open dialog box opens, showing the contents of the folder you used for your last open or save action. 2. If your Chapter01 practice file folder is not displayed, navigate to that folder. 3. Click the Rules_start document, and then click Open. The Rules_start document opens in the Word program window. An existing document displayed in Print Layout view. 4. Display the Backstage view, and in the left pane, click Save As. 5. In the Save As dialog box, change the file name to Rules, and then click Save. Now you can experiment with the document without fear of overwriting the original. Opening, Moving Around in, and Closing Documents 27 6. In the second line of the document title, click at the right end of the paragraph to position the cursor. 7. Press the Home key to move the cursor to the beginning of the line. 8. Press the Right Arrow key six times to move the cursor to the beginning of the word and in the heading. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Press the End key to move the cursor to the end of the line. Press Ctrl+End to move the cursor to the end of the document. Press Ctrl+Home to move the cursor to the beginning of the document. At the bottom of the vertical scroll bar, click the Next Page button. Click above the scroll box on the scroll bar to change the view of the document by one windowful. 14. Drag the scroll box to the top of the scroll bar. The beginning of the document comes into view. Note that the location of the cursor has not changed—just the view of the document. 15. Click to the left of the first line of the title to place the cursor at the top of the document, and then near the bottom of the vertical scroll bar, click the Select Browse Object button. A gallery of browsing choices appears. The Select Browse Object gallery. 16. Move the pointer over the buttons representing the objects you can browse among. As you point to each button, the name of the browsing option appears at the top of the gallery. 28 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 17. Click the Browse by Page button. The cursor moves from the beginning of page 1 to the beginning of page 2. 18. Click the View tab, and then in the Show group, select the Navigation Pane check box. The Navigation task pane opens on the left side of the screen, displaying an outline of the headings in the document. The heading of the section containing the cursor is highlighted. Using the Navigation task pane, you can move from heading to heading or from page to page. 19. In the Navigation task pane, click the Landscaping heading. Word scrolls the document and moves the cursor to the selected heading. 20. In the Navigation task pane, click the Browse the pages in your document tab (the one with the icon of four small pages). Then scroll the thumbnails in the task pane, and click page 5. 21. At the right end of the Navigation task pane title bar, click the Close button. 22. At the right end of the program window title bar, click the Close button. The Rules document closes, and Document1 becomes the active document. Viewing Documents in Different Ways 29 23. Display the Backstage view, and then click Close. If Word asks whether you want to save changes to this document, click Don't Save. Document1 closes, leaving Word running. Troubleshooting In step 23, if you click the Close button at the right end of the title bar instead of clicking Close in the Backstage view, you’ll close the open Word document and exit the Word program. To continue working, start Word again. Viewing Documents in Different Ways In Word, you can display a document in a variety of views, each suited to a specific purpose. You switch the view by clicking the buttons in the Document Views group on the View tab, or those on the View Shortcuts toolbar in the lower-right corner of the program window. ● Print Layout view This view displays a document on the screen the way it will look when printed. You can see elements such as margins, page breaks, headers and footers, and watermarks. ● Full Screen Reading view This view displays as much of the content of the docu- ment as will fit on the screen at a size that is comfortable for reading. In this view, the ribbon is replaced by one toolbar at the top of the screen with buttons for saving and printing the document, accessing reference and other tools, highlighting text, and making comments. You can move from page to page and adjust the view by selecting options from the View Options menu. You can edit the document only if you turn on the Allow Typing option on this menu, and you can switch views only by clicking the Close button to return to the previous view. ● Web Layout view This view displays the document the way it will look when viewed in a Web browser. You can see backgrounds and other effects. You can also see how text wraps to fit the window and how graphics are positioned. See Also For information about Web documents, see “Creating and Modifying Web Documents” in Chapter 11, “Create Documents for Use Outside of Word.” ● Outline view This view displays the structure of a document as nested levels of headings and body text, and provides tools for viewing and changing its hierarchy. See Also For information about outlining, see “Reorganizing Document Outlines” in Chapter 10, "Organize and Arrange Content.” ● Draft view This view displays the content of a document with a simplified layout so that you can type and edit quickly. You cannot see layout elements such as headers and footers. 30 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 When you want to focus on the layout of a document, you can display rulers and gridlines to help you position and align elements. Simply click the corresponding check boxes in the Show group on the View tab. You can also adjust the magnification of the document by using the tools available in the Zoom group on the View tab or the Zoom Level button or Zoom Slider at the right end of the status bar. Clicking either the Zoom button or Zoom Level button displays a dialog box where you can select or type a percentage; or you can drag the Zoom Slider to the left or right or click the Zoom Out or Zoom In button on either side of the slider to change the percentage incrementally. You are not limited to working with one document at a time. You can easily switch between open documents, and you can display more than one program window simultaneously. If you want to work with different parts of the same document, you can open the active document in a second window and display both, or you can split a single window into two panes and scroll each pane independently. Tip At the right end of the View tab is the Macros group, which includes commands for viewing, recording, and pausing macros. A discussion of macros is beyond the scope of this book. If you are interested in finding out about them, enter macros in Word Help. Not represented on the View tab is a feature that can be invaluable when you are finetuning the layout of a document. Clicking the Show/Hide ¶ button in the Paragraph group on the Home tab turns the display of formatting marks and hidden characters on and off. Formatting marks, such as tabs and paragraph marks, control the layout of your document, and hidden characters provide the structure for behind-the-scenes processes, such as indexing. When you are developing a document, you might want to turn these marks and characters on, and when you want to see what the finished piece will look like to other people, you will want to turn them off. Tip You can hide any text by selecting it, clicking the Font dialog box launcher in the lowerright corner of the Font group on the Home tab, selecting the Hidden check box, and clicking OK. When the Show/Hide ¶ button is turned on, hidden text is visible and is identified in the document by a dotted underline. In this exercise, you’ll first explore various ways that you can customize Print Layout view to make the work of developing documents more efficient. You’ll turn white space on and off, zoom in and out, display the rulers and Navigation task pane, and view formatting marks and hidden characters. Then you’ll switch to other views, noticing the differences so that you have an idea of which one is most appropriate for which task. Finally, you’ll switch between open documents and view documents in more than one window at the same time. Viewing Documents in Different Ways 31 SET UP You need the Procedures_start and Prices_start documents located in your Chapter01 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the Procedures_start document, and save it as Procedures. Then follow the steps. 1. With the document displayed in Print Layout view (the default), scroll through the document. As you can see, on all pages but the first, the printed document will have the title in the header at the top of the page, the page number in the right margin, and the date in the footer at the bottom of each page. See Also For information about headers and footers, see “Inserting Building Blocks” in Chapter 5, ”Add Simple Graphic Elements.” 2. Point to the gap between any two pages, and when the pointer changes to two opposing arrows, double-click the mouse button. Then scroll through the document again. The white space at the top and bottom of each page and the gray space between pages is now hidden. Hiding white space makes it quicker to scroll through a long document and easier to compare the content on two pages. 3. Restore the white space by pointing to the line that separates one page from the next and double-clicking the mouse button. 4. Press Ctrl+Home to move to the top of the document, and then on the View Shortcuts toolbar near the right end of the status bar, click the Zoom Level button, which currently indicates that the document is displayed at 100%. The Zoom dialog box opens. 32 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 You can click a built-in zoom percentage or specify your own. 5. Click Many pages. Then click the monitor button, click the second page thumbnail in the top row, and click OK . The magnification changes so that you can see two pages side by side. You can now scroll through the document two pages at a time. 6. At the bottom of the vertical scroll bar, click the Next Page button to display the third and fourth pages of the document. Viewing Documents in Different Ways 33 7. On the View tab, click the Zoom button. Then in the Zoom dialog box, click 75%, and click OK . Notice that the Zoom Level percentage and slider position are adjusted to reflect the new setting. 8. At the left end of the Zoom Slider, click the Zoom Out button two times. As you click the button, the Zoom Level percentage decreases and the slider moves to the left. 9. At the right end of the Zoom Slider, click the Zoom In button until the Zoom Level percentage is 100 percent. 10. On the View tab, in the Show group, select the Ruler check box. Horizontal and vertical rulers appear above and to the left of the page. On the rulers, the content area of the page is white and the margins are gray. 11. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Show/Hide ¶ button. Formatting marks such as spaces, tabs, and paragraph marks are now visible. You can display the formatting marks that control the layout of the content. 12. On the View Shortcuts toolbar, click the Full Screen Reading button. Word displays the document in a format that is easy to read. 34 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 You cannot edit content in Full Screen Reading view unless you select Allow Typing on the View Options menu. 13. In the lower-right corner of the window, click the Forward button. You can now read the next two screens of information. 14. To the right of the screen indicator at the top of the window, click the Previous Screen button. 15. Point to each button on the toolbar at the top of the window to display its ScreenTip. Then in the upper-right corner, click the Close button to return to Print Layout view. 16. Press Ctrl+Home. Then on the View Shortcuts toolbar, click the Web Layout button, and scroll through the document. In a Web browser, the text column will fill the window, and there will be no page breaks. 17. Press Ctrl+Home, and then on the View Shortcuts toolbar, click the Outline button. Word displays the document’s hierarchical structure, and the Outlining tab appears on the ribbon. 18. On the Outlining tab, in the Outline Tools group, click the Show Level arrow, and in the list, click Level 2. The document collapses to display only the Level 1 and Level 2 headings. Viewing Documents in Different Ways 35 You can control the level of detail shown in the document’s outline. 19. On the View Shortcuts toolbar, click the Draft button, and then scroll through the document. You can see the basic content of the document without any extraneous elements, such as margins and headers and footers. The active area on the ruler indicates the width of the text column, dotted lines indicate page breaks, and scrolling is quick and easy. 20. Display the Backstage view, click Open, and then in the Open dialog box, doubleclick Prices_start. The Prices_start document opens in Print Layout view in its own window. Notice that the telephone number in the body of the memo has a dotted underline, which indicates that it is formatted as hidden. 21. Save the Prices_start document as Prices so that you can work with it without overwriting the original. 22. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Show/Hide ¶ button to turn it off. The telephone number is no longer visible. 23. On the View tab, in the Window group, click the Switch Windows button, and then in the list of open documents, click Procedures. The Procedures document is displayed in Draft view with formatting marks and hidden text turned on. You can control the view and formatting marks for each window. 36 Chapter 1 Explore Word 2010 24. On the View tab, in the Window group, click the Arrange All button. The open windows are sized and stacked one above the other. Each window has a ribbon, so you can work with each document independently. You can display more than one window at the same time. Tip The ribbons in each window take up a lot of screen space. To see more of each document, you can click the Minimize The Ribbon button to hide all but the tab names. 25. At the right end of the Procedures title bar, click the Close button. 26. At the right end of the Prices title bar, click the Maximize button. The window expands to fill the screen. 27. On the View tab, in the Show group, clear the Ruler check box to turn off the rulers. CLEAN UP Close the Prices document. Key Points 37 Key Points ● You can open more than one Word document, and you can view more than one document at a time, but only one document can be active at a time. ● You create Word documents by selecting a template and typing text at the cursor. It’s easy to move the cursor by clicking in the text or by pressing keys and keyboard shortcuts. ● When you save a Word document, you specify its name, location, and file format in the Save As dialog box. ● You can view a document in a variety of ways, depending on your needs as you create the document and on the purpose for which you are creating it. Chapter at a Glance Find and replace text, page 49 Make text changes, page 40 Fine-tune text, page 55 Correct spelling and grammatical errors, page 63 Insert saved text, page 69 2 Edit and Proofread Text In this chapter, you will learn how to ✔ Make text changes. ✔ Find and replace text. ✔ Fine-tune text. ✔ Correct spelling and grammatical errors. ✔ Insert saved text. As you learned in Chapter 1, "Explore Word 2010," entering text is a simple matter of typing. However, even the most accurate typists occasionally make mistakes, also known as t ypos (for t ypographical errors). Unless the documents you create are intended for no one’s eyes but your own, you need to ensure that they are not only correct but also persuasive. Whether you are a novice or experienced writer, Microsoft Word 2010 has several tools that make creating professional documents easy and efficient. ● Editing tools These tools provide quick-selection techniques and drag-and- drop editing to make it easy to move and copy text anywhere you want it. ● Search tools These tools can be used to locate and replace words, phrases, and special characters, either one at a time or throughout a document. See Also For information about using the search tools to find and replace formatting, see the sidebar "Finding and Replacing Formatting" in Chapter 3, "Change the Look of Text." ● Research tools These tools make it easy to find synonyms, look up information, and translate words and phrases. 39 40 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text ● AutoCorrect and Spelling And Grammar These features make it easy to correct typographical and grammatical errors before you share a document with others. ● Quick Parts These building blocks can be used to save and recall specialized terms or standard paragraphs. Tip Word also includes formatted building blocks for document elements such as cover pages, headers, and footers. For information, see "Inserting Building Blocks" in Chapter 5, "Add Simple Graphic Elements." In this chapter, you’ll edit the text in a document by inserting and deleting text, copying and pasting a phrase, and moving a paragraph. Then you’ll replace one phrase with another throughout the entire document. Next, you’ll replace a word with a synonym and translate another word. You’ll also add misspelled words to the AutoCorrect list and check the spelling and grammar of a document. Finally, you’ll save a couple of building blocks for insertion later in a document. Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this chapter, you need to copy the book’s practice files to your computer. The practice files you’ll use to complete the exercises in this chapter are in the Chapter02 practice file folder. A complete list of practice files is provided in “Using the Practice Files” at the beginning of this book. Making Text Changes You’ll rarely write a perfect document that doesn’t require any editing. You’ll almost always want to add or remove a word or two, change a phrase, or move text from one place to another. You can edit a document as you create it, or you can write it first and then revise it. Or you might want to edit a document that you created for one purpose so that you can use it for a different purpose. For example, a letter might make an ideal starting point for a flyer, or a report might contain all the information you need for a Web document. Inserting text is easy; you click to position the cursor and simply begin typing. Any existing text to the right of the cursor moves to make room for the new text. Deleting text is equally easy. If you want to delete only one or a few characters, you can simply position the cursor and then press the Backspace or Delete key until the characters are all gone. Pressing Backspace deletes the character to the left of the cursor; pressing Delete deletes the character to the right of the cursor. Making Text Changes 41 To delete more than a few characters efficiently, you need to know how to select the text. Selected text appears highlighted on the screen. You can drag through a section of text to select it, or you can select specific items as follows: ● Word Double-click anywhere in the word. The word and the space immediately following it are selected, but not any punctuation following the word. ● Sentence Click anywhere in the sentence while holding down the Ctrl key. Word selects all the characters in the sentence, from the first character through the space following the ending punctuation mark. ● Paragraph Triple-click anywhere in the paragraph. Word selects the text of the paragraph and the paragraph mark. ● Adjacent words, lines, or paragraphs Position the cursor at the beginning of the text you want to select, hold down the Shift key, and then press the Arrow keys to select one character or line at a time; hold down the Shift and Ctrl keys and press the Arrow keys to select one word at a time; or click at the end of the text that you want to select. ● Non-adjacent words, lines, or paragraphs Make the first selection, and then hold down the Ctrl key while selecting the next text block. Tip When you select text, Word displays a box called the Mini Toolbar so that you can quickly format the selection. You can ignore this toolbar for now. For more information, see “Manually Changing the Look of Characters” in Chapter 3, “Change the Look of Text.” As an alternative way of selecting, you can use an invisible area in the document’s left margin, called the selection area, to select items. ● Line Click in the selection area to the left of the line. ● Paragraph Double-click in the selection area to the left of the paragraph. ● Entire document Triple-click in the selection area. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+A to select all the content in the body of the document. See Also To see a complete list of keyboard shortcuts, see “Keyboard Shortcuts” at the end of this book. 42 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text Selection area In the selection area, the pointer becomes a right-pointing arrow. After selecting the text you want to delete, press either Backspace or Delete. Tip To release a selection, click anywhere in the window other than the selection area. If you want to move or copy the selected text, you have three options: ● Drag-and-drop editing Use this feature, which is frequently referred to simply as dragging, when you need to move or copy text only a short distance—for example, within a paragraph. Start by using any of the methods described previously to select the text. Then point to the selection, hold down the mouse button, drag the text to its new location, and release the mouse button. To copy the selection, hold down the Ctrl key while you drag. ● Cut, Copy, and Paste buttons Use this method when you need to move or copy text between two locations that you cannot see at the same time—for example, between pages or between documents. Select the text, and click the Cut or Copy button in the Clipboard group on the Home tab. (The cut or copied item is stored in an area of your computer’s memory called the Microsoft Office Clipboard, hence the name of the group.) Then reposition the cursor, and click the Paste button to insert the selection in its new location. If you click the Paste arrow instead of the button, Word displays a list of different ways to paste the selection. Making Text Changes 43 Under Paste Options, buttons represent the ways in which you can paste the item. Pointing to a button under Paste Options displays a preview of how the cut or copied item will look when pasted into the text in that format, so you can experiment with different ways of pasting until you find the one you want. See Also For more information about the Clipboard, see the sidebar “About the Clipboard” later in this chapter. ● Keyboard shortcuts It can be more efficient to press key combinations to cut, copy, and paste selections than to click buttons on the ribbon. The main keyboard shortcuts for editing tasks are shown in the following table. Task Keyboard shortcut Cut Ctrl+X Copy Ctrl+C Paste Ctrl+V Undo Ctrl+Z Repeat/Redo Ctrl+Y Using a keyboard shortcut to cut or copy a selection stores the item on the Clipboard, just as if you had clicked the corresponding button. Tip No matter which method you use, when you cut text, Word removes it from its original location. When you copy text, Word leaves the text in the original location and repeats it in the new location. 44 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text If you make a change to a document and then realize that you made a mistake, you can easily reverse the change. You can undo your last editing action by clicking the Undo button on the Quick Access Toolbar. To undo an earlier action, click the Undo arrow and then click that action in the list. Tip Selecting an action from the Undo list undoes that action and all the editing actions you performed after that one. You cannot undo only one action other than the last one you performed. If you make a change to a document and want to repeat that change elsewhere, you can click the Repeat button on the Quick Access Toolbar. If the last task you performed was to undo an action, the Repeat button is replaced by the Redo button. So if you change your mind about whatever you undid, you can click the Redo button to return the text to its previous state. You can’t redo multiple actions by clicking them in a list as you can with the Undo button, but you can click the Redo button repeatedly until the text is restored to what you want. In this exercise, you’ll edit the text in a document. You’ll insert and delete text, undo the deletion, copy and paste a phrase, and move a paragraph. SET UP You need the Orientation_start document located in your Chapter02 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the Orientation_start document, and save it as Orientation. Then follow the steps. 1. If formatting marks such as spaces and paragraph marks are not visible in the document, on the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Show/Hide ¶ button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+* to turn formatting marks on or off. (You need to hold down the Shift key to activate the * key. So in effect, you are pressing Ctrl+Shift+8.) 2. In the second bullet point under Project Goals, double-click the word natural to select it, and then press Backspace. 3. In the third bullet point, click to the left of the a in the word and, hold down the Shift key, and then click to the right of the e in the word motivate. Word selects the text between the two clicks. Troubleshooting If Word selects the word Engage as well, you clicked before the space instead of after it. Click anywhere in the document to release the selection, and then repeat step 3, being sure to click after the space but before the word and. Making Text Changes 45 You can use the Shift+click method to select as much text as you want. 4. Press Delete to delete the selection. Word also deletes the space after the selection. 5. In the fourth bullet point, double-click the word Forge, and then replace it by typing Build. Notice that you don’t have to type a space after Build. Word inserts the space for you. Tip Word inserts and deletes spaces because the Use Smart Cut And Paste check box is selected on the Advanced page of the Word Options dialog box. If you want to be able to control the spacing yourself, click the Options button in the Backstage view, click Advanced, clear this check box (located in the Cut, Copy, And Paste area), and then click OK. 6. Scroll the page, and position the mouse pointer at the edge of the page to the left of the first bullet point under Questions for Team Leaders. Then with the pointer in the selection area, click to select the entire paragraph. Tip Clicking once selects this paragraph because it is only one line long. If the paragraph contained more than one line, you would need to double-click. 46 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text 7. On the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click the Copy button. The selection is copied to the Clipboard. 8. If you can’t see the bulleted list under Questions for Department Reps, click the Next Page button below the vertical scroll bar to move to the beginning of the next page. Then click to the left of What in the first bullet point under Questions for Department Reps, and in the Clipboard group, click the Paste arrow. The Paste Options menu opens. The Paste Options menu includes buttons representing pasting options. 9. Point to the Merge List button, notice how the text will look with this paste option implemented, and then click the button. The Paste Options button appears below and to the right of the inserted bullet point. You can click this button to display a list of paste options if you want to change the way the text has been pasted or the default way Word pastes. In this case, you can just ignore it. 10. In the Set Up Team section, triple-click anywhere in the paragraph that begins The Committee will pursue to select the entire paragraph. 11. In the Clipboard group, click the Cut button. 12. Press the Up Arrow key to move to the beginning of the preceding paragraph, and then in the Clipboard group, click the Paste button. The two paragraphs switch places. 13. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Undo arrow, and then in the Undo list, click the third action (Paste Merge List). Making Text Changes 47 Word undoes the previous cut-and-paste operation and the pasting of the copied text. 14. Press Ctrl+Home to move to the top of the document. Then position the pointer in the selection area adjacent to the third bullet point under Project Goals, and click to select the paragraph. 15. Point to the selection, hold down the mouse button, and then drag the paragraph up to the left of the word Make at the beginning of the preceding bullet point. When you release the mouse, the bullet point moves to its new location. 16. With the text still selected, press the End key. Word releases the selection and moves the cursor to the end of the paragraph. 17. Press the Spacebar, and then press Delete. Word deletes the paragraph mark and merges the two bullet points. In the second bullet point, two bullets have now been combined into one. CLEAN UP If you prefer not to see formatting marks, turn them off. Then save and close the Orientation document. 48 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text About the Clipboard You can view the items that have been cut or copied to the Clipboard in the Clipboard task pane, which you display by clicking the Clipboard dialog box launcher on the Home tab. The Clipboard stores items that have been cut or copied from any Office program. To paste an individual item at the cursor, you simply click the item in the Clipboard task pane. To paste all the items, click the Paste All button. You can point to an item, click the arrow that appears, and then click Delete to remove it from the Clipboard and the task pane, or you can remove all the items by clicking the Clear All button. You can control the behavior of the Clipboard task pane by clicking Options at the bottom of the pane, and choosing the circumstances under which you want the task pane to appear. To close the Clipboard task pane, click the Close button at the right end of its title bar. Finding and Replacing Text 49 Finding and Replacing Text One way to ensure that the text in your documents is consistent and accurate is to use the Find feature to search for every occurrence of a particular word or phrase. For example, if you are responsible for advertising a trademarked product, you might want to search your marketing materials to check that every occurrence of the product’s name is correctly identified as a trademark. Clicking the Find button (not the arrow) in the Editing group on the Home tab displays the Navigation task pane with the Search tab active. As you type characters in the Search Document box at the top of the task pane, Word highlights all occurrences of those characters in the document and displays them in the search results list in the Navigation task pane. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+F to display the Search tab of the Navigation task pane. The Navigation task pane shows enough of the text surrounding the search term to identify its context. 50 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text When you point to a particular search result in the Navigation task pane, a ScreenTip displays the number of the page on which that result appears. You can click a search result to scroll the document to display the result’s location. Tip The beauty of the Navigation task pane is that you can continue editing your document as you normally would, without closing the pane. If you want to be more specific about the text you are looking for—for example, if you want to look for occurrences that match the exact capitalization of your search term— click the arrow at the right end of the Search Document box in the Navigation task pane and then click Advanced Find to display the Find page of the Find And Replace dialog box. Clicking More in the lower-left corner expands the dialog box to make additional search options available. You can make a search more specific by using the criteria in the Search Options area of the Find And Replace dialog box. Finding and Replacing Text 51 In the expanded dialog box, you can do the following: ● Guide the direction of the search by selecting Down, Up, or All from the Search list. ● Locate only text that matches the capitalization of the Find What text by selecting the Match Case check box. ● E xclude occurrences of the Find What text that appear within other words by selecting the Find Whole Words Only check box. ● Find two similar words, such as effect and affect by selecting the Use Wildcards check box and then entering a wildcard character in the Find What box. The two most common wildcard characters are: ❍ ?, which represents any single character in this location in the Find What text. ❍ *, which represents any number of characters in this location in the Find What text. Tip To see a list of the available wildcards, use Help to search for the term wildcards. ● Find occurrences of the search text that sound the same but are spelled differently, such as there and their, by selecting the Sounds Like check box. ● Find occurrences of a particular word in any form, such as try, tries, and tried, by selecting the Find All Word Forms check box. You can match a prefix or a suffix, and you can ignore punctuation and white space. ● Locate formatting, such as bold, or special characters, such as tabs, by selecting them from the Format or Special list. See Also For information about finding and replacing formatting, see the sidebar “Finding and Replacing Formatting” in Chapter 3, ”Change the Look of Text.” If you want to substitute a specific word or phrase for another, you can use the Replace feature. Clicking the Replace button in the Editing group of the Home tab displays the Replace page of the Find And Replace dialog box. 52 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text Correcting errors and inconsistencies is easy with the Replace feature. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+H to display the Replace page of the Find And Replace dialog box. Tip If the Navigation task pane is open, you can click the arrow at the right end of the Search Document box and then click Replace. The Find And Replace dialog box opens with the search term from the Navigation task pane already in the Find What box. On the Replace page, you can click the following: ● Find Next Finds the first occurrence or leaves the selected occurrence as it is and locates the next one ● Replace Replaces the selected occurrence with the text in the Replace With box and moves to the next occurrence ● Replace All Replaces all occurrences with the text in the Replace With box Tip Before clicking Replace All, ensure that the replacement is clearly defined. For example, if you want to change trip to journey, be sure to tell Word to find only the whole word trip; otherwise, triple could become journeyle. As on the Find page, clicking More displays the options you can use to carry out more complicated replacements. In this exercise, you’ll find a phrase and make a correction to the text. Then you’ll replace one phrase with another throughout the entire document. SET UP You need the RulesRegulations_start document located in your Chapter02 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the RulesRegulations_start document, and save it as RulesRegulations. Then follow the steps. 1. With the cursor at the beginning of the document, on the Home tab, in the Editing group, click the Find button (not its arrow). The Navigation task pane opens, displaying the Search tab. 2. With the cursor in the Search Document box, type Board. (Don’t type the period.) Finding and Replacing Text 53 The Navigation task pane displays 62 matches with the word Board and highlights every occurrence in the document. In the Navigation task pane, you can click each match to view its corresponding location in the document. 3. In the Navigation task pane, click the fifth match in the search results to jump to page 2. Notice that under the heading 4. Storage, Word has highlighted the board portion of skateboards. You need to restrict the search to the whole word Board. 4. In the Navigation task pane, click the arrow at the right end of the Search Document box. A menu of options for refining the search appears. You can click options that allow you to find specific types of objects as well as text. 5. In the top part of the list, click Advanced Find. The Find And Replace dialog box opens with the Find page displayed. The Find What box already contains the search term from the Navigation task pane. 54 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text 6. In the lower-left corner of the dialog box, click More. The dialog box expands to display options for refining the search. 7. In the Search Options area of the dialog box, select the Match case and Find whole words only check boxes. Then click Reading Highlight, click Highlight All, and click Close. Under the 4. Storage heading, the word skateboards is no longer highlighted. 8. Press Ctrl+Home to move the cursor to the beginning of the document. 9. In the Navigation task pane, display the search options list again, and then click Replace. The Find And Replace dialog box opens with the Replace page active. The Find What box retains the entry from the previous search, and the Match Case and Find Whole Words Only check boxes are still selected. 10. Click Less to reduce the size of the box, and then drag the box by its title bar toward the top of the document. 11. Click the Replace with box, type Association Board, and then click Find Next. Word highlights the first occurrence of Board. 12. In the dialog box, click Replace. Word replaces the first occurrence of Board with Association Board and then finds the next occurrence. If you don’t want to replace an occurrence, click Find Next to skip it. Fine-Tuning Text 55 13. Having tested the replacement, click Replace All. 14. When Word tells you how many replacements it made, click OK to close the message box. Then in the Find and Replace dialog box, click Close. 15. Press Ctrl+Home to move to the beginning of the document. In the Updated and Approved line of text, the word Association is now duplicated. 16. Use your new find and replace skills to replace any instances of Association Association in the document with Association. CLEAN UP Close the Navigation task pane. Then save and close the RulesRegulations document. Fine-Tuning Text Language is often contextual—you use different words and phrases in a marketing brochure than you would in a letter requesting immediate payment of an invoice or in an informal memo about a social gathering after work. To help you ensure that you’re using the words that best convey your meaning in any given context, Word provides a thesaurus where you can look up alternative words, called synonyms, for a selected word. The Thesaurus is one of a set of research services provided by Word. To look up alternatives for a word, you can right-click the word, and then click Synonyms to display a list from which you can choose the one you want. Alternatively, you can select the word and then click the Thesaurus button in the Proofing group on the Review tab. The Research task pane opens, displaying the selected word in the Search For box and synonyms for that word in the Thesaurus list. Keyboard Shortcuts Press Shift+F7 to open the Research task pane and display Thesaurus entries for the active word, which is also displayed in the Search For box. 56 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text You can click a synonym to display its synonyms and click again to repeat that process until you find exactly the word you want. To replace the selected word with a synonym, point to your chosen synonym, click the arrow that appears, and then click Insert. In addition to the Thesaurus, the Research task pane provides access to a variety of informational resources. You first open the Research task pane by clicking the Research button in the Proofing group and then enter a topic in the Search For box, specifying in the box below which resource Word should use to look for information about that topic. Fine-Tuning Text 57 Keyboard Shortcut Press the Alt key and click anywhere in the document to display the Research task pane. You can choose a specific resource from the list or click All Reference Books or All Research Sites to widen the search. Clicking Research Options at the bottom of the Research task pane displays the Research Options dialog box. In this dialog box, you can specify which of a predefined set of reference materials and other Internet resources will be available from the list. 58 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text You can click Add Services to include your favorite reference resources in the list. Word also comes with three translation tools with which you can quickly translate words and phrases, or even entire documents. ● Mini Translator You turn the Mini Translator on or off by clicking the Translate button in the Language group of the Review tab and then clicking Mini Translator. When the Mini Translator is turned on, you can point to a word or selected phrase to display a translation in the specified language. When the box containing the translation is displayed, you can click the Expand button to display the Research task pane, where you can change the translation language. You can also copy the translated word or phrase, or hear the word or phrase spoken for you. Using the Mini Translator is the quickest way to obtain the translation of a selection. Fine-Tuning Text 59 ● Online bilingual dictionary To obtain the translation of a word that does not appear in the text of a document, you can click Translate Selected Text in the Translate menu to display the Research task pane, type the word in the Search For box, specify the language you want, and then click Start Searching. Word consults the online bilingual dictionary for the language you chose and displays the result. You can then click Insert to enter a translated word in the document at the cursor. You can use the bilingual dictionary to translate a selected word or the word you type in the Search For box. 60 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text ● Online machine translator To translate an entire document, you can click Translate Document on the Translate menu. When Word displays a message that the document will be sent for translation by the Microsoft Translator service (which is free), click Send. The document and its translation then appear side by side in your Web browser. You can set the translation from and translation to languages in the boxes at the top of the Web page and click buttons to change the view. The Microsoft Translator service translates complete documents into the language you select. To change the default language used by the Mini Translator or the machine translator, you click Choose Translation Language on the Translate menu. Then in the Translation Language Options dialog box, you can select different language pairs for each type of translator. You can translate from and to many languages, including Arabic, Chinese, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Swedish. In this exercise, you’ll use the Thesaurus to replace one word with another. Then you’ll experiment with the Mini Translator. Fine-Tuning Text 61 SET UP You need the Brochure_start document located in your Chapter02 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the Brochure_start document, and save it as Brochure. Then follow the steps. 1. Double-click the word acclaimed in the second line of the first paragraph. 2. On the Review tab, in the Proofing group, click the Thesaurus button. The Research task pane opens, listing synonyms for the word acclaimed. 3. In the task pane, under much-admired, click commended. The word commended replaces acclaimed in the Search For box at the top of the task pane. Synonyms for commended are now listed in the task pane. 62 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text 4. Point to the word celebrated, click the arrow that appears to its right, and then click Insert. The word celebrated replaces acclaimed in the document. 5. Close the Research task pane. Tip You can open the Research task pane at any time by clicking the Research button in the Proofing group on the Review tab. 6. In the Language group, click the Translate button, and then click Choose Translation Language. The Translation Language Options dialog box opens. 7. Under Choose Mini Translator language, click the Translate to arrow, click French (France) in the list, and then click OK . 8. In the Language group, click the Translate button, and then click Mini Translator [French (France)]. The Mini Translator is now turned on. 9. In the last paragraph of the document, point to the word wardrobe, and then move the pointer over the shadow box that appears above the word. The Mini Translator appears, showing two French translations for the word wardrobe: armoire and garde-robe. You can click the Play button to hear the translated word. Correcting Spelling and Grammatical Errors 63 10. In the Mini Translator box, click the Expand button. The Research task pane opens, displaying the settings for translating from English into French. 11. Under Bilingual Dictionary in the Research task pane, double-click armoire to select it. 12. Right-click the selection, and click Copy. 13. In the document, double-click the word wardrobe. 14. Right-click the selection, and under Paste Options in the list, point to (don’t click) the Keep Text Only button. Word displays a live preview of what the text will look like if you replace wardrobe with armoire. 15. Press the Esc key to close the shortcut menu and leave the word wardrobe in the text. CLEAN UP Close the Research task pane, and turn off the Mini Translator by clicking the Translate button in the Language group and clicking Mini Translator. Then save and close the Brochure document. Correcting Spelling and Grammatical Errors In the days of handwritten and typewritten documents, people might have tolerated a typographical or grammatical error or two because correcting such errors without creating a mess was difficult. Word-processing programs such as Word have built-in spelling and grammar checkers, so now documents that contain these types of errors are likely to reflect badly on their creators. Tip Although Word can help you eliminate misspellings and grammatical errors, its tools are not infallible. You should always read through your document to catch any problems that the Word tools can’t detect—for example, homonyms such as their, there, and they’re. 64 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text Word provides these three tools to help you with the chore of eliminating spelling and grammar errors: ● AutoCorrect This feature corrects commonly misspelled words, such as adn to and, so that you don’t have to correct them yourself. AutoCorrect comes with a long list of frequently misspelled words and their correct spellings. If you frequently misspell a word that AutoCorrect doesn’t change, you can add it to the list in the AutoCorrect dialog box. If you deliberately mistype a word and don’t want to accept the AutoCorrect change, you can reverse the correction by clicking the Undo button before you type anything else. ● Error indicators Word underlines potential spelling errors with red wavy under- lines and grammatical errors with green wavy underlines. You can right-click an underlined word or phrase to display suggested corrections in a shortcut menu. ● Spelling and Grammar dialog box If you want to check the spelling or grammar of the entire document, you can click the Spelling & Grammar button in the Proofing group on the Review tab. Word then works its way through the document and displays the Spelling And Grammar dialog box if it encounters a potential error. The buttons in the Spelling And Grammar dialog box are dynamic and reflect the type of error found. Keyboard Shortcut Press F7 to start checking the spelling and grammar from your current location in the document. If the error is a misspelling, the Spelling And Grammar dialog box suggests corrections; if the error is a breach of grammar rules, the Spelling And Grammar dialog box tells you which rule you have broken and suggests corrections. You can implement a suggestion by double-clicking it in the Suggestions box. Correcting Spelling and Grammatical Errors 65 In this exercise, you’ll change an AutoCorrect setting and add a word to the AutoCorrect list. You’ll check the spelling in the document and add terms to the custom dictionary, and then you’ll find, review, and correct a grammatical error. SET UP You need the Letter_start document located in your Chapter02 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the Letter_start document, and save it as Letter. Then follow the steps. 1. Click immediately to the left of negative in the last line of the first paragraph, and then type coresponding, followed by a space. As soon as you press the Spacebar, AutoCorrect changes coresponding to corresponding. 2. Click the File tab to display the Backstage view, and then click Options. 3. In the left pane of the Word Options dialog box, click Proofing, and then on the Proofing page, click AutoCorrect Options. The AutoCorrect dialog box opens, displaying the AutoCorrect page. A selected check box indicates an error that AutoCorrect will automatically correct. 66 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text Tip You can clear the check box of any item you don’t want corrected. For example, if you don’t want AutoCorrect to capitalize the first letter that follows a period, clear the Capitalize First Letter Of Sentences check box. 4. In the Replace box, type avalable. Word scrolls the list below to show the entry that is closest to what you typed. 5. 6. 7. 8. Press the Tab key to move the cursor to the With box, and then type available. Click Add to add the entry to the correction list, and then click OK . Click OK to close the Word Options dialog box. Position the cursor at the end of the second paragraph, press the Spacebar, and then type Sidney will not be avalable May 10-14 followed by a period. The word avalable changes to available. 9. In the first paragraph, right-click sorces, the first word with a red wavy underline. Word lists possible correct spellings for this word. The shortcut menu also lists actions you might want to carry out, such as adding the word to the AutoCorrect list. 10. In the list, click sources. Word removes the red wavy underline and inserts the correction. Correcting Spelling and Grammatical Errors 67 Tip Word’s grammar checker helps identify phrases and clauses that don’t follow traditional grammatical rules, but it’s not always accurate. It’s easy to get in the habit of ignoring green wavy underlines. However, it’s wise to scrutinize them all to be sure that your documents don’t contain any embarrassing mistakes. 11. Press Ctrl+Home to move to the beginning of the document, and then on the Review tab, in the Proofing group, click the Spelling & Grammar button. The Spelling And Grammar dialog box opens, with the duplicate word to in red in the Repeated Word box. Behind the dialog box, Word has highlighted the duplicate to in the document. Troubleshooting If the errors we mention don’t appear to be in the practice file, click Options at the bottom of the Spelling And Grammar dialog box. Then in the Word Options dialog box, under When Correcting Spelling And Grammar In Word, click Recheck Document. Click Yes to reset the spelling and grammar checkers, and then click OK. 12. Click Delete. Word deletes the second to and then displays the first word it does not recognize, commited, in red in the Not In Dictionary box. 13. With committed selected in the Suggestions box, click AutoCorrect. Word adds the misspelling and the selected correction to the AutoCorrect list, so that the next time you type commited by mistake, the spelling will be corrected for you as you type. The program then identifies a possible grammatical error. 68 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text This grammatical error is identified as an incorrect use of a comma. You need to read the sentence and then decide whether and how to correct the error. In this case, the error is not related to the comma after venture but to the fact that there is no verb in the first half of the sentence. 14. In the Comma Use box, double-click the word An at the beginning of the sentence with the error, and type The import business is an. Then click Change. Word flags Contoso as a word it doesn’t recognize. Troubleshooting If Word does not proceed to the next potential error after you click Change, click Resume to tell Word to continue with the spelling and grammar check. Contoso is a proper noun and is spelled correctly. You could click Ignore All to cause Word to skip over any other instances of this word in this document. However, if this name appears frequently in your documents, you can prevent Word from continuing to flag it by adding the word to the custom dictionary. 15. Click Add to Dictionary. Word displays a message indicating that it has finished checking the spelling and grammar of the document. 16. Click OK to close the message box. Tip The grammar checker doesn’t always catch awkward phrasing. For example, note the error in the second sentence of the first paragraph of the Letter document. It’s a good example of why you should always proofread your documents, to catch the things that Word doesn’t. CLEAN UP Save the Letter document, and then close it. Inserting Saved Text 69 Viewing Document Statistics As you type, Word keeps track of the number of pages and words in your document and displays this information at the left end of the status bar. To see the number of words in only part of the document, such as a few paragraphs, simply select that part. The status bar then displays the number of words in the selection, expressed as a fraction of the total, such as 250/800. You can see more statistics in the Word Count dialog box, which you open by clicking the Word Count button in the Proofing group on the Review tab. In addition to counting pages and words, Word counts characters, paragraphs, and lines. Word also gives you the option of including or excluding words in text boxes, footnotes, and endnotes. Inserting Saved Text Another way to ensure consistency in your documents while also saving time is to use building blocks. These are saved items that are available for use in any document. Word 2010 comes with many built-in building blocks for formatted items such as cover pages, headers and footers, tables, and text boxes. You can also save your own building blocks by using the Quick Parts feature. See Also For information about the building blocks that come with Word, see “Inserting Building Blocks” in Chapter 5, “Add Simple Graphic Elements.” A custom building block can be a simple phrase or sentence that you type often, or it can include multiple paragraphs, formatting, graphics, and so on. The trick is to first ensure that the text is exactly the way you want it. Then you can save the building block and use it confidently wherever you need it. 70 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text To create a building block, you select the item you want to save, click Quick Parts in the Text group on the Insert tab, and save the selection in the Quick Parts gallery with an assigned name. You can then insert the building block at the cursor by clicking Quick Parts to display the gallery and clicking the thumbnail of the building block you want. Or you can insert it elsewhere by right-clicking the thumbnail in the gallery and then clicking one of the specified locations. You can insert a custom building block by selecting a location from a list. Tip In a document, you can type the name of any building block and then press the F3 key to insert it at the cursor. When you create a custom building block, Word saves it in a special file called the Building Blocks template. When you exit Word, you’ll be asked whether you want to save this template. If you want to discard the building blocks you have created in this Word session, click Don’t Save. If you want them to be available for future documents, click Save. In this exercise, you’ll save a company contact-information block and the Latin name of a plant as building blocks so that you can insert them elsewhere in a document. SET UP You need the Bamboo_start document located in your Chapter02 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the Bamboo_start document, and save it as Bamboo. Then follow the steps. 1. At the top of the document, select the first four lines by using any of the selection techniques described earlier in this chapter. 2. On the Insert tab, in the Text group, click the Quick Parts button, and then click Save Selection to Quick Part Gallery. The Create New Building Block dialog box opens. Inserting Saved Text Word suggests the first few words of the selection as the name of the building block. 3. In the Name box, type Contact Block, and then click OK. Word saves the selection in the Quick Parts gallery. 4. In the third paragraph of the document, select obatea acuminata aztectorum (don’t select the period). Then in the Text group, click the Quick Parts button. Notice that the company contact information now appears as a building block in the Quick Parts gallery. The Quick Parts gallery displays only the building blocks you create. The built-in building blocks are available from other galleries, such as the Cover Page gallery. 5. Click Save Selection to Quick Part Gallery, type oaa in the Name box, and then click OK . 6. Press Ctrl+End to move the cursor to the end of the document, and then press the Spacebar. 71 72 Chapter 2 Edit and Proofread Text 7. Type In particular, we recommend oaa (don’t type a period). 8. Press F3, and then type a period. Word replaces oaa with its building block, obatea acuminata aztectorum. Troubleshooting Pressing F3 substitutes the corresponding building block only if there is a space to the left of the building block name and the cursor is immediately to its right. If you want to enter a building block in existing text (rather than at the end of it), you need to ensure that there is a space after the cursor. Type two spaces, position the cursor between them, type the building block name, and then press F3. 9. Press Enter. Then in the Text group, click the Quick Parts button, and in the gallery, click the Contact Block entry. The company contact information appears at the cursor. The two custom building blocks are inserted with just a few clicks. CLEAN UP Save the Bamboo document, and then close it. When you exit Word, remember to click Don’t Save when you are asked whether you want to save changes to the Building Blocks template. Key Points 73 Inserting One Document into Another Sometimes you’ll want to insert one saved document into another document. For example, you might want to compile four quarterly reports so that you can edit them to create an annual report. In this situation, it would be tedious to have to select and copy the text of each report and then paste it into the annual document. Instead, you can have Word insert the existing documents for you. Here’s how: 1. Position the cursor where you want to insert the existing document, and then on the Insert tab, in the Text group, click the Object arrow. 2. In the list, click Text From File. The Insert File dialog box opens. 3. Locate the file you want, and double-click it to insert it at the cursor. Key Points ● You can cut or copy text and paste it elsewhere in the same document or in a different document. Cut and copied text is stored on the Clipboard. ● Undo one action or the last several actions you performed by clicking the Undo button (or its arrow) on the Quick Access Toolbar. Click the Redo button if you change your mind again. ● You can find each occurrence of a word or phrase and replace it with another. ● Rely on AutoCorrect to correct common misspellings. Correct other spelling and grammatical errors individually as you type or by checking the entire document in one pass. ● You don’t have to type and proof the same text over and over again. Instead, save the text as a building block and insert it with a few mouse clicks. Chapter at a Glance Quickly format text, page 76 Change a document’s theme, page 82 Manually change the look of characters, page 87 Create and modify lists, page 106 Manually change the look of paragraphs, page 95 3 Change the Look of Text In this chapter, you will learn how to ✔ Quickly format text. ✔ Change a document’s theme. ✔ Manually change the look of characters. ✔ Manually change the look of paragraphs. ✔ Create and modify lists. The appearance of your documents helps to convey their message. Microsoft Word 2010 can help you develop professional-looking documents whose appearance is appropriate to their contents. You can easily format the characters and paragraphs so that key points stand out and your arguments are easy to grasp. You can also change the look of major elements within a document by applying predefined sets of formatting called Quick Styles, and you can change the look of selected text by applying predefined combinations called text effects. In addition, you can change the fonts, colors, and effects throughout a document with one click by applying one of the built-in themes. Tip A font consists of alphabetic characters, numbers, and symbols that share a common design. In this chapter, you’ll first experiment with built-in Quick Styles and text effects, and then you’ll change the theme applied to a document. You’ll change the look of individual words, and then you’ll change the indentation, alignment, and spacing of individual paragraphs. You’ll also add borders and shading to make paragraphs stand out. Finally, you’ll create and format both bulleted and numbered lists. Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this chapter, you need to copy the book’s practice files to your computer. The practice files you’ll use to complete the exercises in this chapter are in the Chapter03 practice file folder. A complete list of practice files is provided in “Using the Practice Files” at the beginning of this book. 75 76 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text Quickly Formatting Text You don’t have to know much about character and paragraph formatting to be able to format your documents in ways that will make them easier to read and more professional looking. With a couple of mouse clicks, you can easily change the look of words, phrases, and paragraphs by using Quick Styles. Word has several types of predefined Quick Styles, but the simplest are those you can apply to text. ● Paragraph styles You apply these to entire paragraphs, such as headings. ● Character styles You apply these to words. ● Linked styles You apply these to either paragraphs or words. By default, Word makes just a few of the predefined Quick Styles available in the Quick Styles gallery in the Styles group on the Home tab. Quick Styles apply a combination of character formatting (such as font, size, and color) and paragraph formatting (such as line spacing). The Quick Styles gallery. The styles displayed as thumbnails in the Quick Styles gallery have been designed to go well together, so applying styles from the gallery produces a harmonious effect. After you apply styles from the current set of styles, you can easily change the look of the Quickly Formatting Text 77 entire document by switching to a different style set. The Quick Style names are the same; only their defined formatting changes. So if you have applied the Heading 1 style to a paragraph, you can change its formatting simply by changing the style set. You display the list of available style sets by clicking the Change Styles button and then clicking Style Set. Clicking one of these style sets displays thumbnails of its styles in the Quick Styles gallery. You can point to any style set in the list to see a live preview of how the applied styles in a set will look, and you can click a style set to apply its definitions to the document. See Also For information about creating custom styles, see “Working with Styles and Templates” in Chapter 16, “Work in Word More Efficiently.” In addition to applying Quick Styles to quickly change the look of paragraphs and characters, you can apply predefined text effects to a selection to add more zing. Clicking the Text Effects button in the Font group on the Home tab displays a gallery of effects to choose from. 78 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text You can apply any predefined effect in the gallery to selected text, or you can click options at the bottom of the gallery and define a custom effect. These effects are dramatic, so you’ll probably want to restrict their use to document titles and similar elements to which you want to draw particular attention. In this exercise, you’ll experiment with Quick Styles and text effects. SET UP You need the AgendaA_start document located in your Chapter03 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the AgendaA_start document, and save it as AgendaA. Then follow the steps. 1. In the lower-right corner of the program window, at the left end of the Zoom Slider, click the Zoom Out button until you can see all of the text. For example, if your current view is 100% and your resolution is 1024x768, you can click the Zoom Out button three times to set the zoom percentage to 70%. 2. Ensure that the cursor is located at the top of the document, at the beginning of the Building Association paragraph. Then on the Home tab, in the Styles group, point to each thumbnail in the displayed row of the Quick Styles gallery. The formatting of the first line changes to show you a live preview of how its text will look if you click the style you are pointing to. You don’t have to actually apply the formatting to see its effect. 3. Without making a selection, click the Down arrow to the right of the gallery. The next row of the Quick Styles gallery appears. Quickly Formatting Text 79 4. Point to each thumbnail in this row of the Quick Styles gallery. Only the styles that are paragraph or linked styles affect the text. You cannot see a live preview of character styles unless the cursor is within a word or multiple words are selected. 5. To the right of the Quick Styles gallery, click the More button. Word displays the entire Quick Styles gallery. The style applied to the paragraph containing the cursor is surrounded by a border. 6. In the gallery, click the Title thumbnail. Word applies that style to the paragraph containing the cursor. 7. Click anywhere in the ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING line, and then in the gallery, click the Heading 1 thumbnail. 8. Click anywhere in the Agenda line, and then in the gallery, click the Heading 1 thumbnail. Notice that although you applied the same Heading 1 style to ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING and Agenda, the first heading looks bigger because of the use of all capital letters. The styles make it easy to distinguish information. Tip We have hidden formatting marks for this exercise. 9. Point in the selection area to the left of the Preliminaries line, and click to select the line. Then hold down the Ctrl key while clicking adjacent to the following lines: Approval of Minutes Board Reports Election of Board Members New Business Adjournment 80 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text 10. Apply the Heading 1 style to the selected lines. Then without moving the selection, click the More button and, in the gallery, click Emphasis. Applying the Emphasis character style on top of the Heading 1 paragraph style makes these headings italic, which looks lighter. 11. Select the Date and Time lines, and then in the Quick Styles gallery, click the No Spacing thumbnail. 12. Apply the No Spacing style to the three lines under Preliminaries, the two lines under Board Reports, and the two lines under Election of Board Members. 13. Press Ctrl+Home to release the selection and move the cursor to the top of the document. As you can see, the results look very professional. You have clearly defined the hierarchy of the agenda with just a few clicks. 14. In the Styles group, click the Change Styles button, point to Style Set, and then point to each style set in turn, watching the effect on the document. 15. When you finish exploring, click Formal. The formatting of the document changes and the headings and text take on the look assigned to this style set. Quickly Formatting Text 81 The Title, Heading 1, and Emphasis style definitions in the Formal style set produce a different look from those in the default set. 16. Select the document title. Then in the Font group, click the Text Effects button. Word displays the Text Effects gallery. 17. Point to each thumbnail in the gallery, observing the effect on the title behind the gallery. 18. Click the right-most thumbnail in the third row (Fill - Red, Accent 2, Double Outline - Accent 2). Then click away from the title to release the selection. The effect applied to the title makes it really stand out. By using text effects, you can apply complex sets of formatting with a few clicks. CLEAN UP Save the AgendaA document, and then close it. 82 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text Changing a Document’s Theme To enhance the look of a Word document whose components have been styled, you can apply a predefined theme. A theme is a combination of colors, fonts, and effects that project a certain feeling or tone. For example, the Flow theme uses a palette of blues and greens, the Calibri and Constantia fonts, and understated effects. You apply a theme to the entire document by clicking the Themes button in the Themes group on the Page Layout tab, and then making a selection from the Themes gallery. The Themes gallery. Changing a Document’s Theme 83 If you like the colors of one theme and the fonts of another, you can mix and match theme elements. First apply the theme that most closely resembles the look you want, and then in the Themes group, change the colors by clicking the Theme Colors button or the fonts by clicking the Theme Fonts button. If you create a combination of colors and fonts that you would like to be able to use with other documents, you can save the combination as a new theme. By saving the theme in the default Document Themes folder, you make the theme available in the Themes gallery. However, you don’t have to store custom themes in the Document Themes folder; you can store them anywhere on your hard disk, on removable media, or in a network location. To use a theme that is stored in a different location, you click the Themes button, and then click Browse For Themes at the bottom of the gallery. Locate the theme you want in the Choose Theme Or Themed Document dialog box, and then click Open to apply that theme to the current document. Tip The bottom section of the Themes gallery displays themes downloaded from the Microsoft Office Online Web site. You can visit this Web site at office.microsoft.com to find additional themes and templates created by Microsoft and by other people. In this exercise, you’ll apply a theme to an existing document and change the colors and fonts. Then you’ll save the new combination as a custom theme. SET UP You need the AgendaB_start document located in your Chapter03 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the AgendaB_start document, and save it as AgendaB. Then follow the steps. 1. On the Page Layout tab, in the Themes group, click the Themes button. The Themes gallery appears. 2. Point to each thumbnail in turn to display a live preview of the theme. (Scroll through the gallery so that you can explore all the themes.) 3. In the Themes gallery, click Trek. The colors and fonts change to those defined for the selected theme. 4. In the Themes group, click the Theme Colors button. The Theme Colors gallery appears. (The currently selected color set, which is not shown in the graphic on the next page, is indicated by a border.) 84 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text The Theme Colors gallery. 5. Preview any color set that interests you, and then in the gallery, click Newsprint. The Newsprint colors replace the Trek colors, but nothing else in the document changes. 6. In the Themes group, click the Theme Fonts button. The Theme Fonts gallery appears. The currently selected font set is highlighted. Each built-in option includes a set of two fonts—the first is used for headings and the second for body text. Changing a Document’s Theme 85 The Theme Fonts gallery. 7. Preview any set of fonts that interests you, and then in the gallery, click Apex. The Apex fonts replace the Trek fonts, but the colors remain the same. 8. In the Themes group, click the Themes button, and then below the gallery, click Save Current Theme. The Save Current Theme dialog box opens and displays the contents of the Document Themes folder. (This dialog box resembles the Save As dialog box.) The Document Themes folder is the default location for saving any new themes you create. 9. In the File name box, replace the suggested name with My Theme, and then click Save. 10. In the Themes group, click the Themes button to display the gallery. Your new theme appears in the Custom section at the top of the gallery. 86 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text You can apply the custom theme to any document. 11. Click away from the gallery to close it without making a selection. CLEAN UP Save the AgendaB document, and then close it. Tip If you want to delete the theme you created in this topic, open Windows Explorer and navigate to the C:\Users\<user name>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Templates\Document Themes folder. (In Windows 7, you can click the Start button, type Document Themes in the Search box at the bottom of the Start menu, and then click the folder in the search results.) Then select My Theme, and press Delete. Manually Changing the Look of Characters 87 Manually Changing the Look of Characters As you have seen, Word 2010 makes changing the look of content in a styled document almost effortless. But styles can’t do everything. To be able to precisely control the look of your text, you need to know how to manually change individual elements. When you type text in a document, it is displayed in a particular font. By default the font used for text in a new Word document is Calibri, but you can change the font of any element at any time. The available fonts vary from one computer to another, depending on the programs installed. Common fonts include Arial, Verdana, and Times New Roman. You can vary the look of a font by changing the following attributes: ● Size Almost every font comes in a range of sizes, which are measured in points from the top of letters that have parts that stick up (ascenders), such as h, to the bottom of letters that have parts that drop down (descenders), such as p. A point is approximately 1/72 of an inch (about 0.04 centimeters). ● Style Almost every font comes in a range of styles. The most common are regular (or plain), italic, bold, and bold italic. ● Effect Fonts can be enhanced by applying effects, such as underlining, small capital letters (small caps), or shadows. ● Color A palette of coordinated colors is available, and you can also specify custom colors. ● Character spacing You can alter the spacing between characters by pushing them apart or squeezing them together. Although some attributes might cancel each other out, they are usually cumulative. For example, you might use a bold font in various sizes and various shades of green to make words stand out in a newsletter. Collectively, the font and its attributes are called character formatting. You apply character formatting from one of three locations: ● Mini Toolbar Several common formatting buttons are available on the Mini Toolbar that appears when you point to selected text. The Mini Toolbar is transparent until you point to it. 88 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text ● Font group on the Home tab This group includes buttons for changing the font and most of the font attributes you are likely to use. The Font group. ● Font dialog box If you are looking for an attribute, such as small caps, and don’t see it in the Font group, click the Font dialog box launcher. All the attributes are gathered together on the Font page of the dialog box, except character spacing, which is on the Advanced page. The Font page of the Font dialog box. Manually Changing the Look of Characters 89 In this exercise, you’ll format the text in a document by changing its font, style, size, color, and character spacing. You’ll also highlight a few words. Then you’ll return selected text to its original condition by clearing some formatting you no longer want. SET UP You need the OrientationDraft_start document located in your Chapter03 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the OrientationDraft_start document, and save it as OrientationDraft. Then follow the steps. 1. In the Employee Orientation heading, click anywhere in the word Orientation. 2. On the Home tab, in the Font group, click the Underline button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+U to underline the active word or selection. See Also To see a complete list of keyboard shortcuts, see “Keyboard Shortcuts” at the end of this book. The word containing the cursor is now underlined. Notice that you did not have to select the entire word. Tip If you click the Underline arrow, you can choose an underline style and color from the Underline gallery. 3. In the same heading, click anywhere in the word Employee, and then on the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Repeat button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+Y to repeat an action. Word repeats the previous formatting command. Again, although you did not select the entire word, it is now underlined. 4. In the selection area, click adjacent to Employee Orientation to select the entire heading. Word displays a transparent version of the Mini Toolbar. You can use the common commands on the Mini Toolbar to quickly change the look of the selection. 5. Point to the Mini Toolbar to make it fully visible. Then on the Mini Toolbar, click the Bold button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+B to make the active word or selection bold. 90 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text The heading is now bold. The active buttons on the Mini Toolbar and in the Font group on the Home tab indicate the attributes you applied to the selection. The ribbon reflects the settings in the Mini Toolbar. Troubleshooting The appearance of buttons and groups on the ribbon changes depending on the width of the program window. For information about changing the appearance of the ribbon to match our screen images, see “Modifying the Display of the Ribbon” at the beginning of this book. 6. On the Mini Toolbar, click the Format Painter button. Then move the pointer into the selection area to the left of the Proposal heading, and click the mouse button. Tip The Format Painter button is also available in the Clipboard group on the Home tab. Word applies the formatting of Employee Orientation to Proposal. 7. Select Employee Orientation, and then on the Home tab, in the Font group, click the Font arrow. The Font gallery appears. Manually Changing the Look of Characters Word comes with many fonts. 8. Scroll through the gallery of available fonts, and then click Impact. Troubleshooting If Impact is not available, select any heavy font that catches your attention. The Employee Orientation heading now appears in the new font. 91 92 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text 9. In the Font group, click the Font Size arrow, and then in the list, click 20. The size of the heading text decreases to 20 points. Tip You can increase or decrease the font size in set increments by clicking the Grow Font and Shrink Font buttons in the Font group, or by clicking the same buttons on the Mini Toolbar that appears when you select text. You can also press Ctrl+> or Ctrl+<. 10. Click the Font dialog box launcher. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+Shift+F to display the Font dialog box. The Font dialog box opens. 11. Click the Underline style arrow, and then in the list, click (none). 12. In the Effects area, select the Small caps check box. 13. Click the Advanced tab. Notice that the Spacing option is currently set to Expanded. The Advanced page of the Font dialog box. Manually Changing the Look of Characters 93 14. To the right of the Spacing option, in the By box, select 0.25 pt, type 10 pt (the pt stands for points), and click OK . Then press Home to release the selection. The manually formatted text appears in small capital letters with the spacing between the characters expanded by 10 points. You can expand and contract the spacing between letters to create different effects. 15. Select Employee Orientation again. In the Font group, click the Font Color arrow, and then under Theme Colors in the palette, click the box at the right end of the top row (Lime, Accent 6). The selected words are now lime green. Tip To apply the Font Color button’s current color, you can simply click the button (not its arrow). If you want to apply a color that is not shown under Theme Colors or Standard Colors, click More Colors at the bottom of the palette, and in the Colors dialog box, click the color you want in the color wheel. 16. In the first bullet point, select the phrase concept of service. Then in the Font group, click the Text Highlight Color arrow, and click the Turquoise box in the top row. The selected phrase is now highlighted in turquoise, and the Text Highlight Color button shows turquoise as its active color. Tip If you click the Text Color Highlight button without first making a selection, the shape of the mouse pointer changes to a highlighter that you can drag across text. Click the button again, or press Esc, to turn off the highlighter. 17. In the fifth bullet point, double-click the word brainstorming. Then hold down the Ctrl key while double-clicking planning and leadership. 94 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text 18. In the Font group, click the Change Case button, and click UPPERCASE. Then click away from the bullet point to release the selection. The selected words now appear in all capital letters. Instead of retyping, you can have Word change the case of words. 19. Select the Proposal line. Then on the Home tab, in the Font group, click the Clear Formatting button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+Spacebar to clear manually applied formatting. The formatting of the selected text is removed. Tip You cannot click the Clear Formatting button to remove highlighting. If the highlight is the same color as that shown on the Text Highlight Color button, you can select the text and click the button to remove the highlighting. If the button shows a different color, select the text, click the Text Highlight Color arrow, and then click No Color. CLEAN UP Save the OrientationDraft document, and then close it. Manually Changing the Look of Paragraphs 95 Character Formatting and Case Considerations The way you use case and character formatting in a document can influence its visual impact on your readers. Used judiciously, case and character formatting can make a plain document look attractive and professional, but excessive use can make it look amateurish and detract from the message. For example, using too many fonts in the same document is the mark of inexperience, so don’t use more than two or three. Bear in mind that lowercase letters tend to recede, so using all uppercase (capital) letters can be useful for titles and headings or for certain kinds of emphasis. However, large blocks of uppercase letters are tiring to the eye. Tip Where do the terms uppercase and lowercase come from? Until the advent of computers, individual characters made of lead were assembled to form the words that would appear on a printed page. The characters were stored alphabetically in cases, with the capital letters in the upper case and the small letters in the lower case. Manually Changing the Look of Paragraphs As you know, you create a paragraph by typing text and then pressing the Enter key. The paragraph can consist of one word, one sentence, or multiple sentences. You can change the look of a paragraph by changing its indentation, alignment, and line spacing, as well as the space before and after it. You can also put borders around it and shade its background. Collectively, the settings you use to vary the look of a paragraph are called paragraph formatting. In Word, you don’t define the width of paragraphs and the length of pages by defining the area occupied by the text; instead you define the size of the white space—the left, right, top, and bottom margins—around the text. You click the Margins button in the Page Setup group on the Page Layout tab to define these margins, either for the whole document or for sections of the document. See Also For information about setting margins, see “Previewing and Adjusting Page Layout” in Chapter 6, “Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents.” For information about sections, see “Controlling What Appears on Each Page” in the same chapter. 96 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text Although the left and right margins are set for a whole document or section, you can vary the position of the paragraphs between the margins. The quickest way to indent a paragraph from the left is to click the Increase Indent button; clicking the Decrease Indent button has the opposite effect. You cannot increase or decrease the indent beyond the margins. Another way to control the indentation of lines is by dragging markers on the horizontal ruler to indicate where each line of text starts and ends. ● First Line Indent Begins a paragraph’s first line of text at this marker ● Hanging Indent Begins a paragraph’s second and subsequent lines of text at this marker at the left end of the ruler ● Left Indent Indents the text to this marker ● Right Indent Wraps the text when it reaches this marker at the right end of the ruler You display the ruler by clicking the Ruler check box in the Show group on the View tab, or by clicking the View Ruler button located at the top of the vertical scroll bar. You can manually change a paragraph’s indentation by moving markers on the horizontal ruler. Setting a right indent indicates where the lines in a paragraph should end, but sometimes you might want to specify where only one line should end. For example, you might want to break a title after a particular word to make it look balanced on the page. You can end an individual line by inserting a text wrapping break (more commonly known as a line break). After positioning the cursor where you want the break to occur, you click the Breaks button in the Page Setup group on the Page Layout tab, and then click Text Wrapping. Word indicates the line break with a bent arrow. Inserting a line break does not start a new paragraph, so when you apply paragraph formatting to a line of text that ends with a line break, the formatting is applied to the entire paragraph, not just that line. Manually Changing the Look of Paragraphs 97 Keyboard Shortcut Press Shift+Enter to insert a line break. You can also determine the positioning of a paragraph between the left and right margins by changing its alignment. You can click buttons in the Paragraph group on the Home tab to align paragraphs. ● Align Left Aligns each line of the paragraph at the left margin, with a ragged right edge Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+L to left-align a paragraph. ● Center Aligns the center of each line in the paragraph between the left and right margins, with ragged left and right edges Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+E to center-align a paragraph. ● Align Right Aligns each line of the paragraph at the right margin, with a ragged left edge Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+R to right-align a paragraph. ● Justify Aligns each line between the margins, creating even left and right edges Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+J to justify a paragraph. Tip If you know that you want to create a centered paragraph, you don’t have to type the text and then align the paragraph. You can use the Click And Type feature to create appropriately aligned text. Move the pointer to the center of a blank area of the page, and when the pointer’s shape changes to an I-beam with centered text attached, double-click to insert the cursor in a centered paragraph. Similarly, you can double-click at the left edge of the page to enter left-aligned text and at the right edge to enter right-aligned text. You can align lines of text in different locations across the page by using tab stops. The easiest way to set tab stops is to use the horizontal ruler. By default, Word sets left-aligned tab stops every half inch (1.27 centimeters), as indicated by gray marks below the ruler. To set a custom tab stop, you start by clicking the Tab button located at the left end of the ruler until the type of tab stop you want appears. You have the following options: ● Left Tab Aligns the left end of the text with the tab stop ● Center Tab Aligns the center of the text with the tab stop ● Right Tab Aligns the right end of the text with the tab stop ● Decimal Tab Aligns the decimal point in the text (usually a numeric value) with the tab stop ● Bar Tab Draws a vertical line at the position of the tab stop 98 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text After selecting the type of tab stop you want to set, you simply click the ruler where you want the tab stop to be. Word then removes any default tab stops to the left of the one you set. This ruler has a custom left-aligned tab stop at the 1.5 inch mark and default tab stops every half inch to the right of the custom tab stop. To change the position of an existing custom tab stop, you drag it to the left or right on the ruler. To delete a custom tab stop, you drag it away from the ruler. To align the text to the right of the cursor with the next tab stop, you press the Tab key. The text is then aligned on the tab stop according to its type. For example, if you set a center tab stop, pressing Tab moves the text so that its center is aligned with the tab stop. Tip To fine-tune the position of tab stops, click the Paragraph dialog box launcher on either the Home or Page Layout tab. In the Paragraph dialog box, click Tabs to display the Tabs dialog box. You might also open this dialog box if you want to use tab leaders—visible marks such as dots or dashes connecting the text before the tab with the text after it. For example, tab leaders are useful in a table of contents to carry the eye from the text to the page number. To make it obvious where one paragraph ends and another begins, you can add space between them by adjusting the Spacing After and Spacing Before settings in the Paragraph group on the Page Layout tab. You can adjust the spacing between the lines in a paragraph by clicking the Line And Paragraph Spacing button in the Paragraph group on the Home tab. The Line Spacing options. Manually Changing the Look of Paragraphs 99 When you want to make several adjustments to the alignment, indentation, and spacing of selected paragraphs, it is sometimes quicker to use the Paragraph dialog box than to click buttons and drag markers. Clicking the Paragraph dialog box launcher on either the Home tab or the Page Layout tab opens the Paragraph dialog box. The Indents And Spacing page of the Paragraph dialog box. You can do a lot with the options in the Paragraph dialog box, but to make a paragraph really stand out, you might want to put a border around it or shade its background. (For real drama, you can do both.) Clicking the Border arrow in the Paragraph group on the Home tab displays a gallery of border options. 100 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text The Borders gallery. Clicking Borders And Shading at the bottom of the list displays the Borders And Shading dialog box, where you can select the style, color, width, and location of the border. The Border page of the Borders And Shading dialog box. Manually Changing the Look of Paragraphs 101 In this exercise, you’ll change text alignment and indentation, insert and modify tab stops, modify paragraph and line spacing, and add borders and shading to paragraphs. SET UP You need the Information_start document located in your Chapter03 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the Information_start document, and save it as Information. Then click the Show/Hide ¶ button to turn on the display of formatting marks, and follow the steps. 1. Set the zoom percentage so that you can see almost all of the paragraphs in the document. Then on the View tab, in the Show group, select the Ruler check box. Tip In the following steps, we give measurements in inches. You can substitute approximate measurements in your own measuring system. If you want to change the measuring system Word uses, display the Backstage view, click Options, and in the Word Options dialog box, display the Advanced page. Then under Display, click the system you want in the Show Measurements In Units Of list, and click OK. 2. Select the first two paragraphs ( Welcome! and the next paragraph). Then on the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Center button. The lines are now centered between the margins. Tip When applying paragraph formatting, you don’t have to select the entire paragraph. 3. After the comma in the second paragraph, click to the left of your. Then on the Page Layout tab, in the Page Setup group, click the Breaks button, and click Text Wrapping. Word inserts a line break character and moves the part of the paragraph that follows that character to the next line. The bent arrow after cottage indicates that you have inserted a line break. See Also For information about page and section breaks, see “Controlling What Appears on Each Page” in Chapter 6, “Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents.” 4. Click anywhere in the next paragraph, and then on the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Justify button. Word inserts space between the words in the lines of the paragraph so that the edges of the paragraph are flush against both the left and right margins. 102 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text 5. Without moving the cursor, on the horizontal ruler, drag the Left Indent marker to the 0.5 inch mark. The First Line Indent and Hanging Indent markers move with the Left Indent marker. 6. At the right end of the ruler, drag the Right Indent marker to the 6 inch mark. The paragraph is now indented a half inch in from each of the side margins. Left and right indents are often used to make paragraphs such as quotations stand out. 7. Click in the Be careful paragraph, and then in the Paragraph group, click the Increase Indent button. 8. Select the Pillows, Blankets, Towels, and Dish towels paragraphs, and with the Left Tab stop active at the left end of the ruler, click the ruler at the 2 mark. Word removes the default tab stops (indicated by gray lines below the ruler) up to the 2-inch mark and inserts a custom left-aligned tab at that location on the ruler. 9. Click to the left of There in the Pillows paragraph, and press the Tab key. Then insert tabs to the left of You, These, and There in the next three paragraphs. The part of each paragraph that follows the colon is now aligned at the 2-inch mark, producing more space than you need. 10. Select the four paragraphs containing tabs, and on the ruler, drag the Left Tab stop to the 1.25 mark. 11. Without changing the selection, on the ruler, drag the Hanging Indent marker to the 1.25 mark. Then press Home to release the selection. The Left Indent marker has moved as well, causing the second line of the second selected paragraph to start in the same location as the tab stop. Manually Changing the Look of Paragraphs 103 Hanging indents are often used to create table-like effects. 12. At the bottom of the document, select the three paragraphs containing dollar amounts. Where the horizontal and vertical rulers meet, click the Tab button until the Decimal Tab button is displayed and then click the ruler at the 3 mark. 13. Insert a tab to the left of each dollar amount. Word aligns the three paragraphs on the decimals. 14. Select the first paragraph containing tabs (Pillows), hold down the Ctrl key, and then select the paragraphs that begin with the following: Blankets Towels Limousine winery tour In-home massage 15. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Line Spacing button, and click Remove Space After Paragraph. Then press the Home key. Now only the last paragraphs of the two lists have extra space after them. Removing internal space from lists makes them easier to read. 104 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text 16. Scroll up until the top of the document is in view, and click anywhere in the Please take a few minutes paragraph. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Border arrow, and then click Outside Borders. 17. Click anywhere in the Be careful paragraph, click the Border arrow, and then at the bottom of the list, click Borders and Shading. The Borders And Shading dialog box opens, with the Borders page displayed. 18. Under Setting, click the 3-D icon to select that border style. Scroll through the Style list and click the fourth style from the bottom. Then click the Color arrow, and under Theme Colors in the palette, click the Red, Accent 2 box. Tip If you want only one, two, or three sides of the selected paragraphs to have a border, click the buttons surrounding the image in the Preview area. 19. Click the Shading tab. You can use the options on this page to format the background of the selected paragraph. The Shading page of the Borders And Shading dialog box. Manually Changing the Look of Paragraphs 105 20. Click the Fill arrow, and under Theme Colors, click the lightest color in the red column (Red, Accent 2, Lighter 80%). Then click OK to close the Borders and Shading dialog box. A border surrounds the paragraph, and a light red color fills its background. The border stretches all the way to the right margin. 21. To achieve a more balanced look, in the Paragraph group, click the Decrease Indent button. Then click the Center button. The paragraph is now centered between the page margins and within its surrounding box. A combination of a border and shading really makes text stand out. Don’t overdo it! CLEAN UP Leave the rulers and formatting marks displayed for the next exercise, but change the zoom percentage back to 100%. Save the Information document, and then close it. 106 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text Finding and Replacing Formatting In addition to searching for words and phrases in the Find And Replace dialog box, you can use the dialog box to search for a specific format and replace it with a different one. See Also For information about finding and replacing text, see “Finding and Replacing Text” in Chapter 2, “Edit and Proofread Text.” To search for a specific format and replace it with a different format: 1. On the Home tab, in the Editing group, click the Replace button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+H to display the Replace tab of the Find And Replace dialog box. The Find And Replace dialog box opens, displaying the Replace tab. 2. Click More to expand the dialog box. Then click Format, and on the Format menu, click either Font or Paragraph. Tip You can click Style to search for paragraph styles or character styles. The Find Font or Find Paragraph dialog box opens. 3. In the dialog box, click the format you want to find, and then click OK. 4. Click the Replace With text box, click Format, click Font or Paragraph, click the format you want to substitute for the Find What format, and then click OK. 5. Click Find Next to search for the first occurrence of the format, and then click Replace to replace that one occurrence or Replace All to replace every occurrence. Creating and Modifying Lists Lists are paragraphs that are usually formatted with a hanging indent so that the first line of each paragraph is longer than subsequent lines. Fortunately, Word takes care of the formatting of lists for you. You simply indicate the type of list you want to create. When the order of items is not important—for example, for a list of supplies needed to carry out a task—a bulleted list is the best choice. And when the order is important—for example, for the steps in a procedure—you will probably want to create a numbered list. Creating and Modifying Lists 107 You can indicate the start of a list as follows: ● Bulleted list Type * (an asterisk) at the beginning of a paragraph, and then press the Spacebar or the Tab key before entering the list item text. Or click the Bullets button in the Paragraph group on the Home tab. ● Numbered list Type 1. (the number 1 followed by a period) at the beginning of a paragraph, and then press the Spacebar or the Tab key before entering the list item text. Or click the Numbering button in the Paragraph group on the Home tab. When you start a list in this fashion, Word automatically formats it as a bulleted or numbered list. When you press Enter to start a new item, Word continues the formatting to the new paragraph. Typing items and pressing Enter adds subsequent bulleted or numbered items. To end the list, press Enter twice; or click the Bullets arrow or Numbering arrow in the Paragraph group on the Home tab, and then in the library, click None. Tip If you want to start a paragraph with an asterisk or number but don’t want to format the paragraph as a bulleted or numbered list, click the AutoCorrect Options button that appears after Word changes the formatting, and then in the list, click the appropriate Undo option. You can also click the Undo button on the Quick Access Toolbar. If you want to create a list that has multiple levels, you start off by creating the list in the usual way. Then when you want the next paragraph to be a level lower (indented more), you press the Tab key after pressing Enter and before you type the text of the item. If you want the next paragraph to be a level higher (indented less), you press Shift+Tab after pressing Enter. In the case of a bulleted list, Word changes the bullet character for each item level. In the case of a numbered list, Word changes the type of numbering used, based on a predefined numbering scheme. Tip To create a multilevel numbered list with a scheme that is different from the default, you can click the Multilevel List button in the Paragraph group of the Home tab and then select a scheme from the List gallery. You can also define your own scheme. If you type a set of paragraphs containing a series of items and then decide you want to turn the set into a list, you can select the paragraphs and then click the Bullets or Numbering button. After you create a list, you can modify, format, and customize the list as follows: ● You can move items around in a list, insert new items, or delete unwanted items. If the list is numbered, Word automatically updates the numbers. ● You can sort items in a bulleted list into ascending or descending order by clicking the Sort button in the Paragraph group on the Home tab. ● For a bulleted list, you can change the bullet symbol by clicking the Bullets arrow in the Paragraph group and making a selection from the Bullets gallery. You can also define a custom bullet (even a picture bullet) by clicking Define New Bullet. 108 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text ● For a numbered list, you can change the number style by clicking the Numbering arrow in the Paragraph group and making a selection from the Numbering gallery. You can also define a custom style by clicking Define New Number Format. ● You can modify the indentation of the list by dragging the indent markers on the horizontal ruler. You can change both the overall indentation of the list and the relationship of the first line to the other lines. See Also For information about paragraph indentation, see “Manually Changing the Look of Paragraphs" earlier in this chapter. In this exercise, you’ll create a bulleted list and a numbered list and then modify lists in various ways. SET UP You need the RulesDraft_start document located in your Chapter03 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the RulesDraft_start document, and save it as RulesDraft. Then follow the steps. 1. With formatting marks and the rulers displayed, select the first four paragraphs under The rules fall into four categories, and then on the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Bullets button. The selected paragraphs are reformatted as a bulleted list. Word indents the list and precedes each item with a bullet and a tab. The program also removes the space after all paragraphs except the last one. 2. With the paragraphs still selected, in the Paragraph group, click the Bullets arrow. The Bullets gallery appears. The Bullets gallery offers several predefined bullet choices. Creating and Modifying Lists 109 3. Under Bullet Library, point to each bullet character to display a live preview of its effect on the selected list items, and then click the bullet composed of four diamonds. The bullet character that begins each item in the selected list changes. Different bullets are suited to different types of documents. 4. Select the two paragraphs below the Definitions heading, and then in the Paragraph group, click the Numbering button. Word numbers the two selected paragraphs sequentially. 5. Select the first four paragraphs below the General Rules heading, and then click the Numbering button. Word restarts the second numbered list from 1. 6. Select the next three paragraphs, and then in the Paragraph group, click the Bullets button. Word formats the paragraphs as a bulleted list, using the symbol you specified earlier. These three bullets are a second-level list of the preceding numbered item and should be indented. 7. With the three bulleted items still selected, in the Paragraph group, click the Increase Indent button. The bulleted paragraphs move to the right. Tip You can also adjust the indent level of a bulleted list by selecting its paragraphs, and on the horizontal ruler, dragging the Left Indent marker to the left or right. You can move just the Hanging Indent marker to adjust the space between the bullets and their text. 8. Select the remaining three paragraphs, and click the Numbering button. Word restarts this numbered list from 1, but you want it to continue the sequence of the previous numbered list. 9. Click anywhere in the No large dogs item, and then click the Numbering arrow. The Numbering gallery appears. 110 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text The Numbering gallery offers several predefined number formats. 10. At the bottom of the gallery, click Set Numbering Value. The Set Numbering Value dialog box opens. In this dialog box, you specify how this numbered list relates to the previous one. Creating and Modifying Lists 111 11. Change the Set value to setting to 5, and then click OK. Word renumbers the list after the bullet items so that it continues from the previous list. 12. In the No large dogs numbered item, click to the left of Seeing, press Enter, and then press Tab. Word first creates a new number 6 item and renumbers all subsequent items. However, when you press Tab to make the item second level, Word changes the 6 to a, indents the item, and restores the original numbers to the subsequent items. 13. Press the End key, and then press Enter. Then type The Board reserves the right to make exceptions to this rule. (type the period), and press Enter. 14. Click the Numbering arrow, click Change List Level at the bottom of the gallery, and click the first 1. option. Then in the new first-level item, type All pets must reside within their Owners’ Apartments. The lists are now organized hierarchically. Word takes the work out of creating hierarchical lists. 15. Select the three bulleted paragraphs, and then in the Paragraph group, click the Sort button. 112 Chapter 3 Change the Look of Text Formatting Text as You Type The Word list capabilities are just one example of the program’s ability to intuit how you want to format an element based on what you type. You can learn more about these and other AutoFormatting options by exploring the AutoCorrect dialog box. Display the Backstage view, click Options, click Proofing in the left pane of the Word Options dialog box, and then on the Proofing page, click AutoCorrect Options. On the AutoFormat As You Type page, you can see the options Word implements by default, including bulleted and numbered lists. You can select and clear options to control AutoFormatting behavior. The AutoFormat As You Type page of the AutoCorrect dialog box. One interesting option is Border Lines. When this check box is selected, typing three consecutive hyphens (-) or three consecutive underscores (_) and pressing Enter draws a single line across the page. Three consecutive equal signs (=) draw a double line, and three consecutive tildes (~) draw a zigzag line. Key Points 113 The Sort Text dialog box opens. You can sort text in lists in ascending or descending order. 16. With the Ascending option selected, click OK. The order of the bulleted items changes to ascending alphabetical order. CLEAN UP If you want, turn off the rulers and formatting marks. Then save and close the RulesDraft document. Key Points ● Quick Styles and style sets make it simple to apply combinations of character and paragraph formatting to give your documents a professional look. ● The same document can look very different depending on the theme applied to it. Colors, fonts, and effects can be combined to create just the look you want. ● You can format characters with an almost limitless number of combinations of font, size, style, and effect. For best results, resist the temptation to use more than a handful of combinations. ● You can change the look of paragraphs by varying their indentation, spacing, and alignment and by setting tab stops and applying borders and shading. Use these formatting options judiciously to create a balanced, uncluttered look. ● Bulleted and numbered lists are a great way to present information in an easy-to-read, easy-to-understand format. If the built-in bulleted and numbered formats don’t provide what you need, you can define your own formats. Chapter at a Glance Present information in columns, page 116 Create tabbed lists, page 123 Present information in tables, page 125 Format tables, page 136 4 Organize Information in Columns and Tables In this chapter, you will learn how to ✔ Present information in columns. ✔ Create tabbed lists. ✔ Present information in tables. ✔ Format tables. Information in documents is most commonly presented as paragraphs of text. To make a text-heavy document more legible, you can flow the text in two or more columns, or you can display information in a table. For example, flowing text in multiple columns is a common practice in newsletters, flyers, and brochures; and presenting information in tables is common in reports. When you need to present data in a document, using a table is often more efficient than describing the data in a paragraph, particularly when the data consists of numeric values. Tables make the data easier to read and understand. A small amount of data can be displayed in simple columns separated by tabs, which creates a tabbed list. A larger amount of data, or more complex data, is better presented in a table, which is a structure of rows and columns, frequently with row and column headings. In this chapter, you’ll first create and modify columns of text. Then you’ll create a simple tabbed list. Finally, you’ll create tables from scratch and from existing text, and format a table in various ways. Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this chapter, you need to copy the book’s practice files to your computer. The practice files you’ll use to complete the exercises in this chapter are in the Chapter04 practice file folder. A complete list of practice files is provided in “Using the Practice Files” at the beginning of this book. 115 116 Chapter 4 Organize Information in Columns and Tables Presenting Information in Columns By default, Microsoft Word 2010 displays text in one column that spans the width of the page between the left and right margins. You can specify that text be displayed in two, three, or more columns to create layouts like those used in newspapers and magazines. When you format text to flow in columns, the text fills the first column on each page and then moves to the top of the next column. You can manually indicate where you want the text within each column to end. The Columns gallery in the Page Setup group on the Page Layout tab displays several standard options for dividing text into columns. You can choose one, two, or three columns of equal width or two columns of unequal width. If the standard options don’t suit your needs, you can specify the number and width of columns. The number of columns is limited by the width and margins of the page, and each column must be at least a half inch wide. The Columns gallery displays the predefined column options. No matter how you set up the columns initially, you can change the layout or column widths at any time. You can format an entire document or a section of a document in columns. When you select a section of text and format it as columns, Word inserts section breaks at the beginning and end of the selected text to delineate the area in which the columnar formatting is applied. Within the columnar text, you can insert column breaks to specify where you want to end one column and start another. Section and column breaks are visible when you display formatting marks in the document. Presenting Information in Columns 117 Tip You can apply many types of formatting, including page orientation, to content within a specific section of a document without affecting the surrounding text. For information about sections, see “Controlling What Appears on Each Page” in Chapter 6, “Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents.” See Also For information about formatting marks, see ”Viewing Documents in Different Ways” in Chapter 1, “Explore Word 2010.” You can apply character and paragraph formatting to columnar text in the same way you would any text. Here are some formatting tips for columnar text: ● When presenting text in narrow columns, you can justify the paragraphs (align the text with the left and right edges) to achieve a neat and clean appearance. To justify the paragraphs, Word adjusts the spacing between words, essentially moving the empty space that would normally appear at the end of the line into the gaps between words. ● To more completely fill columns, you can have Word hyphenate the text to break words into syllables to fill up the gaps. In this exercise, you’ll flow the text in one section of a document into three columns. You’ll justify the text in the columns, change the column spacing, and hyphenate the text. You’ll then break a column at a specific location instead of allowing the text to flow naturally from one column to the next. SET UP You need the RoomPlanner_start document located in your Chapter04 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the RoomPlanner_start document, and save it as RoomPlanner. Then display formatting marks and the rulers, and follow the steps. 1. Click at the beginning of the paragraph that begins Take a look (do not click in the selection area). Then scroll down until you can see the end of the document, hold down the Shift key, and click to the right of the paragraph mark after credit cards. Word selects the text from the Take a look paragraph through the end of the last paragraph (but not the empty paragraph). Tip If you want to format an entire document with the same number of columns, you can simply click anywhere in the document—you don’t have to select the text. 2. On the Page Layout tab, in the Page Setup group, click the Columns button, and then in the Columns gallery, click Three. Word inserts a section break above the selected text and flows the text within the section into three columns. www.FreeDownload.ir 118 Chapter 4 Organize Information in Columns and Tables 3. Press Ctrl+Home to move to the top of the document. The section break is visible above the columns. A continuous section break changes the formatting of the subsequent text but keeps it on the same page. 4. On the Home tab, in the Editing group, click the Select button, and then click Select All. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+A to select all the text in the document. See Also To see a complete list of keyboard shortcuts, see “Keyboard Shortcuts” at the end of this book. 5. In the Paragraph group, click the Justify button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+J to justify paragraphs. The spacing between the words changes to align all the paragraphs in the document with both the left and right margins. Because you applied the formatting to the entire document, the title is no longer centered. However, it is often quicker to apply formatting globally and then deal with the exceptions. Presenting Information in Columns 119 6. Press Ctrl+Home to move to the paragraph containing the document title. Then in the Paragraph group, click the Center button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+E to center text. Word centers the document title between the left and right margins. 7. Adjust the zoom percentage until you can see about two-thirds of the first page of the document. See Also For information about adjusting the zoom percentage, see “Viewing Documents in Different Ways” in Chapter 1, “Explore Word 2010.” 8. Click anywhere in the first column. On the horizontal ruler, Word indicates the margins of the columns. On the ruler, the indent markers show the indentation of the active column. Tip If your rulers aren’t turned on, select the Ruler check box in the Show group of the View tab. 120 Chapter 4 Organize Information in Columns and Tables 9. On the Page Layout tab, display the Columns gallery, and click More Columns. The Columns dialog box opens. The spacing between columns is set by default to a half inch. Because the Equal Column Width check box is selected, you can adjust the width and spacing of only the first column. Tip To separate the columns with vertical lines, select the Line Between check box. 10. In the Width and spacing area, in the Spacing box for column 1, type or select 0.2". Word changes the measurement in the Spacing box for column 2, and widens all the columns in the Preview area to reflect the new setting. 11. Click OK. Word reflows the columns to fit their new margins. Presenting Information in Columns 121 Wider columns generally look neater on the page. 12. Click at the beginning of the Take a look paragraph. Then in the Page Setup group, click the Hyphenation button, and click Automatic. Word hyphenates the text of the document, which fills in some of the large gaps between words. 13. Click anywhere in the NOTE paragraph in the third column. 14. On the horizontal ruler, at the left end of the third column, drag the Hanging Indent marker 0.25 inch (two marks) to the right. All the lines in the NOTE paragraph except the first are now indented, offsetting the note from the paragraphs above and below it. 122 Chapter 4 Organize Information in Columns and Tables You can change the indentation of individual paragraphs within a column. 15. Display the bottom of page 1. In the first column on page 1, click at the beginning of the Take your Room Planner home paragraph. Then in the Page Setup group, click the Breaks button, and click Column. Word inserts a column break. The text that follows the column break moves to the top of the second column. 16. At the bottom of the third column on page 1, click at the beginning of the If you’re not sure paragraph, and then on the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Repeat Insertion button to insert another column break. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+Y to repeat the previous action. Word inserts a column break. The text that follows the column break moves to the top of the first column on page 2. CLEAN UP Return the Zoom Level setting to 100%, and then save and close the RoomPlanner document. Creating Tabbed Lists 123 Creating Tabbed Lists If you have a relatively small amount of data to present, you might choose to display it in a tabbed list, which arranges text in simple columns separated by tabs. You can align the text within the columns by using left, right, centered, or decimal tab stops. See Also For more information about setting tab stops, see “Manually Changing the Look of Paragraphs” in Chapter 3, “Change the Look of Text.” When entering text in a tabbed list, inexperienced Word users have a tendency to press the Tab key multiple times to align the columns of the list with the default tab stops. If you do this, you have no control over the column widths. To be able to fine-tune the columns, you need to set custom tab stops rather than relying on the default ones. When setting up a tabbed list, you should press Tab only once between the items that you want to appear in separate columns. Next you apply any necessary formatting. And finally, you set the custom tab stops. Set left, right, centered, and decimal tabs to control the alignment of the column content, or set a bar tab to add a vertical line to visually separate list columns. By setting the tabs in order from left to right, you can check the alignment of the text within each column as you go. In this exercise, you’ll first enter text separated by tabs and format the text. Then you’ll set custom tab stops to create a tabbed list. SET UP You need the ConsultationA_start document located in your Chapter04 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the ConsultationA_start document, and save it as ConsultationA . Then display formatting marks and the rulers, and follow the steps. 1. Set the zoom percentage to a level that is comfortable for you, and then press Ctrl+End to move the cursor to the blank line at the end of the document. 2. Type Location, press Tab, type Discount Applies, press Tab, type Hourly Rate, and then press Enter. 124 Chapter 4 Organize Information in Columns and Tables 3. Add three more lines to the list by typing the following text, pressing the Tab and Enter keys where indicated. In home Tab No Tab $50.00 Enter Phone Tab Yes Tab $35.00 Enter In store Tab Yes Tab $40.00 Enter The tab characters push the items to the next default tab stop, but because some items are longer than others, they do not line up. In a tabbed list, it’s important to press the Tab key only once between items. 4. Select the first line of the tabbed list, and then on the Mini Toolbar that appears, click the Bold button. Troubleshooting If the Mini Toolbar doesn’t appear, click the Bold button in the Font group on the Home tab. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+B to apply bold. 5. Select all four lines of the tabbed list, and then on the Mini Toolbar, click the Increase Indent button. Tip It’s more efficient to make all character and paragraph formatting changes to the text before setting tab stops. Otherwise, you might have to adjust the tab stops after applying the formatting. 6. With the tabbed list still selected, on the Page Layout tab, in the Paragraph group, under Spacing, change the After setting to 0 pt. 7. Click the tab setting button at the junction of the horizontal and vertical rulers until the Center Tab button is active. (You will probably have to click only once.) Then click the 2.5 inch mark on the horizontal ruler. Presenting Information in Tables 125 On the ruler, Word sets a center-aligned tab stop that looks like the Center Tab icon. The items in the second column of the tabbed list center themselves at that position. 8. Click the tab setting button once. The Right Tab button is now active. 9. With the Right Tab button active, click the horizontal ruler at the 4.5 inch mark. On the ruler, Word sets a right-aligned tab stop that looks like the Right Tab icon. The items in the third column of the tabbed list right-align themselves at that position. 10. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Show/Hide ¶ button to hide the tabs, paragraph marks, and other formatting marks. Then click away from the tabbed list to see the results. The tabbed list resembles a simple table. You have created a simple table-like layout with just a few clicks. CLEAN UP Save the ConsultationA document, and then close it. Presenting Information in Tables A table is a structure of vertical columns and horizontal rows. Each column and each row can be named with a heading, although some tables have only column headings or only row headings. At the junction of each column and row is a box called a cell in which data (text or numeric information) is stored. 126 Chapter 4 Organize Information in Columns and Tables You can create empty or predefined tables in a Word document in the following ways: ● The Insert Table gallery, which is available from the Tables group on the Insert tab, displays a simple grid. You can create a simple table from the grid in the Insert Table gallery. Clicking a cell in the grid inserts an empty table the width of the text column. The table has the number of rows and columns you indicated in the grid, with all the rows one line high and all the columns of an equal width. ● To insert a more customized empty table, you can click Insert Table on the menu at the bottom of the Insert Table gallery to open the Insert Table dialog box, in which you can specify the number of rows and columns and customize the column width. You can create a custom-width table from the Insert Table dialog box. Presenting Information in Tables 127 ● To insert a less clearly defined empty table, you can click Draw Table below the grid in the Insert Table gallery. This command displays a pencil with which you can draw cells directly in the Word document to create a table. The cells you draw connect by snapping to a grid, but you have some control over the size and spacing of the rows and columns. You can draw a table directly on the page. See Also For information about drawing tables, see “Using Tables to Control Page Layout” in Chapter 10, “Organize and Arrange Content.” ● In addition to empty tables, you can insert any of the available Quick Tables, which are predefined tables of formatted data that you can replace with your own information. Built-in Quick Tables include a variety of calendars, simple tables, tables with subheadings, and tabbed lists. You can also save your own custom tables to the Quick Tables gallery so that you can easily insert a frequently used table structure and data into any document. The Quick Tables gallery includes a selection of predefined tables such as this one. 128 Chapter 4 Organize Information in Columns and Tables A new table appears in the document as a set of cells, usually bordered by gridlines. (In some Quick Tables, the gridlines are turned off.) Each cell contains an end-of-cell marker, and each row ends with an end-of-row marker. (The end-of-cell markers and end-of-row markers are identical in appearance, and are visible only when you display formatting marks in the document.) When you point to a table, a move handle appears in its upperleft corner and a size handle in its lower-right corner. When the cursor is in a table, two Table Tools contextual tabs—Design and Layout—appear on the ribbon. Move handle End-of-cell marker Size handle End-of-row marker A table has its own controls and its own contextual ribbon tabs. Tip The move handle and size handle appear only in Print Layout view and Web Layout view. After you create a table, you can enter data (such as text, numbers, or graphics) into the table cells and press the Tab key to move the cursor from cell to cell. Pressing Tab when the cursor is in the last cell of a row moves the cursor to the first cell of the next row. Pressing Tab when the cursor is in the last cell of the last row adds a new row to the table and moves the cursor to the first cell of that row. Tip You can move and position the cursor by pressing the Tab key or the Arrow keys, or by clicking in a table cell. If the data you want to present in a table already exists in the document, either as regular text or as a tabbed list, you can convert the text to a table by selecting it and then clicking Convert Text To Table in the Insert Table gallery. Conversely, you can convert an active table to regular text by clicking the Convert To Text button in the Data group on the Layout tab. You can modify a table’s structure by changing the size of the table, changing the size of one or more columns or rows, or adding or removing rows, columns, or individual cells. Presenting Information in Tables 129 Tip To change a table’s structure, you often need to select the entire table or a specific column or row. The simplest way to do this is to position the cursor in the table, column, or row, click the Select button in the Table group on the Layout tab, and then click the table element you want. Alternatively, you can point to the top edge of a column or left edge of a row and, when the pointer changes to an arrow, click to select the column or row. The basic methods for manipulating a table or its contents are as follows: ● Insert a row or column Click anywhere in a row or column adjacent to where you want to make the insertion. Then on the Layout tab, in the Rows & Columns group, click the Insert Above, Insert Below, Insert Left, or Insert Right button. The Rows & Columns group of the Layout tab. Selecting more than one row or column before you click an Insert button inserts that number of rows or columns in the table. Tip You can insert cells by clicking the Rows & Columns dialog box launcher and specifying in the Insert Cells dialog box how adjacent cells should be moved to accommodate the new cells. ● Delete a row or column Click anywhere in the row or column, and in the Rows & Columns group, click the Delete button. Then click Delete Cells, Delete Columns, Delete Rows, or Delete Table. ● Resize an entire table Drag the size handle. ● Resize a single column or row Without selecting the column, drag its right border to the left or right. Without selecting the row, drag its bottom border up or down. (If you select a column or row and then drag its border, only the selected column or row changes.) ● Move a table Point to the table, and then drag the move handle that appears in its upper-left corner to a new location. Or use the Cut and Paste commands in the Clipboard group on the Home tab to move the table. ● Merge cells Create cells that span multiple columns or rows by selecting the cells you want to merge and clicking the Merge Cells button in the Merge group on the Layout tab. For example, to center a title in the first row of a table, you can merge all the cells in the row to create one merged cell that spans the table’s width. 130 Chapter 4 Organize Information in Columns and Tables ● Split cells Divide one cell into multiple cells by clicking the Split Cells button in the Merge group on the Layout tab and then specifying the number of columns and rows you want. ● Sort information Click the Sort button in the Data group on the Layout tab to sort the rows in ascending or descending order by the data in any column. For example, in a table that has the column headings Name, Address, ZIP Code, and Phone Number, you can sort on any one of those columns to arrange the information in alphabetical or numerical order. In this exercise, you’ll work with two tables. First you’ll create an empty table, enter and align text in the table cells, add rows to the table, and merge cells. Then you’ll create a second table by converting an existing tabbed list, change the width of a column, and change the width of the entire table. SET UP You need the ConsultationB_start document located in your Chapter04 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the ConsultationB_start document, and save it as ConsultationB. Then display formatting marks and the rulers, and follow the steps. 1. Click to the left of the second blank paragraph below Please complete this form. 2. On the Insert tab, in the Tables group, click the Table button. Then in the Insert Table gallery, point to (don’t click) the cell that is five columns to the right and five rows down from the upper-left corner of the grid. Word highlights the cells that will be in the table, indicates the table dimensions in the gallery header, and creates a temporary table in the document. You can preview the table with the number of columns and rows you have specified. Presenting Information in Tables 131 3. Click the cell. Word creates a blank table consisting of five columns and five rows. The cursor is located in the first cell. Because the table is active, Word displays the Design and Layout contextual tabs. 4. In the selection area to the left of the table, point to the first row of the table, and then click once to select it. 5. On the Layout contextual tab, in the Merge group, click the Merge Cells button. Word combines the five cells in the first row into one cell. 6. With the merged cell selected, in the Alignment group, click the Align Center button. The end-of-cell marker moves to the exact center of the merged cell to indicate that anything you type there will be centered both horizontally and vertically. 7. Type Consultation Estimate. The table now has content that looks like a table title. Merged cells are often used for table titles and column headings. 8. Click the first cell in the second row, type Type, and then press Tab. 9. Type Location, Consultant, Hourly Rate, and Total, pressing Tab after each entry. Pressing Tab after the Total heading moves the cursor to the first cell of the third row. The table now has a row of column headings. 10. Select the column heading row, and then on the Mini Toolbar, click the Bold button. 11. In the third row, type Window treatments, In home, Andy Ruth, $50.00, and $50.00, pressing Tab after each entry. You have entered a complete row of data. 12. Select the last two rows, and then on the Layout tab, in the Rows & Columns group, click the Insert Below button. Word adds two new rows and selects them. 13. In the last row, click the first cell, hold down the Shift key, and then press the Right Arrow key four times to select the first four cells in the row. 132 Chapter 4 Organize Information in Columns and Tables 14. In the Merge group, click the Merge Cells button. Word combines the selected cells into one cell. 15. In the Alignment group, click the Align Center Right button. 16. Type Subtotal, and then press Tab twice. Word adds a new row with the same structure to the bottom of the table. When you add a new row, it has the same format as the one it is based on. 17. Type Add trip fee, press Tab twice to add a new row, and then type Total. Now you’ll create a different table by converting existing text. 18. Scroll down to the bottom of the document, and select the rows of the tabbed list beginning with Distance and ending with $20.00. 19. On the Insert tab, in the Tables group, click the Table button, and then click Convert Text to Table. The Convert Text To Table dialog box opens. You can separate text into columns based on the symbol you specify. Presenting Information in Tables 133 20. Verify that the Number of columns box displays 2, and then click OK. The selected text appears in a table with two columns and six rows. 21. Click anywhere in the table to release the selection, and then point to the right border of the table. When the pointer changes to two opposing arrows, doubleclick the border. Word adjusts the width of the right column to accommodate its longest cell entry. Tip You can also adjust the column width by changing the Table Column Width setting in the Cell Size group on the Layout tab. 22. Point to the In-Home Trip Charge table. Word displays the move handle in the upper-left corner and the size handle in the lower-right corner. 23. Drag the size handle to the right, releasing the mouse button when the right edge of the table aligns approximately with the 4 inch mark on the horizontal ruler. The width of the table expands. The table is now approximately as wide as the tabbed list above, creating a nice balance. CLEAN UP Save the ConsultationB document, and then close it. 134 Chapter 4 Organize Information in Columns and Tables Performing Calculations in Tables When you want to perform calculations with the numbers in a Word table, you can create a formula that uses a built-in mathematical function. You construct a formula by using the tools in the Formula dialog box, which you display by clicking the Formula button in the Data group on the Layout contextual tab. The Formula dialog box. A formula consists of an equal sign (=), followed by a function name (such as SUM), followed by parentheses containing the location of the cells you want to use for the calculation. For example, the formula =SUM(Left) totals the cells to the left of the cell containing the formula. To use a function other than SUM in the Formula dialog box, you click the function you want in the Paste Function list. You can use built-in functions to perform a number of calculations, including averaging (AVERAGE) a set of values, counting (COUNT) the number of values in a column or row, or finding the maximum (MAX) or minimum (MIN) value in a series of cells. Although formulas commonly refer to the cells above or to the left of the active cell, you can also use the contents of specified cells or constant values in formulas. To use the contents of a cell, you type the cell address in the parentheses following the function name. The cell address is a combination of the column letter and the row number—for example, A1 is the cell at the intersection of the first column and the first row. A series of cells in a row can be addressed as a range consisting of the first cell and the last cell separated by a colon, such as A1:D1. For example, the formula =SUM(A1:D1) totals the values in row 1 of columns A through D. A series of cells in a column can be addressed in the same way. For example, the formula =SUM(A1:A4) totals the values in column A of rows 1 through 4. Presenting Information in Tables 135 Other Layout Options You can control many aspects of a table in the Table Properties dialog box, which you display by clicking the Properties button in the Table group on the Layout tab. You can set the following options: ● On the Table page, you can specify the width of the entire table, as well as the way it interacts with the surrounding text. ● On the Row page, you can specify the height of each row, whether a row is allowed to break across pages, and whether a row of column headings should be repeated at the top of each page. Tip The Repeat As Header Row option is available only if the cursor is in the top row of the table. ● On the Column page, you can set the width of each column. ● On the Cell page, you can set the width of cells and the vertical alignment of text within them. Tip You can also control the widths of selected cells by changing the settings in the Cell Size group on the Layout tab. ● On either the Table page or Cell page, you can control the margins of cells (how close text comes to the cell border) by clicking Options and specifying top, bottom, left, and right settings. Tip You can also control the margins by clicking the Cell Margins button in the Alignment group on the Layout tab. ● On the Alt Text page, you can enter text that describes what the table is about. 136 Chapter 4 Organize Information in Columns and Tables Formatting Tables Formatting a table to best convey its data can be a process of trial and error. With Word 2010, you can quickly get started by applying one of the table styles available in the Table Styles gallery on the Design contextual tab. The table styles include a variety of borders, colors, and other attributes to give the table a professional look. If you want to control the appearance of a table more precisely, you can use the commands on the Design and Layout tabs. You can also format the table content. As you saw in the previous exercise, you can apply character formatting to the text in tables just as you would to regular text, by clicking buttons on the Mini Toolbar. You can also click the buttons in the Font group on the Home tab. You can apply paragraph formatting, such as alignment and spacing, by clicking buttons in the Paragraph group on the Home tab. And you can apply both character and paragraph styles from the Quick Styles gallery. Formatting Tables 137 In this exercise, you’ll first apply a table style to a table. Then you’ll format a table row and column. You’ll also apply character and paragraph formatting to various cells so that the table’s appearance helps the reader understand its data. SET UP You need the RepairCosts_start document located in your Chapter04 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the RepairCosts_start document, and save it as RepairCosts. If formatting marks are displayed, hide them, and then follow the steps. 1. Click anywhere in the table, and then on the Design tab, point to each thumbnail in the first row of the Table Styles gallery to see its live preview. 2. In the Table Style Options group, clear the Banded Rows check box, and select the Total Row check box. The table style thumbnails no longer have banded rows, reflecting your changes. 3. In the Table Styles group, click the More button. The Table Styles gallery appears. 4. Preview all the styles in the gallery. When you finish exploring, click the second thumbnail in the fifth row (Medium Shading 2 – Accent 1). The style needs to be modified to suit the data, but it’s a good starting point. This table style applies formatting to the header and total rows, the first column, and the text of the table. 138 Chapter 4 Organize Information in Columns and Tables 5. Select all the cells in the last row by clicking in the selection area to its left. Then in the Table Styles group, click the Borders arrow, and click Borders and Shading. The Borders And Shading dialog box opens, displaying the borders applied to the selected cells. 6. On the Borders page of the dialog box, scroll to the top of the Style list, and click the thick black border. 7. In the Preview area, click the top border button once to remove the current border, and click again to apply the thick black border. 8. Click the Shading tab, and click the Fill arrow. Under Theme Colors in the palette, click the fifth box in the top row (Blue, Accent 1). Then click OK. 9. Without moving the selection, on the Home tab, in the Font group, click the Font Color arrow, and under Theme Colors in the palette, click the white box. Then press Home to release the selection. The table now has the same border at the top and bottom. You can customize a table style to meet your needs. 10. Point to the left side of the Elastomeric Decks cell, and when the pointer changes to a black right-pointing arrow, drag downward to select all the cells in the Item column except the TOTAL cell. Formatting Tables 139 11. On the Design tab, in the Table Styles group, click the Shading arrow, and under Theme Colors, click the third box in the blue column (Blue, Accent 1, Lighter 40%). 12. Select all the cells containing amounts in the Cost, $ column, including the cell with the total. Then on the Layout tab, in the Alignment group, click the Align Center Right button. Tip If the first row of your table has several long headings that make it difficult to fit the table on one page, you can turn the headings sideways. Simply select the heading row and click the Text Direction button in the Alignment group on the Layout tab. Now you can judge how well the table displays its data. The total now stands out better, and the amounts are easier to read. Tip If you will need to use this formatted table with different data in the future, you can save it as a Quick Table. For information about saving customized tables for future use, see the sidebar “Quick Tables” on the next page. CLEAN UP Save the RepairCosts document, and then close it. 140 Chapter 4 Organize Information in Columns and Tables Quick Tables With Word 2010, you can create Quick Tables—preformatted tables with sample data that you can customize. To create a Quick Table: 1. On the Insert tab, in the Tables group, click the Table button, and then point to Quick Tables. The Quick Tables gallery appears. The predefined Quick Tables meet several common needs. 2. Scroll through the gallery, noticing the types of tables that are available, and then click the one you want. For example, this is the Matrix Quick Table. The Matrix Quick Table includes row and column headings, placeholder data, and no summary data, such as totals. Key Points 141 3. On the Design tab, apply formatting to tailor the Quick Table to your needs. For example, here’s the Matrix Quick Table after we formatted it. It is easy to customize a Quick Table for your own needs. If you will use the table again, you can save it in the Quick Tables gallery. Select the table, display the Quick Tables gallery, and click Save Selection To Quick Tables Gallery. Then in the Create New Building Block dialog box, assign a name to the table, and click OK. Provided you save the Building Blocks template when Word prompts you to, the table will be available in the Quick Tables gallery for future use. See Also For information about building blocks, see “Inserting Building Blocks” in Chapter 5, “Add Simple Graphic Elements.” Key Points ● To vary the layout of a document, you can divide text into columns. You can control the number of columns, the width of the columns, and the space between the columns. ● To clearly present a simple set of data, you can use tabs to create a tabbed list, with custom tab stops controlling the width and alignment of columns. ● You can create a table from scratch, or convert existing text to a table. You can control the size of the table and its individual structural elements. ● By using the built-in table styles, you can quickly apply professional-looking cell and character formatting to a table and its contents. ● You can enhance a table and its contents by applying text attributes, borders, and shading. Chapter at a Glance Insert and modify pictures, page 144 Change a document’s background, page 152 Insert building blocks, page 159 Add WordArt text, page 173 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements In this chapter, you will learn how to ✔ Insert and modify pictures. ✔ Change a document’s background. ✔ Insert building blocks. ✔ Add WordArt text. Some documents that you create in Microsoft Word 2010 are straightforward and require nothing more than words. Others might benefit from the addition of graphic elements to reinforce their concepts, to grab the reader’s attention, or to make them more visually appealing. These graphic elements can include a wide variety of objects and effects, including: ● Pictures These objects are created outside of Word—photographs from digital cameras, clip art images, or files created on a computer with a graphics program. No matter what the origin of the picture, you can change its size and its position in relation to other content after you insert it in the Word document. For some types of pictures, you can make additional changes from within Word, such as cropping the picture or embellishing it by applying artistic effects. ● Drawing objects These objects are created within Word—text boxes, WordArt text, diagrams, charts, shapes, and other such objects. As with pictures, you can size, move, and format drawing objects from within Word. See Also For information about diagrams, see Chapter 7, “Insert and Modify Diagrams.” For information about charts, see Chapter 8, “Insert and Modify Charts.” For information about shapes, see “Drawing and Modifying Shapes” in Chapter 9, “Use Other Visual Elements.” 143 144 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements ● Building blocks You can draw attention to specific information and add graphic appeal by incorporating ready-made graphic building blocks (also called Quick Parts) into a document. These building blocks are combinations of drawing objects (and sometimes pictures) in a variety of formatting styles that you can select to insert elements such as cover pages, quotations pulled from the text (called pull quotes), and sidebars. You can also create your own building blocks, which then become available in the Quick Parts gallery. ● Backgrounds You can apply a variety of backgrounds to the pages of your docu- ment, including plain colors, gradients, textures, patterns, and pictures. In this chapter, you’ll first insert and modify pictures in a document. You'll experiment with page backgrounds, and then add three types of building blocks to a document. Finally, you'll have a bit of fun with WordArt. Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this chapter, you need to copy the book’s practice files to your computer. The practice files you’ll use to complete the exercises in this chapter are in the Chapter05 practice file folder. A complete list of practice files is provided in “Using the Practice Files” at the beginning of this book. Inserting and Modifying Pictures You can insert digital photographs or pictures created in almost any program into a Word document. You specify the source of the picture you want to insert by clicking one of these two buttons, which are located in the Illustrations group on the Insert tab: ● Picture Click this button to insert a picture that is saved as a file on your computer, or on a device (such as an external hard drive or a digital camera) that is connected to your computer. ● Clip Art Click this button to insert one of hundreds of clip art images, such as photos and drawings of people, places, and things. See Also For information about clip art, see the sidebar “About Clip Art” later in this chapter. After you insert a picture in a document, you can modify the image by using commands on the Format contextual tab, which is displayed only when a picture or drawing object is selected. For example, you can click buttons in the Adjust group to change the picture’s brightness and contrast, recolor it, apply artistic effects to it, and compress it to reduce the size of the document containing it. The Picture Styles group offers a wide range of picture styles that you can apply to a picture to change its shape and orientation, as well as add borders and picture effects. And finally, you can use the commands in the Size group for cropping and resizing pictures. Inserting and Modifying Pictures 145 The Format contextual tab for pictures. Troubleshooting The appearance of buttons and groups on the ribbon changes depending on the width of the program window. For information about changing the appearance of the ribbon to match our screen images, see “Modifying the Display of the Ribbon” at the beginning of this book. See Also For information about using the commands in the Arrange group, see “Arranging Objects on the Page” in Chapter 10, “Organize and Arrange Content.” In this exercise, you’ll insert a couple of photographs and size and crop them. You’ll modify one of them and then copy the modifications to the other one. Then you’ll insert an illustration and apply an artistic effects to it. SET UP You need the Authors_start document, the Joan and Joyce photographs, and the OTSI-Logo illustration located in your Chapter05 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the Authors_start document, and save it as Authors. Display the rulers and formatting marks, and then follow the steps. 1. Click to the left of the Joyce has 30 years’ experience paragraph, press the Enter key, and press the Up Arrow key. Then on the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click the Picture button. The Insert Picture dialog box opens, displaying the contents of your Pictures library. 2. Navigate to the Chapter05 practice file folder, and double-click the Joyce picture. Word inserts the picture at the cursor and displays the Format contextual tab on the ribbon. Troubleshooting If Word inserts a frame the size of the picture but displays only a sliver of the picture itself, Word cannot increase the line spacing to accommodate the picture because it is set to a specific amount. To correct this problem, click the Paragraph dialog box launcher, and in the Paragraph dialog box, change the Line Spacing setting to Single. Tip In this exercise, you insert pictures in blank paragraphs. By default, Word inserts the picture in-line with the text, meaning that Word increases the line spacing as necessary to accommodate the picture. If you were to type text adjacent to the picture, the bottom of the picture would align with the bottom of the text on the same line. After you insert a picture, you can change its position and the way text wraps around it. See Also For more information about positioning objects and wrapping text around them, see “Adding WordArt Text” later in this chapter and “Arranging Objects on the Page” in Chapter 10, “Organize and Arrange Content.” 146 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements 3. In the lower-right corner of the picture, point to the handle (the circle). When the pointer changes to a double arrow, drag up and to the left until the right side of the picture’s shadow frame is in line with the 1.75 inch mark on the horizontal ruler. When you release the mouse button, the picture assumes its new size. Because the ratio of the picture’s height to its width (called the aspect ratio) is locked, the height and width change proportionally. Tip You can fine-tune the size of a graphic by adjusting the Shape Height and Shape Width settings in the Size group on the Format tab. 4. On the Format contextual tab, in the Size group, click the Crop button. Word surrounds the picture with crop handles. 5. Point to the bottom-middle handle, and when the pointer changes to a black T, drag upward until the picture is about 1 inch high. Word grays out the part of the picture you have cropped away. Word will not actually crop the picture until you turn off the crop button. 6. Click the Crop button to turn it off. Word removes the crop handles and discards the gray part of the picture. Inserting and Modifying Pictures 147 Tip In addition to cropping a picture manually, you can click the Crop arrow and select from various options, including having Word crop a picture to fit a shape you select, cropping to a precise width:height ratio, filling an area with a picture, or fitting a picture to an area. 7. Click to the left of the Joan has worked paragraph, press Enter, and then press the Up Arrow key. Then repeat steps 1 through 6 to insert, size, and crop the Joan picture below the Joan Lambert heading. 8. With the Joan picture still selected, on the Format contextual tab, in the Adjust group, click the Color button. The Color gallery appears. You can change the saturation and tone, as well as recolor the picture. 9. Under Recolor in the Color gallery, preview each option, and then click the second thumbnail in the first row (Grayscale). The picture is grayscaled—that is, each color is converted into a shade of gray. 10. In the Adjust group, click the Corrections button. Then in the Corrections gallery, under Brightness and Contrast , preview each option, and then click the fourth thumbnail in the top row (Brightness: +20% Contrast: -40%). 148 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements 11. In the Picture Styles group, click the More button. The Picture Styles gallery appears. You can apply frames, shadows, glows, and 3-D effects from the Picture Styles gallery. Troubleshooting The number of thumbnails per row in your galleries might be different than ours, depending on the screen resolution and the width of the program window. In the steps, look for the thumbnail with the name specified. 12. In the gallery, preview each thumbnail, and then click the first thumbnail in the fifth row (Bevel Rectangle). Click away from the picture to see the effect. The photograph now has a three-dimensional appearance. This picture style gives the effect of a padded square button. Inserting and Modifying Pictures 149 13. Click the Joan picture to select it, and then on the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click the Format Painter button. 14. If necessary, scroll up in the document, and click the Joyce picture. Word copies the grayscale format, color corrections, and picture style from one picture to the other. 15. Scroll down until the Online Training Solutions, Inc. (OTSI) heading is visible, click to the left of the OTSI specializes paragraph, press Enter, and then press Up Arrow. 16. On the Insert tab, in the Illustration group, click the Picture button. Then in the Chapter05 folder displayed in the Insert Picture dialog box, double-click the OTSI-Logo graphic. 17. With the logo selected, on the Format contextual tab, in the Adjust group, click the Artistic Effects button. 18. In the Artistic Effects gallery, preview each thumbnail, and then click the last thumbnail in the fifth row (Glow Edges). Click away from the picture to see the effect. The logo now has a black-and-white stylized effect. You can use artistic effects to make pictures look like paintings, pencil sketches, cutouts and more. Tip To move a picture, simply drag it to the desired location. Tocopy a graphic, hold down the Ctrl key while you drag, releasing first the mouse button and then the Ctrl key. (If you release Ctrl first, Word will move the image instead of copying it.) CLEAN UP Save the Authors document, and then close it. 150 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements About Clip Art If you want to dress up a document with a graphic but you don’t have a suitable picture, you might want to search for a clip art image. Clip art comes in many different styles and formats, including illustrations, photographs, videos, and audio clips. The only thing the clips have in common is that they are free and available without any copyright restrictions. Clicking the Clip Art button displays the Clip Art task pane, where you can enter a search term to look for an image on your computer or on the Office.com Web site. When clip art images matching your search term are displayed in the task pane, you can click an image to insert it in your document. If you don’t want to insert an image at the cursor but want it to be available for use somewhere else, you can point to the image in the Clip Art task pane, click the arrow that appears, and then click Copy to store a copy of the image on the Microsoft Office Clipboard. If you find an image on Office.com and want to be able to insert it in documents when you are not online, you can point to the arrow, click Make Available Offline, and then store it in a clip art collection. You can also edit the keywords associated with an image and view its properties. To find and insert a clip art image: 1. Position the cursor where you want the image to appear. Then on the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click the Clip Art button. 2. In the Clip Art task pane, select the current entry in the Search For box (or click in the box if there is no entry), and enter a keyword for the type of clip art you are looking for, such as cats. Then select the Include Office.com Content check box, and click Go. Tip You can restrict the search results to a particular type of clip art by selecting the type in the Results Should Be list. The task pane displays any clip art images that have your keyword associated with them. Inserting and Modifying Pictures Cat-related clip art images from your computer and Office.com. 3. In the task pane, click the image you want to insert into the document. You can then manipulate the clip art image the same way you would a picture. 151 152 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements Changing a Document’s Background Whether you’re creating a document that will be printed, viewed on a computer, or published on the Internet and viewed in a Web browser, you can make your document stand out by adding a background color, texture, or picture to every page in a document. You can also add borders to every page. See Also For information about creating documents for the Web, see “Creating and Modifying Web Documents” in Chapter 11, “Create Documents for Use Outside of Word.” When it comes to backgrounds, the trick is to not overdo it. Your effects need to be subtle enough that they do not interfere with the text or other elements on the page. In this exercise, you’ll first apply a solid background color to every page. Then you’ll create a two-color gradient across the pages. You’ll fill the pages with one of the textures that come with Word and then fill them with a picture. Finally, you’ll put a border around every page. SET UP You need the MarbleFloor picture located in your Chapter05 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open a blank document, turn off the rulers and formatting marks, and then follow the steps. 1. In the lower-right corner of the program window, click the Zoom Level button, and set the zoom percentage to display the whole page. 2. On the Page Layout tab, in the Page Background group, click the Page Color button, and then under Theme Colors, in the column of green boxes, click the second box from the top (Olive Green, Accent 3, Lighter 60%). The background of the document changes to the selected color. 3. In the Page Background group, click the Page Color button, and then click Fill Effects. The Fill Effects dialog box opens. Changing a Document’s Background 153 The Gradient page of the Fill Effects dialog box. 4. In the Colors area, click Two colors, and then leaving Color 1 set to light green, click the Color 2 arrow, and in the fifth column of boxes, select the top box (Blue, Accent 1, Lighter 80%). The Variants and Sample areas change to show graded combinations of the two colors. 5. In the Shading styles area, click each option in turn and observe the effects in the Variants and Sample areas. Then click Diagonal Up. 6. In the Variants area, click the option in the upper-left corner, and then click OK. The background of the document is now shaded from light green to light blue. 154 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements 7. Display the Fill Effects dialog box again, and click the Texture tab. On this page, you can select from a number of texture files that come with Word. The Texture page of the Fill Effects dialog box. 8. Click the effect in the second column of the third row ( White Marble), and then click OK. The background changes to display the effect rather than the color. Changing a Document’s Background 155 The page with the White Marble texture applied to the background. 9. Display the Fill Effects dialog box again, and click the Picture tab. Then click Select Picture, and with the contents of your Chapter05 practice file folder displayed in the Select Picture dialog box, double-click MarbleFloor. In the Fill Effects dialog box, click OK. 156 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements The background changes to display a blurred picture of a marble floor in the Doge’s Palace in Venice. The page with the MarbleFloor picture applied to the background. Tip Word fills the page with as much of the picture as will fit. If one copy of the picture does not completely fill the page, Word inserts another copy, effectively “tiling” the image. Changing a Document’s Background 157 10. In the Page Background group, click the Page Borders button. The Borders And Shading dialog box opens with the Page Border page active. The Page Border page is almost the same as the Borders page, except that an Art option is available at the bottom of the center pane. 11. In the Setting area of the Borders and Shading dialog box, click Box . Then in the Color list, click the third box in the blue column (Blue, Accent 1, Lighter 40%). 12. In the Art list, scroll down, clicking any art option you like to see it applied to the page in the Preview pane. When you find a style you like, click OK . We chose a classic double border near the bottom of the Art list. 158 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements The page with a double border applied on top of the picture background. 13. Press Ctrl+Enter to insert a page break, and then scroll to the second page. When you apply a background, it is reflected in all the pages of the document. CLEAN UP If you want, save the document as PageBackground, and then close it. Inserting Building Blocks 159 Inserting Building Blocks To simplify the creation of professional-looking text elements, Word 2010 comes with ready-made visual representations of text, known as building blocks, which are available from various groups on the Insert tab. You can insert the following types of building blocks: ● Cover page You can quickly add a formatted cover page to a longer document such as a report by selecting a style from the Cover Page gallery. The cover page includes text placeholders for elements such as a title so that you can customize the page to reflect the content of the document. Tip You can also insert a blank page anywhere in a document—even in the middle of a paragraph—by positioning the cursor and then clicking the Blank Page button in the Pages group on the Insert tab. ● Header and footer You can display information on every page of a document in regions at the top and bottom of a page by selecting a style from the Header or Footer gallery. Word indicates the header and footer areas by displaying dotted borders and displays a Design contextual tab on the ribbon. You can enter information in the header and footer areas the same way you enter ordinary text. You can have a different header and footer on the first page of a document and different headers and footers on odd and even pages. Tip If your document contains section breaks, each successive section inherits the headers and footers of the preceding section unless you break the link between the two sections. You can then create a different header and footer for the current section. For information about sections, see “Controlling What Appears on Each Page” in Chapter 6, “Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents.” ● Page number You can quickly add headers and footers that include only page numbers and require no customization by selecting the style you want from one of the Page Number galleries. ● Text box To reinforce key concepts and also alleviate the monotony of page after page of plain text, you can insert text boxes such as sidebars and quote boxes by selecting a style from the Text Box gallery. The formatted text box includes placeholder text that you replace with your own. If you frequently use a specific element in your documents, such as a formatted titlesubtitle-author arrangement at the beginning of reports, you can define it as a custom building block. It is then available from the Quick Parts gallery. See Also For information about saving frequently used text as a custom building block, see “Inserting Saved Text” in Chapter 2, “Edit and Proofread Text.” 160 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements You can see a list of all the available building blocks by clicking the Quick Parts button in the Text group on the Insert tab and then clicking Building Blocks Organizer. The Building Blocks Organizer dialog box. Initially the building blocks are organized by type, as reflected in the Gallery column. If you want to insert building blocks of the same design in a document, you might want to sort the list alphabetically by design name, by clicking the Name column heading. For example, a cover page, footer, header, quote box, and sidebar are all available with the Pinstripes design. Some elements, such as bibliographies, equations, tables of contents, tables, and watermarks, are not part of a design family and have their own unique names. Tip You can see more information about each building block by dragging the horizontal scroll box to display the right side of the Building Blocks list. Inserting Building Blocks 161 At the bottom of the Building Blocks Organizer dialog box, you can click Edit Properties to display a dialog box where you can see the information about a selected building block in a more readable format. If you are viewing the properties associated with a custom building block, you can change them in this dialog box, but we don’t recommend changing the properties assigned to a building block that came with Word. The Modify Building Block dialog box. You can delete a selected custom building block from the list by clicking Delete at the bottom of the Building Blocks Organizer dialog box, and you can insert a selected building block into the document by clicking Insert. In this exercise, you’ll insert a cover page and add a header and footer to a document. You’ll also insert two kinds of text boxes with the same design. Finally, you’ll save a customized sidebar as a building block. SET UP You need the Flyer_start document located in your Chapter05 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the Flyer_start document, and save it as Flyer. Then follow the steps. 1. Click the Zoom Level button in the lower-right corner of the program window. In the Zoom dialog box, click Whole page, and then click OK. 2. With the cursor at the top of the document, on the Insert tab, in the Pages group, click the Cover Page button. 162 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements The Cover Page gallery appears. The thumbnails show the designs of the available cover pages. 3. Scroll through the Cover Page gallery to see the available options, and then click Pinstripes. Word inserts the cover page at the beginning of the document and adds placeholders for the title, subtitle, date, company name, and author name. Inserting Building Blocks 163 The selected cover page. Tip If any of the required information is attached to the document as properties, Word inserts the information instead of the placeholder. 4. Click anywhere in the title placeholder, and type Simple Room Design. Then click the Pick the date placeholder, click the arrow that appears, and in the calendar, click today’s date (indicated by a red box). Delete the remaining placeholder paragraphs. 164 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements 5. On the Insert tab, in the Header & Footer group, click the Header button. Scroll through the Header gallery, and then click Pinstripes. Word displays the Design contextual tab, dims the text of the document, and indicates the header and footer areas with dotted lines. Because the Different First Page check box in the Options group on the Design tab is selected, the header area is labeled First Page Header. 6. In the Navigation group, click the Next button. Word moves to the next section of the document, which is the page after the cover page. Inserting Building Blocks 165 7. Type Wide World Importers. Then on the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Center button. 8. On the Design tab, in the Navigation group, click the Go to Footer button. The cursor moves to the footer area at the bottom of the page. 9. In the Header & Footer group, click the Page Number button, point to Current Position in the list, and then in the gallery, click Large Color. Except for the first page of the document, the pages now have a header and footer. Headers and footers can include any information you want repeated on each page in a section, including graphics. 166 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements Tip To use a numbering scheme other than Arabic numerals, to number pages by chapter, or to control the starting number, click the Page Number button in the Header & Footer group, and then click Format Page Numbers. In the Page Number Format dialog box, click the Number Format arrow, and then in the list, click the format you want. 10. In the Close group, click the Close Header and Footer button. 11. At the top of the second page, delete Simple Room Design. Then on the Insert tab, in the Text group, click the Quick Parts button, and click Building Blocks Organizer. The Building Blocks Organizer shown at the beginning of this topic opens. The left pane displays a complete list of all the building blocks available on your computer. Clicking a building block in the left pane displays a preview in the right pane. Tip The Building Blocks list you see on your computer includes AutoText entries for your user name and initials. To change either of these entries, display the Backstage view, click Options, and then on the General page of the Word Options dialog box, update your information and click OK. 12. Scroll through the Building blocks list, previewing a few of the building blocks. Then click the Name column heading, and scroll through the list again. Notice that page elements of the same theme are coordinated. The Building Blocks Organizer dialog box, after the Name column has been sorted. Inserting Building Blocks 167 13. In the Building blocks list, click Pinstripes Quote (the first of the Pinstripes text boxes), and then below the list, click Insert. Word inserts the quote box halfway down the right side of the page. Placeholder text in the quote box tells you how to insert your own text and format the block. 14. Click the Zoom Out button on the Zoom Slider until you can read the text of the document. Then select and copy the last sentence of the fourth paragraph (Go with what you love…). 15. Click the quote box to select the placeholder text. Then on the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click the Paste arrow, and under Paste Options, click the Keep Text Only button. 168 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements The copied text replaces the placeholder, and because it was pasted as unformatted text, it retains the formatting of the placeholder text. The quote box automatically resizes to fit its new contents. See Also For information about text boxes, see the sidebar “Drawing Text Boxes” later in this chapter. 16. Display the whole page again. Then scroll to the last page of the document, and click anywhere on the page. 17. On the Insert tab, in the Text group, click the Text Box button, scroll through the gallery, and click Pinstripes Sidebar. Word inserts the sidebar down the right side of the page. This sidebar consists of two overlapping, coordinated boxes. Inserting Building Blocks 169 18. If necessary, zoom out so that you can see the text well enough to edit it. Then at the beginning of the last paragraph of the document, delete NOTE: (including the colon and following space). 19. Select the last paragraph, and on the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click the Cut button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+X to cut the selected content to the Clipboard. See Also For more information about keyboard shortcuts, see “Keyboard Shortcuts” at the end of this book. 20. Click the sidebar to select the placeholder text. Then in the Clipboard group, click the Paste arrow, and under Paste Options, click the Keep Text Only button. The sidebar now contains the cut text. The pasted text takes on the formatting assigned to the text box. 21. To widen the sidebar so that the Web site address fits on one line, click the sidebar text, and drag the blue handle on the dotted line at the left side of the white box to the left, until it sits slightly to the left of the frame of the white box. If the Web site address still doesn’t fit, adjust the width of the sidebar again. 170 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements 22. Click at the top of the sidebar’s blue box. Then on the Insert tab, in the Text group, click the Quick Parts button, and click Save Selection to Quick Part Gallery. Troubleshooting If you click the text in the sidebar or elsewhere in the document after resizing the sidebar, the sidebar will no longer be selected and the Save Selection To Quick Part Gallery command will not be available. The Create New Building Block dialog box opens. 23. Replace the text in the Name box with Order Sidebar, and then click OK. You can now insert this custom sidebar from the Quick Parts gallery into other documents. 24. In the Text group, click the Quick Parts button. The Quick Parts gallery appears. The Order Sidebar custom building block appears at the top of the gallery. 25. Click Building Blocks Organizer, and then in the Building Blocks Organizer dialog box, click the Category column heading to sort the Building blocks list by that column. Inserting Building Blocks 171 26. In the Building blocks list, scroll to the General category, and click Order Sidebar once. The building block you just created appears in the preview pane. The General category includes your custom building block and the user name and initials AutoText entries. CLEAN UP If you want, delete the building block you just created before you close the Building Blocks Organizer dialog box. Then save the Flyer document, and close it. Important When you exit Word after saving a custom building block, you’ll be asked whether you want to save changes to the template in which you stored the building block. If you want the building block to be available for future documents, click Save; otherwise, click Don’t Save. 172 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements Drawing Text Boxes If none of the predefined text-box building blocks meets your needs, you can draw your own text box. At the bottom of the Text Box gallery, click Draw Text Box, and then drag a box the size you want anywhere on the page. You can immediately start typing at the blinking cursor, and you can format the text the way you would any other text. When a text box is surrounded by a dashed border, it’s selected for text editing. To manipulate the text box itself, you need to click its frame. The text box on the left is selected for editing, and the one on the right is selected for manipulation. When a text box has a solid border, you can reposition it by dragging it to another location, and you can change its size by dragging the size handles around its frame. You can change the outline and fill colors by using the commands in the Shape Styles group on the Format contextual tab. You can link text boxes so that text flows from one to the next. To do so: 1. Click the first text box. 2. In the Text group on the Format contextual tab, click Create Link. The mouse pointer changes to a small pitcher. 3. Point to the second text box, and then when the mouse pointer changes to a pouring pitcher, click once. Note that the second text box must be empty. Adding WordArt Text 173 Adding WordArt Text If you’re familiar with WordArt in earlier versions of Word, you’re in for a surprise. WordArt has matured from the fun little tool you might have used in the past to create headings in molded shapes and gaudy colors. Its capabilities are now oriented toward creating more sophisticated display-text objects that you can position anywhere on the page. Although the WordArt object is attached to the paragraph that contained the cursor when you created it, you can move it independently from the text, even positioning it over the text if you want. To insert a WordArt object, you click the WordArt button in the Text group on the Insert tab, and click a text style in the WordArt gallery. (The WordArt styles are the same as the text effects available in the Text Effects gallery in the Font group of the Home tab.) Then you enter your text in the text box that appears. You can edit the text, adjust the character formatting in the usual ways, and change the text style at any time. Tip You can also select existing text before clicking the WordArt button to convert that text into a WordArt object. See Also For information about character formatting, see “Manually Changing the Look of Characters” in Chapter 3, “Change the Look of Text.” For information about text effects, see “Quickly Formatting Text” in the same chapter. When a WordArt object is selected, the Format contextual tab appears on the ribbon. You can use the commands on this tab to format the WordArt object to meet your needs. For example, from the Format tab, you can add effects such as shadows and 3-D effects, change the fill and outline colors, and change the text direction and alignment. You can also position the WordArt object in any of several predefined locations on the page, as well as specify how the text should wrap around the object. Tip Don’t go too wild with WordArt formatting. Many WordArt Styles and Shape Styles take up space and can involve trial and error to produce a neat effect. In this exercise, you’ll insert a new WordArt object, modify it, and then position it on the page. Then you’ll change the way it relates to the text on the page. 174 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements SET UP You need the Announcement_start document located in your Chapter05 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the Announcement_start document and save it as Announcement. Then with the rulers and formatting marks turned off, follow the steps. 1. On the Insert tab, in the Text group, click the WordArt button. The WordArt gallery appears, displaying the same formatted letters you see when you click the Text Effects button. 2. Click the third thumbnail in the fifth row (Fill – Red, Accent 2, Warm Matte Bevel). Word inserts a WordArt object with that text effect at the cursor. Because a graphic object is selected, the Format contextual tab appears on the ribbon. The WordArt object contains placeholder text in the style you chose. Tip If formatting marks are displayed, you see an anchor icon adjacent to the first paragraph. You can ignore it for now. See Also For information about anchoring objects, see “Arranging Objects on the Page” in Chapter 10, “Organize and Arrange Content.” 3. With Your Text Here selected, type The Room Planner. (Don’t type the period.) Tip WordArt objects can accommodate multiple lines. Simply press Enter if you want to start a new line. 4. Without moving the cursor, on the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Center button. 5. Click the border of the text box to select the box, and then change the zoom percentage so that you can see the whole page. 6. On the Format contextual tab, in the Arrange group, click the Position button. The Position gallery appears. Adding WordArt Text 175 You can position the WordArt object in one of 10 predefined positions. 7. Point to each thumbnail in turn to preview where each option will place the object. Then under With Text Wrapping, click the second thumbnail in the second row (Position in Middle Center with Square Text Wrapping). The object moves to the middle of the page. Don’t worry if the word Planner is now truncated. Because of the interaction of the object with its surrounding text, sometimes not all the WordArt text fits in its box after you position it. You’ll fix that in a minute. 8. In the Arrange group, click the Wrap Text button. The Wrap Text gallery appears. You can change the text wrapping without changing the position. 176 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements 9. Point to each thumbnail in turn to preview their effects, and then click Tight. 10. In the Arrange group, click the Wrap Text button, and then click More Layout Options. The Layout dialog box opens with the Text Wrapping page active. If you know what kind of text wrapping you want, you can select it on this page of the dialog box, but you can’t preview it. 11. In the Distance from text area, change the Left and Right settings to 0.3", and then click OK . The text outside the box is no longer encroaching on the box. If the word Planner was truncated in your box, the entire word should now be displayed. If it isn’t, try increasing the Distance From Text settings to 0.4". 12. In the WordArt Styles group, display the WordArt Quick Styles gallery, and then click the fourth thumbnail in the third row (Gradient Fill – Blue, Accent 1). Troubleshooting Depending on your screen resolution and program window size, you might have to click the Quick Styles button to display the gallery. Adding WordArt Text 177 13. In the Shape Styles group, display the Shape Styles gallery, and then click the fourth thumbnail in the fourth row (Subtle Effect – Olive Green, Accent 3). 14. Press Ctrl+Home. Now you can see the effect of the WordArt text. This simple text banner is a stylish alternative to a traditional title. 15. If you want, experiment with combinations of the styles and formatting available on the Format tab. For example, you might want to try some of the Text Effects options, such as the molding effects available in the Transform gallery. CLEAN UP Save the Announcement document, and then close it. 178 Chapter 5 Add Simple Graphic Elements Formatting the First Letter of a Paragraph Many books, magazines, and reports begin the first paragraph of a section or chapter by using an enlarged, decorative capital letter. Called a dropped capital, or simply a drop cap, this effect can be an easy way to give a document a finished, professional look. The Drop Cap gallery provides two basic drop-cap styles: ● Dropped Sits in the text column and displaces paragraph text ● In margin Hangs in the margin adjacent to the paragraph text In either case, the drop cap is as tall as three lines of text and uses the same font as the rest of the paragraph. To insert a drop cap: 1. Click anywhere in a paragraph of text, and then on the Insert tab, in the Text group, click the Drop Cap button. 2. Point to each thumbnail to display its live preview, and then click the one you want. Word inserts the first letter of the paragraph in a box. If you selected Dropped, Word rewraps the text to the right of the graphic. For more options, click Drop Cap Options at the bottom of the Drop Cap gallery to open the Drop Cap dialog box. You can choose a font that is different from the paragraph and adjust the drop cap’s height and distance from the text. If you want to make the first word of the paragraph stand out, you can click to the right of the drop cap and type the rest of the word. If you do this, don’t forget to delete the word from the beginning of the paragraph! Key Points 179 Key Points ● You can insert illustrations created with most graphics programs, as well as digital photos, into a Word document. ● A background color, texture, pattern, or picture can really give a document pizzazz, but be careful that it doesn’t overwhelm the text. ● Word comes with predefined building blocks that quickly add graphic elements to a document. ● Using WordArt, you can easily add fancy text to a document and then format and position it for the best effect. Chapter at a Glance Preview and adjust page layout, page 182 Print documents, page 193 Control what appears on each page, page 188 Prepare documents for electronic distribution, page 195 6 Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents In this chapter, you will learn how to ✔ Preview and adjust page layout. ✔ Control what appears on each page. ✔ Print documents. ✔ Prepare documents for electronic distribution. When you finish developing a document, you’ll often want to distribute either a printed version or an electronic version. Before committing the document to paper, you should check that the pages are efficiently laid out and that there are no glaring problems, such as headings that print on separate pages from their text. Microsoft Word 2010 provides several tools you can use to manipulate how much text appears on each page and to control page layout. It also provides tools for finalizing an electronic document and ensuring that the end product of all your hard work contains no traces of personal or confidential information. When you are ready to print, you can control precisely how many copies and what parts of your document appear on paper. In this chapter, you’ll first preview a document and make some adjustments to improve its presentation. Then you’ll look at the options available for controlling page breaks. You’ll print a document, and finally, you’ll inspect and finalize it for electronic distribution. Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this chapter, you need to copy the book’s practice files to your computer. The practice files you’ll use to complete the exercises in this chapter are in the Chapter06 practice file folder. A complete list of practice files is provided in “Using the Practice Files” at the beginning of this book. 181 182 Chapter 6 Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents Previewing and Adjusting Page Layout Usually while you’re creating a document, you’ll make decisions about the size of the margins and the direction of the page (called the orientation) to best suit your content. You can use the Margins and Orientation commands in the Page Setup group of the Page Layout tab to make any necessary adjustments to the document, and you can use the Size command to change the paper size. You can also display the Page Setup dialog box, where you can make these basic layout changes all in one place. You can adjust all the page layout settings in one place. Previewing and Adjusting Page Layout 183 Working on your document in Print Layout view helps to ensure that the document looks tidy on the page. However, before you print the document, you’ll almost always want to check how it will look on paper by previewing it. Previewing is essential for multipage documents but is helpful even for one-page documents. To preview a document, you display the Print page of the Backstage view and then page through the document displayed in the right pane. This view shows exactly how each page of the document will look when printed on the specified printer. The Print page of the Backstage view. 184 Chapter 6 Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents If you don’t like what you see in the preview pane of the Print page, you don’t have to leave the Backstage view to make adjustments. The middle pane of the Print page provides tools for making the following changes: ● Orientation You can switch the direction in which a page is laid out on the paper. The default orientation is Portrait, in which the page is taller than it is wide. You can set the orientation to Landscape, in which the page is wider than it is tall. ● Paper size You can switch to one of the sizes available for the selected printer by making a selection from a list. ● Margins Changing the margins of a document changes where information can appear on each page. You can select one of Word's predefined sets of top, bottom, left, and right margins, or set custom margins. Tip All the pages of a document have the same orientation and margins unless you divide the document into sections. Then each section can have independent orientation and margin settings. For more information about sections, see “Controlling What Appears on Each Page” later in this chapter. If your printer is capable of scaling the pages of your document, you’ll also see an option to set the number of pages to print per sheet of paper, up to 16. You might use this option to print a booklet with two pages per sheet that will be folded in the middle. You might also be tempted to use this option to save paper, but bear in mind that the smaller the pages, the harder it is to read them. You can also open the Page Setup dialog box from the Print page to make multiple adjustments in one place. In this exercise, you’ll preview a document, change the orientation, and adjust the margins. SET UP You need the InfoSheetA_start document located in the Chapter06 practice file folder, and an active printer connection, to complete this exercise. Open the InfoSheetA_start document, and save it as InfoSheetA. Then follow the steps. 1. Display the Backstage view, and in the left pane, click Print. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+P to display the Print page of the Backstage view. See Also For more information about keyboard shortcuts, see “Keyboard Shortcuts” at the end of this book. Previewing and Adjusting Page Layout 185 The Print page is displayed, with a preview of the document on the right. The shaded background of the document is not displayed because it will not be printed. 2. In the lower-right corner of the preview pane, click the Zoom button, and then in the Zoom dialog box, click Many pages, click the monitor button, and click the second page icon in the top row of the grid (1x2 Pages). Then click OK. Word displays the two pages of the document side by side. You can preview multiple pages. Tip If you want to preview a multipage document as it will look when printed on both sides of the page and bound, add a blank page to the beginning of the document before previewing it. 3. Under Settings in the middle pane, click Custom Margins. The gallery of margin options appears. 186 Chapter 6 Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents You can select predefined margins or set your own. 4. In the list, click Wide. The text rewraps within the new margins. 5. In the page range in the lower-left corner of the preview pane, click the Next Page button. The page range updates to show that the document now has three pages and that page 2 is the active page. 6. Click the Next Page button again to see the last page of the document. 7. At the bottom of the middle pane, click Page Setup. The Page Setup dialog box opens, displaying the Margins page. Notice that selecting Wide margins on the Print page set the left and right margins to 2 inches. 8. In the Pages area, display the Multiple pages list, and click Mirror Margins. The Preview area now displays two pages side by side, and in the Margins area, Left and Right have changed to Inside and Outside. Previewing and Adjusting Page Layout 187 9. In the Margins area, change the value in the Outside box to 1". Tip You can either type a new value or click the down arrow at the right end of the box. In the pages in the Preview area, the width of the outside margins decreases. You might use the Mirror Margins setting if you were planning on printing on both sides of the paper and then stapling the pages. 10. Return the Multiple pages setting to Normal, and in the Margins area, change the value in the Left box to 1". 11. If you want, in the Page Setup dialog box, click the Paper tab and then the L ayout tab, and notice the available options on those pages. Then click OK . On the Print page, the margins setting is now Normal Margins, and the page range indicator shows that the number of pages in the document has decreased to two. CLEAN UP Save the InfoSheetA document, and then close it. 188 Chapter 6 Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents Controlling What Appears on Each Page When a document includes more content than will fit between its top and bottom margins, Word creates a new page by inserting a soft page break. If you want to break a page before Word would normally break it, you can insert a manual page break in one of three ways: ● Click Page Break in the Pages group on the Insert tab. ● Click Breaks in the Page Setup group on the Page Layout tab, and then click Page. ● Press Ctrl+Enter. Tip As you edit the text in a document, Word changes the location of the soft page breaks, but the program cannot change the location of any manual page breaks you might have inserted. If a paragraph breaks so that most of it appears on one page but its last line appears at the top of the next page, the line is called a widow. If a paragraph breaks so that its first line appears at the bottom of one page and the rest of the paragraph appears on the next page, the line is called an orphan. These single lines of text can make a document hard to read, so by default, Word specifies that a minimum of two lines should appear at the top and bottom of each page. However, on the Line And Page Breaks page of the Paragraph dialog box, you can change whether page breaks are allowed to create widows and orphans. You can also change the following options: ● Keep with next This option controls whether Word will break a page between the paragraph containing the cursor and the following paragraph. ● Keep lines together This option controls whether Word will break a page within a paragraph. ● Page break before This option controls whether Word will break a page before the paragraph containing the cursor. Controlling What Appears on Each Page 189 The Line And Page Breaks page of the Paragraph dialog box. Tip You can apply these options to individual paragraphs, or you can incorporate them into the styles you define for document elements such as headings. For information about styles, see “Working with Styles and Templates” in Chapter 16, “Work in Word More Efficiently.” 190 Chapter 6 Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents In addition to page breaks, you can insert section breaks in your documents. A section break identifies a part of the document that has page settings, such as orientation or margins, that are different from those of the rest of the document. For example, you might want to put a large table in its own section so that you can turn it sideways by changing its orientation to Landscape. You insert a section break by clicking Breaks in the Page Setup group on the Page Layout tab and then selecting from the following section types: ● Next Page Starts the following section on the next page ● Continuous Starts a new section without affecting page breaks ● Even Page Starts the following section on the next even-numbered page ● Odd Page Starts the following section on the next odd-numbered page If formatting marks are displayed, a section break appears in Print Layout view as a double-dotted line from the preceding paragraph mark to the margin, with the words Section Break and the type of section break in the middle of the line. Tip To remove a page or section break, click at the left end of the break and then press the Delete key. In this exercise, you’ll insert page and section breaks, and ensure that the pages break in logical places. SET UP You need the OfficeInfo_start document located in the Chapter06 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the OfficeInfo_start document, and save it as OfficeInfo. Display formatting marks, and then follow the steps. 1. Scroll through the document, noticing any awkward page breaks, such as a topic or list that starts close to the bottom of a page. 2. On the Home tab, in the Editing group, click the Select button, and then click Select All. 3. Click the Paragraph dialog box launcher, and then in the Paragraph dialog box, click the Line and Page Breaks tab. Because different settings have been applied to different paragraphs in the document, all the check boxes have a solid filling. Controlling What Appears on Each Page 191 When multiple paragraphs are selected, solid check boxes indicate that the paragraphs have different settings. 4. Double-click all the check boxes to clear them. 5. Select the Keep lines together check box (click more than once if necessary), and then click OK . This setting ensures that none of the paragraphs will be broken across two pages. Word alerts you to the presence of this formatting by displaying a square symbol to the left of each paragraph. 6. Press Ctrl+Home to release the selection, and then scroll through the document, again looking for untidy page breaks. 7. Click to the left of the Facilities heading. 8. On the Insert tab, in the Pages group, click the Page Break button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+Enter to insert a page break. Word breaks the page and moves the Facilities heading and the following text to the next page. 9. Scroll down to the bottom of page 3, select the Supplies heading and the three lines that follow it (the third line is at the top of page 4), and then display the Line and Page Breaks page of the Paragraph dialog box. 192 Chapter 6 Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents 10. In the Pagination area, leave the Keep lines together check box selected, select the Keep with next check box, and then click OK. Word moves the selection to the next page. 11. Scroll down to page 9, and click to the left of the Shipping Quick Reference heading. Tip If you drag the scroll box in the scroll bar, Word displays a ScreenTip with the number of the page that will be displayed if you release the mouse button. 12. On the Page Layout tab, in the Page Setup group, click the Breaks button, and then under Section Breaks, click Next Page. Word pushes the heading to the next page. 13. Scroll up until the text on page 9 is displayed. A double dotted line with the words Section Break (Next Page) appears at the right end of the paragraph preceding the section break. The section break indicator. 14. Scroll down to page 10, and with the cursor in the Shipping Quick Reference heading, on the Page Layout tab, in the Page Setup group, click the Margins button. Then in the Margins gallery, click Wide. The table in the new section shrinks in width to fit between the wider margins. 15. On the Insert tab, in the Header & Footer group, click the Header button, and then click Edit Header. In the Navigation group of the Design contextual tab, the Link To Previous button is selected, meaning that the header of the new section has inherited the settings of the preceding section. Because the preceding section has no header on its first page, this one doesn’t have one either. 16. On the Design contextual tab, in the Options group, clear the Different First Page check box. Then click the Close Header and Footer button. Printing Documents 193 Now the header from pages 2 through 9 of the preceding section is repeated on page 10 in this section. You might have to adjust the header settings after creating a new section. CLEAN UP Save the OfficeInfo document, and then close it. Printing Documents When you are ready to print a document, you display the Print page of the Backstage view, and then, to print one copy on the current printer with the settings shown, you simply click the Print button. If you need to use settings other than the defaults, you can change the following: ● Number of copies Click the arrows or type the number you need. ● Printer Switch to a different printer, or click Printer Properties to change the printer options. ● Print range Print the entire document, the selected text, the current page, or a custom range of pages. (Point to the information icon to the right of the Pages box to see the format in which to enter a custom range.) ● Sides of the paper Print on one side or both sides, either manually or, if your printer has duplex capability, automatically. ● Collation For multiple copies of a multipage document, print all the pages in the document as a set or print all the copies of each page as a set. 194 Chapter 6 Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents If your printer has multiple paper trays or a manual paper feeder, you can select the paper source you want to use, on the Paper page of the Page Setup dialog box. In this exercise, you’ll see how to select a different printer before sending two copies of the current page of a document to be printed. SET UP You need the InfoSheetB_start document located in the Chapter06 practice file folder, and multiple active printer connections, to complete this exercise. Open the InfoSheetB_start document, and save it as InfoSheetB. Then follow the steps. 1. Display the Backstage view, and in the left pane, click Print. If you don’t need to change any settings, you can simply click the Print button at the top of the middle pane of the Print page. 2. If you have more than one printer available and you want to switch printers, under Printer in the middle pane, click the option displaying the name of the default printer, and in the list, click the printer you want. 3. Point to the information icon to the right of the Printer area heading. Tip You can also point to the selected printer. Information about your printer’s status is displayed. You can check your printer’s status without leaving the Print page. 4. In the Copies box next to the Print button, change the number of copies to 2. 5. Under Settings, click the arrow to the right of the first box to expand the list of print options, and then in the list, click Print Current Page. 6. Leaving the other settings as they are, click the Print button at the top of the middle pane. Word prints two copies of the document’s first page on the designated printer, and returns you to the document. CLEAN UP Close the InfoSheetB document. Preparing Documents for Electronic Distribution 195 Preparing Documents for Electronic Distribution When a document is complete, you can distribute it in two basic ways: on paper or electronically. If you distribute it electronically, you need to ensure that no private or inappropriate information is attached to the file and that it can be viewed by the people to whom you are sending it. Many documents go through several revisions, and some are scrutinized by multiple reviewers. During this development process, documents can accumulate information that you might not want in the final version, such as the names of people who worked on the document, comments that reviewers have added to the file, or hidden text about status and assumptions. This extraneous information is not a concern if the final version is to be delivered as a printout. However, these days, more and more files are delivered electronically, making this information available to anyone who wants to read it. To examine some of the attached information, you can display the document’s properties on the Info page of the Backstage view. You can change or remove the information in either the Document Panel or the Properties dialog box. However, Word provides a tool called the Document Inspector to automate the process of finding and removing all extraneous and potentially confidential information. After you run the Document Inspector, you see a summary of its search results, and you have the option of removing all the items found in each category. Word also includes two other finalizing tools: ● Check Accessibility Checks for document elements and formatting that might be difficult for people with certain kinds of disabilities to read. ● Check Compatibility Checks for the use of features not supported in earlier versions of Word. After you have handled extraneous information and accessibility and compatibility issues, you can mark a document as final and make it a read-only file, so that other people know that they should not make changes to this released document. 196 Chapter 6 Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents In this exercise, you’ll inspect a document for inappropriate information and mark it as final. SET UP You need the InfoSheetC_start document located in the Chapter06 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the InfoSheetC_start document, and save it as InfoSheetC. Then follow the steps. 1. Display the Backstage view, and in the left pane, click Info. In the right pane you see the properties that have been saved with the file. Some of the information, including the name of the author, was attached to the file by Word. Other information, such as the title, was added by a user. The properties attached to this document. Preparing Documents for Electronic Distribution 197 2. In the right pane, click the Properties button, and then in the list, click Advanced Properties. The Properties dialog box for this document opens. On the General page of the dialog box are properties maintained by Word. 3. Click the Summary tab. Notice that additional identifying information is displayed on this page. These properties were entered by the people who worked on the document. Tip To make a document easier to find in Windows Explorer, you can add tags in the Properties area of the Info page or keywords in the Properties dialog box. 4. Click Cancel to close the Properties dialog box. 5. In the Prepare for Sharing area of the Info page, click Check for Issues, and then click Inspect Document . Troubleshooting If Word asks whether you want to save changes to the file, click Yes. The Document Inspector dialog box opens, listing the items that will be checked. 198 Chapter 6 Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents 6. Without changing the default selections in the Document Inspector dialog box, click Inspect. The Document Inspector reports the presence of the properties you viewed earlier, as well as some custom XML data. The results of the inspection. 7. To the right of Document Properties and Personal Information, click Remove All. 8. To the right of Custom XML Data, click Remove All. 9. Click Reinspect, and then click Inspect. Word has removed the properties and XML data. 10. In the Document Inspector dialog box, click Close. The right pane of the Info page now shows that there are no custom properties attached to the document. Preparing Documents for Electronic Distribution 199 11. In the Permissions area of the Info page, click Protect Document, and then click Mark As Final. A message tells you that the document will be marked as final and then saved. 12. Click OK. A message tells you that the document has been marked as final and that typing, editing commands, and proofing marks are turned off. 13. Click OK. The Permissions area now indicates that the file is final. The Info page reminds people that the file is final. 14. Click the Insert tab. An orange bar appears, notifying you that the document has been marked as final. 15. Click the Insert tab again. The tab’s groups and buttons are displayed, but all of the buttons are inactive. Tip If you really want to make changes to the document, you can click a tab to display the orange bar and then click the Edit Anyway button to unmark the file. CLEAN UP Save the InfoSheetC document, and then close it. Tip If you need to distribute a document electronically but you don’t want to share the actual file, you can “print” the document to a new file in XML Paper Specification (XPS) format. For information, see “Saving Files in Different Formats” in Chapter 11, “Create Documents for Use Outside of Word.” 200 Chapter 6 Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents Key Points ● You should always preview a document before printing it. ● You can use page and section breaks and page break options to ensure that pages break in logical places. ● All the printing options are now gathered together on the Print page of the Backstage view. ● Before distributing a document, you can use the Document Inspector to remove private or inappropriate information. Part 2 Document Enhancements 7 Insert and Modify Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .203 8 Insert and Modify Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .223 9 Use Other Visual Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .243 10 Organize and Arrange Content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .267 11 Create Documents for Use Outside of Word. . . . . .287 201 Chapter at a Glance Create diagrams, page 203 Modify diagrams, page 210 Create picture diagrams, page 216 7 Insert and Modify Diagrams In this chapter, you will learn how to ✔ Create diagrams. ✔ Modify diagrams. ✔ Create picture diagrams. Diagrams are graphics that convey information. Business documents often include diagrams to clarify concepts, describe processes, and show hierarchical relationships. Microsoft Word 2010 comes with a powerful diagramming tool called SmartArt that you can use to create diagrams directly in your documents. By using ready-made diagram templates, you can produce sophisticated results tailored to your needs. In this chapter, you’ll insert a diagram into a document and specify its size and position. Then you’ll change the diagram’s layout, visual style, and color theme. Finally, you’ll see how to use a diagram to arrange pictures in a document. Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this chapter, you need to copy the book’s practice files to your computer. The practice files you’ll use to complete the exercises in this chapter are in the Chapter07 practice file folder. A complete list of practice files is provided in “Using the Practice Files” at the beginning of this book. Creating Diagrams When you need your document to clearly illustrate a concept such as a process, cycle, hierarchy, or relationship, the powerful SmartArt Graphics tool is available to help you create a dynamic, visually appealing diagram. By using predefined sets of sophisticated formatting, you can almost effortlessly put together any of the following diagrams: ● List These diagrams visually represent lists of related or independent information— for example, a list of items needed to complete a task, including pictures of the items. 203 204 Chapter 7 Insert and Modify Diagrams ● Process These diagrams visually describe the ordered set of steps required to complete a task—for example, the steps for getting a project approved. ● Cycle These diagrams represent a circular sequence of steps, tasks, or events, or the relationship of a set of steps, tasks, or events to a central, core element—for example, the looping process for continually improving a product based on customer feedback. ● Hierarchy These diagrams illustrate the structure of an organization or entity—for example, the top-level management structure of a company. ● Relationship These diagrams show convergent, divergent, overlapping, merging, or containment elements—for example, how using similar methods to organize your e-mail, calendar, and contacts can improve your productivity. ● Matrix These diagrams show the relationship of components to a whole—for example, the product teams in a department. ● P yramid These diagrams illustrate proportional or interconnected relationships— for example, the amount of time that should ideally be spent on different phases of a project. ● Picture These diagrams rely on pictures instead of text to create one of the other types of diagrams—for example, a process picture diagram with photographs showing the recession of glaciers in Glacier National Park. You select the type of diagram you want to create from the Choose A SmartArt Graphic dialog box. The categories are not mutually exclusive, meaning that some diagrams appear in more than one category. The Choose A SmartArt Graphic dialog box. Creating Diagrams 205 After creating the diagram, you insert text by typing either directly in its shapes or in the associated Text pane. Depending on the diagram type, the text appears in or adjacent to its shapes. In this exercise, you’ll create a diagram, add text, adjust its size, and specify its position in relation to the document text and page margins. SET UP You need the ServiceA_start document located in the Chapter07 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the ServiceA_start document, and save it as ServiceA. Then follow the steps. 1. Click to the left of the Gather information heading, and then on the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click the SmartArt button. Keyboard Shortcut Press and release Alt, N, and then M to open the Choose A SmartArt Graphic dialog box. See Also For more information about keyboard shortcuts, see “Keyboard Shortcuts” at the end of this book. The Choose A SmartArt Graphic dialog box opens, displaying all the available graphics. 2. In the left pane, click each diagram category in turn to display only the available layouts of that type in the center pane. 3. In the left pane, click Process. Then in the center pane, click each process diagram layout in turn to view an example, along with a description of what the diagram best conveys, in the right pane. Tip While you are exploring, keep in mind how much data your own diagrams might contain, and analyze which diagrams will ensure that the data will all fit on one page. 4. When you finish exploring, click the third thumbnail in the sixth row ( Vertical Process), and then click OK. The process diagram is inserted at the cursor, and the Design and Format contextual tabs are displayed on the ribbon. 206 Chapter 7 Insert and Modify Diagrams Three text placeholders appear in the diagram shapes and in the adjacent Text pane, where the text placeholders are formatted as a bulleted list. Troubleshooting The appearance of buttons and groups on the ribbon changes depending on the width of the program window. For information about changing the appearance of the ribbon to match our screen images, see “Modifying the Display of the Ribbon” at the beginning of this book. Depending on your screen resolution, you might see a description of the Vertical Process diagram at the bottom of the Text pane. If your Text pane looks like the one in our graphic, you can click Vertical Process to display the description. Troubleshooting If the Text pane is not open, click the tab displaying left and right (open and close) arrows on the left side of the diagram frame. You can also display the Text pane by clicking the Text Pane button in the Create Graphic group on the Design contextual tab. 5. With the first bullet selected in the Text pane, type Gather information, and then press the Down Arrow key to move the cursor to the next placeholder. Troubleshooting Be sure to press the Down Arrow key. If you press the Enter key, you’ll start a new bullet, and if you press the Tab key, you’ll turn the current bullet into a level-two bullet below the one above it. As you type in the Text pane, the words also appear in the corresponding shape in the diagram. Tip For a cleaner look, don’t type any punctuation at the end of the text in diagram shapes. Creating Diagrams 207 6. Repeat step 5 for the remaining two placeholders, entering Set up team and Plan project. 7. With the cursor at the end of the third bulleted item in the Text pane, press Enter to extend the bulleted list and add a new shape to the diagram. Then type Meet with department. The widths of the shapes in the diagram adjust to accommodate the length of the bullet point you just typed. You can add as many shapes as you need. 8. In the Text pane, click the Close button. 9. On the left side of the diagram frame, point to the sizing handle (the four dots), and when the pointer changes to a double-headed arrow, drag to the right past the diagram and into the white space, until the frame is approximately as wide as the shapes within the diagram. Troubleshooting Ensure that the pointer is a double-headed arrow before dragging. Point to the four dots, not to a blank part of the frame or to the Text pane tab on the left side of the frame. 208 Chapter 7 Insert and Modify Diagrams 10. If you can’t see the diagram after you release the mouse button, scroll up in the document. The diagram now sits at the left margin of the document, with the Gather information heading to its right. The diagram is anchored to the Gather information heading and moves with it. 11. On the Format contextual tab, in the Arrange group, click the Wrap Text button, and then in the gallery, click Square. Troubleshooting Depending on your window size and screen resolution, you might need to click the Arrange button to display the Arrange group. See Also For information about text wrapping, see “Arranging Objects on the Page” in Chapter 10, “Organize and Arrange Content.” 12. In the Arrange group, click the Position button, and then at the bottom of the gallery, click More Layout Options. The Layout dialog box opens with the Position page displayed. On this page are options for controlling where the diagram appears relative to other elements of the document. Creating Diagrams 209 The Position page of the Layout dialog box. 13. In the Horizontal area, click Alignment. Then click the Alignment arrow, and in the list, click Right. 14. In the Vertical area, click Alignment. Leave the Alignment setting as Top, and then change the relative to setting to Line. 15. Click OK. Instead of sitting at the left margin with text before and after it, the diagram now sits to the right of the text, without interrupting its flow. 16. In the lower-left corner of the diagram frame, point to the sizing handle. When the pointer changes to a diagonal double-headed arrow, drag up and to the right until the bottom of the diagram frame sits level with the last line of text in the Community Service Committee paragraph. Tip You can precisely size the diagram by adjusting the Height or Width setting in the Size group on the Format contextual tab. 17. Click a blank area of the document. The diagram now sits neatly to the right of the introductory text. 210 Chapter 7 Insert and Modify Diagrams You can align and size the diagram to fit your text. CLEAN UP Save the ServiceA document, and then close it. Modifying Diagrams After you create a diagram, you can add and remove shapes and edit the text of the diagram by making changes in the Text pane. You can also customize the diagram by using the options on the SmartArt Tools contextual tabs. You can make changes such as the following by using the commands on the Design contextual tab: ● Switch to a different layout of the same type or of a different type. Tip If you have entered more text than will fit in the new layout, the text is not shown, but SmartArt retains it so that you don’t have to retype it if you switch the layout again. ● Add shading and three-dimensional effects to all the shapes in a diagram. ● Change the color scheme. ● Add shapes and change their hierarchy. Tip You can remove a shape and its text by selecting it and then pressing the Delete key. You can also rearrange shapes by dragging them. You can customize individual shapes in the following ways by using the commands on the Format contextual tab: ● Change an individual shape—for example, you can change a square into a star. ● Apply a built-in shape style. Modifying Diagrams 211 ● Change the color, outline, or effect of a shape. ● Change the style of the shape’s text. You can use Live Preview to display the effects of these changes before you apply them. If you apply a change and then decide you preferred the original version, you can click the Reset Graphic button in the Reset group on the Design contextual tab. In this exercise, you’ll change a diagram’s layout, style, and colors. Then you’ll change the shape and color of one of its elements, and customize copies of the diagram. SET UP You need the ServiceB_start document located in the Chapter07 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the ServiceB_start document, and save it as ServiceB. Then follow the steps. 1. If necessary, adjust your view of the document so that the entire diagram sits in the bottom half of your screen. 2. Click a blank area inside the diagram frame to activate the diagram as a whole. Troubleshooting Be sure to click a blank area away from any shapes. If a shape in the diagram is surrounded by handles, that shape is selected, either for editing or for manipulation, instead of the diagram as a whole. 3. On the Design contextual tab, in the Layouts group, click the More button. The Layouts gallery appears, showing the other available Process diagram layouts. You can switch to any of these layouts. 212 Chapter 7 Insert and Modify Diagrams Tip If a gallery has a sizing handle (three dots) in its lower-right corner, as this one does, you can drag the handle upward to reduce the height of the gallery. You can then see more of the document and the gallery at the same time. 4. In the Layouts gallery, point to each thumbnail to preview the diagram with that layout. Because changing the layout does not change the width of the diagram frame, some of the horizontal layouts create a very small diagram. 5. In the Layouts gallery, click the last thumbnail in the fourth row (Basic Bending Process). The diagram changes to two columns with arrows indicating the process flow. The Basic Bending Process diagram. 6. Point to the sizing handle on the left side of the diagram’s frame, and when the pointer changes to a two-headed arrow, drag the frame to the left until the diagram occupies a bit less than half the page width. When you release the mouse button, the shapes in the diagram expand to fill the resized frame. 7. On the Design contextual tab, in the SmartArt Styles group, click the More button. The SmartArt Styles gallery appears. Modifying Diagrams 213 You can apply two-dimensional or three-dimensional styles. 8. In the gallery, point to each style, noticing the changes to your diagram. Then under 3-D, click the first thumbnail in the first row (Polished). 9. In the SmartArt Styles group, click the Change Colors button. The Colors gallery appears, offering sets of different colors or of different shades of the same color. 10. Preview a few color combinations, and then under Colorful, click the first thumbnail (Colorful – Accent Colors). In the document, you can see that the new diagram colors coordinate with the text colors. The diagram shapes have a new style and new colors. 214 Chapter 7 Insert and Modify Diagrams 11. In the upper-left corner of the diagram, click the Gather information shape (not its text), and then on the Format contextual tab, in the Shapes group, click the Change Shape button. The Shapes gallery appears, showing all the available built-in shapes. You can use any of these shapes in a diagram. 12. Under Basic Shapes, click the first shape in the first row (Oval). The selected shape changes from a rectangle to an oval. 13. Without changing the selection, in the Shape Styles group, click the Shape Fill button. Then under Standard Colors in the palette, click the first box (Dark Red). 14. Click away from the diagram. You can now see the results. Modifying Diagrams 215 The shape that corresponds with the heading to the left of the diagram is now accentuated with a different shape and color. 15. Click a blank area within the diagram to select it. Then on the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click the Copy button. 16. Scroll down the document, click to the left of the Set up team heading, and in the Clipboard group, click the Paste button to paste in a copy of the diagram. 17. On the Format tab, in the Arrange group, click the Position button, and then click More Layout Options to display the Layout dialog box. Ensure that the Horizontal setting is Alignment, Right relative to Column and the Vertical setting is Alignment, Top relative to Line. Then click OK. 18. Click the Gather information shape (not its text). In the Shapes group, click the Change Shape button, and under Rectangles, click the second shape (Rounded Rectangle). Then in the Shape Styles group, click the Shape Fill button, and under Theme Colors in the palette, click the third box (Light Turquoise, Background 2). The shape corresponding to the previous heading is now muted to show that it has already been discussed. 19. Click the Set up team shape (not its text), and change its shape to Oval. Then change its fill color to Dark Red. The diagram now corresponds with the adjacent topic. 216 Chapter 7 Insert and Modify Diagrams The red oval shape reflects the heading to the left, and the previous topic is a muted color. 20. If you want, repeat steps 15 through 19 to insert a customized copy of the diagram adjacent to each of the remaining headings in the Process section. Tip Sometimes headings appear too close together, or a heading might appear too close to the bottom of the page, to accommodate a series of diagrams neatly. In that case, insert a page break (press Ctrl+Enter) to push each heading to a new page before inserting the diagram. CLEAN UP Save the ServiceB document, and then close it. Creating Picture Diagrams The SmartArt Graphics tool that comes with Word 2010 includes a sophisticated new category of diagrams that are designed to hold pictures. You can use these diagrams for business uses such as creating organization charts with pictures as well as names and titles or for personal uses such as creating a page of family photographs. In this exercise, you’ll create a page of photographs. You’ll size and position the photographs and then enter and format accompanying captions. Creating Picture Diagrams 217 SET UP You need the Garden, Park, Pond, and Woods pictures located in the Chapter07 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Create a blank document, and save it as Westbury in the folder where you usually save your practice files. Then follow the steps. 1. On the Page Layout tab, in the Page Setup group, set the orientation to Landscape, and set the margins to Narrow. Then if necessary, set the zoom percentage so that you can see the entire page on your screen. 2. At the top of the document, type Westbury, and press Enter. Select the text, and then on the Home tab, in the Font group, click the Text Effects button. Then in the gallery, click the second thumbnail in the last row (Gradient Fill - Orange, Accent 6, Inner Shadow). Finally, set the size to 72. 3. Press the Down Arrow key, and on the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click the SmartArt button. In the left pane of the Choose a SmartArt Graphic dialog box, click Picture. Then in the middle pane, double-click the first thumbnail in the first row (Accented Picture). The template for the selected diagram is inserted at the cursor. The Accented Picture diagram, ready for you to enter pictures and captions. 218 Chapter 7 Insert and Modify Diagrams 4. Click a blank area inside the diagram frame, and then on the Format contextual tab, in the Size group, change the Height setting to 5.75 and the Width setting to 9. Tip You don’t have to type the inch marks; Word will add them for you. After you enter a Size setting, pressing Enter implements your changes. 5. Click a blank area of the biggest shape, and then in the Size group, change the Height setting to 5 and the Width setting to 8. Then drag the shape down and to the left until it sits in the lower-left corner of the diagram frame. 6. Click a blank area of the top circle, and then in the Size group, use the up arrows in the Height and Width settings to increase the size to 1 .7”. Repeat this step for the other two circles. Troubleshooting Don’t type the sizes; use the arrows. Sometimes the shapes don’t hold precise measurements when you type them. 7. Drag the top circle to the upper-right corner of the diagram frame, drag the middle circle to the right to align with the frame, and drag the bottom circle to the lower-right corner of the frame. The diagram now occupies most of the page. The picture placeholders have been sized and positioned to fit the available space. Creating Picture Diagrams 219 8. In the biggest shape, click the Insert Picture icon. The Insert Picture dialog box opens. 9. Navigate to your Chapter07 practice file folder, and then double-click Park. 10. Repeat step 9 to insert the Garden picture in the top circle, the Pond picture in the middle circle, and the Woods picture in the bottom circle. 11. Open the Text pane, and replace the placeholder bullet points with Park, Garden, Pond, and Woods. The captions appear on the diagram in the position and format specified by the diagram template. The pictures now have captions. 12. In the Text pane, double-click the Park bullet point, and then on the Home tab, in the Font group, apply the Gradient Fill – Orange, Accent 6, Inner Shadow text effect and set the size to 40. Repeat this step for the Garden, Pond, and Woods bullet points. Then close the Text pane. 13. To balance the slide, on the Page Layout tab, in the Page Setup group, click the Margins button, and at the bottom of the gallery, click Custom Margins. Then in the Page Setup dialog box, increase the Left margin to 1 .25, and click OK . Troubleshooting If Word displays a message that one of the margins is outside the printable area of the page, in this case you can click Ignore. If you were going to print this page, you would want to fix the problem. 220 Chapter 7 Insert and Modify Diagrams 14. Make any additional adjustment to achieve a balanced slide. We indented the title by 1 inch and removed the space after it. The final picture diagram. CLEAN UP Save the Westbury document, and then close it. Key Points 221 Key Points ● You can easily create a sophisticated diagram to convey a process or the relationship between hierarchical elements. ● Diagrams are dynamic illustrations that you can customize to produce precisely the effect you are looking for. ● You can use a picture diagram to neatly lay out pictures on a page. Chapter at a Glance Insert charts, page 223 Modify charts, page 230 Use existing data in charts, page 237 8 Insert and Modify Charts In this chapter, you will learn how to ✔ Insert charts. ✔ Modify charts. ✔ Use existing data in charts. You’ll often find it helpful to reinforce the argument you are making in a document with facts and figures. When it’s more important for your audience to understand trends than identify precise values, you can use a chart to present numerical information in visual ways. In this chapter, you’ll add a chart to a document and modify its appearance by changing its chart type, style, and layout, as well as the color of some elements. Then you’ll recreate the chart by plotting data stored in an existing Microsoft Excel worksheet. Important The exercises in this chapter assume that you have Microsoft Excel 2010 installed on your computer. If you do not have this version of Excel, the steps in the exercises won’t work as described. Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this chapter, you need to copy the book’s practice files to your computer. The practice files you’ll use to complete the exercises in this chapter are in the Chapter08 practice file folder. A complete list of practice files is provided in “Using the Practice Files” at the beginning of this book. Inserting Charts When you insert a chart into a document created in Microsoft Word 2010, a sample chart is embedded in the document. The data used to plot the sample chart is stored in an Excel worksheet that is associated with the Word file. (You don’t have to maintain a separate Excel file.) Tip Don’t worry: you don’t have to know how to use Excel to be able to create the chart. 223 224 Chapter 8 Insert and Modify Charts A sample chart plotted from the data in its associated Excel worksheet. Troubleshooting The appearance of buttons and groups on the ribbon changes depending on the width of the program window. For information about changing the appearance of the ribbon to match our screen images, see “Modifying the Display of the Ribbon” at the beginning of this book. The Excel worksheet is composed of rows and columns of cells that contain values, which in charting terminology are called data points. Collectively a set of data points is called a data series. As with Word tables, each worksheet cell is identified by an address consisting of its column letter and row number—for example, A2. A range of cells is identified by the address of the cell in the upper-left corner and the address of the cell in the lower-right corner, separated by a colon—for example, A2:D5. To customize the sample chart, you replace the sample data in the Excel worksheet with your own data. Because the Excel worksheet is linked to the chart, when you change the values in the worksheet, the chart changes as well. To enter a value in a cell, you click the cell to select it, and start typing. You can select an entire column by clicking the column header—the shaded box containing a letter at the top of each column—and an entire row by clicking the row header—the shaded box containing a number to the left of each row. You can select the entire worksheet by clicking the Select All button— the box at the junction of the column and row headers. Inserting Charts 225 Tip If you create a chart and later want to edit its data, you can open the associated worksheet by clicking the chart and then clicking the Edit Data button in the Data group on the Design contextual tab. In this exercise, you’ll insert a chart into a document and then replace the sample data in the associated worksheet with seasonal minimum, average, and maximum temperature data. Tip If you open a document created in Word 2003 in Word 2010 and then insert a chart into it, Word uses Microsoft Graph to create the chart. This Word 2003 charting technology has been retained to maintain compatibility with earlier versions of the program. The steps in this exercise will work only with a document created in Word 2010 or Word 2007. SET UP You need the CottageA_start document located in your Chapter08 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the CottageA_start document, and save it as CottageA. Then follow the steps. 1. Press Ctrl+End to move to the end of the document. Then set the zoom percentage so that you can see almost the entire page. 2. On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click the Chart button. The Insert Chart dialog box opens. In the Insert Chart dialog box, you can select from a variety of chart types and their variations. 3. In the gallery in the right pane, under Column, click the fourth thumbnail in the first row (3-D Clustered Column). Then click OK. 226 Chapter 8 Insert and Modify Charts The document window is resized to fill the left half of the screen, and a sample chart of the type you selected is inserted at the cursor. An Excel worksheet containing the data plotted in the sample chart opens on the right. 4. Click the Select All button in the upper-left corner of the Excel worksheet, and then press the Delete key. The sample data in the worksheet is deleted, and the worksheet is now blank. The columns in the sample chart in the document disappear, leaving a blank chart area. 5. Click the second cell in row 1 (cell B1), type March, and then press the Tab key. Excel enters the heading and activates the next cell in the same row. 6. In cells C1 through E1, type June, September, and December, pressing Tab after each entry to move to the next cell. Tip If you were entering a sequential list of months, you could type January and then drag the fill handle in the lower-right corner of the cell to the right to fill subsequent cells in the same row with the names of the months. 7. Click cell A2, type Minimum, and then press the Enter key. Excel enters the heading and activates the next cell in the same column. Keyboard Shortcut Press Enter to move down in the same column or Shift+Enter to move up. Press Tab to move to the right in the same row or Shift+Tab to move to the left. Or press the Arrow keys to move up, down, left, or right one cell at a time. See Also For more information about keyboard shortcuts, see “Keyboard Shortcuts” at the end of this book. 8. In cells A3 and A4, type Average and Maximum, pressing Enter after each entry. You have now entered the row and column headings for the data you want to plot. The row and column headings for your data. 9. Point to the border between the headers of columns A and B, and when the pointer changes to a double-headed arrow, double-click. Inserting Charts 227 Excel adjusts the width of the column to the left of the border to fit the entries in the column. 10. Select columns B through E by dragging through their headers. Then point to the border between any two selected columns, and double-click. Excel adjusts the width of all the selected columns to fit their cell entries. 11. In cell B2, type 37, and press Tab. Then in cells C2 through E2, type 54, 53, and 29, pressing Tab to move from cell to cell. 12. Type the following data into the cells of the Excel worksheet: B C D E 3 47 67 66 35 4 56 80 70 41 As you enter data, the chart changes to reflect what you type. The data series in the columns (the months) are plotted by the categories in the rows (Minimum, Average, and Maximum). Something is wrong. You entered data for March, June, September, and December, but December is not shown in the chart. This is because the original sample chart plotted only the cells in the range A1:D5, and you have entered data in A1:E4. You need to specify the new range. 13. In the Word document, click a blank area inside the chart frame to activate the chart. Then on the Design contextual tab, in the Data group, click the Select Data button. In the Excel worksheet, the plotted data range is surrounded by a blinking dotted border, and the Select Data Source dialog box opens so that you can make any necessary adjustments. 228 Chapter 8 Insert and Modify Charts The Select Data Source dialog box. 14. At the right end of the Chart data range box, click the Collapse Dialog button to shrink the Select Data Source dialog box. Then if you can’t see the worksheet data, point to the title bar of the collapsed dialog box, and drag it downward. 15. In the Excel worksheet, point to cell A1, and drag down and to the right to cell E4. Then in the Select Data Source dialog box, click the Expand Dialog button. In the Select Data Source dialog box, the Chart Data Range box now contains the new range, and the Legend Entries (Series) list now includes December. 16. Click Switch Row/Column. In the dialog box, Excel switches the entries in the Legend Entries (Series) and Horizontal (Category) Axis Labels boxes. The data series in the rows will be plotted by the categories in the columns. Inserting Charts 229 17. Click OK to close the dialog box. Then in the upper-right corner of the Excel window, click the Close button to close the worksheet. The Word window expands to fill the screen. The data for December now appears in the chart, which is plotted by month. Suppose you realize that you made an error when typing the data for September. 18. Click a blank area inside the chart frame. Then on the Design tab, in the Data group, click the Edit Data button to open the Excel worksheet. 19. In the Excel worksheet, click cell D4, type 79 to replace the existing data, and press Enter. Then close the Excel window. In the chart, the maximum temperature column for September becomes taller to represent the new value. A simple three-dimensional column chart showing seasonal temperatures. CLEAN UP Save the CottageA document, and then close it. 230 Chapter 8 Insert and Modify Charts Modifying Charts If you decide that the chart you created doesn’t adequately depict the most important characteristics of your data, you can change the chart type at any time. Word provides 11 types of charts, each with two-dimensional and three-dimensional variations. Common chart types include the following: ● Column These charts show how values change over time. ● Bar These charts show the values of several items at one point in time. ● Line These charts show erratic changes in values over time. ● Pie These charts show how parts relate to the whole. Having settled on the most appropriate chart type, you can modify the chart as a whole or any of its elements, such as the following: ● Chart area This is the entire area within the chart frame. ● Plot area This is the rectangular area bordered by the axes. ● A xes These are the lines along which the data is plotted. The x-axis shows the categories, and the y-axis shows the data series, or values. (Three-dimensional charts also have a z-axis.) ● Labels These identify the data along each axis. ● Data markers These graphically represent each data point in each data series. ● Legend This is a key that identifies the data series. y-axis Data marker Plot area Chart area Legend x-axis The main elements of a chart. Label Modifying Charts 231 To modify a specific element, you first select it by clicking it, or by clicking its name in the Chart Elements box in the Current Selection group on the Format tab. You can then modify the element by clicking the buttons on the Design, Layout, and Format contextual tabs. If you make extensive modifications, you might want to save the customized chart as a template so that you can use it for plotting similar data in the future without having to repeat all the changes. In this exercise, you’ll modify the appearance of a chart by changing its chart type and style. You’ll change the color of the plot area and the color of two data series. You’ll then hide gridlines and change the layout to display titles and a datasheet. After adding an annotation in a text box, you’ll save the chart as a template. SET UP You need the CottageB_start document located in your Chapter08 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the CottageB_start document, and save it as CottageB. Then follow the steps. 1. Scroll through the document to display the chart, and click a blank area inside the chart frame to activate it. Troubleshooting Be sure to click a blank area inside the chart frame. Clicking any of its elements will activate that element, not the chart as a whole. Word displays the Design, Layout, and Format contextual tabs. 2. On the Design tab, in the Type group, click the Change Chart Type button. The Change Chart Type dialog box opens. This dialog box is the same as the Insert Chart dialog box shown earlier in the chapter. 3. In the gallery on the right, under Line, double-click the fourth thumbnail (Line with Markers). The column chart changes to a line chart, which depicts data by using colored lines instead of columns. 232 Chapter 8 Insert and Modify Charts The temperature data plotted as a line chart. 4. In the Chart Styles group, click the More button. The Chart Styles gallery appears. You can quickly switch to a different color scheme or data marker style. 5. In the gallery, click the second thumbnail in the fourth row (Style 26). The lines are now thicker, and the data markers are three-dimensional. 6. Move the pointer over the chart between the axes that contains the data markers, and when a ScreenTip indicates that you are pointing to the plot area, click to select it. Modifying Charts 233 7. On the Format tab, in the Shape Styles group, click the Shape Fill button, and then click More Fill Colors. The Colors dialog box opens. When none of the theme or standard colors meets your needs, you can pick a color in the Colors dialog box. 8. On the Standard page of the Colors dialog box, click the pale yellow hexagon below and to the left of the center, and then click OK . The plot area is now a pale yellow shade to distinguish it from the rest of the chart. Tip To change several aspects of the plot area, right-click the area and then click Format Plot Area to open the Format Plot Area dialog box. You can then change the fill, border, shadow, and 3-D format in one location. 9. At the top of the Current Selection group, click the Chart Elements arrow to display the list of elements, and then click Series “Average”. An outline appears around the data points of the selected series. 10. In the Current Selection group, click the Format Selection button. 234 Chapter 8 Insert and Modify Charts The Format Data Series dialog box opens. You can change several aspects of the selected data series in this dialog box. 11. In the left pane, click Marker Fill, and on the Marker Fill page, click Solid Fill. In the Fill Color area, click the Color button, and under Theme Colors, click the purple box (Purple, Accent 4). 12. In the left pane, click Line Color. Then on the Line Color page, change the color to the same solid purple. 13. Check that the marker line color is also purple, and then click Close. The Average data series is now represented by the color purple. 14. On the Layout tab, in the A xes group, click the Gridlines button, point to Primary Horizontal Gridlines, and then click None to remove the horizontal gridlines from the chart. 15. On the Design tab, in the Chart Layouts group, click the More button. Modifying Charts 235 The Chart Layouts gallery appears. You can quickly change the layout of the chart by selecting one of the predefined options. 16. In the gallery, click the second thumbnail in the second row (Layout 5). The legend now appears below the chart with the data points in a datasheet. Gridlines have been turned back on, and placeholders for a chart title and axis title have been added to the chart. When you don’t have a lot of data, displaying a datasheet can clarify without adding clutter. 17. In the chart, drag across the Chart Title placeholder at the top, and type Average Temperature. Then replace the A xis Title placeholder on the left with Degrees F. 18. On the Layout tab, in the Insert group, click the Draw Text Box button. 236 Chapter 8 Insert and Modify Charts 19. Point below the chart title and above the June maximum temperature data point, and then drag diagonally down and to the right until the text box stretches as far as the December data. 20. Type Can be hotter in July and August. Then select the text, and on the Home tab, in the Font group, change the size to 10 points and the color to Red. 21. Click outside the text box (but not outside the chart). You can now see the results of your changes. The chart with titles and a custom label. 22. On the Design tab, in the Type group, click the Save As Template button. The Save Chart Template dialog box opens and displays the contents of your Charts folder, which is a subfolder of your Templates folder. Troubleshooting If the Charts folder is not displayed in the Address bar, navigate to the C:\Users\<user name>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Templates\Charts folder. 23. With the Charts folder displayed in the Address bar, type My Temperature Chart in the File name box, and then click Save. 24. In the Type group, click the Change Chart Type button, and then in the left pane of the Change Chart Type dialog box, click Templates. Then, in the right pane, point to the icon under My Templates. A ScreenTip identifies this template as the one you just created. Using Existing Data in Charts 237 In the future, you can click the custom template to create a chart with the same layout and formatting. 25. Click Cancel to close the dialog box. CLEAN UP Save the CottageB document, and then close it. Using Existing Data in Charts If the data you want to plot as a chart already exists in a Microsoft Access database, an Excel worksheet, or a Word table, you don’t have to retype it in the chart’s worksheet. You can copy the data from its source program and paste it into the worksheet. In this exercise, you’ll copy data stored in an Excel worksheet into a chart’s worksheet and then expand the plotted data range so that the new data appears in the chart. SET UP You need the CottageC_start document and the Temperature workbook located in your Chapter08 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the CottageC_start document, and save it as CottageC. Then follow the steps. 1. Press Ctrl+End to move to the end of the document, and then if necessary, adjust the zoom percentage so that you can see the entire page. 2. Right-click a blank area inside the chart frame, and then click Edit Data to open the associated Excel worksheet. 238 Chapter 8 Insert and Modify Charts 3. In the Excel window, click the File tab to display the Backstage view, and in the left pane, click Open. In the Open dialog box, navigate to your Chapter08 practice file folder, and double-click the Temperature workbook. 4. On the Excel View tab, in the Window group, click the Arrange All button. Then in the Arrange Windows dialog box, click Horizontal, and click OK. Excel arranges the Temperature worksheet above the worksheet associated with the chart so that both are visible at the same time. Displaying two worksheets at the same time makes it easy to copy data between them. 5. In the Temperature worksheet, click cell B4. Then at the bottom of the Temperature pane, to the right of the sheet tabs, drag the horizontal scroll bar until you can see column M. Hold down the Shift key, and click cell M7. You have selected the range B4:M7. Using Existing Data in Charts 239 6. On the Excel Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click the Copy button. 7. Click the title bar of the Chart in Microsoft Word worksheet to activate it, click cell B1, and then on the Excel Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click the Paste button. The copied data is pasted into the worksheet associated with the chart. The copied data will be plotted in the chart. 8. Click the Temperature title bar to activate that worksheet, and close the Temperature workbook. Then maximize the chart worksheet. Troubleshooting Be sure to click the Close button at the right end of the Temperature title bar, and not the Close button in the upper-right corner of the Excel program window. Now you need to specify that the new data should be included in the chart. 240 Chapter 8 Insert and Modify Charts 9. In the Word document, click a blank area inside the chart frame, and then on the Design contextual tab, in the Data group, click the Select Data button. The Select Data Source dialog box opens. 10. In the Chart data range box, click to the right of the highlighted cell range, and change the range to read =Sheet1!$A$1:$M$4. You are telling Excel to use the values in A1:M4 on Sheet1 of the associated worksheet. (The $ signs ensure that only that range of cells will be used as the source of the chart’s data. Sheet1 is the name defined for the worksheet on the sheet tab at the bottom of the Excel program window.) 11. Click OK , and then close the Excel window. 12. In the lower-right corner of the chart frame, drag the sizing handle down and to the right until the chart occupies most of the available space on the page. Troubleshooting If the chart disappears onto the next page when you release the mouse button, click the Undo button on the Quick Access Toolbar, and then try again. 13. Click Can be hotter in July and August, click the border of the text box, and press the Delete key. Then click outside the chart frame. You can now see twelve months of data. You can see from the chart that winter is relatively cold, summer is relatively hot, and spring and fall are mild. CLEAN UP Save the CottageC document, and then close it. Key Points 241 Tip You can also import data into your chart from a text file, Web page, or other external source, such as Microsoft SQL Server. To import data, first display the associated Excel worksheet. Then on the Excel Data tab, in the Get External Data group, click the button for your data source, and navigate to the source. For more information, see Microsoft Excel Help. Key Points ● A chart is often the most efficient way to present numeric data with at-a-glance clarity. ● You can select the type of chart and change the appearance of its elements until it clearly conveys key information. ● Existing data in a Word table, Excel workbook, Access database, or other structured source can easily be copied and pasted into the associated chart worksheet, eliminating time-consuming typing. Chapter at a Glance Add watermarks, page 243 Insert symbols and equations, page 247 Draw and modify shapes, page 255 Insert screen clippings, page 263 9 Use Other Visual Elements In this chapter, you will learn how to ✔ Add watermarks. ✔ Insert symbols and equations. ✔ Draw and modify shapes. ✔ Insert screen clippings. We have looked at some of the more common graphic elements you can add to a document, such as pictures, diagrams, and charts. These elements reinforce concepts or make a document more attention grabbing or visually appealing. But for some documents, you might need other more specialized visual elements. In this chapter, you’ll create text and picture watermarks, insert a symbol, and build a simple equation. You’ll also draw shapes to create a simple picture, and insert a screenshot. Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this chapter, you need to copy the book’s practice files to your computer. The practice files you’ll use to complete the exercises in this chapter are in the Chapter09 practice file folder. A complete list of practice files is provided in “Using the Practice Files” at the beginning of this book. Adding Watermarks There might be times when you want words to appear behind the text of a printed or online document. For example, you might want the word CONFIDENTIAL to appear faintly behind the text in a contract. When you want to dress up the pages of your document without distracting attention from the main text, you might consider displaying a faint graphic behind the text. These faint background effects are called watermarks. Watermarks are visible in a document, but because they are faint, they don’t interfere with the readers’ ability to view the document’s main text. 243 244 Chapter 9 Use Other Visual Elements In this exercise, you’ll first add a text watermark to every page of a document, and then you’ll add a graphic watermark. SET UP You need the AuthorsDraft_start document and the OTSI-Logo picture located in your Chapter09 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the AuthorsDraft_start document, and save it as AuthorsDraft. Turn off formatting marks and the ruler, and set the magnification so that you can see all the text. Then follow the steps. 1. On the Page Layout tab, in the Page Background group, click the Watermark button. The Watermark gallery appears. You can click the thumbnail of a predefined watermark or click Custom Watermark to define your own. 2. Scroll to the bottom of the gallery, noticing the available options. Clicking any of these options inserts the specified watermark in pale blue on every page of the current document. 3. At the bottom of the gallery, click Custom Watermark. The Printed Watermark dialog box opens. Adding Watermarks In this dialog box, you can specify a custom picture or text watermark. 4. 5. 6. 7. Click Text watermark , display the Text list, and then click DRAFT. Ensure that Verdana appears in the Font box. Click the Color arrow, and then click the purple box (Purple, Accent 4). With the Semitransparent check box and Diagonal option selected, click OK . The specified text is inserted diagonally across the page. The text watermark is faint enough to read the text but bold enough to be noticed. 245 246 Chapter 9 Use Other Visual Elements 8. On the Page Layout tab, in the Page Background group, click the Watermark button, and then click Custom Watermark. 9. In the Printed Watermark dialog box, click Picture watermark, and then click Select Picture. The Insert Picture dialog box opens. 10. Navigate to your Chapter09 practice file folder, and double-click the OTSI-Logo picture file. 11. In the Printed Watermark dialog box, change the Scale setting to 200%, and then click Apply. 12. Drag the dialog box by its title bar until you can see the watermark. Then change the Scale setting by typing 400%, and click Apply. 13. With the Washout check box selected, click Close. The picture is inserted as a watermark at the size you specified. The picture watermark adds visual interest without obscuring the text. CLEAN UP Save the AuthorsDraft document, and then close it. Inserting Symbols and Equations 247 Inserting Symbols and Equations Some documents require characters not found on a standard keyboard. These characters might include the copyright (©) or registered trademark (®) symbols, currency symbols (such as € or £), Greek letters, or letters with accent marks. Or you might want to add arrows (such as  or ) or graphic icons (such as  or ). Word gives you easy access to a huge array of symbols that you can easily insert into any document. Like graphics, symbols can add visual information or eye appeal to a document. However, they are different from graphics in that they are characters associated with a particular font. Keyboard Shortcut You can insert some common symbols by typing a keyboard combination. For example, if you type two consecutive dashes followed by a word and a space, Word changes the two dashes to a professional-looking em-dash—like this one. (This symbol gets its name from the fact that it was originally the width of the character m.) To use these keyboard shortcuts, display the Backstage view, click Options, and on the Proofing page of the Word Options dialog box, click AutoCorrect Options. On the AutoCorrect page of the AutoCorrect dialog box, ensure that the Replace Text As You Type check box is selected, and then select or clear check boxes in the Replace Text As You Type area of the AutoFormat As You Type page. You can see many of the available shortcuts on the Special Characters page of the Symbol dialog box. See Also For more information about keyboard shortcuts, see “Keyboard Shortcuts” at the end of this book. You can insert mathematical symbols, such as π (pi) or ∑ (sigma, or summation), the same way you would insert any other symbol. But you can also create entire mathematical equations in a document. You can insert some predefined equations, including the Quadratic Formula, the Binomial Theorem, and the Pythagorean Theorem, into a document with a few clicks. If you need something other than these standard equations, you can build your own equations by using a library of mathematical symbols. Equations are different from graphics in that they are accurately rendered mathematical formulas that appear in the document as fields. However, they are similar to graphics in that they can be displayed in line with the surrounding text or in their own space with text above and below them. The buttons for inserting symbols and equations are in the Symbols group on the Insert tab: ● Clicking the Symbol button displays a Symbol gallery of commonly used symbols. 248 Chapter 9 Use Other Visual Elements The Symbol gallery is dynamic and changes to reflect recent symbol selections, such as the house symbol in the first row. From this gallery, you can also open the Symbol dialog box, where you can select from hundreds of symbols and special characters in a variety of fonts. ● Clicking the Equation arrow displays the Equation gallery of commonly used equations. Clicking a predefined equation inserts it into the document at the cursor. ● Clicking the Equation button inserts a box where you can type an equation, and also adds the Design contextual tab to the ribbon. This tab provides access to mathematical symbols, structures such as fractions and radicals, and the Equation Options dialog box. After building your equation, you can add it to the Equation gallery so that it is readily available the next time you need it. Inserting Symbols and Equations 249 In this exercise, you’ll insert a symbol into a document. Then you’ll build a simple equation, and you'll add the equation to the Equation gallery. SET UP You need the Welcome_start document located in your Chapter09 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the Welcome_start document, and save it as Welcome. Then follow the steps. 1. With the cursor to the left of the document’s title, on the Insert tab, in the Symbols group, click the Symbol button, and then click More Symbols. The Symbol dialog box opens. The Symbol page of the Symbol dialog box. Tip The Recently Used Symbols area of the Symbol dialog box is dynamic. If you have already explored this dialog box, you will see the symbols you have inserted into your documents. 2. In the dialog box, display the Font list, scroll to the bottom, and then click Webdings. 3. In the rows of symbols, click the ninth icon in the third row (the house), click Insert, and then click Close. Word inserts the house symbol at the insertion point. 4. Press the End key, and in the Symbols group, click the Symbol button. The Symbol gallery appears, with the icon you just inserted at the top. 250 Chapter 9 Use Other Visual Elements 5. Click the house symbol. The house icon now appears at both ends of the title. Inserting a picture symbol like the house is easier than inserting a clip art image. 6. Display formatting marks, and then press Ctrl+End to move to the end of the document. 7. On the Insert tab, in the Symbols group, click the Equation button. An equation field is inserted into the document at the cursor so that you can type the equation. The Design contextual tab appears on the ribbon. The Design tab includes symbols and structures for building an equation. Troubleshooting The appearance of buttons and groups on the ribbon changes depending on the width of the program window. For information about changing the appearance of the ribbon to match our screen images, see “Modifying the Display of the Ribbon” at the beginning of this book. Inserting Symbols and Equations 251 8. In the field, type (p-3)*. The asterisk is a multiplication symbol. 9. On the Design tab, in the Structures group, click the Fraction button. The Fraction gallery appears. This gallery provides ready-made common fractions as well as the structures for creating your own fractions. 10. In the gallery, click the first thumbnail in the first row (Stacked Fraction). The structure for a simple fraction is inserted in the field at the cursor. 11. Click the top box in the fraction structure, and type t. Then click the bottom box, and type 3. 12. Click the blank area to the right of the equation field. Then press the Spacebar, and type where p is the number of people and t is the base cost. (Include the period.) This equation subtracts 3 from the total number of people and multiplies the result by a per-person amount to calculate the cost of a specific number of additional people. Word has taken care of formatting the equation so that it looks professional. 252 Chapter 9 Use Other Visual Elements The p and t variables in the equation are automatically formatted as italic. 13. Click the equation, click the arrow that appears to the right, and then click Save as New Equation. The Create New Building Block dialog box opens. The equation will be saved as a building block and displayed in the Equation gallery. See Also For more information about building blocks, see “Inserting Saved Text” in Chapter 2, “Edit and Proofread Text.” 14. In the Name box, type Additional people cost, and then click OK. 15. Press End to release the selection. Then on the Insert tab, in the Symbols group, click the Equation arrow, and scroll to the bottom of the Equation gallery. Your custom equation is now available in the Equation gallery. Inserting Symbols and Equations 253 Custom equations appear in the General area of the Equation gallery. 16. Press the Esc key to close the gallery without making a selection. 17. In the document, click the equation, click its arrow, and then click Change to Display. Word inserts a line break before and after the equation and positions it in the center of the page. 18. Click the equation’s arrow, point to Justification, and then click Left. 19. Click the equation’s arrow, and then click Change to Inline to move the equation back in line with the text. CLEAN UP Save the Welcome document, and then close it. When you exit Word, remember to click Don’t Save when you are asked whether you want to save changes to the Building Block template. 254 Chapter 9 Use Other Visual Elements Setting Math AutoCorrect Options If you frequently create documents that contain mathematical formulas, you don’t have to rely on the Design tab to insert mathematical symbols. Instead, you can type a predefined combination of characters and have Word automatically replace it with a corresponding math symbol. For example, if you type \infty, Word replaces the characters with the infinity symbol. This replacement is made possible by the Math AutoCorrect feature. You can view all the predefined combinations by displaying the Backstage view, clicking Proofing, and then clicking AutoCorrect Options. Then in the AutoCorrect dialog box, click the Math AutoCorrect tab. The Math AutoCorrect page of the AutoCorrect dialog box. Drawing and Modifying Shapes 255 Tip You can create custom Math AutoCorrect entries in the same way you create text AutoCorrect entries. For information, see “Correcting Spelling and Grammatical Errors” in Chapter 2, “Edit and Proofread Text.” Clicking Recognized Functions at the bottom of the AutoCorrect dialog box displays the Recognized Math Functions dialog box, which lists the math expressions Word recognizes. Word most recognizes common math expressions. If you use a math expression that is not included in the list, you can easily make it available in the future by clicking Add. Drawing and Modifying Shapes If you want to add visual interest and impact to a document but you don’t need anything as fancy as a picture or a clip art image, you can draw a shape. Shapes can be simple, such as lines, circles, or squares, or more complex, such as stars, hearts, and arrows. To draw a shape directly on the page (Word’s default setting), you click the Shapes button in the Illustrations group on the Insert tab, and click the shape you want in the Shapes gallery. 256 Chapter 9 Use Other Visual Elements The Recently Used Shapes area of the Shapes gallery is dynamic and reflects any shapes you have drawn. After selecting the shape you want, you can do one of the following: ● Click the document where you want a drawing with the default size and shape to be placed. ● Drag the pointer across the page to create a drawing the size and shape you want. Drawing and Modifying Shapes 257 When you finish drawing the shape, it is automatically selected. Later, you can select the shape by clicking it. While the shape is selected, you can move and size it, and you can modify it by using commands on the Format contextual tab to do the following: ● Change the shape. ● Change the style, fill color, outline, and effects assigned to the shape, including the three-dimensional aspect, or perspective, from which you are observing the shape. Tip If you change the attributes of a shape—for example, its fill color and border weight—and you want all the shapes you draw from now on in this document to have those attributes, right-click the shape, and then click Set As Default Shape. ● Specify the position of the shape on the page, and the way text wraps around the shape. Tip You can also position a shape by dragging it, or you can hold down the Ctrl key and press the Arrow keys on your keyboard to move the shape in small increments. ● Control the order of the shape in a stack of shapes. ● Specify the shape's alignment and angle of rotation. ● Precisely control the size of the shape. Tip You can also change the size and shape of an object by dragging its handles. You can right-click a shape and click Add Text to place a cursor in the center of the shape. After you type the text, you can format it with the commands in the WordArt Styles group and control its direction and alignment with the commands in the Text group. If you build a picture by drawing individual shapes, you can group them so that they act as one object. If you move or size a grouped object, the shapes retain their positions in relation to each other. To break the bond, you ungroup the object. If your picture consists of more than a few shapes, you might want to draw the shapes on a drawing canvas instead of directly on the page. The drawing canvas keeps the parts of the picture together, helps you position the picture, and provides a frame-like boundary between your picture and the text on the page. To open a drawing canvas, you click New Drawing Canvas at the bottom of the Shapes gallery. You can then draw shapes on the canvas in the usual ways. At any time, you can size and move the drawing canvas and the shapes on it as one unit. Tip If you prefer to always use the drawing canvas when creating pictures with shapes, display the Backstage view, click Options, and in the Word Options dialog box, click Advanced. Then under Editing Options, select the Automatically Create Drawing Canvas When Inserting AutoShapes check box, and click OK. 258 Chapter 9 Use Other Visual Elements In this exercise, you’ll draw two shapes and a text box on a drawing canvas to create a logo. Next, you’ll change the style of the shapes and the color of the text box. Then you’ll size and position the canvas. SET UP You don’t need any practice files to complete this exercise. Open a blank document, and save it as CSC-Logo. Display the rulers, and then follow the steps. 1. On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click the Shapes button, and then at the bottom of the Shapes gallery, click New Drawing Canvas. Word inserts a drawing canvas and displays the Format contextual tab on the ribbon. 2. On the Format tab, in the Insert Shapes group, click the More button to display the Shapes gallery, and then under Block Arrows, click the first shape in the second row (Curved Right Arrow). 3. Point to the upper-left corner of the drawing canvas, and then drag down and to the right to draw an arrow about 1.5 inches tall and 1.5 inches wide. Tip To draw a shape with equal height and width, such as a square or circle, hold down the Shift key while you drag, and then release the mouse button before releasing the Shift key. When you finish drawing, the arrow is selected, as indicated by the handles around it. Rotating handle Sizing handle Shape changing handles You can drag handles to rotate the arrow, change its size, and change its shape— for example, to make it fatter or make the arrowhead bigger. Drawing and Modifying Shapes 259 4. In the Size group, set the Height and Width to precisely 1.5. 5. Hold down the Ctrl key, drag a shadow outline of the arrow to the upper-right corner of the drawing canvas, and release first the mouse button and then the Ctrl key. Word creates a copy of the arrow in the location where you release the mouse button. 6. In the Arrange group, click the Rotate button, and then click Flip Horizontal. The copy of the arrow is now facing to the left. 7. In the Insert Shapes group, click the Draw Text Box button, and drag a text box between the two arrows. Then type What goes around comes around. 8. Select the left arrow, hold down the Shift key, and then select both the text box and the right arrow. All three shapes are now selected. Handles around each shape indicate that they are all selected individually. 9. In the Arrange group, click the Group button, and then click Group. The three shapes are grouped as one object. 260 Chapter 9 Use Other Visual Elements One set of handles appears around a grouped object. 10. In the Shape Styles group, click the More button, and in the Shape Styles gallery, click the fourth thumbnail in the last row (Intense Effect – Olive Green, Accent 3). The style is applied to all the grouped shapes. 11. Select the text in the text box, and in the WordArt Styles group, display the WordArt Quick Styles gallery. Then click the third thumbnail in the first row (Fill – White, Drop Shadow). Tip Depending on your screen resolution, you might need to click the Quick Styles button to display the WordArt Quick Styles gallery. 12. Click a blank area of the drawing canvas to release the selection. You can now see the results. Drawing and Modifying Shapes 261 You can format a grouped object as a whole, or format individual shapes within the object. 13. In the Size group, click the Width down arrow until the drawing canvas is as narrow as it can be without the word around disappearing from the text box or wrapping to a second line. 14. Point to the sizing handle (the four dots) in the middle of the bottom border of the drawing canvas frame, and drag upward until the drawing canvas is just tall enough to contain the logo. 15. In the Arrange group, click the Wrap Text button, and then click Top and Bottom. You can now move the drawing canvas independently of the text around it. See Also For information about text wrapping, see “Arranging Objects on the Page” in Chapter 10, “Organize and Arrange Content.” 16. In the Arrange group, click the Position button, and click More Layout Options to display the Position page of the Layout dialog box. 262 Chapter 9 Use Other Visual Elements 17. In the Horizontal area, set Alignment to Centered, relative to Column. Then in the Vertical area, set Absolute position to 0.5", below Top Margin. Click OK. The logo is now centered at the top of the page. You can position the drawing canvas anywhere on the page. 18. In the Shape Styles group, click the Shape Fill arrow, and then under Theme Colors, click the third box ( Tan, Background 2). 19. Click the Shape Fill arrow again, point to Gradient, and then under Variations, click the second thumbnail in the second row (From Center). 20. Click outside of the drawing canvas. The logo is now ready to use as part of a letterhead. You can format the drawing canvas or leave it blank. CLEAN UP Save the CSC-Logo document, and then close it. Inserting Screen Clippings 263 Inserting Screen Clippings These days, many people rely on the Web as a source of the information they use in their daily life. Sometimes that information is presented in a graphic that would be useful in a Word document. Included in Word 2010 is a screen clipping tool that you can use to capture an image of anything that is visible on your computer screen. After you display the content you want to include in a document, you click the Screenshot button in the Illustrations group on the Insert tab. You can then insert a screen clipping in one of two ways: ● Clicking a window thumbnail in the Screenshot gallery inserts a picture of that window into the document at the cursor. ● Clicking Screen Clipping at the bottom of the gallery enables you to drag across the part of the screen you want to capture, so that only that part is inserted as a picture into the document. In this exercise, you’ll insert a screen clipping from a Web site into a document. SET UP You need the AgendaDraft_start document located in your Chapter09 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the AgendaDraft_start document, and save it as AgendaDraft. Then follow the steps. 1. Press Ctrl+End to move to the end of the document, and then at the right end of the program window title bar, click the Minimize button. 2. Start your Web browser, and display a Web site from which you want to capture a screen clipping. For example, we searched for a map showing the location of the Bellevue public library. You might want to display a map of the location of your office or a local landmark. 3. On the Windows Taskbar, click the button for the AgendaDraft document. Then on the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click the Screenshot button. A gallery displays the open windows from which you can capture a screen clipping. 264 Chapter 9 Use Other Visual Elements Clicking the thumbnail of a window inserts an image of the window in the document. 4. At the bottom of the gallery, click Screen Clipping. The Word program window is minimized on the Windows Taskbar, and a translucent white layer covers the entire screen. Tip If you change your mind about capturing the screen clipping, press the Esc key to remove the white layer. 5. Drag to select the area of the Web page you want. For example, we dragged across the map showing the Bellevue public library location. As you drag, the white layer is removed from the selected area so that you can see what you are selecting. When you release the mouse button, Word inserts the screen clipping into the document at the cursor. Key Points 265 The screen clipping is a picture that can be formatted by using the commands on the Format contextual tab, just like any other picture. See Also For information about formatting pictures, see “Inserting and Modifying Pictures” in Chapter 5, “Add Simple Graphic Elements.” CLEAN UP Save the AgendaDraft document, and then close it. Key Points ● By using a watermark, you can flag every page of a document with a faint word, such as Confidential, or a faint picture. Watermarks appear behind the text of the document, so the text can still be read. ● The Symbols dialog box provides access not only to the symbols you might need in a professional document but also to little icons that add pizzazz. ● You can construct complex math equations in your documents and have Word display them in traditional math formats. ● To dress up a document, you can draw shapes. You can also group shapes on a drawing canvas to create simple pictures. ● You can capture graphical information from other programs by using the Screenshot command. Chapter at a Glance Reorganize document outlines, page 268 Arrange objects on the page, page 273 Use tables to control page layout, page 282 10 Organize and Arrange Content In this chapter, you will learn how to ✔ Reorganize document outlines. ✔ Arrange objects on the page. ✔ Use tables to control page layout. Microsoft Word 2010 gives you the following tools for organizing and arranging your document's content: ● Outlining tools You can use these tools to control the organization of the content in a styled document. In Outline view, you can reorganize content by moving it or by promoting or demoting it. ● Object arranging tools You can use these tools to control the layout of objects on the page. You can precisely position objects and control their alignment and stacking order. ● Nested tables You can use a table to control the positions of blocks of information on the page. For example, a table with two columns and two rows can hold a set of four paragraphs, four bulleted lists, or four tables in a format in which they can be easily compared. In this chapter, you’ll first reorganize a document by working with its outline. Then you’ll modify the text-wrapping, position, and stacking order of multiple pictures in a document. Finally, you’ll create a table to hold nested tables of information. Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this chapter, you need to copy the book’s practice files to your computer. The practice files you’ll use to complete the exercises in this chapter are in the Chapter10 practice file folder. A complete list of practice files is provided in “Using the Practice Files” at the beginning of this book. 267 268 Chapter 10 Organize and Arrange Content Reorganizing Document Outlines When you create a document that contains headings, you can format the headings with built-in heading styles that include outline levels. Then it is easy to view and organize the document in Outline view. In this view, you can hide all the body text and display only the headings at and above a particular level. You can also rearrange the sections of a document by moving their headings. See Also For information about formatting headings with styles, see “Quickly Formatting Text” in Chapter 3, “Change the Look of Text.” For information about styles in general, see “Working with Styles and Templates” in Chapter 16, “Work in Word More Efficiently.” When you view a document in Outline view, the document is displayed with a hierarchical structure, and the Outlining tab appears on the ribbon. A styled document, displayed in Outline view. Troubleshooting The appearance of buttons and groups on the ribbon changes depending on the width of the program window. For information about changing the appearance of the ribbon to match our screen images, see “Modifying the Display of the Ribbon” at the beginning of this book. The indentations and symbols used in Outline view to indicate the level of a heading or paragraph in the document’s structure don’t appear in the document in other views or when you print it. To the left of the document, the style area pane shows the style applied to each paragraph. This pane is available only in Draft and Outline views, and it is not visible by default. Reorganizing Document Outlines 269 Tip By default, the style area pane is 0 inch wide, which effectively closes it. We find it useful to work in Outline view with the style area pane open. If you want your screen to look like the ones shown in our graphics, display the Advanced page of the Word Options dialog box and in the Display area, change the Style Area Pane Width In Draft And Outline Views setting to 1". You can use commands in the Outline Tools group of the Outlining tab to do the following: ● Display only the headings at a specific level and above. ● Promote or demote headings or body text by changing their level. ● Move headings and their text up or down in the document. Tip You can click the buttons in the Master Document group to create a master document with subdocuments that you can then display or hide. The topic of master documents and subdocuments is beyond the scope of this book. For information, see Word Help. In this exercise, you’ll switch to Outline view, promote and demote headings, move headings, and expand and collapse the outline. SET UP You need the OfficeProcedures_start document located in your Chapter10 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the OfficeProcedures_start document, and save it as OfficeProcedures. Turn on formatting marks, open the style area pane (see the tip at the top of the page), and then follow the steps. 1. In the lower-right corner of the window, on the View Shortcuts toolbar, click the Outline button. The document is displayed in Outline view, and the Outlining tab appears at the left end of the ribbon. 2. On the Outlining tab, in the Outline Tools group, click the Show Level arrow, and in the list, click Level 1. The document collapses to display only level-1 headings. Level-1 headings are those that have the Heading 1 style applied to them. 270 Chapter 10 Organize and Arrange Content 3. Click anywhere in the ACCOUNTING heading. 4. In the Outline Tools group, click the Expand button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Alt+Shift++ to expand a heading. See Also For more information about keyboard shortcuts, see “Keyboard Shortcuts” at the end of this book. Word expands the ACCOUNTING section to display its level-2 headings. 5. In the Outline Tools group, click the Demote button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Alt+Shift+Right Arrow to demote a heading. The ACCOUNTING heading changes to a level-2 heading. The style of the Accounting heading changes to Heading 2 when it is demoted. 6. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Undo button. The ACCOUNTING heading changes back to a level-1 heading. 7. In the Outline Tools group, click the Collapse button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Alt+Shift+_ to collapse a heading. 8. Click the Demote button. Again, the ACCOUNTING heading changes to a level-2 heading. 9. Click the Expand button. Reorganizing Document Outlines 271 Because the subheadings were hidden when you demoted the ACCOUNTING heading, all the subheadings are demoted to level 3 to maintain the hierarchy of the section. The Accounting heading changes to Heading 2, and all its subheadings change to Heading 3. 10. Click the Collapse button, and then in the Outline Tools group, click the Promote button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Alt+Shift+Left Arrow to promote a heading. The ACCOUNTING heading is now a level-1 heading again. 11. Press Ctrl+Home to move to the top of the document, and then in the Outline Tools group, in the Show Level list, click Level 2. The outline shows all the level-1 and level-2 headings. 12. Click the plus sign to the left of the SHIPPING heading, and then in the Outline Tools group, click the Move Up button five times. Keyboard Shortcut Press Alt+Shift+Up Arrow to move a selected heading upward in an outline. The SHIPPING heading and all its subheadings move above the ACCOUNTING heading. 272 Chapter 10 Organize and Arrange Content Clicking the plus sign adjacent to a heading selects all the headings and text in that section. 13. Press Ctrl+Home to release the selection, and then in the Outline Tools group, in the Show Level list, click All Levels. Keyboard Shortcut Press Alt+Shift+A to display all levels. You can now scroll through the document to see the effects of the reorganization. 14. In the Close group, click the Close Outline View button. Word displays the reorganized document in Print Layout view. CLEAN UP Save the OfficeProcedures document, and then close it. Arranging Objects on the Page 273 Arranging Objects on the Page You have already learned basic ways to control how text wraps around an object such as a picture and to position an object on the page. However, sometimes things don’t work out quite the way you expect them to, especially when you are dealing with multiple objects. Tip In the exercise for this chapter, you work with photographs, but the concepts discussed here also apply to other graphic objects, such as clip art images, diagrams, and shapes. When you choose a text wrapping option other than In Line With Text, you can specify that an object be positioned in one of two ways: ● Absolutely This option positions the object at a distance you set from a margin, page, paragraph, or line. ● Relatively This type of positioning is determined by the relationship of the object to a margin or page. However, you can take the guesswork out of setting an object's position by choosing one of nine predefined position options from the Position gallery. These options all implement square text wrapping in a specific location relative to the margins of the page. If you use one of the position options to locate an object, you can still move it manually by dragging it. Often it is easier to drag objects into position if you display an onscreen grid to align against. You can also use alignment commands to align objects with the margins and with each other. After you position an object, adding text might upset the arrangement of the page. You can specify whether the object should move with its related text or should remain anchored in its position. You can also specify whether the object should be allowed to overlap other objects. If you insert several objects and then position them so that they overlap, they are said to be stacked. The stacking order (which object appears on top of which) is initially determined by the order in which you inserted the objects, but can also be determined by other factors such as the type of text wrapping assigned to each object. Provided all the objects have the same kind of text wrapping, you can change their order by selecting an object and clicking the Bring Forward or Send Backward button in the Arrange group to move the object to the top or bottom of the stack. If you click either button’s arrow and then click Bring Forward or Send Backward, the object moves forward or backward in the stack one position at a time. 274 Chapter 10 Organize and Arrange Content After you have arranged objects on the page, you can use the Selection And Visibility task pane to hide and show them so that you can judge each object’s contribution to the whole. In this exercise, you’ll modify the text-wrapping, position, and stacking order of pictures that have already been inserted into a document. Then you’ll hide one of the pictures. SET UP You need the BambooInfo_start document located in your Chapter10 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the BambooInfo_start document, and save it as BambooInfo. Turn off formatting marks and the rulers, and set the zoom percentage so that you can see the entire first page. Then follow the steps. 1. Click the first picture, and on the Format tab, in the Arrange group, click the Wrap Text button. The Wrap Text gallery appears. The selected picture is assigned the In Line With Text text-wrapping option. 2. In the Wrap Text gallery, click More Layout Options. Then in the Layout dialog box, click the Position tab. All the options on the Position page are unavailable. You cannot manually change these settings when text wrapping is set to In Line With Text. 3. Click the Text Wrapping tab, and in the Wrapping style area, click Tight. Then in the Wrap Text area, click Right only. Finally, in the Distance from text area, set both Left and Right to 0.3”. 4. Click the Position tab. The options on the Position page are now available. Notice that the Horizontal and Vertical settings are Absolute and that the Move Object With Text check box is selected. Arranging Objects on the Page The selected picture is anchored to its paragraph. 5. Click OK. The text now wraps to the right of the picture. You have controlled the text wrapping and position of this picture, as well as the distance from the adjacent text. 275 276 Chapter 10 Organize and Arrange Content 6. Click anywhere in the first line of text to the right of the picture, and press the Home key to position the cursor at the beginning of the line. Then press Enter. Word inserts a blank paragraph below the document title. The picture moves down with the paragraph to which it is attached. 7. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Undo button to remove the blank paragraph. 8. Click the picture to select it. Then on the Format tab, in the Arrange group, click the Position button. The Position gallery appears. This gallery offers nine With Text Wrapping positions. Arranging Objects on the Page 277 9. In the Position gallery, point to each thumbnail in turn to see a live preview of its effects. Then under With Text Wrapping, click the first thumbnail in the first row (Position in Top Left with Square Text Wrapping). The picture moves to the upper-left corner of the document. The picture is now aligned with the top and left page margins. 10. Click to the left of Beautiful in the title, and press Enter. Word inserts a blank paragraph above the document title, but the picture does not move down with the title. 11. Click the picture, and then at the bottom of the Position gallery, click More Layout Options to display the Position page of the Layout dialog box. Notice that the Horizontal and Vertical settings have changed to Alignment and that the Move Object With Text check box is no longer selected. The relationship of the picture with the text is broken, and the picture is now sitting in a fixed position relative to the margins of the page. 12. Click Cancel to close the dialog box. 13. Click the second bamboo picture, display the Position gallery, and under With Text Wrapping, click the third thumbnail in the first row (Position in Top Left with Square Text Wrapping). Selecting one of the predefined Position options is a quick way of both setting text wrapping and breaking the relationship of the picture with the text. 278 Chapter 10 Organize and Arrange Content 14. In the Arrange group, click the Align button. The Align gallery appears. The Align gallery provides easy access to all the alignment options. Tip When pictures have a text wrapping setting other than In Line With Text, you can use the options in the Align gallery to align multiple objects horizontally or vertically. You can also distribute selected objects equally between the first and last objects in the selection. Understanding how these options work takes practice. It is a good idea to test various settings with multiple objects to see the results. Remember, the Undo button is your ally! 15. At the bottom of the gallery, click Grid Settings. The Drawing Grid dialog box opens. Arranging Objects on the Page 279 The settings in this dialog box control the appearance of an onscreen grid. 16. In the Grid settings area, set both Horizontal spacing and Vertical spacing to 0.25". Then in the Show grid area, select the Display gridlines on screen check box, and click OK . The text column is filled with a grid of quarter-inch squares. 17. Drag the selected picture down and to the left until it sits three squares from the top margin and three squares from the left margin, overlapping the first picture. Notice as you drag that the picture snaps to the grid. Tip To move a picture without snapping to the grid, hold down the Ctrl key while pressing an Arrow key. The picture moves in tiny increments in the direction of the key. 280 Chapter 10 Organize and Arrange Content 18. Click the third picture in the document, set its position to Position in Bottom Left with Square Text Wrapping, and then drag it up and to the right until it sits six squares from the top margin and six squares from the left margin, overlapping the second picture. The text wraps on both sides of the picture, which is not the effect you want. Aligning objects doesn’t always produce the results you expect. To behave predictably, the objects need to have the same text-wrapping settings. 19. Click the first picture, display the Text Wrapping page of the Layout dialog box, and in the Wrapping style area, click Tight. In the Wrap Text area, ensure that the setting is Right only. Then in the Distance from text area, ensure that both Left and Right are set to 0.3”, and click OK. 20. Repeat step 19 for the second and third pictures. 21. With the third picture still selected, in the Arrange group, click the Send Backward button. The middle picture now overlaps the first and third pictures. 22. In the Arrange group, click the Align button, and click View Gridlines to turn them off. Then click away from the picture to release the selection. The text now wraps to the right of the pictures. Arranging Objects on the Page 281 It is easier to judge the balance of your layout if you turn off gridlines. 23. Click the third picture, and then in the Arrange group, click the Selection Pane button. The Selection And Visibility task pane opens, identifying the three objects on this page. You can click buttons to show, hide, and change the order of objects on a page. 282 Chapter 10 Organize and Arrange Content 24. At the bottom of the task pane, click the Hide All button. Then in turn, click the boxes adjacent to the three pictures. When an object is hidden, its box is blank, and when it is visible, its box contains an eye icon. 25. Click the check box for Picture 3 to hide just that picture. Then close the task pane. CLEAN UP Save the BambooInfo document, and then close it. Using Tables to Control Page Layout Most people are accustomed to thinking of a table as a means of displaying data in a quick, easy-to-grasp format. But tables can also serve to organize your pages in creative ways. For example, suppose you want to display two tables next to each other. The simplest way to do this is to first create a table with one tall row and two wide columns and no gridlines. You can then insert one table in the first cell and the other table in the second cell. These nested tables then seem to be arranged side by side. These tables are nested within the cells of a one-row, two-column table. As with regular tables, you can create a nested table in one of three ways: ● From scratch ● By formatting existing information ● By inserting Microsoft Excel data And just like other tables, you can format a nested table either manually or by using one of the ready-made table styles. Tip You can use tables to organize a mixture of elements such as text, tables, charts, and diagrams. When creating a table to contain other elements, you might want to take advantage of the Word table-drawing feature. If you click Draw Table below the grid displayed when you click the Table button on the Insert tab, the pointer changes to a pencil you can use Using Tables to Control Page Layout 283 to draw cells on the page. You can set up the container table visually, without having to fuss with dialog boxes and precise dimensions while you are designing the layout. Then after everything is set up the way you want it, you can use the Table Properties dialog box to fine-tune the table specifications. In this exercise, you’ll draw a table to contain two other tables. You’ll then insert and format the nested tables. SET UP You need the Loan workbook, the DeliveryTruckPurchase document, and the LoanComparisons_start document located in your Chapter10 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the Loan workbook in Excel, and open the DeliveryTruckPurchase document in Word. Then open the LoanComparisons_start document, and save it as LoanComparisons. Turn on formatting marks and the rulers, and then follow the steps. 1. With the LoanComparisons document active, on the Insert tab, in the Tables group, click the Table button, and then click Draw Table. The pointer becomes a pencil. 2. Point below the last paragraph mark in the document, and drag across and down to create a cell about 3 inches wide and 1.5 inches tall. Tip The location of the pencil is marked with guides on the horizontal and vertical rulers. You can use these guides to help you draw cells of specific dimensions. 3. Point to the upper-right corner of the cell (you don’t have to be precise), and drag to create another cell about the same size as the first. When you release the mouse button, Word joins the two cells. The structure of a table, created with the drawing tool. Troubleshooting If your table is not placed between the two paragraph marks, as shown in the graphic, click the Undo button and redraw your table, being sure to start below the last paragraph mark. When you finish drawing the first cell, Word positions the table correctly. 284 Chapter 10 Organize and Arrange Content 4. On the View tab, in the Window group, click the Switch Windows button, and then click DeliveryTruckPurchase. 5. Scroll to the bottom of the page, and click anywhere in the Payment Schedule table. Then on the Layout contextual tab, in the Table group, click Select , and click Select Table. 6. On the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click the Copy button. 7. Switch to the LoanComparisons document, right-click the first cell in the table, and then under Paste Options, click the Nest Table button. Word inserts the table you copied into the cell and adjusts the height of the container table to fit the size of the nested table. 8. On the Windows Taskbar, click the Microsoft Excel button to activate Sheet1 of the Loan workbook. Then select cells A1:B8, and on the Excel Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click the Copy button. 9. Switch back to the LoanComparisons document, click the second cell in the table, and then on the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click the Paste button. Word inserts the worksheet data as a nested table in the cell. These nested tables come from a Word document and an Excel worksheet. 10. Move the pointer to the selection area adjacent to the container table, and then click to select its two cells. 11. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Border arrow, and then in the list, click No Border. Word removes the borders from the container cells. Key Points 285 12. Click anywhere in the left table, and on the Design contextual tab, in the Table Style Options group, ensure that the Header Row check box is selected, select the Total Row check box, and clear any other check boxes. 13. In the Table Styles group, display the Table Styles gallery, and click the thumbnail of the table style you want to apply to the nested table. We used Medium Grid 3 – Accent 1. 14. Repeat steps 12 and 13 to format the right table, perhaps using a similar table style with a different color. We used Medium Grid 3 – Accent 2. 15. Turn off formatting marks to see the results. The nested tables now clearly contrast the two loans. Although invisible, the container table provides the structure to display these two tables effectively. CLEAN UP Save the LoanComparisons document, and then close it. Then close the DeliveryTruckPurchase document. Finally, close the Loan workbook without saving any changes. Key Points ● If you take the time to apply heading styles to a document, you can use the document’s outline to rearrange its sections. ● You can position an object in relation to the text that surrounds it and in relation to other objects on the page. ● By using tables in creative ways, you can place information in non-linear arrangements for easy comparison or analysis. Chapter at a Glance Save files in different formats, page 288 Create and modify Web documents, page 293 Create and publish blog posts, page 299 11 Create Documents for Use Outside of Word In this chapter, you will learn how to ✔ Save files in different formats. ✔ Create and modify Web documents. ✔ Create and publish blog posts. Sometimes you’ll create a document in Microsoft Word 2010 and then want to send it to someone who doesn’t have Word 2010 installed on his or her computer. Word comes with several conversion utilities that you can use to save documents in other file formats so that you can distribute documents that your colleagues can read and use in almost any program. If you need to distribute a document electronically but you don’t want to share the actual file, you can “print” the document to a new file in Portable Document Format (PDF) or XML Paper Specification (XPS) format. When people view the PDF or XPS file, they see it just as it would look if you printed it. If they print the file, no matter what computer or what printer they use, the pages look just as they do when printed from your computer on your printer. One way of distributing the information in your documents is by converting them to Web pages so that people can read them on the Web. The Web has become a major part of our everyday lives. We use it to research topics, shop, check the news, and find out how our favorite sports team is doing. It’s also a great publishing tool if you are trying to reach a broad audience. For example, your organization might want to publish a Web newsletter to provide information while advertising its goods or services. Or you might want to use built-in Word tools to create and post articles to a blog (short for Web log) about a particular topic. 287 288 Chapter 11 Create Documents for Use Outside of Word In this chapter, you’ll first save a document in a different file format. Then you’ll preview a document in Web Layout view, save the document as a Web page, and make any adjustments necessary for optimum presentation in a Web browser. Finally, you’ll create a blog post, register an existing blog account, and then publish the blog post. Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this chapter, you need to copy the book’s practice files to your computer. The practice files you’ll use to complete the exercises in this chapter are in the Chapter11 practice file folder. A complete list of practice files is provided in “Using the Practice Files” at the beginning of this book. Saving Files in Different Formats When you save a Word document, the default file format is the Word 2010 .docx format. To save a document in a different file format, you display the Backstage view, click Save As to open the Save As dialog box, and then change the Save As Type setting to the format you want to use. Viewing the .docx Format The .docx format actually consists of a set of files in various folders. The entire set is compressed so that the “file” has the smallest possible footprint. If you are interested in taking a look at a “file,” you can change the .docx file name extension to .zip and then view the files in Windows Explorer. To view the components of a .docx file: 1. Display Windows Explorer, click Organize, and then click Folder And Search Options to display the Folder Options dialog box. 2. Click the View tab, and in the Advanced Settings list, clear the Hide Extensions For Known File Types check box. Then click OK. 3. Navigate to the folder containing the file you want to view, and change the file name extension from .docx to .zip. Click Yes to acknowledge the warning message. 4. Double click the .zip file, and then double-click any folders you want to view. You can see the component files in the expanded folder. 5. When you have finished exploring, change the file name extension back to .docx, and in the Folder Options dialog box, hide the display of file name extensions. Saving Files in Different Formats 289 If you want to save the file so that it can be used with an earlier version of Word, you need to save it in the .doc format. You do this by changing the Save As Type setting to Word 97-2003 Document. You can save Word documents in many different formats. If you want to save a Word document in a format that can be opened by the widest variety of programs, use one of the following formats: ● Rich Text Format (*.rtf) This format preserves the document’s formatting. ● Plain Text (*.txt) This format preserves only the document's text. 290 Chapter 11 Create Documents for Use Outside of Word If you want people to be able to view a document but not change it, you can save the document in one of two formats: ● PDF (.pdf) This format is preferred by commercial printing facilities. You should also use this format if you know that recipients have a PDF reader, such as Adobe Acrobat Reader, installed on their computer. ● XPS (.xps) This format precisely renders all fonts, images, and colors on recipients' computers. Both the PDF and XPS formats are designed to deliver documents as electronic representations of the way they look when printed. The text and graphics in .pdf and .xps files are essentially static and content cannot be easily edited, so these formats are ideal for legal documents. Both types of files can easily be sent by e-mail to many recipients and can be made available on a Web page for downloading by anyone who wants them. However, the files are no longer Word documents, and they cannot be opened, viewed, or edited in Word. When you indicate that you want to save a Word document in PDF or XPS format, the Save As dialog box expands so that you can optimize the file size of the document for your intended distribution method. You can also click Options to display a dialog box where you can do the following: ● Specify the pages to include in the .pdf or .xps version of the document. ● Include or exclude comments and tracked changes. ● Include or exclude items such as bookmarks and properties. ● Set specific PDF options. Tip Another way to create an .xps file or a .pdf file is to display the Backstage view, and in the left pane, click Save & Send. Then in the File Types area of the center pane, click Create PDF/XPS Document to display information about this task in the right pane. Clicking the Create PDF/XPS button displays the Publish As PDF Or XPS dialog box, in which you can save (publish) the file in the usual way. You can also click Change File Type in the center pane of the Save & Send page to display information about common file formats. Selecting a format and then clicking the Save As button in the right pane opens the Save As dialog box with that file type already selected. In this exercise, you’ll save one page of a multipage document in XPS format for publication online. Then you’ll view the XPS page. Saving Files in Different Formats 291 SET UP You need the ParkingRules_start document located in your Chapter11 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the ParkingRules_start document, and then follow the steps. 1. Scroll down to page 3 of the document. You want to save only this page in XPS format. 2. Display the Backstage view, and then in the left pane, click Save As. 3. In the File name box of the Save As dialog box, change the name to ParkingRules. 4. Display the Save as type list, and click XPS Document. The Save As dialog box expands so that you can select options for the file. The expanded Save As dialog box for the XPS format. 292 Chapter 11 Create Documents for Use Outside of Word 5. In the Optimize for area, click Minimum size (publishing online). Then click Options. The Options dialog box opens. You can choose from these options to tailor the .xps file to your needs. 6. In the Page range area, click Current page. 7. In the Include non-printing information area, clear the Document properties check box, and then click OK. 8. Back in the Save As dialog box, select the Open file after publishing check box, and then click Save. The document is saved in XPS format. Because you indicated that you wanted to open the file after saving it, the XPS Viewer starts and displays the file. Creating and Modifying Web Documents 293 Only page 3 of the Word document appears in the .xps file. CLEAN UP Close the XPS Viewer, and then close the ParkingRules_start document. Creating and Modifying Web Documents You don’t need to be a Web designer to create a Web page. From within Word 2010, you can view a document in Web Layout view, make any necessary adjustments in Word, and then save the document as a Web page, as easily as you would save it in any other format. During the process of saving the Web page, you can assign a page title that will appear in the title bar of the viewer’s Web browser. When you save a document as a Web page, Word converts the styles and formatting in the document to Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) codes, which are called tags. These tags tell a Web browser how to display the document. During the conversion, some of the document’s formatting might be changed or ignored because it is not supported by all Web browsers. If that is the case, Word alerts you and gives you the option of stopping the conversion process so that you can make adjustments to the formatting to make it more compatible. 294 Chapter 11 Create Documents for Use Outside of Word Tip In the Web Options dialog box, you can specify which browsers you anticipate will be used to view your Web pages. You can also have Word disable any features that are incompatible with the specified browsers. You can save a document as a Web page in any of three formats: ● Web Page This format saves the Web page as a .htm file with a folder of supporting files that ensure the page is rendered exactly as you want it. ● Single File Web Page This format embeds all the information necessary to render the Web page in one MIME-encapsulated aggregate HTML (.mhtml) file that can be distributed via e-mail. ● Web Page, Filtered This format removes any Office-specific tags from the file and significantly reduces the size of the Web document and its accompanying folder of supporting files. However, it can also radically change the look of the document. For example, it might change a shaded background to a solid color, making the resulting page difficult to read. After you save a document as a Web page, it is no longer a Word document. However, you can still open, view, and edit the Web page in Word, just as you would a normal document. (You can also open and edit HTML-format Web pages created in other programs.) Making changes can be as basic as replacing text and adjusting alignment, or as advanced as moving and inserting graphics. When you finish modifying the Web page, you can resave it as a Web page, or save it as a regular Word document. In this exercise, you’ll check that your computer is optimized for displaying documents as Web pages in Windows Internet Explorer 6, Internet Explorer 7, or Internet Explorer 8. You’ll preview a document in Web Layout view and make adjustments necessary for online presentation. Finally, you’ll save the document as a Web page, provide a title for the Web page, open the Web page in Word to make some modifications, and then save and view your changes. SET UP You need the RoomPlannerWeb_start document located in your Chapter11 practice file folder to complete this exercise. You also need a Web browser. Internet Explorer 8 is recommended; the steps might be different for other browsers and versions. Open the RoomPlannerWeb_start document, and save it as RoomPlannerWeb. Hide formatting marks, display the rulers, and be sure the zoom percentage is set to 100%. Then follow the steps. Creating and Modifying Web Documents 295 1. Display the Backstage view, and in the left pane, click Options. The Word Options dialog box opens. 2. In the left pane, click Advanced. Then at the bottom of the Advanced page, in the General area, click Web Options. The Web Options dialog box opens. The Browsers page of the Web Options dialog box. 3. On the Browsers page, verify that the People who view this Web page will be using option is set to Microsoft Internet Explorer 6 or later and that under Options, all five check boxes are selected. 4. If you want, view the other pages of the Web Options dialog box to familiarize yourself with the kinds of settings available for your Web pages. Then click OK . 5. Click OK to close the Word Options dialog box. 6. On the View Shortcuts toolbar in the lower-right corner of the screen, click the Web Layout button. Word displays the page as it will appear in your Web browser. 296 Chapter 11 Create Documents for Use Outside of Word In Web Layout view, the document expands to fill the screen. Troubleshooting The appearance of buttons and groups on the ribbon changes depending on the width of the program window. For information about changing the appearance of the ribbon to match our screen images, see “Modifying the Display of the Ribbon” at the beginning of this book. As you can see, the page margins are ignored. The page will be easier to read if the text lines are shorter, which you can accomplish by indenting the paragraphs. You also need to adjust the size of the quote box for a more dramatic visual effect. 7. On the Home tab, in the Editing group, click the Select button, and then click Select All. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+A to select an entire document. See Also For more information about keyboard shortcuts, see “Keyboard Shortcuts” at the end of this book. 8. With the document selected, click the Paragraph dialog box launcher. 9. On the Indents and Spacing page of the Paragraph dialog box, in the Indentation area, change the Left and Right settings to 1.25", and then click OK. The text is now indented from the left and right edges of the window. 10. Click the frame of the quote box to select it, and then on the Format contextual tab, in the Size group, change the Width setting to 2.5". Press Enter to implement the change, and then click away from the quote box to release the selection. Creating and Modifying Web Documents 297 Troubleshooting If the quote box jumps to the middle of the window when you change its size, select it and then in the Arrange group, click the Wrap Text button, and click Square to reapply that text wrapping option. The Web document is now more readable. (Depending on your screen configuration, your line breaks might be different than those shown here.) The “margins” are wider and the quote box is half its original width, making the quote wrap to two lines. 11. Display the Backstage view, and in the left pane, click Save As. 12. With the contents of the Chapter11 practice file folder displayed in the Save As dialog box, type My Web Page in the File name box. 13. Display the Save as type list, and click Web Page. Then when the Save As dialog box expands, click Change Title. The Enter Text dialog box opens. 14. In the Page title box, type Room Planner, and click OK. This title will appear in the title bar of the Web browser window when the Web page is displayed. 15. In the Save As dialog box, click Save. 298 Chapter 11 Create Documents for Use Outside of Word The Microsoft Word Compatibility Checker tells you that the Small Caps effect used for the Information Sheet subtitle is not supported by the specified Web browsers and will be changed to all capital letters. 16. In the Compatibility Checker, click Continue. Word saves the document as an HTML file called My Web Page. 17. Press Ctrl+End to move to the end of the document, and then type Looking for free advice? Check our schedule of decorating seminars. (Include the period.) 18. If you want, format the text to make it stand out. Then save the Web page. 19. Open Windows Explorer, and navigate to the Chapter11 practice file folder. The Chapter11 folder contains the My Web Page file and a folder named My Web Page_files, which contains supporting files for the Web page. 20. Double-click My Web Page. Your Web browser starts, and the Web page opens. The Web document looks the same in a Web browser as it did in Web Layout view. You can scroll to the bottom of the page to see the changes you made to the HTML file in Word. CLEAN UP Close your Web browser and Windows Explorer. Then close the My Web Page HTML file. Creating and Publishing Blog Posts 299 Creating and Publishing Blog Posts Blogs used to be personal Web sites—online spaces where individuals expressed their opinions about anything and everything. With the evolution of social sites such as Facebook and MySpace, blogs are now less likely to be personal online diaries intended for a limited audience, such as the author’s family or circle of friends, and are more likely to serve a promotional purpose. For example, they might provide news and information about an industry. Or they might offer commentary on a specific subject, such as a genre of music, a political point of view, a medical condition, or local news. A blog consists of posts that can include text, images, and links to related blogs, Web pages, and other media. Word 2010 makes it easy to create posts that you can upload to your blog. If you have already set up a blog account with a blog service provider, you can register your account with Word the first time you create a blog post. If you haven’t yet set up the blog account, you’ll need to register with a service provider before you can publish your first post. Thereafter, Word uses your registered account information when you create or publish a blog post. To create a blog post, you can use a template designed specifically for that purpose. You then publish a draft of the post to your blog space, where you can review and make any necessary changes before actually publishing the final version. If you create a regular document and then want to publish it as a blog post, display the Backstage view, and in the left pane, click Save & Send. Then in the Save & Send area of the center pane, click Publish As Blog Post to display information about blogging in the right pane. Clicking the Publish As Blog Post button converts the active document to a new blog post containing the content of the document. You can then save and publish the blog post the same way you would a regular blog post. In this exercise, you’ll register your existing blog account in Word, create a blog post, publish it to your blog, and then view the published blog post. SET UP You need the BlogPost document located in your Chapter11 practice file folder to complete this exercise. You need to have an existing blog account with Windows Live Spaces or another blog service provider, with e-mail publishing or the equivalent turned on. Then follow the steps. 1. Display the Backstage view, and in the left pane, click New. 2. In the center pane of the New page, under Available Templates, click Blog post. Then in the right pane, click Create. Word creates a document and the Register A Blog Account dialog box opens. If you already have a blog account, you can click Register Now, and follow the instructions to register your existing account. If you don’t have a blog account, you can click the Office.com link for information about getting an account. www.FreeDownload.ir 300 Chapter 11 Create Documents for Use Outside of Word Setting Up a Blog Account Before setting up a blog account, you must decide which blog service provider you want to use. Many service providers, such as Windows Live Spaces (spaces.live.com) and Blogger (www.blogger.com), offer blog spaces free of charge. If your organization is running Microsoft SharePoint 2007 or SharePoint 2010, the site manager might be able to set up a blog space for you. Tip The following instructions were current at the time of writing, but because the Windows Live site is constantly being updated, the steps might have changed. To open a Windows Live Spaces account and create a blog space: 1. Start your Web browser, and then in the Address bar, type spaces.live.com, and press Enter. Then if necessary, enter your credentials to sign into your account. 2. On the Spaces - Windows Live home page, click Create Your Space. 3. On the [Your Name] Space page, under Welcome To Your Space, click Choose A Web Address. 4. In the box between http:// and .spaces.live.com on the Web Address page, enter the address you want to use. Then click Check Availability. 5. If Windows Live Spaces reports that the Web address is available, click Save; if the address is not available, repeat step 4 with another name. You can then enter information about yourself (your profile), give access to friends, and add content directly on your blog’s home page. If you want to publish to your blog from Word, you need to activate the blog and turn on e-mail publishing. To activate the blog: 1. Under Welcome To Your Space, click Add Blog Entry. A Blog button is added to the toolbar of your blog page header, and a window opens so that you can enter a blog post. 2. Click Cancel, and then in the Exit Without Saving Changes message box, click OK. Creating and Publishing Blog Posts 301 To turn on e-mail publishing: 1. At the right end of the toolbar of your blog page header, click Options, and then click E-mail Publishing. On this page, you specify the locations from which you will post blog materials. The Windows Live Spaces E-mail Publishing page. 2. On the E-mail Publishing page, do the following: a. Select the Turn On E-mail Publishing check box. b. Type up to three e-mail addresses from which you’ll publish blog posts. c. Type a secret word (the password you’ll use to register your blog account in Word). d. Select photo albums to share (optional). e. Choose whether to publish e-mail submissions immediately or review them online before publishing. 3. Record the e-mail addresses given at the bottom of the page, and then click Save. 302 Chapter 11 Create Documents for Use Outside of Word This dialog box appears the first time you create a blog post. Tip If you don’t already have a blog account, you can click Register Later and skip to step 8. Word will prompt you again to register your account the first time you publish a blog post or the next time you create a blog post. The following steps are for registering a blog account created on Windows Live Spaces. 3. Click Register Now. The New Blog Account dialog box opens. Remember, you are not creating a new account but registering one you have already created. 4. In the Blog list, click Windows Live Spaces, and then click Next. The New Windows Live Spaces Account dialog box opens. You need the space name and secret word assigned to your blog account to complete the registration process. Creating and Publishing Blog Posts 303 5. Enter your space name and secret word, and then click OK. Tip With Windows Live Spaces, your space name is part of your space address. For example, if your space address is http://lucernepublishing.spaces.live.com/, the space name is lucernepublishing. The Picture Options dialog box opens. 6. In the Picture Options dialog box, verify that None – Don’t upload pictures is selected in the Picture provider box, and then click OK . Tip If you want to be able to upload pictures, you can get information about setting up a provider by clicking the links in the Picture Options dialog box. A message box appears when your account has been successfully registered. You can now publish blog posts from Word to your blog account. 7. In the Microsoft Word message box, click OK. Word displays a blank blog post with a title placeholder at the top. For a blog post, the ribbon displays only the File, Blog Post, and Insert tabs. 8. Click the title placeholder, and type Walla Walla Music. 9. Display the Backstage view, and in the left pane, click Open. Then in the Open dialog box, navigate to your Chapter11 practice file folder, and double-click the BlogPost document. 10. Select and copy the two paragraphs, and then close the BlogPost document. 11. In the blog post, click below the line, and then paste the two paragraphs from the Microsoft Office Clipboard. 12. If you want, use the commands in the Basic Text group on the Blog Post tab to format the title and text. 304 Chapter 11 Create Documents for Use Outside of Word We left the default formatting. The entry is ready to be posted to your blog. Tip Before you publish this blog post, you can turn wwsymphony.org in the last line of the second paragraph into a Web link by clicking the Hyperlink button in the Links group on the Insert tab. For information about inserting Web links, see “Adding Hyperlinks” in Chapter 12, “Explore More Text Techniques.” You can also insert tables and illustrations by clicking their buttons and using the techniques you would use in a regular Word document. 13. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Save button. 14. With the contents of your Chapter11 practice file folder displayed in the Save As dialog box, type My Blog Post in the File name box, and then click Save. 15. On the Blog Post tab, in the Blog group, click the Publish arrow, and then click Publish as Draft. The Connect To <Blog Title> dialog box opens. You can specify the blog account for each blog post. Troubleshooting If you have only one blog account, you might not see this dialog box. 16. Enter your space name and secret word, and then click OK. A message appears when the blog post has been published to your blog. Creating and Publishing Blog Posts 305 This message confirms that the draft blog post was successfully published. 17. In the Blog group, click the Home Page button. Your default Web browser opens, displaying the home page of your registered blog space. 18. Under Blog, click Summary. On the Web page that opens, click the Walla Walla Music link. Word displays the draft of the Word blog post in the Windows Live Spaces blog window. You can edit and format the blog post here, just as you would edit it in Word. 19. After making any necessary changes, click Publish Entry. Word publishes the post to your blog. 306 Chapter 11 Create Documents for Use Outside of Word The blog post, after it has been published to the blog. CLEAN UP Close Internet Explorer, and then save and close the My Blog Post document. Key Points ● You can save a document in a file format that allows it to be opened in other programs. ● To distribute information in a format that cannot be easily changed, you can save the document as an XPS file so that it looks on the screen the way it will when it is printed. ● A Word document can easily be converted to a Web page. You can see how it will look in a Web browser, and you can adjust the layout from within Word. ● If you have a blog space, you can easily create and publish blog posts in Word. 12 Part 3 Additional Techniques 12 Explore More Text Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .309 13 Use Reference Tools for Longer Documents . . . . . .329 14 Work with Mail Merge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .355 15 Collaborate on Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .379 16 Work in Word More Efficiently . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .405 307 Chapter at a Glance Add hyperlinks, page 310 Insert fields, page 316 Add bookmarks and cross-references, page 322 12 Explore More Text Techniques In this chapter, you will learn how to ✔ Add hyperlinks. ✔ Insert fields. ✔ Add bookmarks and cross-references. Microsoft Word 2010 has several tools that make creating professional documents easy and efficient: ● Hyperlinks To help a reader move to a location in the same file, in another file, or on a Web page, you can add links from text or graphics to the target location. ● Fields Instead of typing information that is associated with a document, you can have Word insert it for you in a field. Then if the information changes, you can simply update the field to ensure that the information is current. ● Bookmarks You can quickly return to a specific location in a document by inserting a bookmark. You can jump to a bookmarked location by selecting it from a list, and you can help a reader find information by inserting hyperlinks or cross-references to bookmarks. ● Cross-references To help a reader move to a related location in a document, you can insert a cross-reference. Then if the text at the location changes, you can tell Word to update the cross-reference to reflect the change. In this chapter, you’ll insert two different kinds of hyperlinks and three different types of fields. Then you'll create and modify bookmarks and cross-references. Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this chapter, you need to copy the book’s practice files to your computer. The practice files you’ll use to complete the exercises in this chapter are in the Chapter12 practice file folder. A complete list of practice files is provided in “Using the Practice Files” at the beginning of this book. 309 310 Chapter 12 Explore More Text Techniques Adding Hyperlinks Like Web pages, Word documents can include hyperlinks that provide a quick way to perform tasks such as the following: ● Open another document. ● Link to a Web site. ● Download a file. ● Send an e-mail message. You insert hyperlinks into a Word document by displaying the Insert Hyperlink dialog box, specifying the type of link you want to create, and then entering an appropriate destination for that type of link. While creating a hyperlink to a document or a Web page, called the target, you can specify whether the target information should appear in the same window or frame as the active document or in a new one. You can also make a particular setting the default for all hyperlinks. Within a document, hyperlinks appear underlined and in the color specified for hyperlinks by the document’s theme. You can jump to the target of the hyperlink by holding down the Ctrl key and clicking the link. After you click the hyperlink, its color changes to the color specified for followed hyperlinks. To edit or remove a hyperlink, you can select it and click Hyperlink in the Links group on the Insert tab or you can right-click the selection and then click the appropriate command. In this exercise, you’ll insert and test a hyperlink to a different document. Then you’ll insert, modify, and test a hyperlink that opens an e-mail message window. SET UP You need the VisitorGuide_start and Conductors documents located in your Chapter12 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the VisitorGuide_start document, and save it as VisitorGuide. Then follow the steps. 1. In the second sentence of the second paragraph, select series of outstanding conductors. Then on the Insert tab, in the Links group, click the Hyperlink button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+K to open the Insert Hyperlink dialog box. See Also For more information about keyboard shortcuts, see “Keyboard Shortcuts” at the end of this book. Adding Hyperlinks 311 The Insert Hyperlink dialog box opens. On the Link To bar, Existing File Or Web Page is selected, and the dialog box shows the contents of your Chapter12 practice file folder. You can select the target type in the Link To bar. Troubleshooting If you don’t see the contents of the Chapter12 folder, ensure that Existing File Or Web Page is selected on the Link To bar, and then click the Look In arrow, and navigate to your Chapter12 practice file folder. 2. In the list of file names, click (don’t double-click) the Conductors document, and then click Target Frame. The Set Target Frame dialog box opens with Page Default (None) selected as the frame in which the document will open. In the Set Target Frame dialog box, you can change the way the target of the hyperlink will be displayed. 312 Chapter 12 Explore More Text Techniques 3. Display the Select the frame list, and click New window. Then click OK. 4. Click OK to close the Insert Hyperlink dialog box. Word inserts a hyperlink from the selected text in the VisitorGuide document to the Conductors document. The hyperlink is indicated by an underline and the color assigned to hyperlinks by the document’s theme. 5. Point to the hyperlink. Word displays a ScreenTip. The ScreenTip shows the path to the Conductors document and instructions for following the link. 6. Hold down the Ctrl key, and then click the hyperlink. Word opens the Conductors document in a new window. 7. On the View tab, in the Window group, click the Switch Windows button, and then click VisitorGuide. In the VisitorGuide document, the color of the hyperlink has changed to indicate that you have followed this link to its target. 8. In the last line of the document, select e-mail us, and then on the Insert tab, in the Links group, click the Hyperlink button. Adding Hyperlinks 313 9. At the bottom of the Link to bar of the Insert Hyperlink dialog box, click E-mail Address. The dialog box changes so that you can enter the information appropriate for an e-mail hyperlink. If you have already inserted a hyperlink to an e-mail address, it will appear in the Recently Used list, and you can click it to use it again. 10. In the E-mail address box, type margie@margiestravel.com. Tip When you begin typing in the E-Mail Address box, Word inserts mailto: in the box, in front of the address you type. When a person clicks the link, Word will start his or her default e-mail program and open a new e-mail message window. 11. In the Subject box, type Flora and Fauna inquiry. This text will be automatically entered in the Subject box of the new e-mail message window. 12. Click OK. The hyperlinked text is indicated by an underline and its assigned theme color. Pointing to it displays a ScreenTip with the hyperlink’s target. 314 Chapter 12 Explore More Text Techniques 13. Right-click the e-mail us hyperlink, and then click Edit Hyperlink. The Edit Hyperlink dialog box opens with the current destination for this link in the E-Mail Address box. 14. In the upper-right corner of the dialog box, click ScreenTip. The Set Hyperlink ScreenTip dialog box opens. You can specify the text you want for the ScreenTip that appears when someone points to the hyperlink. 15. In the ScreenTip text box, type Send e-mail message to Margie’s Travel, and then click OK . 16. In the Edit Hyperlink dialog box, click OK. 17. Point to the hyperlink. Word displays your custom ScreenTip. The custom ScreenTip. Adding Hyperlinks 315 18. Hold down Ctrl, and click the hyperlink. Your e-mail program starts, and a message window opens. (This is the message window displayed by Microsoft Outlook 2010.) The specified e-mail address has been inserted in the To box, and the specified description appears in the Subject box. See Also For information about the many features of Outlook 2010, see Microsoft Outlook 2010 Step by Step by Joan Lambert and Joyce Cox (Microsoft Press, 2010). 19. Close the message window, clicking No when asked whether you want to save the changes. The hyperlinked text is now displayed in the color assigned to followed hyperlinks by the document’s theme. CLEAN UP Save and close the VisitorGuide document, and then close the Conductors document. 316 Chapter 12 Explore More Text Techniques Inserting Fields When you insert a hyperlink into a document, you are actually inserting a HYPERLINK field. A field is a placeholder that tells Word to supply the specified information or perform the specified action in the specified way. Word inserts fields to control certain processes, such as the creation of a table of contents or the merging of a form letter with a data source. You can use fields to insert information that can be updated with the click of a button if the information changes. You can’t type a field in your document; instead, you must tell Word to insert the field you want. You do this by clicking the Quick Parts button in the Text group on the Insert tab and then clicking Field to display the Field dialog box. The Field dialog box provides a comprehensive list of all the available fields. In this dialog box, you can also set options that refine the field. Each field consists of a set of curly braces containing the field name and any required or optional instructions or settings. These settings, called switches, refine the results of the field—for example, by formatting it in a particular way. When you insert a field from the Field dialog box, you can click Field Codes in the lower-left corner of the dialog box to display the field’s syntax. Clicking Options in the lower-left corner displays the Field Options dialog box, in which you can add general and specific optional settings to the field code. Inserting Fields 317 Descriptions in the Field and Field Options dialog boxes guide you in defining the field. Tip After Word inserts the field, you see the field results; for example if you insert a FILESIZE field, you see the size of the file. To see the field code that tells Word to insert the file size, either click the field to select it and press Alt+F9, or right-click the field and click Toggle Field Codes. Inserting some types of fields requires advanced knowledge of the fields and how to control them. However, some fields are very easy. For example, to insert today’s date or the current time in a document, you simply click the Date & Time button in the Text group on the Insert tab to display the Date And Time dialog box and select the format you want. to use. To insert the information as regular text, you click OK. If you want to be able to update the date or time, you insert the information as a field by selecting the Update Automatically check box. Word then inserts a Date or Time field matching the format you selected and retrieves the date or time from your computer’s internal calendar or clock. Tip You can insert other types of date and time fields, such as a PrintDate field or an EditTime field. Insert a date or time field in the usual way, right-click the field, and then click Edit Field to display the Field dialog box. Then change the Categories setting to Date And Time, and in the Field Names list, click the field you want. (Clicking a field in the list displays a brief description, so it is easy to choose the one you want.) When you click OK, the information corresponding to the field type you specified is shown in the document. 318 Chapter 12 Explore More Text Techniques By default, date and time fields are updated every time you open the document. You can prevent this updating by selecting the field and pressing Ctrl+F11 to lock the field; press Ctrl+Shift+F11 to unlock it again. If a field is not locked, you can click it and then click the Update button that appears above it or press the F9 key to update it with the most current information. Another type of field you might want to insert in a document—for example, in its header or footer—is one that contains a document property, such as the author, title, or last modification date. This type of information is easily inserted by clicking the Quick Parts button, pointing to Document Property, and then clicking the property you want. If you insert the field and then you edit the contents of the field in the document, the change is carried over to the list of properties displayed on the Info page in Backstage view. See Also For information about document properties, see “Preparing Documents for Electronic Distribution” in Chapter 6, “Preview, Print, and Distribute Documents.” In this exercise, you’ll insert a field that displays the current date and time in the footer of a document, and you’ll update the field. Then you’ll insert a field that displays the Title property, and you’ll change the property by changing the field. You’ll also add the file name. Finally, you’ll convert the current date and time to the date and time when the document was last saved. SET UP You need the ProceduresFields_start document located in your Chapter12 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the ProceduresFields_start document, and save it as ProceduresFields. Display formatting marks, and then follow the steps. 1. On the Insert tab, in the Header & Footer group, click the Footer button, and then click Edit Footer. Word dims the text and displays the footer area at the bottom of the first page of the document. 2. With the cursor in the blank paragraph of the footer, on the Design contextual tab, in the Insert group, click the Date & Time button. The Date And Time dialog box opens. Inserting Fields 319 You can specify the date and/or time format you want. 3. In the Available formats list, click the first format that combines the date and time. 4. Ensure that the Update automatically check box is selected, and then click OK. 5. Press the Tab key. Then in the Insert group, click the Quick Parts button, point to Document Property, and then click Title. Word inserts a field for the Title property in the document. The Title property of this document is currently blank. 320 Chapter 12 Explore More Text Techniques 6. With the Title property active, type Office Procedures. Then press the Right Arrow key to release the selection. 7. Display the Backstage view, and if the Info page is not displayed, click Info. Notice that under Properties in the right pane, the Title property is Office Procedures. The Title property on the Info page reflects the change you made in the document. 8. Click the Design contextual tab to redisplay the document footer. 9. Press the Tab key, type File name: (including the colon), and press the Spacebar. Then in the Insert group, click the Quick Parts button, and click Field. 10. In the Field names list in the Field dialog box, click FileName. Then in the Format list, click Lowercase, and click OK. 11. Save the document. At the left end of the footer, the date and time still reflect the moment when you inserted that field. 12. Click the field, and then click the Update button that appears. The time is updated to reflect the current time. You want this field to reflect the date and time when the document was last saved. 13. Right-click the field, and click Edit Field. Inserting Fields 321 14. In the Field dialog box, display the Categories list, and then click Date and Time. The list is filtered to display only the fields that relate to dates and times. Word has four date fields and two time fields. 15. In the Field names list, click SaveDate, and in the Date formats list, click the first format that combines the date and time. 16. Select the Preserve formatting during updates check box, and click OK. 17. Save the document. Then right-click the field, and click Update Field. The time is updated to reflect the most recent save. The information in this footer is supplied by three fields. CLEAN UP Save the ProceduresFields document, and then close it. 322 Chapter 12 Explore More Text Techniques Adding Bookmarks and Cross-References Word provides two tools that you can use to jump easily to designated places within the same document: ● Bookmarks Whether the document you are reading was created by you or by someone else, you can insert bookmarks to flag information to which you might want to return later. Like a physical bookmark, a Word bookmark marks a specific named place in a document. After inserting a bookmark, you can quickly jump to it by displaying the Bookmark dialog box, clicking the bookmark you want to locate, and then clicking Go To. Tip Alternatively, you can display the Go To page of the Find And Replace dialog box, click Bookmark in the Go To What list, and then select the bookmark you want from the Enter Bookmark Name list. ● Cross-references You use cross-references to quickly move readers to associated information elsewhere in the document. You can create cross-references to headings, figures, and tables, for which Word automatically creates pointers. You can also create cross-references to manually inserted bookmarks. If you delete an item you have designated as the target of a cross-reference, you must update the cross-reference. See Also For information about using hyperlinks to jump to other locations, see “Adding Hyperlinks” earlier in this chapter. For information about using the Navigation task pane to jump to any paragraph styled as a heading, see “Viewing Documents in Different Ways” in Chapter 1, “Explore Word 2010.” In this exercise, you’ll insert a bookmark and then jump to it. You’ll also create a crossreference, edit the referenced item, and then update the cross-reference. SET UP You need the RulesBookmarks_start document located in your Chapter12 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the RulesBookmarks_start document, and save it as RulesBookmarks. Then follow the steps. 1. On the Home tab, in the Editing group, click the Find arrow, and in the list, click Go To. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+G to display the Go To tab of the Find And Replace dialog box. The Find And Replace dialog box opens, with the Go To page active. Adding Bookmarks and Cross-References 323 You can select the type of element and the specific element to which you want to jump. 2. With Page selected in the Go to what list, in the Enter page number box, type 5. Then click Go To, and click Close. 3. On page 5, click to the left of the 10. Building Maintenance heading. Then on the Insert tab, in the Links group, click the Bookmark button. The Bookmark dialog box opens. You create and manage your bookmarks in this dialog box. 4. In the Bookmark name box, type Maintenance, and then click Add. The Bookmark dialog box closes, and although you can’t see it, a bookmark named Maintenance is inserted into the document. 324 Chapter 12 Explore More Text Techniques 5. Below the 10.3 paragraph, select the six bulleted items. Then display the Bookmark dialog box, type LimitedCommon in the Bookmark name box, and click Add. Troubleshooting Bookmark names cannot contain spaces. If you enter a space and then type a character, the Add button becomes inactive. To name bookmarks with multiple words, either run the words together and capitalize each word, or replace the spaces with underscores for readability. 6. Press the Home key to release the selection. Then display the Advanced page of the Word Options dialog box, and under Show Document Content , select the Show Bookmarks check box. Click OK . The location of the bookmark you inserted without selecting text is identified by a large, gray I-beam. The location of the one you inserted after selecting the bulleted items is identified by large, gray square brackets around the selection. Location bookmark Text selection bookmark The identifiers for the two types of bookmarks. 7. Press Ctrl+Home to move to the beginning of the document. Then display the Go To page of the Find and Replace dialog box. Adding Bookmarks and Cross-References 325 8. In the Go to what list, click Bookmark. The dialog box changes so that you can specify the bookmark you want to jump to. The bookmarks you created are accessible on the Go To page. 9. Display the Enter bookmark name list, click Maintenance, and then click Go To. The cursor moves to the location of the bookmark. The dialog box remains open in case you want to move somewhere else. 10. Close the Find and Replace dialog box. Tip You can also jump to a bookmark by displaying the Bookmark dialog box, clicking the bookmark you want, and then clicking Go To. In the Bookmark dialog box, you can sort the bookmarks alphabetically or in the order in which they are located. To delete a bookmark, click its name, and then click Delete. 11. Scroll upward to page 2, and click at the end of the 4.2 paragraph. Press the Spacebar, type See also, and then press the Spacebar again. 12. On the Insert tab, in the Links group, click the Cross-reference button. The Cross-Reference dialog box opens. You can specify the type of item you want to reference and what you want the cross-reference inserted in the document to say. 13. Display the Reference type list, and click Heading. The list box in the Cross-Reference dialog box now displays all the headings in this document. 326 Chapter 12 Explore More Text Techniques Word can identify the headings in a document only if you have applied heading styles. 14. With Heading text selected in the Insert reference to box, click 6. Parking and Vehicles in the For which heading list. Then click Insert , and click Close. The text 6 . Parking and Vehicles appears in the document at the cursor. Although it’s not obvious, the text is inserted as a field. 15. Hold down the Ctrl key, and then click the cross-reference to move to the 6. Parking and Vehicles heading. 16. In the heading, delete and Vehicles. 17. Move back to page 2, and at the end of the 4.2 paragraph, click 6. Parking and Vehicles to select the cross-reference field. Troubleshooting Click the field; don’t try to select the text. 18. Right-click the selected cross-reference, and then click Update Field. Word deletes the words and Vehicles at the end of the cross-reference. Updated cross-reference The cross-reference reflects the change you made to the target heading. Key Points 327 19. Hold down Ctrl, and click the cross-reference to jump to the associated heading. CLEAN UP Turn off the display of bookmark identifiers by displaying the Advanced page of the Word Options dialog box and clearing the Show Bookmarks check box in the Show Document Content area. Then save and close the RulesBookmarks document. Key Points ● Documents can contain hyperlinks to Web pages, files, or e-mail addresses. ● You can use fields to tell Word to supply the specified information or perform the specified action in the specified way. ● Flagging information with a bookmark makes it easy to look up the information later. ● Using Word to insert cross-references makes them easier to maintain. Chapter at a Glance Create and modify tables of contents, page 332 Create and modify indexes, page 340 Add sources and compile bibliographies, page 347 13 Use Reference Tools for Longer Documents In this chapter, you will learn how to ✔ Create and modify tables of contents. ✔ Create and modify indexes. ✔ Add sources and compile bibliographies. If you create long documents and are concerned about helping your readers find the information they’re looking for, you can rely on the following Microsoft Word 2010 tools to do the job: ● Table of contents You can provide an overview of the information contained in a document and help readers locate topics by compiling a table of contents from the document headings. Depending on the intended delivery format (printed or electronic), you can choose to include page numbers or hyperlinks to each heading. ● Index You can help readers locate specific information by inserting index entry fields within a document and compiling an index of keywords and concepts that directs the reader to the corresponding page numbers. ● Information sources and a bibliography You can appropriately attribute informa- tion to its source by inserting citations into a document. Word will then compile a professional bibliography from the citations. In this chapter, you’ll create and update a table of contents. Then you’ll mark index entries in a document and compile an index. Finally, you’ll use the Source Manager to enter source information, insert a few citations, and compile a bibliography. 329 330 Chapter 13 Use Reference Tools for Longer Documents Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this chapter, you need to copy the book’s practice files to your computer. The practice files you’ll use to complete the exercises in this chapter are in the Chapter13 practice file folder. A complete list of practice files is provided in “Using the Practice Files” at the beginning of this book. Adding Footnotes and Endnotes When you want to make a comment about a statement in a document—for example, to explain an assumption or cite the source for a different opinion—you can enter the comment as a footnote or an endnote. Doing so inserts a number or symbol called a reference mark, and your associated comment appears with the same number or symbol, either as a footnote at the bottom of the page or as an endnote at the end of the document or document section. In most views, footnotes or endnotes are divided from the main text by a note separator line. To create a footnote or endnote: 1. With the cursor where you want the reference mark to appear, on the References tab, in the Footnotes group, click either the Insert Footnote or the Insert Endnote button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Alt+Ctrl+F to insert a footnote or Alt+Ctrl+D to insert an endnote. See Also For more information about keyboard shortcuts, see “Keyboard Shortcuts” at the end of this book. Word inserts the reference mark in the document and creates a linked area at the bottom of the page or end of the section. 2. Type the note text. Word applies default styles to the reference marks for footnotes and endnotes. By default, footnote reference marks use the 1, 2, 3 format, and endnote reference marks use i, ii, iii. To change the number format of footnotes or endnotes: 1. On the References tab, click the Footnotes dialog box launcher. The Footnote And Endnote dialog box opens. Adding Footnotes and Endnotes 331 You can change the format before or after you enter footnotes or endnotes. 2. In the Location area, click Footnotes or Endnotes. 3. In the Format area, display the Number Format list, and click the number format you want. 4. With Whole Document shown in the Apply Changes To box, click Apply. All footnotes or endnotes change to the new number format. To change the formatting applied to existing footnote or endnote reference marks: 1. In the document text, select the reference mark for any footnote or endnote. 2. On the Home tab, in the Editing group, click the Select button, and then click Select Text With Similar Formatting. All the footnote or endnote reference marks are selected. 3. On the Home tab, apply the character formatting you want the reference marks to have. All the reference marks in the body of the document now appear with the character formatting you applied. 332 Chapter 13 Use Reference Tools for Longer Documents Creating and Modifying Tables of Contents If you create a long document with headings and subheadings, such as an annual report or a catalog that has several sections, you might want to add a table of contents to the beginning of the document to give your readers an overview of the document’s contents and help them navigate to specific sections. In a document that will be printed, you can indicate with a page number the page where each heading is located. If the document will be distributed electronically, you can link each entry in the table of contents to the corresponding heading in the document so that readers can jump directly to the heading with a click of the mouse. By default, Word expects to create a table of contents based on paragraphs within the document that you have formatted with the standard heading styles: Heading 1, Heading 2, and so on. (Word can also create a table of contents based on outline levels or on fields that you have inserted in the document.) When you tell Word to create the table, Word identifies the table of contents entries and inserts the table at the cursor as a single field. You can modify the elements on which Word bases the table at any time. The table of contents is a field that can be updated. See Also For information about applying styles, see “Quickly Formatting Text” in Chapter 3, “Change the Look of Text.” Creating and Modifying Tables of Contents 333 The Table Of Contents gallery offers three standard table options: ● Automatic Table 1 This option inserts a table of contents with the heading Contents. ● Automatic Table 2 This option inserts a table of contents with the heading Table of Contents. ● Manual Table This option inserts a table of contents with placeholders that you replace manually. The formatting of the entries in a table of contents is controlled by nine levels of built-in TOC styles (TOC 1, TOC 2, and so on). By default, Word uses the styles that are assigned in the template attached to the document. If you want to use a different style, instead of clicking one of the three options in the Table Of Contents gallery, you can click Insert Table Of Contents below the gallery to display the Table Of Contents dialog box, where you can choose from several variations, such as Classic, Fancy, and Simple. After you create a table of contents, you can format it manually by selecting text and then applying character or paragraph formatting or styles. If you change a heading in the document or if edits to the text change the page breaks, the easiest way to update the table of contents is to click the Update Table button and have Word do the work for you. You have the option of updating only the page numbers, or if you have changed, added, or deleted headings, you can update (re-create) the entire table. In this exercise, you’ll create a table of contents for a document based on heading styles. You’ll alter the document by deleting page breaks, and then you’ll update the table of contents to reflect your changes. SET UP You need the ProceduresContents_start document located in your Chapter13 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the ProceduresContents_start document, and save it as ProceduresContents. Display formatting marks, and then follow the steps. 1. Click to the left of GENERAL ADMINISTRATION, and then on the References tab, in the Table of Contents group, click the Table of Contents button. The Table Of Contents gallery appears. 334 Chapter 13 Use Reference Tools for Longer Documents You can choose from three built-in styles or insert a custom table of contents. 2. In the Table of Contents gallery, click Automatic Table 1. 3. Press Ctrl+Home to return to the beginning of the document. Word has inserted a table of contents at the cursor. Each heading level is assigned its own TOC style. Creating and Modifying Tables of Contents 335 4. In the Table of Contents group, click the Table of Contents button, and then below the gallery, click Remove Table of Contents. 5. Click at the right end of the Office Procedures title, and press Enter. Then type Table of Contents, and make this heading bold. 6. Click at the left end of GENERAL ADMINISTRATION, and on the Insert tab, in the Pages group, click the Page Break button. Then press the Up Arrow key to position the cursor at the left end of the empty page-break paragraph. 7. On the References tab, in the Table of Contents group, click the Table of Contents button, and then below the gallery, click Insert Table of Contents. The Table Of Contents dialog box opens. You can specify the format for both print and the Web. 8. In the General area of the Table of Contents page, display the Formats list, and click Classic. Examples of entries with the Classic table of contents styles applied appear in the Print Preview and Web Preview boxes. 336 Chapter 13 Use Reference Tools for Longer Documents Tip If you create a table of contents based on the document’s template, you can customize the TOC styles during the creation process. With Formats set to From Template in the General area of the Table Of Contents dialog box, click Modify. The Style dialog box opens, displaying the nine TOC styles. You can modify the font, paragraph, tabs, border, and other formatting of these styles the same way you would modify any other style. For information about creating styles, see “Working with Styles and Templates” in Chapter 16, “Work in Word More Efficiently.” 9. Display the Tab leader list, click the dotted leader option, and then click OK to insert the table of contents. 10. Press Ctrl+Home to move to the beginning of the document, and then point to any entry in the table of contents. A ScreenTip tells you that you can hold down the Ctrl key and click any entry in the table of contents to jump to that heading in the document. 11. Click anywhere in the table. The table of contents is contained in one large field, and clicking anywhere in the field selects the entire field. See Also For information about fields, see “Inserting Fields” in Chapter 12, “Explore More Text Techniques.” 12. Scroll down to page 2, click in the selection area to the left of the page break, and then press the Delete key to delete the page break. The Contact Information heading is now on page 2. 13. Scroll down to the next page break, and delete it. The Facilities heading is now also on page 2. 14. On the References tab, in the Table of Contents group, click the Update Table button. The Update Table Of Contents dialog box opens. If you make a change to a document that affects the headings or page breaks, you can easily update the table of contents. Creating and Modifying Tables of Contents 337 15. Click Update entire table, and click OK. Then press Ctrl+Home. Word has updated the table of contents to reflect the new page numbers. 16. Drag in the selection area to select all the lines of the table of contents. Troubleshooting You need to drag to select the actual text of the table of contents, not just click to select the field. 17. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Line and Paragraph Spacing button, and then click Remove Space Before Paragraph. 18. Press Ctrl+Home to release the selection and move to the top of the document. Word has removed the extra space between the lines in the table of contents. You can format the text of a table of contents just like any other text. CLEAN UP Save the ProceduresContents document, and then close it. 338 Chapter 13 Use Reference Tools for Longer Documents Tables of Figures If a document includes figures or tables that have captions, you can tell Word to create a table of figures. To insert a caption: 1. Position the cursor where you want the caption to appear (usually in an empty paragraph immediately after the figure), and then on the References tab, in the Captions group, click the Insert Caption button. The Caption dialog box opens. 2. If you want to change the label shown in the Caption box (the default is Figure), in the Label list, click Table or Equation; or click New Label, type the label you want, and then click OK. Tip The number 1 in the Caption box is a field that reflects the graphic’s position in the figure sequence. If you add or delete graphics, this number is automatically updated. 3. In the Caption box, click to the right of the label and number, press the Spacebar, type the caption, and then click OK. Word adds the caption to the document. To create a table of figures: 1. Position the cursor where you want to insert the table of figures, and then on the References tab, in the Captions group, click Insert Table Of Figures. The Table Of Figures dialog box opens. This dialog box looks similar to the Table Of Contents dialog box. 2. If you want to change the default caption label, in the General area, display the Caption Label list, and click the label you want. 3. If you want to change the default format, display the Formats list, and click the format you want. 4. Select any additional options you want, and then click OK. Word inserts the table of figures in the specified format above the cursor. Creating and Modifying Tables of Contents Tables of Authorities If a legal document contains items such as regulations, cases, and statutes that are identified as legal citations, you can tell Word to create a table of authorities. Word uses the citations to create this type of table the same way it uses headings to create a table of contents. To insert a legal citation: 1. Select the first legal reference that you want to mark with a citation. 2. On the References tab, in the Table Of Authorities group, click the Mark Citation button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Alt+Shift+D to open the Mark Citation dialog box. The Mark Citation dialog box opens. Tip You can leave the Mark Citation dialog box open to facilitate the marking of citations. 3. In the Short Citation box, edit the citation to reflect the way you want it to appear in the table. 4. If you want to change the category, display the Category list, and click the category that applies to the citation. 5. To mark one citation, click Mark. To mark all citations that match the selected citation, click Mark All. To create a table of authorities: 1. Position the cursor where you want the table of authorities to appear, and then on the References tab, in the Table Of Authorities group, click the Insert Table Of Authorities button. The Table Of Authorities dialog box opens. 2. In the Category list, click the category of citations that you want to appear in the table, or click All to include all categories. 3. Select formatting options for the table, and then click OK. Word inserts the table in the specified format above the cursor. 339 340 Chapter 13 Use Reference Tools for Longer Documents Creating and Modifying Indexes To help readers find specific concepts and terms that might not be readily located by looking at a table of contents, you can include an index at the end of a document. Word creates an index by compiling an alphabetical listing with page numbers based on index entry fields that you mark in the document. As with a table of contents, an index is inserted at the cursor as one field. Tip You don’t need to create indexes for documents that will be distributed electronically because readers can use the Navigation task pane to search for the information they need. For information about searching for information in a document, see “Finding and Replacing Text” in Chapter 2, “Edit and Proofread Text.” In the index, an index entry might apply to a word or phrase that appears on one page or is discussed on several pages. The entry might have related subentries. For example, in the index to this book, the main index entry text effects might have below it the subentries applying and live preview of. An index might also include cross-reference entries that direct readers to related entries. For example, the main index entry text wrapping breaks might be cross-referenced to line breaks. Entry Subentry Crossreference The three types of index entries, as they appear in an index. To insert an index entry field into the document, you select the text you want to mark, and click the Mark Entry button in the Index group on the References tab to open the Mark Index Entry dialog box, where you can do the following: ● Use the selected text as is, modify the entry, or add a subentry. ● Format the entry—for example, to make it appear bold or italic in the index—by right-clicking it, clicking Font, and selecting the options you want; or by using keyboard shortcuts. Creating and Modifying Indexes 341 ● Designate the entry as a cross-reference, one-page entry, or a page-range entry. Tip Cross-references appear in the index in the following format: garages. See parking In this manner, you can direct readers to index terms they might not think of when looking for specific information. ● Specify the formatting of this entry’s page number. Keyboard Shortcut Press Alt+Shift+X to open the Mark Index Entry dialog box. After you have set the options in the dialog box the way you want them, you can insert an index entry field adjacent to the selected text by clicking Mark, or adjacent to every occurrence of the selected text in the document by clicking Mark All. The Mark Index Entry dialog box remains open to simplify the process of inserting multiple index entry fields, so you don’t have to click the Mark Entry button for each new entry. You can move the dialog box off to the side so that it doesn’t block the text you’re working with. Tip When building an index, you should choose the text you mark carefully, bearing in mind what terms readers are likely to look up. One reader might expect to find information about cell phones by looking under cell, whereas another might look under mobile, another under phones, and another under telephones. A good index will include all four entries. Index entry fields are formatted as hidden; you cannot see them unless you click the Show/Hide ¶ button in the Paragraph group on the Home tab to turn on formatting marks and hidden characters. When the index entry field is visible, it appears in the document enclosed in quotation marks within a set of braces, with the designator XE and a dotted underline. Hidden index entry field with main entry and subentry An index entry as it appears when formatting marks and hidden characters are turned on. 342 Chapter 13 Use Reference Tools for Longer Documents Tip You can hide any text in a document by selecting it, clicking the Font dialog box launcher on the Home tab, selecting the Hidden check box, and clicking OK. When you print the document, Word will not include the hidden text unless you select the Print Hidden Text check box in the Printing Options area of the Display page in the Word Options dialog box. To create an index based on the index entries in a document, you position the cursor where you want the index to appear and then click the Insert Index button in the Index group on the References tab. The Index dialog box opens, and you can then specify the following: ● Whether the index formatting should use styles from the current template or be based on one of four predefined formats that you can preview in the Print Preview box. ● Whether page numbers should be right-aligned, and if so whether they should have dotted, dashed, or solid tab leaders. ● Whether the index should be indented, with each subentry on a separate line below the main entries, or run-in, with subentries on the same line as the main entries. ● The number of columns you want. When you click OK in the Index dialog box, Word calculates the page numbers of all the entries and subentries, consolidates them, and inserts the index as one field in the specified format at the specified location in the document. Tip If you make changes to the document that affect its index entries or page numbering, you can update the index by clicking it and then clicking the Update Index button in the Index group on the References tab. You can also right-click the index and then click Update Field. You can edit the text of the index generated from the entries, but the changes you make are not permanent; regenerating the index restores the original entries. It is more efficient to edit the text within the quotation marks in the index entry fields. To delete an index entry, you select the entire hidden field and then press the Delete key. You can move and copy index entries by using the techniques you would use for regular text. Tip Dragging through any part of an index entry field that includes one of the enclosing braces selects the entire field. In this exercise, you’ll first mark a few index entries and a cross-reference entry. Then you’ll create and format an index, delete an index entry from the document, and update the index. SET UP You need the RulesIndex_start document located in your Chapter13 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the RulesIndex_start document, and save it as RulesIndex. Then display formatting marks, and follow the steps. 1. In the first item in the first bulleted list, select the word Declaration. Then on the References tab, in the Index group, click the Mark Entry button. Creating and Modifying Indexes 343 The Mark Index Entry dialog box opens. The selected text appears in the Main Entry box. You can edit it, format it, add a subentry, and otherwise adjust the index entry in this dialog box. 2. Drag the dialog box by its title bar to the upper-right corner of the screen. Then click Mark All. Word inserts hidden index entry fields adjacent to every occurrence of the word Declaration in the document. Tip If this document contained instances of the word declaration, those would not be marked because their capitalization does not match the selected word. 3. In the same paragraph, select the word Bylaws, and click the title bar of the Mark Index Entry dialog box to activate it and enter the selected text. Then click Mark All. 4. In section 2.1, select the word professional, and click the dialog box title bar. Then click at the right end of the entry in the Main entry box, press the Spacebar, and type businesses. Click Mark. Then select and mark administrative businesses. 5. In the Main entry box, delete the word administrative, and then click Mark. 6. In section 2.4, select the words hobby shop, click the dialog box title bar, and in the Main entry box, add an s to shop to make it shops. Then click Mark. Repeat this step to mark carpenter shop, and then create an entry for shops. Tip Index entries will appear in the index exactly as they appear in the Mark Index Entry dialog box. For consistency, make all nouns lowercase and plural except proper nouns and those where only one exists. 344 Chapter 13 Use Reference Tools for Longer Documents 7. In section 4.3, select the word garage, change the entry in the Mark Index Entry dialog box to garages, and click Mark All. 8. In the Mark Index Entry dialog box, in the Options area, click Cross-reference. The cursor moves to the space after the word See in the adjacent box. 9. Without moving the cursor, type also parking. Select the word also, press Ctrl+I to make it italic, and then click Mark. A cross-reference to the garages index entry appears adjacent to the word garage. The cross-reference in the document reflects your specifications in the Mark Index Entry dialog box. 10. In section 7.2, select the words Common Area, and click the dialog box title bar. Then type landscaping in the Subentry box, and click Mark. Word inserts an index entry with the entry and subentry separated by a colon. 11. In section 8.2, mark the words Common Area with a subentry of alterations. 12. Close the Mark Index Entry dialog box. 13. Press Ctrl+End to move to the end of the document, press Enter, and then press Ctrl+Enter to insert a page break. The cursor moves to the top of the new page. Creating and Modifying Indexes 345 14. Type Index, and press Enter. Apply the Heading 1 style to the new heading, and press Ctrl+End to move to the empty paragraph. 15. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Show/Hide ¶ button to hide formatting marks and hidden characters. Troubleshooting When hidden text is visible, the document might not be paginated correctly. Always turn off the display of formatting marks and hidden characters before creating an index. 16. On the References tab, in the Index group, click the Insert Index button. The Index dialog box opens. You can use the settings in this dialog box to tailor the look of the index. 17. In the Columns box, change the setting to 1. 18. Display the Formats list, and click Fancy. Then click OK. Word compiles a short index based on the index entries you just marked. 346 Chapter 13 Use Reference Tools for Longer Documents This index is formatted in one column with the page numbers adjacent to their index entries. 19. Display hidden characters so that you can see the index entry fields in the document, and scroll up to section 4.3. 20. Select the entire cross-reference entry following garage, and press the Delete key. Troubleshooting If you find it hard to select just this entry, try pointing to the right of the closing brace ( } ) and dragging slightly to the left. The cross-reference entry is deleted from the document. 21. Press Ctrl+End to move to the end of the document, and click anywhere in the index to select its field. 22. Hide the formatting marks and hidden characters. Then on the References tab, in the Index group, click the Update Index button. The index is updated to reflect that you have deleted the cross-reference. CLEAN UP Save the RulesIndex document, and then close it. Adding Sources and Compiling Bibliographies 347 Adding Sources and Compiling Bibliographies In Word 2010, you can use the Source Manager to help you keep track of sources you use while researching a document and to ensure that you reference them in the proper format. Whether your sources are books, periodicals, Web pages, or interviews, you can record details about them and then select a common style guide, such as the Chicago Manual of Style, to have Word automatically list your sources in that style guide’s standard format. There are two ways to enter a new source: ● You can enter all the sources in the Source Manager dialog box and then insert the sources from the Source Manager into the document. ● You can enter the information for one specific source in the Create Source dialog box and click OK to insert the citation at the cursor. No matter which method you use to enter the source information, Word stores the sources in a separate file on your computer’s hard disk so that you can cite them in any document you create. You can view this Master List and select which sources will be available to the current document from the Source Manager dialog box. After you enter citations in a document, you can easily compile their sources into one of two types of lists by clicking the Bibliography button in the Citations & Bibliography group on the References tab: ● Bibliography This option inserts the source list with a Bibliography heading. ● Works Cited This option inserts the source list with a Works Cited heading. You can also click Insert Bibliography at the bottom of the gallery to insert the source list without a heading. The type of bibliography you use is usually specified by the organization or person for whom you are preparing the document, such as your company, your instructor, or the publication in which you intend to publish the document. When you compile a bibliography, Word inserts it at the cursor as one field. You can edit the text of a bibliography, but if the source information changes, it is more efficient to edit the source in the Source Manager and then update the bibliography the same way you would update a table of contents or index. 348 Chapter 13 Use Reference Tools for Longer Documents Tip You can update a bibliography by clicking the bibliography and then clicking the Update Citations And Bibliography button that appears above the field. If you used the Insert Bibliography command to compile the source list, the Update Citations And Bibliography button does not appear when you click the field. In that case, you can update the bibliography by right-clicking anywhere in the field and then clicking Update Field. In this exercise, you’ll enter information for a couple of sources, insert citations for existing sources, add a new source, compile a bibliography, and then change its format. SET UP You need the AllAboutBamboo_start and BambooBibliography_start documents located in your Chapter13 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the AllAboutBamboo_start document, and save it as AllAboutBamboo. Then follow the steps. 1. On the References tab, in the Citations & Bibliography group, display the Style list, and then click Chicago Fifteenth Edition. Any sources you create and citations you insert will be formatted according to the Chicago Manual of Style rules. 2. In the Citations & Bibliography group, click the Manage Sources button. The Source Manager dialog box opens. The Source Manager accumulates sources from all documents on your hard disk, so if other documents contain citations, their source information might appear in here. 3. In the Source Manager dialog box, click New. The Create Source dialog box opens. Adding Sources and Compiling Bibliographies 349 The sources you enter in this dialog box will become part of the Source Manager’s Master List. 4. Ensure that Book is selected in the Type of Source list. Then in the Bibliography Fields for Chicago Fifteenth Edition area, type Goldberg, Jossef in the Author box, Black Bamboo in the Title box, 2008 in the Year box, and Litware in the Publisher box. Then click OK . The new source is added to the Source Manager and appears not only in the Master List but also in the Current List, which is the list of sources that can be used in this document. 5. In the Source Manager dialog box, click New, and then in the Create Source dialog box, click Edit . The Edit Name dialog box opens. If a source has more than one author, you enter their names in the Edit Name dialog box. 350 Chapter 13 Use Reference Tools for Longer Documents 6. Under Add name, type Freitas in the Last box, type Victor in the First box, and then click Add. Freitas, Victor appears in the Names box. 7. To enter a second author for the same book, type Stewart in the Last box, type Sean in the First box, click Add, and then click OK. 8. In the Create Source dialog box, type Bamboo Garden in the Title box, 2009 in the Year box, and Lucerne Publishing in the Publisher box. Then click OK . The new source is added to the Master List and the Current List. 9. Close the Source Manager dialog box. 10. Open the BambooBibliography_start document, and save it as BambooBibliography. Then open the Source Manager dialog box. The two sources you just entered appear in the Master List but not in the Current List, meaning they are not available for use in this document. You can select the sources in the Master List that you want to be available for a particular document. 11. With the Freitas source selected in the Master List box, click Copy to make that source available in this document. Then copy the Goldberg source to the Current List box, and click Close. 12. In the document, position the cursor to the right of Black Bamboo on the last line of the first paragraph. Then in the Citations & Bibliography group, click the Insert Citation button, and in the list of citations, click Goldberg, Jossef. Adding Sources and Compiling Bibliographies 351 Word inserts the source in parentheses. Citation Information stored in the Source Manager is used to create the citation in the specified format (in this case, the Chicago Manual of Style, Fifteenth Edition format). 13. Insert a Freitas, Victor, Stewart, Sean citation to the right of Bamboo Garden (but before the period) at the end of the same paragraph. 14. Click to the right of Entire books (one line up in the same paragraph). Then in the Citations & Bibliography group, click the Insert Citation button, and in the list, click Add New Source. 15. In the Create Source dialog box, display the Type of Source list, and click Web site. 16. In the Name of Web Page box, type American Bamboo Society, and in the Year box, type 2006. Then type w ww.americanbamboo.org/BooksOnBamboo.html in the URL box, and click OK . Word inserts the source in parentheses at the insertion point. 17. In the Citations & Bibliography group, click the Manage Sources button. In the Source Manager dialog box, the new citation appears in both the Master List and the Current List. 352 Chapter 13 Use Reference Tools for Longer Documents Because the sources in the Current List are actually cited in the document, they have a check mark beside them. 18. Close the Source Manager dialog box, and then press Ctrl+End to move to the end of the document. 19. In the Citations & Bibliography group, click Bibliography. The Bibliography gallery appears. You can choose from two built-in styles or insert a bibliography with no heading. Key Points 353 20. In the gallery, click Bibliography. Word inserts a bibliography of all the citations in the document in alphabetical order. A bibliography formatted in the specified format (in this case, the Chicago Manual of Style Fifteenth Edition). 21. In the Citations & Bibliography group, display the Style list, and click APA Fifth Edition. Tip You don’t have to select the bibliography to apply this change; you can do it from anywhere in the document. The format of the bibliography and of the citations changes to bring it in line with the style specified by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. CLEAN UP Save and close the BambooBibliography and AllAboutBamboo documents. Key Points ● A table of contents provides an overview of the topics covered in a document and lets readers navigate quickly to a topic. ● After marking index entries for key concepts, words, and phrases, you can use the Insert Index command to tell Word to compile an index. ● Word can keep track of sources and compile a bibliography of cited sources based on the style of your choosing. Chapter at a Glance Prepare data sources, page 356 Prepare main documents, page 363 Merge main documents and data sources, page 367 Send personalized e-mail messages to multiple recipients, page 370 Create and print labels, page 374 14 Work with Mail Merge In this chapter, you will learn how to ✔ Understand mail merge. ✔ Prepare data sources. ✔ Prepare main documents. ✔ Merge main documents and data sources. ✔ Send personalized e-mail messages to multiple recipients. ✔ Create and print labels. Many business and other organizations communicate with their customers or members by means of letters, newsletters, and promotional pieces that are sent to everyone on a mailing list. The easiest way to generate a set of documents that are identical except for certain information—such as the name, address, and greeting of a letter—is to use a process called mail merge. If you have a list of potential recipients stored in a consistent format, you can use the mail merge process to easily produce a set of personalized documents and mailing labels. In this chapter, you’ll use the Mail Merge wizard in Microsoft Word 2010 to guide you through the process of creating a form letter. You’ll select a data source, add a record to it, sort it, and filter it. You’ll then add merge fields for an address and greeting line to an existing form letter, preview the merged data, exclude recipients from the merge, merge the letters into a new document, and save the merged file. You’ll also set up and send a merged e-mail message. Finally, you’ll create and print mailing labels. Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this chapter, you need to copy the book’s practice files to your computer. The practice files you’ll use to complete the exercises in this chapter are in the Chapter14 practice file folder. A complete list of practice files is provided in “Using the Practice Files” at the beginning of this book. 355 356 Chapter 14 Work with Mail Merge Understanding Mail Merge The mail merge process combines the static information stored in one document with variable information stored in another document, as follows: ● Main document This document contains the static text that will appear in all the merged documents. It also contains placeholders—called merge fields—that tell Word where to insert the variable information. ● Data source This is a structured document, such as a Word table, Microsoft Excel worksheet, Microsoft Access database table, or Microsoft Outlook contacts list, that contains sets of information—called records—in a predictable format. You can use an existing data source, or you can create a new one as part of the mail merge process. You can use the Mail Merge wizard to merge a main document with a data source in easy steps. The first step is to select the document type, which can be a letter, an e-mail message, envelopes, labels, or a directory. The type you select determines the subsequent steps. When you have some experience with mail merge, you can use the buttons on the Mailings tab to create and merge documents, instead of the Mail Merge wizard. Regardless of the method, the end result is one copy of the merged document for every record in the data source. You can merge the main document and data source into a new document, with each merged document separated from the next by a page break. You can then personalize the merged documents before printing them, and you can save the document for later use. If you don’t need to edit or save the merged documents, you can merge the main document and data source directly to the printer or to an e-mail message. Preparing Data Sources The first step in the mail merge process is to either specify an existing data source or create one. The data source consists of a matrix of rows and columns. Each row contains one record, such as the complete name and address of a customer, and each column contains a particular type of information—called a field —such as the first name of all the customers. In the first row of the data source, each field is identified by its column heading—called a field name. Preparing Data Sources 357 Field name Record Field The data source stores information in a structured way so that individual items can easily be identified and retrieved. Tip B ecause the field names are also used as the merge fields in the main document, they cannot contain spaces. To make the field names readable with no spaces, capitalize each word, as in PostalCode, or replace the spaces with underscores, as in L ast_Name. If the data source contains many records and it changes frequently, you might want to create it in a program designed for working with large amounts of data, such as Excel or Access. You can also use the contacts list from Outlook. If the data source contains only a few records and it won’t be updated often, you can create it in Word, either as a table or as a list with each field separated by a tab. Or you can create it as part of the mail merge process. What if you want to create merge documents for only a subset of the data in the data source? For example, you might have mail-order customers from all over the United States but want to send an announcement about a store sale only to customers with addresses in your state. After you specify the data source, you can do the following: ● Filter the data source to create merged documents for only some of its data. ● Create a query (a set of selection criteria) to extract only the information you’re interested in—for example, all the postal codes for your state. ● Sort the data source—for example, in postal code order for a bulk mailing. When you use a filter or a query, all the data remains in the data source, but only the data that meets your specifications is used for the mail merge. In this exercise, you’ll open a document that you want to send to multiple people (the main document) and use the Mail Merge wizard to select the list of recipients (the data source). After you add information for a new recipient (a record) to the data source, you’ll sort and filter it. Important The mail merge process is discussed in this topic and the two following topics, each with its own exercise. You need to complete the exercises in sequence. Be sure to read the SET UP paragraphs of each exercise closely to ensure that you can successfully complete the exercises. 358 Chapter 14 Work with Mail Merge SET UP You need the AnniversaryLetter_start document and CustomerList_start workbook located in your Chapter14 practice file folder to complete this exercise. In Windows Explorer, navigate to your Chapter14 folder, double-click the CustomerList_ start workbook to open it in Excel, save it as CustomerListLetter, and then close it. (To save the file, click the File tab to display the Backstage view, and click Save As in the usual way.) Open the AnniversaryLetter_start document, save it as AnniversaryLetter, and leave it open. Then display formatting marks, and follow the steps. 1. On the Mailings tab, in the Start Mail Merge group, click the Start Mail Merge button, and then click Step by Step Mail Merge Wizard. The Mail Merge task pane opens. The first of the wizard’s six mail merge steps. 2. With Letters selected as the document type, at the bottom of the Mail Merge task pane, click Next: Starting document. 3. With Use the current document selected in the step 2 task pane, click Next: Select recipients. 4. With Use an existing list selected in the step 3 task pane, click Browse. The Select Data Source dialog box opens so that you can select the file in which your recipient information is stored. Preparing Data Sources 359 5. Navigate to your Chapter14 practice file folder, and double-click the CustomerListLetter workbook. The Select Table dialog box opens. This workbook contains three sheets, so you need to specify which sheet contains the data. 6. With Customers$ selected in the Select Table dialog box, click OK. The Mail Merge Recipients dialog box opens. The dialog box shows the records contained in the data source. 360 Chapter 14 Work with Mail Merge 7. In the box in the Data Source area, click CustomerListLetter.xlsx , and then click Edit . The Edit Data Source dialog box opens. You can make changes to the data source in this dialog box. 8. Click New Entry, and then in the cell below John, type the following, pressing Tab to move from field to field: FirstName Heidi LastName Steen Address1 678 Pine St. City Agriculture State WA PostalCode 10003 Tip You can add multiple records by clicking New Entry after you enter each record. 9. Click OK , and then click Yes to update the recipient list. The new record appears at the bottom of the list of recipients in the Mail Merge Recipients dialog box. 10. In the Refine recipient list area, click Sort. The Filter And Sort dialog box opens, with the Sort Records page displayed. Preparing Data Sources 361 You can sort the records on up to three fields, each in ascending or descending order. 11. Display the Sort by list, and click PostalCode. Then with Ascending selected, click OK . Tip You can also sort data in the Mail Merge Recipients dialog box by clicking the arrow to the right of the field you want to sort on and then clicking Sort Ascending or Sort Descending. 12. Drag the horizontal scroll box to the right, and verify that the records are sorted in ascending order by the PostalCode field. Then in the Refine recipient list area, click Filter. The Filter And Sort dialog box opens, with the Filter Records page displayed. You can specify that only the records that match certain criteria should be included in the merge. Tip You can also open the Filter And Sort dialog box by clicking the arrow to the right of any field name and then clicking Advanced. 362 Chapter 14 Work with Mail Merge 13. Display the Field list, and click State. The Comparison box displays the default Equal To criterion. 14. In the Compare to box, type WA, and then click OK. The Mail Merge Recipients dialog box is updated to show only Washington State residents in ascending PostalCode order. The records for customers who do not live in Washington State are hidden and will be excluded from the merge process. 15. Click OK to close the Mail Merge Recipients dialog box. CLEAN UP Save the AnniversaryLetter document, and leave it open for the next exercise. Preparing Main Documents 363 Using an Outlook Contacts List as a Data Source Using information from an Outlook contacts list as the data source for the merge process requires a few extra steps in the Mail Merge wizard. To use Outlook information as the data source for a form letter: 1. In the Mail Merge task pane, display the step 3 task pane. 2. Under Select Recipients, click Select From Outlook Contacts, and then click Choose Contacts Folder. 3. If you are prompted to select your Outlook profile, select the one you want to use, and then click OK. The Select Contacts dialog box opens. 4. In the Select A Contact Folder To Import list, click the folder you want to use, and then click OK. The Mail Merge Recipients dialog box opens, displaying your Outlook contacts. 5. In the contacts table, clear the check boxes of any contacts you want to exclude from the merge process, or sort and filter the list to display the contacts you want to include in the desired order. 6. Click OK. You can then continue with the next steps in the merge process, as explained in later topics in this chapter. Preparing Main Documents One common type of main document used in the mail merge process is a form letter. This type of document typically contains merge fields for the name and address of each recipient along with text that is the same in all the letters. In the form letter, each merge field is enclosed in « and » characters, which are called chevrons—for example, «AddressBlock». If you have already written the letter, you can insert the merge fields during the merge process; if you haven’t written the letter, you can write it as part of the process. Either way, you first enter the text that will be common to all the letters and then insert the merge fields that will be replaced by the variable information from the data source. 364 Chapter 14 Work with Mail Merge Tip If you need to stop before you finish the merge process, you can save the form letter to retain the work you have done so far. You can then open the form letter and resume from where you left off. Because you have specified a data source for the form letter, you will be asked to confirm that you want to run a command to reattach the same data source. You can insert merge fields in two ways: ● From the Mail Merge task pane in step 4 of the Mail Merge wizard ● By clicking buttons in the Write & Insert Fields group on the Mailings tab Either way, clicking Address Block or Greeting Line opens a dialog box in which you can refine the fields’ settings, whereas clicking individual fields inserts them with their default settings. Merge field You can insert a merge field anywhere in the main document. Tip To save the form letter without any mail merge information, click Start Mail Merge in the Start Mail Merge group on the Mailings tab, and then click Normal Word Document. In this exercise, you’ll modify an existing form letter by adding merge fields for a standard address, an informal greeting line, and the recipient’s first name. SET UP This exercise uses the AnniversaryLetter document to which you attached the CustomerListLetter workbook as the data source in the previous exercise. If you didn’t complete that exercise, you should do so now. If you closed the AnniversaryLetter document at the end of the previous exercise, open it, and when a message asks whether you want to run the command that will attach the data source to the document, click Yes. Then open the Mail Merge task pane by clicking the Start Mail Merge button in the Start Mail Merge group on the Mailings tab and clicking Step by Step Mail Merge Wizard. The Mail Merge task pane opens to the step 3 task pane. Then display formatting marks, and follow the steps. 1. At the bottom of the Mail Merge task pane, click Next: Write your letter. 2. In the document, position the cursor in the first empty left-aligned paragraph, and then in the Mail Merge task pane, click Address block. The Insert Address Block dialog box opens. Preparing Main Documents 365 In this dialog box, you can refine the format of the fields that make up the Address Block merge field. 3. Click OK to accept the default settings. Word inserts the «AddressBlock» merge field into the document. When you merge the form letter with the data source, Word will substitute the component name and address information for this merge field. 4. Press the Enter key twice, and then in the Mail Merge task pane, click Greeting line. The Insert Greeting Line dialog box opens. In this dialog box, you can specify how the greeting line should appear in the merged letters. 366 Chapter 14 Work with Mail Merge 5. Under Greeting line format, display the list for the second box, and then click Joshua. 6. In the Preview area, click the Next button three times to view the greeting line for each of the recipients in the linked data source. Then click OK to close the Insert Greeting Line dialog box. Word inserts the «GreetingLine» merge field into the document. When you merge the form letter with the data source, Word will replace this merge field with the word Dear and a space, followed by the information in the FirstName field, followed by a comma. 7. Click to the left of the For even greater savings paragraph, and in the Mail Merge task pane, click More items. The Insert Merge Field dialog box opens. You can insert individual fields from the data source. 8. With Database Fields selected and FirstName highlighted in the Fields box, click Insert, and then click Close. The «FirstName» merge field appears at the beginning of the third paragraph. 9. Without moving the cursor, type a comma and press the Spacebar. Then change For to for. The form letter is now ready for merging. Merging Main Documents and Data Sources 367 This form letter contains three merge fields that will be replaced with information from the data source. CLEAN UP Save the AnniversaryLetter document, and leave it open for the next exercise. Merging Main Documents and Data Sources After you specify the data source you want to use and enter merge fields in the main document, you can preview the merged documents before performing the actual merge. You can exclude recipients during this preview. When you are ready, you can either send the merged documents directly to the printer or you can merge them one after the other into a new document, separated by page breaks. If you merge to a new document, you have another chance to review and, if necessary, edit the merged documents before sending them to the printer. In this exercise, you’ll preview merged letters, exclude recipients from the merge, merge the letters into a new document, and then save the merged file. 368 Chapter 14 Work with Mail Merge SET UP This exercise uses the AnniversaryLetter document to which you attached the CustomerListLetter workbook as the data source and in which you inserted merge fields in the previous two exercises. If you didn’t complete those exercises, you should do so now. If you closed the AnniversaryLetter document at the end of the last exercise, open it, and when a message asks whether you want to run the command that will attach the data source to the document, click Yes. Then open the Mail Merge task pane by clicking the Start Mail Merge button in the Start Mail Merge group on the Mailings tab and clicking Step by Step Mail Merge Wizard. The Mail Merge task pane opens to the step 3 task pane. Then display formatting marks, and follow the steps. 1. At the bottom of the Mail Merge task pane, click Next until the step 5 task pane is displayed. 2. If necessary, scroll down the letter until you can see the address block, the greeting line, and the third paragraph at the same time. Word displays a preview of how the personalized letter will look when merged with the data source. You can preview how the personalized letters will look before you proceed with the merge. 3. Under Preview your letters in the Mail Merge task pane, click the Previous Record button three times to preview all the letters. Merging Main Documents and Data Sources 369 Tip You can also preview the next or previous documents by clicking the Next Record or Previous Record button in the Preview Results group on the Mailings tab. You can jump to the first merged document by clicking the First Record button or the last merged document by clicking the Last Record button. 4. To exclude the displayed recipient (Garth Fort) from the merge, under Make changes in the Mail Merge task pane, click Exclude this recipient. 5. Preview the letters again. Then at the bottom of the Mail Merge task pane, click Next: Complete the merge. 6. In the Mail Merge task pane, click Edit individual letters. The Merge To New Document dialog box opens. If you want to merge only some of the records, you can specify which ones in this dialog box. 7. With the All option selected, click OK. Word creates a document called Letters1 that contains a personalized copy of the form letter for each of the selected records. 8. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Save button. Keyboard Shortcut Press Ctrl+S to save files. See Also For more information about keyboard shortcuts, see “Keyboard Shortcuts” at the end of this book. The Save As dialog box opens so that you can save the new document with a more specific name. 9. Navigate to your Chapter14 practice file folder, type My Merged Letters in the File name box, and then click Save. Word saves the new document in the specified folder with the name My Merged Letters. CLEAN UP Close the My Merged Letters document. Then save and close the AnniversaryLetter document. 370 Chapter 14 Work with Mail Merge Printing Envelopes You can print an envelope based on an address in a document. To do this: 1. In the document, select the lines of the address. (Do not select any blank lines above or below the address.) 2. On the Mailings tab, in the Create group, click the Envelopes button. The Envelopes And Labels dialog box opens. You can edit the address in the Delivery Address box and enter a return address in the Return Address box. Tip You can have Word supply the return address. Display the Advanced page of the Word Options dialog box. Toward the bottom of the page, under General, enter the return address in the Mailing Address box, and click OK. The address then appears by default as the Return Address in the Envelopes And Labels dialog box. If you want to use envelopes with a preprinted return address, you must select the Omit check box to avoid duplication. 3. Size 10 is the default envelope size. If you want to select a different envelope size, click Options, make your selection, and then click OK. In the Envelope Options dialog box, you can also specify the feed method (horizontally or vertically and face up or face down), and the font and font size of both the address and the return address. If you have electronic postage software installed on your computer, you can include electronic postage. 4. Insert an envelope in the printer, and then click Print. Alternatively, you can click Add To Document to have Word insert the address in the format required for an envelope on a separate page at the beginning of the current document. Sending Personalized E-Mail Messages to Multiple Recipients When you want to send the same information to all the people on a list—for example, all your customers, or all the members of a club or your family—you don’t have to print letters and physically mail them. Instead, you can use mail merge to create a personalized e-mail message for each person in a data source. As with a form letter that will be printed, you can either use the Mail Merge wizard or use the buttons on the Mailings tab to insert merge fields into the form message. These merge fields will be replaced with information from the specified data source. Sending Personalized E-Mail Messages to Multiple Recipients 371 If you are using the wizard, be sure to click E-Mail Messages in step 1. If you are not using the wizard, you can specify the list of e-mail addresses you want to send the message to by clicking the Select Recipients button in the Start Mail Merge group on the Mailings tab. In either case, you have three options: ● Type an entirely new list of recipients. ● Use an existing list of recipients. ● Select recipients from an Outlook contacts list. You can quickly add merge fields to a form message by using the buttons in the Write & Insert Fields group. Many e-mail messages need only a greeting line. Because e-mail messages tend to be less formal than printed letters, you might want to start the messages with something other than the predefined greeting options (Dear and To:) by typing a custom greeting. In this exercise, you’ll open an existing form message, use the buttons on the Mailings tab to create a short mailing list, add a custom greeting line merge field, and then complete the merge. SET UP You need the ThankYouEmail_start document located in your Chapter14 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the ThankYouEmail_start document, and save it as ThankYouEmail. Display formatting marks, and then follow the steps. 1. On the Mailings tab, in the Start Mail Merge group, click the Select Recipients button, and then in the list, click Type New List. The New Address List dialog box opens. If you don’t have an existing data source, you can create one as part of the mail merge process. 372 Chapter 14 Work with Mail Merge 2. Skipping over the Title field, type Andrea in the First Name field, type Dunker in the Last Name field, press the Tab key until you reach the E-mail Address field (the last field in the table), and then type andrea@consolidatedmessenger.com. 3. Click New Entry, and then add Judy Lew, whose e-mail address is judy@lucernepublishing.com. Tip If you have several e-mail addresses to add to the list, you can press Tab in the last field of the last entry, instead of clicking New Entry each time. 4. Repeat step 3 to add Ben Miller, whose e-mail address is ben@wingtiptoys.com, and then click OK . The Save Address List dialog box opens, with the contents of your My Data Sources folder displayed. This dialog box is very similar to the Save As dialog box. Troubleshooting If the dialog box doesn’t appear, it might be hidden behind the program window, which will start flashing to indicate that you need to attend to the dialog box before you can proceed. Click the program window title bar to make the dialog box appear, or click the Word button on the Windows Taskbar and then click the dialog box thumbnail. 5. Navigate to your Chapter14 practice file folder, type My E-Mail Data Source in the File name box, and then click Save. Word saves the data source in the specified location as a database. 6. With the cursor at the beginning of the form message, press Enter twice, and then press the Up Arrow key twice. 7. On the Mailings tab, in the Write & Insert Fields group, click the Greeting Line button. The Insert Greeting Line dialog box opens. 8. In the first box under Greeting line format, replace Dear with Hello followed by a comma and a space. Display the list of options for the second box, and click Joshua. Then display the list of options for the third box, and click : (the colon). 9. In the Preview area, click the Next button twice to preview the greetings as they will appear in the e-mail messages. 10. Click the First button to return to the first record, and then click OK. Word inserts the «GreetingLine» merge field at the top of the form message. Sending Personalized E-Mail Messages to Multiple Recipients 373 If you want to edit the custom greeting, you can right-click its merge field and then click Edit Greeting Line. 11. On the Mailings tab, in the Preview Results group, click the Preview Results button. Word shows a preview of the first message. You can click the Next Record button in the Preview Results group to preview the messages for other recipients. Clicking the Preview Results button again turns off the preview. 12. In the Write & Insert Fields group, click the Highlight Merge Fields button. Word indicates the merge field with a gray highlight. 13. In the Finish group, click the Finish & Merge button, and then in the list, click Send E-mail Messages. The Merge To E-Mail dialog box opens. You set up the e-mail message header information and format in this dialog box. 374 Chapter 14 Work with Mail Merge 14. In the Message options area, verify that Email_Address is selected in the To box, type Welcome to Wide World Importers! in the Subject line box, and verify that HTML is selected in the Mail format box. 15. In this case, click Cancel. If you click OK, Word converts the form message to an e-mail message and transmits it to your default e-mail program, which then sends the message to each of the selected addresses in the data source. Tip Your e-mail program might require that you log in or manually send the messages (they will be held in the outbox until sent). If you are using Outlook, a copy of each sent message appears in your Outlook Sent Items folder. If you plan to send a large number of messages, you might want to turn off the saving of sent messages. CLEAN UP Save the ThankYouEmail document, and then close it. Creating and Printing Labels Most organizations keep information about their customers or clients in a worksheet or database that can be used for several purposes. For example, the address information might be used to send billing statements, form letters, and brochures. It might also be used to print sheets of mailing labels that can be attached to items such as packages and catalogs. To create sheets of mailing labels, you first prepare the data source and then prepare the main document by selecting the brand and style of labels you plan to use. Word creates a table with cells the size of the labels on a page the size of the label sheet, so that each record will print on one label on the sheet. You insert merge fields into the first cell as a template for all the other cells. When you merge the main document and the data source, you can print the labels or create a new label document that you can use whenever you want to send something to the same set of recipients. In this exercise, you’ll use the Mail Merge wizard to create mailing labels. You’ll then print the labels on standard paper to proofread them. SET UP You need the CustomerList_start workbook located in your Chapter14 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the CustomerList_start workbook, save it as CustomerListLabels, and then close it. Display formatting marks, and be sure to turn on your printer. (If you don’t want to print the labels, you can proof them on-screen.) Then with the Word program window active, follow the steps. 1. Display the Backstage view, click New, and then double-click Blank document. A new blank document opens. Creating and Printing Labels 375 2. On the Mailings tab, in the Start Mail Merge group, click the Start Mail Merge button, and then click Step by Step Mail Merge Wizard. 3. In the Mail Merge task pane, click Labels, and then click Next: Starting document. 4. With Change document layout selected in the step 2 task pane, click Label options. The Label Options dialog box opens. Every label is different. You need to specify the print method, the manufacturer and/or type, and the product number so that Word can set up the labels correctly. 5. In the Label information area, ensure that the Label vendors setting is Avery US Letter. 6. In the Product number box, ensure that the setting is 5159 Mailing Labels, and then click OK . Word inserts a table that fills the first page of the main document. 7. At the bottom of the Mail Merge task pane, click Next: Select recipients. 8. With Use an existing list selected, click Browse, navigate to your Chapter14 practice file folder, double-click the CustomerListLabels workbook, and then in the Select Table dialog box, click OK . 9. In the Mail Merge Recipients dialog box, clear the check boxes of the two recipients whose addresses are not in Washington State (WA), and then click OK. Word inserts a «Next Record» merge field in all the cells in the main document except the first. 376 Chapter 14 Work with Mail Merge 10. At the bottom of the Mail Merge task pane, click Next: Arrange your labels, and then ensure that you can see the left edge of the main document. 11. With the cursor positioned in the first cell, in the Mail Merge task pane, click Address block. 12. In the Insert Address Block dialog box, click OK to accept the default settings. Word inserts an «AddressBlock» merge field into the first cell. The merge fields in the first cell in the table will be used as a template for all the other cells. 13. In the Mail Merge task pane, click Update all labels. The «AddressBlock» merge field is copied to the other cells, after the «Next Record» merge field. 14. At the bottom of the Mail Merge task pane, click Next: Preview your labels. Then in the Preview Results group, click the First Record button. The merge fields are replaced by the specified information from the data source. Labels for the three recipients who live in Washington State, as they will appear after the merge. 15. At the bottom of the Mail Merge task pane, click Next: Complete the merge. Then in the Mail Merge task pane, click Print. Key Points 377 The Merge To Printer dialog box opens. You have the opportunity to exclude records from the merge before printing the labels. 16. With the All option selected, click OK. 17. In the Print dialog box, verify that the name of the printer you want to use to print the labels appears in the Name box, and then click OK to print the labels. The labels are printed on regular paper on the printer you selected. If you want to print on label sheets, insert the sheets in the printer’s paper tray before clicking OK in the Print dialog box. CLEAN UP Save the label document as My Merged Labels, and then close it. Key Points ● The mail merge process works by combining static information in a main document with variable information in a data source. ● The main document can be any type of document, such as a letter, e-mail message, envelope or label template, or a directory or catalog. ● The data source is organized into sets of information, called records, with each record containing the same items, called fields. ● You insert placeholders called merge fields into the main document to tell Word where to merge items from the data source. ● You don’t have to use all the records in a data source for a mail merge. You can filter the data and exclude specific records. ● You can send the mail merged results directly to your printer or to a new document that you can edit and save. Chapter at a Glance Add and review comments, page 385 Track and manage document changes, page 388 Compare and merge documents, page 393 Passwordprotect documents, page 396 15 Collaborate on Documents In this chapter, you will learn how to ✔ Coauthor documents. ✔ Send documents directly from Word. ✔ Add and review comments. ✔ Track and manage document changes. ✔ Compare and merge documents. ✔ Password-protect documents. ✔ Control changes. In today’s workplace, many documents are developed collaboratively by a team of people. You might be the lead author of some documents that are reviewed by your colleagues and managers, and you might be a reviewer of other documents. With Microsoft Word 2010, you can collaborate on the development of documents in new and exciting ways. You can also easily attach a document to an e-mail message and send it to colleagues for review. These days, most documents are reviewed on the screen rather than on paper printouts. With Word, it’s easy to edit documents on-screen without losing track of the original text, and it’s easy to accept or reject changes. You can also make comments, ask questions, and respond to comments made by others. If you send a document out for review and then receive several copies with changes and suggestions back from different people, you can merge the different versions into one file to simplify the process of reviewing and accepting or rejecting changes. Sometimes you’ll want other people to review a document but not change it. You can prevent other people from making changes to a document by assigning a password to it. You can also specify that only certain people are allowed to make changes, and what types of formatting and content changes are allowed. 379 380 Chapter 15 Collaborate on Documents In this chapter, we’ll first discuss the new Word coauthoring capabilities., and then you’ll send a document directly from Word. You’ll track changes that you make to a document, and then accept and reject changes. You’ll review, add, delete, and hide comments, and merge three versions of the same document. Finally, you’ll set and remove a password and set up editing and formatting restrictions. Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this chapter, you need to copy the book’s practice files to your computer. The practice files you’ll use to complete the exercises in this chapter are in the Chapter15 practice file folder. A complete list of practice files is provided in “Using the Practice Files” at the beginning of this book. Coauthoring Documents Whether you work for a large organization or a small business, you might need to collaborate with other people on the development of a document. Or perhaps you are working with a team of students or volunteers on a document that requires input from everyone. No matter what the circumstances, it can be difficult to keep track of different versions of a document produced by different people. With Word 2010, however, it is now possible to store one version of the document that can be worked on by multiple people simultaneously. To develop a document with other users, you need to save it to a Microsoft SharePoint 2010 site. Display the Save & Send page of the Backstage view, click Save To SharePoint, and then use the settings in the Save As dialog box to save the document to the site. You then continue to work on it from the site. When another contributor begins making changes to the file stored on the site, Word alerts you to that person’s presence. You can display a list of the other people who are actively working on the document and their availability. As the people working on the document make changes, Word keeps track of them. When you finish working with the document, you save and close it as usual. The next time you open it, you’ll see the changes made by anyone else who has worked on the document. In this way, people can work efficiently on a document whether they are in the same office building, on the other side of town, or in a different time zone. If your organization has implemented the Word 2010 Web App on a server, team members who travel frequently can review documents while on the road. With the Web App, you can review and edit a document stored on your organization’s server on any computer running Windows Internet Explorer 7 or Internet Explorer 8, FireFox 3.5, or Safari 4 on the Mac. You can also save a document to a Windows Live SkyDrive space and share it with other people from there. SkyDrive is part of Windows Live Online Services, a suite of useful programs that are available over the Internet from your computer or from mobile devices, Sending Documents Directly from Word 381 such as portable computers or smartphones. You can visit www.windowslive.com/Online/ to learn about these services. All you need to start using them is a Windows Live ID. You save a document to SkyDrive by displaying the Save & Send page of the Backstage view, clicking Save To Web, and then specifying the location where you want to save the file. You can make the document publicly available by saving it in the Public folder, or you can save it in your My Documents folder and then assign access permissions to specific people. You and colleagues who can access the file can then work on it by using the Word Web App from the site. (At the time of writing, editing capabilities were not yet available.) If you have a smartphone, you might be able to use the Word 2010 Mobile App to view and edit documents. More in-depth discussion of the Web App and the Mobile App, which allow you to continue collaborating with your team no matter where you are, is beyond the scope of this book, but if you are a “road warrior,” you will certainly want to research them further. Sending Documents Directly from Word After you create a document, you can quickly send it via e-mail from the Save & Send page of the Backstage view, without starting your e-mail program. You can send a file in .docx, .pdf, or .xps format. 382 Chapter 15 Collaborate on Documents Clicking Send As Attachment opens a message window with the current document already attached as a .docx file. All you have to do is enter the e-mail addresses of anyone you want to receive the message and its attachment. If you want, you can modify the subject line, which contains the name of the document you’re sending. Similarly, you can click Send As PDF or Send As XPS to attach a version of the document saved in the corresponding file format. In addition to sending a document as an e-mail attachment from within Word, if you have signed up with an Internet fax service provider, you can send the document as a fax. Although the exact terms vary from one provider to another, these services let you send and receive faxes from your computer without needing a fax machine or dedicated fax line. After establishing an Internet fax service account, you can send the current document as a fax by clicking Send As Internet Fax on the Save & Send page. You then follow the procedure specified by your fax service provider. Tip If you do not sign up with an Internet fax service provider before clicking Send As Internet Fax, a message box appears. Clicking OK opens a Web page where you can choose a fax service provider. In this exercise, you’ll attach three documents to an e-mail message so that you can simulate sending them for review. SET UP You need the InfoSheetReviewA_start, InfoSheetReviewB_start, and InfoSheetReviewC_start documents located in your Chapter15 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open each document and save it without _ start a s part of the file name. Be sure to have an e-mail program installed on your computer and an e-mail account set up before beginning this exercise. Microsoft Outlook 2010 is recommended. You can use another e-mail program, but the steps for attaching and sending a message might vary from those given in this exercise. Then with only the InfoSheetReviewA document open, follow the steps. 1. Display the Backstage view, and click Save & Send. 2. With Send Using E-mail selected in the center pane of the Save & Send page, click Send as Attachment. A message window opens. Sending Documents Directly from Word 383 Word enters the name of the document in the Subject line and attaches the document to the message. 3. In the To box, type your own e-mail address. 4. In the message content pane, type Please review the attached documents and let me know which title you prefer. You can format the text of the message in the same way you would the text of a document. 5. On the Message tab, in the Include group, click the Attach File button. The Insert File dialog box opens. 6. Navigate to your Chapter15 practice file folder. 7. Click InfoSheetReviewB, hold down the Ctrl key, click InfoSheetReviewC, and then click Insert. In the message window, the Attached box shows that three files are attached to the message. 8. On the Message tab, in the Tags group, click the High Importance button. If the message recipient is using Outlook, the message header will display a red exclamation mark to indicate that it is important. 384 Chapter 15 Collaborate on Documents 9. In the message header, click the Send button. Outlook sends the e-mail message with the attached documents. You’ll receive the message the next time Outlook connects to your mail server. CLEAN UP Close the InfoSheetReviewA document. Adding Digital Signatures When you create a document that will be circulated to other people via e-mail or the Web, you might want to attach a digital signature, which is an electronic stamp of authentication. The digital signature confirms the origin of the document and indicates that no one has tampered with the document since it was signed. To add a digital signature to a Word document: 1. Display the Backstage view, and click Info. 2. On the Info page, click the Protect Document button, and then click Add A Digital Signature. If you do not already have a digital signature stored on this computer, a dialog box opens. 3. If you want to obtain a signature from a third-party company such as ARX CoSign or IntelliSafe, click Signature Services From The Office Marketplace to display a Web site with instructions. 4. If you want to create your own signature, click OK. Then in the Get A Digital ID dialog box, click Create Your Own Digital ID, and click OK. Then in the Create A Digital ID dialog box, enter the information you want included in the boxes provided, and click Create. 5. In the Sign dialog box, enter the purpose for signing the document, if you want, and click Sign. Then click OK in the message that the signature has been saved with the document. The Info page now indicates that the document is signed and final. When you click any of the other ribbon tabs, an info bar at the top of the document discourages editing by announcing that the document is final, and the ribbon commands are hidden. Adding and Reviewing Comments 385 Adding and Reviewing Comments When reviewing a document, you can insert notes, called comments, to ask questions, make suggestions, or explain edits. To insert a comment, you select the text to which the comment refers, click the New Comment button in the Comments group on the Review tab, and type what you want to say in the balloon that appears. In Print Layout view, Word highlights the associated text in the document in the same color as the balloon and adds your initials and a sequential number to the balloon itself. You can work with comments in the following ways: ● To display the reviewer’s name and the date and time the comment was inserted, point to either the commented text or the balloon. ● To review comments, scroll through the document, or in the case of long docu- ments, click the Next or Previous button in the Comments group to jump from balloon to balloon. ● To edit a comment, click the balloon and use normal editing techniques. ● To delete a comment, click its balloon and then click the Delete button in the Comments group; or right-click the balloon and then click Delete Comment. ● To respond to a comment, simply add text to its existing balloon. You can also click the existing balloon and then click the New Comment button to attach a new balloon to the same text in the document. ● If the complete text of a comment isn’t visible in its balloon, view it in its entirety by clicking the Reviewing Pane button to display the Reviewing pane. To change the size of the pane, point to its border, and when the pointer changes to a doubleheaded arrow, drag the border. To close the Reviewing pane, click its Close button, or click the Reviewing Pane button again. Tip In addition to displaying comments, the Reviewing pane displays all the editing and formatting changes made to a document in Track Changes, with the number of each type of change summarized at the top of the pane. For information about Track Changes, see the next topic in this chapter. ● Turn off the display of comment balloons by clicking the Show Markup button in the Tracking group and then clicking Comments. ● If multiple people have reviewed a document and you want to see only the com- ments of a specific person, click the Show Markup button, click Reviewers, and then click the name of any reviewer whose comments you don’t want to see. 386 Chapter 15 Collaborate on Documents In this exercise, you’ll show and review comments in a document, add and respond to comments, delete one that is no longer needed, and then hide the remaining comments. SET UP You need the CompetitiveAnalysisA_start document located in your Chapter15 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the CompetitiveAnalysisA_start document, and save it as CompetitiveAnalysisA. Then follow the steps. 1. If comments are not visible in the document, click the Review tab, and in the Tracking group, ensure that the Display for Review box displays Final: Show Markup. If comments are still not visible, in the Tracking group, click the Show Markup button, and if Comments does not have a check mark to its left in the list, click it. 2. On the Review tab, in the Comments group, click the Next button. In the document, Word highlights the first instance of commented text. Word positions the cursor in the highlighted comment balloon, in case you want to edit the comment. Tip If a document contains both comments and tracked changes, clicking the Next or Previous button in the Changes group on the Review tab moves sequentially among both elements, whereas clicking the Next or Previous button in the Comments group moves only among comments. 3. In the Comments group, click the Next button. Word moves to the next comment. 4. In the table, point to Adequate. A ScreenTip displays information about who inserted the comment and when. 5. In the fifth column of the same row, select the words some good, and then in the Comments group, click the New Comment button. Word highlights the selection and displays a new balloon in the right margin. 6. In the comment balloon, type They carry the new Ultra line. Adding and Reviewing Comments 387 7. Click the comment balloon associated with the word competitors, and in the Comments group, click the Delete button. Word deletes the comment and its balloon. 8. In the Tracking group, click the Reviewing Pane button. The Reviewing pane opens at the left side of the program window. The Reviewing pane shows the two remaining comments. Tip You can click the Reviewing Pane arrow and then click Reviewing Pane Horizontal to display the pane across the bottom of the page. 9. In the Reviewing pane, click at the right end of the second comment, press Enter, type the date and a colon (:), press the Spacebar, and then type These are special order. The new text is added to the same comment in the Reviewing pane. 10. In the Tracking group, click the Reviewing Pane button to close the pane, and then scroll through the document so that you can see its text. 11. Click anywhere in the comment balloon associated with Adequate, and then in the Comments group, click the New Comment button. Word attaches a response comment to the same text in the document. 388 Chapter 15 Collaborate on Documents The response comment is labeled with your initials, the sequential comment number 2, and R1, which indicates that this is a response to comment 1. 12. In the response comment balloon, type If you had been a real customer, would you have left? 13. In the Tracking group, click the Show Markup button, and then click Comments to hide them. CLEAN UP Save the CompetitiveAnalysisA document, and then close it. Tracking and Managing Document Changes When two or more people collaborate on a document, one person usually creates and “owns” the document and the others review it, adding or revising content to make it more accurate, logical, or readable. In Word, reviewers can turn on the Track Changes feature so that the revisions they make to the document are recorded without the original text being lost. (Note that turning on Track Changes affects only the active document, not any other documents that might also be open.) To turn on Track Changes, you click the Track Changes button in the Tracking group on the Review tab. You then edit the text as usual. Tip If you want to know whether Track Changes is turned on when the Review tab is not displayed, right-click the status bar and then click Track Changes on the Customize Status Bar menu. Word then adds a Track Changes button to the status bar that you can click to turn the feature on and off. By default, your revisions appear in a different color from the original text, as follows: ● Insertions and deletions are inserted in the text in your assigned color and are underlined. ● Formatting changes appear in balloons in the right margin. Tracking and Managing Document Changes 389 ● All changes are marked in the left margin by a vertical line. ● You can display deletions in balloons instead of in the text, and you can display formatting changes in the text instead of in balloons. Simply click the Show Markup button in the Tracking group on the Review tab, click Balloons, and then click the options you want. You can specify whether you want revisions to be displayed in the text or in balloons. Tip The colors used for revisions are controlled by the settings in the Track Changes Options dialog box, which you can display by clicking the Track Changes arrow and then clicking Change Tracking Options. You can display a ScreenTip identifying the name of the reviewer who made a specific change and when the change was made, by pointing to a revision or balloon. The reviewer name is taken from the user information stored with the user account. You can change the user information by clicking the Track Changes arrow, clicking Change User Name, typing the name and initials you want in the Word Options dialog box, and then clicking OK. By using the commands available on the Review tab, you can work with revisions in the following ways: ● To track changes without showing them on the screen, hide the revisions by clicking the Display For Review arrow in the Tracking group and clicking Final in the list. To display the revisions again, click Final: Show Markup in the Display For Review list. You can also display the original version, with or without revisions. ● When revisions are visible in the document, select which types of revisions you want to display from the Show Markup list in the Tracking group—for example, you can display only comments or only insertions and deletions. You can also display or hide the revisions of specific reviewers from this list. ● Move forward or backward from one revision or comment to another by clicking the Next or Previous button in the Changes group. 390 Chapter 15 Collaborate on Documents ● Incorporate a selected change into the document and move to the next change by clicking the Accept button in the Changes group. Click the Reject button to remove the selected change, restore the original text, and move to the next change. Tip You can also right-click the change and then click Accept Change or Reject Change. ● Accept or reject all the changes in a block of text, such as a paragraph, by selecting the block and clicking the Accept or Reject button. ● Accept all the changes in the document by clicking the Accept arrow and then clicking Accept All Changes In Document. Reject all the changes at once by clicking the Reject arrow and then clicking Reject All Changes In Document. ● Accept or reject only certain types of changes or changes from a specific reviewer by displaying only the changes you want to accept or reject, clicking the Accept or Reject arrow, and then clicking Accept All Changes Shown or Reject All Changes Shown in the list. In this exercise, you’ll turn on Track Changes, edit the document, and accept and reject changes. SET UP You need the CompetitiveAnalysisB_start document located in your Chapter15 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the CompetitiveAnalysisB_start document, and save it as CompetitiveAnalysisB. Then follow the steps. 1. On the Review tab, in the Tracking group, click the Track Changes button. The active (orange) button indicates that Track Changes is turned on. Any changes that you make now will be indicated in the document as revisions. 2. To display changes the same way we do in our graphics, in the Tracking group, click the Show Markup button, point to B alloons, and then click Show All Revisions Inline. 3. In the table at the end of the document, in Some much lower in the third column, double-click much, and then press the Delete key. Word changes the font color of the word much and indicates with strikethrough formatting that you deleted it. 4. In the fourth column of the same row, position the insertion point at the right end of Adequate, press the Spacebar, and then type but slow. Word inserts the new text in the same color as the deletion. Tracking and Managing Document Changes 391 A vertical line in the left margin draws your attention to revisions. 5. In the fifth column of the Northwind Traders row, select the word Poor, and then type Substandard. Word interprets this one change as both a deletion and an insertion. 6. Point to Substandard. A ScreenTip appears. Revision ScreenTips display your user name, the date and time you made the change, the type of change, and the affected text. 392 Chapter 15 Collaborate on Documents 7. In the Tracking group, click Show Markup, point to Balloons, and then click Show Revisions in Balloons. Word removes the deletions from the text and displays them in balloons in the right margin. The text is less cluttered if you display deletions in balloons. 8. In the Tracking group, display the Display for Review list, and then click Final. Word hides the revisions, displaying the document as it would appear if all the changes are accepted. 9. Display the Display for Review list, and click Final: Show Markup to make the revisions visible again. 10. Press Ctrl+Home to move to the beginning of the document. 11. In the Changes group, click the Next button. Word selects the first change in the document—the deleted word much. 12. In the Changes group, click the Accept button. Word accepts the change, removes the revision and associated balloon, and moves to the next change (but slow). 13. In the Changes group, click the Reject button. Word removes the inserted text, and because there are no more changes in this row of the table, it also removes the adjacent vertical bar from the left margin. It then moves to the next change (Substandard ). 14. In the Changes group, click the Accept button to implement the deletion, and then click the same button again to implement the insertion. A message box tells you that there are no more changes in the document. 15. Click OK to close the message box. Comparing and Merging Documents 393 16. In the Tracking group, click the Track Changes button to stop tracking changes made to the active document. CLEAN UP Change the balloons setting to the one you want. Then save and close the CompetitiveAnalysisB document. Comparing and Merging Documents Sometimes you might want to compare several versions of the same document. For example, if you have sent a document out for review by colleagues, you might want to compare their edited versions with the original document. Instead of comparing multiple open documents visually, you can tell Word to compare the documents and merge the changes into one document. Even if the changes were not made with Track Changes turned on, they are recorded in the merged document as revisions. From within that one document, you can view all the changes from all the reviewers or view only those from a specific reviewer. In this exercise, you’ll merge three versions of the same document: your version, a version edited by Chris Preston, and a version edited by Terry Adams. You’ll then evaluate and resolve the differences between the versions. SET UP You need the ServiceSH_start, ServiceCP_start, and ServiceTA_start documents located in your Chapter15 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open each document and save it without _start as part of the file name. Then with only the ServiceSH document open, follow the steps. 1. On the Review tab, in the Compare group, click the Compare button, and then click Combine. Tip Click the Compare option to compare two documents and display the differences between them in a third document. The documents being compared are not changed. The Combine Documents dialog box opens. You select the two documents you want to combine in this dialog box. 394 Chapter 15 Collaborate on Documents 2. Display the Original document list, and click ServiceSH. Then ensure that Sidney Higa appears in the Label unmarked changes with box. Troubleshooting If ServiceSH doesn’t appear in the list, browse to your Chapter15 practice file folder, and then double-click the file. 3. Display the Revised document list, and click ServiceCP. Then ensure that Chris Preston appears in the Label unmarked changes with box. 4. In the lower-left corner of the dialog box, click More, and then in the Comparison settings area, verify that all the check boxes are selected. 5. In the Show changes area, under Show changes in, click Original document, and then click OK . Troubleshooting If the documents contain conflicting formatting, you’ll see a message box asking you to confirm which document’s formatting should be used. Word compares the two documents and marks the differences in the ServiceSH document, which is displayed in the center pane. To the left, it displays the Reviewing pane, and to the right, it displays the two documents being compared. The document in the center pane combines the changes from the two documents on the right. Comparing and Merging Documents 395 Troubleshooting The appearance of buttons and groups on the ribbon changes depending on the width of the program window. For information about changing the appearance of the ribbon to match our screen images, see “Modifying the Display of the Ribbon” at the beginning of this book. Troubleshooting If the Reviewing pane is not open, click the Reviewing Pane button in the Tracking group on the Review tab. If the source documents are not displayed, click the Compare button, point to Show Source Documents, and then click Show Both. 6. On the Review tab, in the Compare group, click the Compare button, and then click Combine to display the Combine Documents dialog box. 7. Display the Original document list, and click ServiceSH. Then display the Revised document list, and click ServiceTA. Ensure that the changes are assigned to Sidney Higa and Terry Adams, respectively. Then with Original document selected, click OK . The changes from the ServiceTA version of the document are added to those of the other two versions. 8. In the center pane, scroll through the document to see all the revisions, and then in the Reviewing pane, scroll through the individual revisions. 9. In the Tracking group, click the Show Markup button, point to Reviewers, and then click Sidney Higa. The revisions made by Sidney Higa are hidden. 10. Display the Reviewers list again, and then click All Reviewers to redisplay all the revisions. 11. Press Ctrl+Home to ensure that the cursor is at the top of the document. Then in the Changes group, click the Accept arrow, and in the list, click Accept All Changes in Document. All the changes are accepted. 12. Close the Reviewing pane, and then close the two windows on the right side of the screen. Tip The next time you combine documents, the Reviewing pane and the source windows will be closed. You can open the Reviewing pane by clicking the Reviewing Pane button in the Tracking group on the Review tab, and you can open the source windows by clicking Show Source Documents in the Compare list and then clicking the option you want. CLEAN UP Save the ServiceSH document, and then close it. 396 Chapter 15 Collaborate on Documents Password-Protecting Documents Sometimes, you might want only certain people to be able to open and change a document. The easiest way to exercise this control is to assign a password to protect the document. Word then requires that the password be entered correctly before it will allow the document to be opened and changed. Word offers two levels of password protection: ● Unencrypted The document is saved in such a way that only people who know the password can open it, make changes, and save the file. People who don’t know the password can open a read-only version. If they make changes and want to save them, they have to save the document with a different name or in a different location, preserving the original. ● Encrypted The document is saved in such as way that people who do not know the password cannot open it at all. In this exercise, you’ll set an unencrypted password for a document and then test the document’s security by entering an incorrect password. You’ll open a read-only version of the document and then reopen it with the correct password. You’ll remove the unencrypted password-protection from the document and then set an encrypted password. SET UP You need the LoansProtected_start document located in your Chapter15 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the LoansProtected_start document, and then follow the steps. 1. Display the Backstage view, and click Save As. 2. With your Chapter15 practice file folder displayed in the Save As dialog box, change the name in the File name box to LoansProtected. 3. At the bottom of the dialog box, click Tools, and then in the list, click General Options. The General Options dialog box opens. Password-Protecting Documents 397 Assigning a password to open a document encrypts the document; assigning a password to modify the document does not encrypt it. Tip If you want people to be able to read the document’s contents but you don’t expect them to change the document, you can select the Read-Only Recommended check box to tell Word to display a message suggesting that the document be opened as read-only. Then click OK to close the General Options dialog box without assigning a password. 4. In the Password to modify box, type P@ssword. As you type the password, dots appear instead of the characters to keep the password confidential. Important Don’t use common words or phrases as passwords, and don’t use the same password for multiple documents. After assigning a password, make a note of it in a safe place. If you forget it, you won’t be able to open the password-protected document. 5. Click OK. The Confirm Password dialog box opens. 398 Chapter 15 Collaborate on Documents 6. In the Reenter password to modify box, type P@ssword, and then click OK to set the password. 7. In the Save As dialog box, click Save. Word protects the document by assigning the selected password, and then saves it in the Chapter15 folder. 8. Display the Backstage view, and click Close to close the LoansProtected document. 9. Display the Backstage view, and on the Recent page, click the LoansProtected document. Because this document is protected by the password you just set, the Password dialog box opens. You must enter the password or open the document as read-only. 10. In the Password box, type password, and click OK. A message tells you that you typed an incorrect password. 11. In the message box, click OK. 12. In the Password dialog box, click Read Only. The LoansProtected document opens as a read-only document, as indicated by (Read-Only) in its title bar. 13. Close the document from the Backstage view, and then reopen it. Word asks whether you want to open a read-only version of the document again. Word displays this dialog box because you opened the document as read-only last time. Password-Protecting Documents 399 14. Click No. Then when the Password dialog box opens, type P@ssword, and click OK . Because you typed the correct password, the document opens. 15. Display the Backstage view, and click Save As. Then click Tools, and click General Options. 16. In the General Options dialog box, select the contents of the Password to modify box, press Delete, and click OK to close the dialog box. 17. In the Save As dialog box, click Save. Then click Yes to confirm that you want to replace the existing file. The document is no longer protected by a password. 18. Display the Backstage view, and in the Permissions area of the Info page, click Protect Document. Then click Encrypt with Password. The Encrypt Document dialog box opens. After the password is assigned, you will no longer be able to open the document without it. 19. In the Password box, type P@ssword, and click OK . Then type the password again in the Confirm Password dialog box, and click OK . The Info page now reports that a password is required to open the LoansProtected document. 20. In the Backstage view, click Save. Then redisplay the Backstage view, and close the document. 21. Test the document’s security by trying to open it with an incorrect password. CLEAN UP If you want, remove the encrypted password by opening the LoansProtected document with the P@ssword password, reversing steps 18 and 19, and then saving and closing the document. 400 Chapter 15 Collaborate on Documents Restricting Who Can Do What to Documents If rights management software is installed on your computer, you can control who can see and work with your documents. The minimum required software is Windows Rights Management Services (RMS) Client Service Pack 1 (SP1). If your computer is running Windows 7 or Windows Vista, the software is already installed. (Rights management is usually configured by an administrator for an entire company.) If you have this capability, you will see a Restrict Permission By People option in the list displayed when you click the Protect Document button in the Permissions area of the Info page. Pointing to the Restrict Permission By People command and then clicking Restricted Access displays the Permission dialog box. In this dialog box, you can click Restrict Permission To This Document and then allow specific people to perform specific tasks, such as opening, printing, saving, or copying the document. When this protection is in place, other people cannot perform these tasks. The assigned permissions are stored with the document and apply no matter where the file is stored. Before you can work on a document to which access has been restricted, you must verify your credentials with a licensing server. You can then download a use license that defines the tasks you are authorized to perform with the document. You need to repeat this process with each restricted document. See Also For more information about rights management, search for Information Rights Management in Word Help. Controlling Changes Sometimes you’ll want people to be able to open and view a document but not make changes to it. Sometimes you’ll want to allow changes, but only of certain types. For example, you can specify that other people can insert comments in the document but not make changes, or you can require that people track their changes. To prevent anyone from introducing inconsistent formatting into a document, you can limit the styles that can be applied. You can select the styles individually, or you can implement the recommended minimum set, which consists of all the styles needed by Word for features such as tables of contents. (The recommended minimum set doesn’t necessarily include all the styles used in the document.) Controlling Changes 401 To protect a document from unauthorized changes, you display the Restrict Formatting And Editing task pane. You specify the changes that are allowed in the document in this task pane. In this exercise, you’ll set editing and formatting restrictions to selectively allow modifications to a document. SET UP You need the ProceduresRestricted_start document located in your Chapter15 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the ProceduresRestricted_start document, and save it as ProceduresRestricted. Then follow the steps. 1. On the Review tab, in the Protect group, click the Restrict Editing button. The Restrict Formatting And Editing task pane opens. 2. Under Formatting restrictions in the task pane, select the Limit formatting to a selection of styles check box, and then click Settings. The Formatting Restrictions dialog box opens. 402 Chapter 15 Collaborate on Documents All the available styles are currently allowed. 3. Scroll through the Checked styles are currently allowed list. The styles reflect those in the template attached to the open document, including styles that are available but not currently in use. 4. Click Recommended Minimum, and then scroll through the list again. All the selected styles are designated by the word recommended. The recommended set does not include some of the styles used in the document, so you need to add them. 5. Toward the top of the list, select the Address check box. Then scroll through the list, and select the BulletList1 and BulletList2 check boxes. 6. In the Formatting area, select the Block Theme or Scheme switching and the Block Quick Style Set switching check boxes. 7. Click OK to implement the restricted set of styles. Word displays a message stating that the document might contain formatting that is not allowed, and asking if you want the formatting to be removed. 8. In the message box, click Yes. 9. Under Editing restrictions in the task pane, select the Allow only this type of editing in the document check box. Then click the arrow to the right of the box below, and in the list, click Tracked changes. Key Points 403 10. Under Start enforcement in the task pane, click Yes, Start Enforcing Protection. The Start Enforcing Protection dialog box opens. People who don’t know the password can’t turn off the restrictions. 11. Without entering a password, click OK. The Restrict Formatting And Editing task pane indicates that formatting and editing in this document is now restricted. 12. Close the task pane, and then display the Home tab. Many of the buttons in the Font and Paragraph groups are now unavailable. 13. Display the Review tab, and notice that you cannot turn off Track Changes. 14. In the document title, double-click the word Office, and type Operations. Your change is marked as a revision. Any edits you make will be recorded, and because the Track Changes button is unavailable, you cannot turn it off. CLEAN UP Save the ProceduresRestricted document, and then close it. Key Points ● You can send a document for review via e-mail. When you receive the reviewed ver- sions, you can merge them so that all the changes are recorded in one document. ● You can insert comments in a document to ask questions or explain suggested edits. ● When you collaborate on a document, you can record the revisions you make to the document without losing the original text. ● If only specific people should work on a document, you can protect it with a password. You can also restrict what people can do to it. Chapter at a Glance Work with styles and templates, page 406 Change default program options, page 422 Customize the ribbon, page 431 Customize the Quick Access Toolbar, page 437 16 Work in Word More Efficiently In this chapter, you will learn how to ✔ Work with styles and templates. ✔ Change default program options. ✔ Customize the ribbon. ✔ Customize the Quick Access Toolbar. If you use Microsoft Word 2010 only occasionally, you might be perfectly happy creating new documents with the wide range of tools we have already discussed in this book. And you might be comfortable with the default working environment options and behind-thescenes settings. However, if you create a lot of documents of various types, you might find yourself wishing that you could streamline the document development process or change aspects of the program to make it more suitable for the kinds of documents you create. In this chapter, you’ll explore styles and templates, which can greatly enhance document development efficiency. You’ll also take a tour of the pages of the Word Options dialog box to understand the ways in which you can customize the program. Then you’ll manipulate the ribbon and the Quick Access Toolbar to put the tools you need for your daily work at your fingertips. Practice Files Before you can complete the exercises in this chapter, you need to copy the book’s practice files to your computer. The practice files you’ll use to complete the exercises in this chapter are in the Chapter16 practice file folder. A complete list of practice files is provided in “Using the Practice Files” at the beginning of this book. 405 406 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently Working with Styles and Templates When you want to quickly create an effective, visually attractive document, you can take advantage of your previous work or even the work of other people by saving an existing document with a new name and then customizing it to suit the current purpose. However, if you frequently create the same type of document, such as a monthly or quarterly report, one of the most efficient ways to generate the document is to base it on a template that already contains the text, character and paragraph styles, page formatting, and graphic elements that you generally use in that type of document. When it comes to making your work in Word more efficient, styles and templates are among the most powerful tools available to you. Entire books have been written about them; this discussion can only scratch the surface. We’ll talk about templates first; then we’ll discuss styles. Templates Although you might not have realized it, all documents are based on a template. New blank documents are based on the built-in Normal template, which defines paragraph styles for regular text paragraphs, a title, and different levels of headings. It also defines a few character styles that you can use to change the look of selected text. These styles appear in the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab, and you can apply these Quick Styles to format the text in the document. See Also For information about applying Quick Styles, see “Quickly Formatting Text” in Chapter 3, “Change the Look of Text.” In addition to the Normal template, Word 2010 comes with a variety of templates for a variety of types of documents. To create a document based on one of these templates, you start by displaying the New page in the Backstage view. At the top of the New page are icons for templates or categories of templates that were installed with Word on your computer. The Office.com Templates area lists categories of templates that are available for downloading from the Office.com Web site. Tip If the designation (Compatibility Mode) appears in the title bar when you create a document based on a template, it indicates that the template was created in an earlier version of Word. Usually this will have no effect on your use of the template, but bear in mind that sometimes compatibility can have an impact on functionality. Working with Styles and Templates 407 The New page of the Backstage view. In general, templates can contain the following: ● Formatting Most templates contain formatting information, which in addition to styles can include page layout settings, backgrounds, themes, and other types of formatting. A template that contains only formatting defines the look of the document, and you add your own content. ● Text Templates can also contain text that you customize for your own purposes. For example, if you base a new document on an agenda template from Office.com, the text of the agenda is already in place, and all you have to do is customize it. Sometimes, a document based on a template displays formatted text placeholders surrounded by square brackets—for example, [Company Name]—instead of actual text. You replace a placeholder with your own text by clicking it and then typing the replacement. If you don’t need a placeholder, you simply delete it. ● Graphics, tables, charts, and diagrams Templates can contain ready-made graphic elements, either for use as is or as placeholders for elements tailored to the specific document. 408 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently ● Building blocks Some templates make custom building blocks, such as headers and footers or a cover page, available for use with a particular type of document. They might also include AutoText, such as contact information or standard copyright or privacy paragraphs. See Also For information about creating building blocks, see "Inserting Building Blocks” in Chapter 5, ”Add Simple Graphic Elements.” ● Macros Sophisticated templates contain macros that allow users to perform processes with the click of a button. The topic of macros is beyond the scope of this book; for information, search for macros in Word Help. Tip Word 2010 template files have one of two file name extensions, depending on their content. Those that contain macros have the .dotm file name extension; those that don’t contain macros have the .dotx extension. When you base a new document on a template, that template is said to be attached to the document. The styles defined in the attached template appear in the Quick Styles gallery so that you can easily apply them to any content you add to the document. In addition to attaching a document template, you can load global templates to make their contents available to a document. Two global templates are automatically loaded by Word—the Normal template and the Building Blocks template—but you can load others. For example, your organization might have a Custom Building Blocks template containing items that it wants you to use in all documents. See Also For information about attaching a different template to an existing document and about loading global templates, see the sidebar “Switching to a Different Template” later in this chapter. If none of the templates that come with Word or that you download from Office.com meets your needs, you can create your own template. If you routinely create the same type of document, such as a monthly financial report, you can create the appropriate styles, format the document, and then save it as a template on which to base future versions of that type of document. You can save your new template with text in it, which is handy if you create many documents with only slight variations. Or you can delete the text so that a new document based on the template will open as a blank document with the set of predefined styles available to apply to whatever content you enter. You can save a custom template anywhere and then browse to and double-click the file name to open a new document based on the template. However, if you save the template in your default Templates folder, it will be available when you click My Templates on the New page of the Backstage view. Tip On a Windows 7 computer, the default Templates folder location is C:\Users\<user name>\ AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Templates. By default, this folder is hidden. Working with Styles and Templates 409 Styles Even if you don’t want to create your own templates, it’s useful to know how to create and modify styles. When you apply direct character formatting or paragraph formatting, you affect only the selected characters or paragraphs. If you change your mind about the formatting, you have to change the formatting manually everywhere it is applied. When you apply a style to characters or paragraphs, you can change the way those characters or paragraphs look simply by changing the style definition. With one change in one place, you can completely change the look of the document. You already know that when you create a blank document, it is based on the Normal template. Initially, the Normal template displays only a limited number of styles in the Quick Styles gallery, but in fact it contains styles for just about every element you can think of. Although they are available, these styles aren’t actually used unless you apply the style or add the corresponding element to the document. For example, nine paragraph styles are available for an index, but none of them is used until you create and insert an index in the document. You can access the unused styles and manually apply them to characters and paragraphs in two ways: ● Clicking the Styles dialog box launcher displays the Styles task pane. By default, the task pane shows only the styles in use in the document. Clicking Options at the bottom of the task pane opens the Style Pane Options dialog box. You can specify which styles should be shown and how. By selecting All Styles in the Select Styles To Show list and Alphabetical in the Select How List Is Sorted list, you can display all the available styles in alphabetical order. You can then apply a style from the Styles task pane by clicking it. 410 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently The Styles task pane, as it looks when all the available styles are shown. Tip Selecting the Show Preview check box below the style list displays the style names in the formatting assigned to the style. Pointing to a style displays a ScreenTip with its formatting specifications. ● Clicking Apply Styles at the bottom of the Quick Styles gallery opens the Apply Styles dialog box. The Style Name box displays the name of the style applied to the active paragraph or selected text. Working with Styles and Templates 411 Clicking Reapply reapplies the formatting defined in the style, stripping away any direct formatting. Selecting a different style from the Style Name list applies it to the active paragraph or selected text. The Style Name list reflects the display in the Styles task pane; that is, if the task pane shows only the styles in use, so does the Style Name list in the Apply Styles dialog box. There are three major types of styles, identified in the Styles task pane by icons: ● Paragraph These styles can include any formatting that can be applied to a para- graph. They can also include character formatting. Paragraph styles are applied to the entire paragraph containing the cursor. In the Styles task pane, they are identified by a paragraph mark to the right of their names. ● Character These styles can include any formatting that can be applied to selected text. They are applied on top of the character formatting defined for the paragraph style. Like direct character formatting, character styles are applied to selected text; to apply them to an entire paragraph, you must select it. ● Linked These styles are hybrids. If you click in a paragraph and then apply the style, the style is applied to the entire paragraph like a paragraph style. If you select text and then apply the style, the style is applied to the selection only. Tip Two additional style types, Table and List, are reserved for styles for those document elements. The simplest way to customize the look of a document is to modify an existing style in one of the following ways: ● Apply the style to a paragraph or selected text, and adjust the formatting so that the paragraph or selection looks the way you want it. Then update the style definition with the new formatting by right-clicking the style in the Quick Styles gallery, or by clicking the arrow to the right of the style in the Styles task pane, and then clicking Update <style> To Match Selection. 412 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently ● Right-click the style in the Quick Styles gallery, and click Modify; or click the arrow to the right of the style in the Styles task pane; or display the style name in the Apply Styles dialog box and click Modify. Then in the Modify Style dialog box, change the settings in the Formatting area to achieve the look you want. You can adjust the formatting definition of any style by changing the settings in this dialog box. If you modify the existing styles, you can save the new style definitions as a style set. (Each new style must have the same name as its corresponding existing style.) Clicking the Change Styles button in the Styles group on the Home tab, pointing to Style Set, and then clicking Save As Quick Style Set opens the Save Quick Style Set dialog box, where you name the set. Without changing the storage location, click Save to save the style set in the QuickStyles folder. You can then make the style set accessible to any document by selecting it from the Style Set list. Working with Styles and Templates 413 S ee Also F or information about switching style sets, see “Quickly Formatting Text” in Chapter 3, “Change the Look of Text.” If you want to create a style rather than redefine an existing one, you apply the formatting you want for the style to a paragraph or selection and then click Save Selection As A New Quick Style at the bottom of the Quick Styles gallery to open the Create New Style From Formatting dialog box. You can see the formatting applied to the selected text in the Paragraph Style Preview box. If you want to refine the definition of the new style, clicking Modify expands the dialog box so that it resembles the Modify Style dialog box. (You can go directly to the expanded dialog box by clicking the New Style button at the bottom of the Styles task pane.) There you can specify the style name and type and all formatting for the style. If you are building on an existing style, you can select that style in the Style Based On list and then specify the formatting differences rather than defining the style from scratch. If you are creating the style as part of a new template, you can make the style part of the template instead of only part of the current document. After you have created the styles you want, you might want to remove any you don’t want from the Quick Styles gallery. Right-click the style in the gallery and click Remove From Quick Style Gallery. The styles will still be available in the Styles task pane, and you can add them back to the Quick Styles gallery at any time by clicking the arrow to the right of the style in the task pane and then clicking Add To Quick Style Gallery. To remove a style from the Styles task pane, click the arrow to the right of the style, click Delete or Revert, and then click Yes to confirm the deletion. Tip You cannot delete a built-in style, but if you have modified it, you can revert it back to its original formatting. 414 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently In this exercise, you’ll create a template based on a predefined Word template, and then you’ll create a document based on the custom template. You’ll also create a template based on a document, modify the template’s styles, and create a style. Finally, you’ll create a document based on that template. SET UP You need the AuthorsTemplate_start document located in your Chapter16 practice file folder to complete this exercise, but don’t open it yet. Just follow the steps. 1. Display the New page in the Backstage view, and then under Available Templates, click Sample templates. The center pane displays thumbnails of the installed templates. 2. Scroll down the Available Templates list, and double-click the Oriel Fax template. Word opens a new fax cover page document based on the selected template. The fax cover page has placeholders for the text you need to supply. 3. On the right side of the page, click the [Type the sender company name] placeholder, and type Lucerne Publishing or your company name. Then if you want, replace the other placeholders in the banner on the right side of the page. Also replace the placeholders in the FROM area of the cover page. Working with Styles and Templates 415 4. On the right side of the page, click Lucerne Publishing or your company name, and drag across it to select it. Then display the Quick Styles gallery, and click the Strong thumbnail. 5. Open the Save As dialog box, and in the File name box, type My Fax Template. 6. Display the Save as type list, and click Word Template. Tip If you want users who have older versions of Word to be able to use the template, click Word 97-2003 Template instead. 7. At the top of the Navigation pane, click Templates. Word displays your default Templates folder. See Also For information about changing default file locations, see “Changing Default Program Options” later in this chapter. 8. Click Save, and then close the template. 9. Display the New page in the Backstage view, and under Available Templates, click My templates. The New dialog box opens. The customized template is available in the Personal Templates list. 416 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently Tip If you frequently create your own templates, you might want to organize them by storing them in subfolders of the default Templates folder. With the contents of the Templates folder displayed in the Save As dialog box, click the New Folder button, and name the folder in the usual way. When you click My Templates on the New page to create a document based on one of your custom templates, the subfolders of the Templates folder will appear as tabs in the New dialog box. 10. With My Fax Template highlighted and Document selected in the Create New area, click OK . Word opens a new document based on your custom fax cover page template. The customized template produces fax cover pages with all the information that doesn’t change already filled in. 11. Make any changes you want to the fax cover page document, save it in your Chapter16 practice file folder with the name My Fax, and then close the document. 12. Open the AuthorsTemplate_start document from the Chapter16 folder, and save it as a template named AuthorsTemplate in your default Templates folder. 13. Select all the text in the document, and change the font to Tahoma. Change the color of About the Authors and Author1 to Purple, Accent 4. Then change the size of the first paragraph under the Author1 heading to 12 points. Working with Styles and Templates 417 14. Click anywhere in the About the Authors heading, and then in the Quick Styles gallery, right-click the Title style, and click Update Title to Match Selection. 15. Repeat step 14 to update the styles assigned to Author1 (h1) and the first <paragraph1> (Normal). All the paragraphs to which the h1 and Normal styles are applied are updated to reflect your formatting changes. Updating a style changes the formatting of any paragraphs to which the style is applied. 16. Select the last paragraph in the document. Then change the size to 9 pts, and make the selection bold, underlined, and purple. 17. Display the Quick Styles gallery, and below the thumbnails, click Save Selection as a New Quick Style. The Create New Style From Formatting dialog box opens. 18. In the Name box, replace Style1 with Copyright, and then click Modify. The dialog box expands to display options for modifying the new style. 418 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently Because the Style Type setting is Linked, you will be able to apply this style to entire paragraphs or selected text. 19. At the bottom of the expanded dialog box, click New documents based on this template, and then click OK. The new style will be available to other documents. 20. Display the Quick Styles gallery. The new style appears as a thumbnail. Working with Styles and Templates 419 The new style in the Quick Styles gallery. 21. Save and close the template. 22. Display the New page in the Backstage view, click My templates in the center pane, and from the New dialog box, create a document based on the AuthorsTemplate template. Word opens a new document with the template’s title and headline already in place. 23. Replace Author1 with Joyce Cox and Author2 with Joan Lambert. CLEAN UP Save the document as AuthorsDocument, and then close it. Tip If you want to change an existing template, you need to open the template file, not a document based on the template. Display the Backstage view, and click Open. Then in the Open dialog box, set the file type to Word Templates, navigate to your Templates folder, and then double-click the template. 420 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently Switching to a Different Template Although style sets provide a quick and easy way to change the look of an existing document, there might be times when you want to attach a different template to a document. The simplest way to attach a new template is from the Developer ribbon tab, which by default is hidden. To display the Developer tab: 1. Display the Word Options dialog box, and in the left pane, click Customize Ribbon. 2. Under Main Tabs in the list on the right, select the Developer check box, and click OK. To attach a new template to an open document: 1. On the Developer tab, in the Templates group, click Document Template. The Templates And Add-ins dialog box opens. The Template page of the Templates And Add-ins dialog box. 2. In the Document Template area, click Attach. The Attach Template dialog box opens. 3. Navigate to the template you want to attach, and double-click its file name. Working with Styles and Templates 421 4. In the Templates And Add-ins dialog box, select the Automatically Update Document Styles check box, and then click OK to attach the new template. 5. In the Styles group, click the Change Styles button, point to Style Set, and then at the bottom of the style set list, click Reset To Quick Styles From <template name> Template. The document changes to reflect the style definitions in the new template. To load a global template and make it available for use: 1. Display the Templates And Add-ins dialog box, and in the Global Templates And Add-ins area, click Add. 2. In the Add Template dialog box, navigate to the global template you want to load, and double-click its file name. 3. With the check box adjacent to the template’s name selected, click OK. You can deactivate the global template by clearing its check box, and you can unload it by selecting it in the list and clicking Remove. To replace all instances of one style with another style (if style names don’t match): 1. Open the Word Options dialog box, and on the Advanced page, under Editing Options, select the Keep Track Of Formatting check box. Then click OK. 2. Display the Styles task pane, point to a style you want to replace, and click the arrow that appears to its right. A list of actions you can perform with the style appears. You can select or clear all instances of a particular style. 3. Click Select All <n> Instance(s). Then in the Styles list, click the new style you want to apply. 4. Repeat steps 3 and 4 for each style that needs to be replaced. To avoid the style-checking overhead, when you have finished replacing styles, you might want to repeat step 1 to clear the Keep Track Of Formatting check box. 422 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently Changing Default Program Options In earlier chapters, we mentioned that you can change settings in the Word Options dialog box to customize the Word environment in various ways. For example, we told you how to create AutoCorrect entries, how to adjust the save period for AutoRecover information, and how to recheck the spelling and grammar of a document. After you work with Word for a while, you might want to refine more settings to tailor the program to the way you work. Knowing which settings are where in the Word Options dialog box makes the customizing process more efficient. In this exercise, you’ll open the Word Options dialog box and explore several of the available pages. SET UP You don’t need any practice files to complete this exercise. With a blank document open and active, follow the steps. 1. On the Home tab, in the Font group, point to the Bold button. Word displays a ScreenTip that includes the button name, its keyboard shortcut, and a description of its purpose. See Also For information about keyboard shortcuts, see “Keyboard Shortcuts” at the end of this book. 2. Display the Backstage view, and click Options. The Word Options dialog box opens, displaying the General page. The General page of the Word Options dialog box. Changing Default Program Options 423 If having the Mini Toolbar appear when you select text is more of a hindrance than a help, you can disable that feature by clearing the Show Mini Toolbar On Selection check box. Similarly, you can disable the live preview of styles and formatting by clearing the Enable Live Preview check box. 3. Under User Interface options, display the Color scheme list, and click Black. 4. Display the ScreenTip style list, and click Don’t show feature descriptions in ScreenTips. 5. Under Personalize your copy of Microsoft Office, verify that the User name and Initials are correct, or change them to the way you want them to appear. 6. Click OK to close the Word Options dialog box. The program window elements are now black and shades of gray. 7. In the Font group, point to the Bold button. The ScreenTip now includes only the button name and its keyboard shortcut. 8. Open the Word Options dialog box, and in the left pane, click Display. On this page, you can adjust how documents look on the screen and when printed. The Display page of the Word Options dialog box. 424 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently 9. In the left pane, click Proofing. This page provides options for adjusting the AutoCorrect settings and for refining the spell-checking and grammar-checking processes. See Also For information about AutoCorrect and checking spelling, see “Correcting Spelling and Grammatical Errors” in Chapter 2, “Edit and Proofread Text.” The Proofing page of the Word Options dialog box. 10. Display the Save page. On this page, you can change the default document format; the AutoRecover file save rate and location; the default location to which Word saves files you create; and the default location for files you check out from document management servers (such as Microsoft SharePoint) and drafts of those files saved while you are working offline. Tip Although we mention SharePoint in “Co-Authoring Documents” in Chapter 15, “Collaborate on Documents,” a discussion of SharePoint is beyond the scope of this book. Changing Default Program Options 425 The Save page of the Word Options dialog box. The Save page also has options for specifying whether you want the fonts used within the current document to be embedded in the document, in the event that someone who opens the document doesn’t have those fonts on his or her computer. 11. Under Save documents, display the Save files in this format list. Notice the many formats in which you can save files. One of these is the Word 97-2003 Document format that creates .doc files compatible with earlier versions of Word. If you have upgraded to Word 2010 but your colleagues are still working in an earlier version of the program, you might want to select this option so that they will be able to view and work with any document you create. Tip If you want to save just one document in a format that is compatible with earlier versions of the program, you can click Word 97-2003 in the Save As Type list of the Save As dialog box. 426 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently 12. Click away from the list to close it, and then display the Language page. If you create documents for international audiences, you can make additional editing languages available on this page. You can also specify the Display, Help, and ScreenTip languages. The Language page of the Word Options dialog box. 13. Display the Advanced page. This page includes options related to editing document content; displaying documents on-screen; printing, saving, and sharing documents; and a variety of other options. Although these options are labeled Advanced, they are the ones you’re most likely to want to adjust to suit the way you work. Changing Default Program Options 427 The Advanced page of the Word Options dialog box. 14. Take a few minutes to explore all the options on this page. In the General area at the bottom of the page are two buttons: ❍ File Locations You click this button to change the default locations of various types of files associated with Word and its documents. ❍ Web Options You click this button to adjust settings for converting a document to a Web page. See Also For information about converting a Word document to a Web page, see “Creating and Modifying Web Documents” in Chapter 11, “Create Documents for Use Outside of Word.” 428 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently 15. Skipping over Customize Ribbon and Quick Access Toolbar, which we discuss in later topics in this chapter, click Add-Ins. This page displays all the active and inactive add-ins and enables you to add and remove them. The Add-Ins page of the Word Options dialog box. See Also For information about add-ins, see the sidebar “Using Add-ins” at the end of this topic. 16. Display the Trust Center page. This page provides links to information about privacy and security. It also provides access to the Trust Center settings that control the actions Word takes in response to documents that are provided by certain people or companies, that are saved in certain locations, or that contain ActiveX controls or macros. Changing Default Program Options 429 The Trust Center page of the Word Options dialog box. 17. Under Microsoft Word Trust Center, click Trust Center Settings, and then in the left pane of the Trust Center dialog box, click Trusted Locations. On this page, you can specify the locations from which Word will not block content. The Trusted Locations page of the Trust Center dialog box. 430 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently 18. Explore the other pages of the Trust Center dialog box, and then click Cancel to return to the Word Options dialog box. CLEAN UP Reverse any changes you don’t want to keep before moving on. Then close the Word Options dialog box. Using Add-ins Add-ins are utilities that add specialized functionality to a program (but aren’t fullfledged programs themselves). Word includes two primary types of add-ins: COM add-ins and Word add-ins. The first type uses the Component Object Model to create utilities that extend the functionality of Office programs. The second type includes templates that incorporate sophisticated functionality such as macros. There are several sources of add-ins: ● You can purchase add-ins from third-party vendors—for example, you can purchase an add-in that augments the ability to work with numbers in tables. ● You can download free add-ins from the Microsoft Web site or other Web sites. ● When installing a third-party program, you might install an add-in to allow it to interface with Microsoft Office 2010 programs. For example, you can install an add-in to capture screens from within an Office document. Important Be careful when downloading add-ins from Web sites other than those you trust. Add-ins are executable files that can easily be used to spread viruses and otherwise wreak havoc on your computer. For this reason, default settings in the Trust Center intervene when you attempt to download or run add-ins. To use some add-ins, you must first install them on your computer and then load them into your computer’s memory, as follows: 1. At the bottom of the Add-Ins page of the Word Options dialog box, display the Manage list, click either COM Add-ins or Word Add-ins, and then click Go. A dialog box corresponding to the type of add-in you selected opens. For example, if you select COM Add-ins in the Manage list, the COM Add-ins dialog box opens. Customizing the Ribbon 431 2. In the dialog box, click Add. 3. In the Add-In dialog box, navigate to the folder where the add-in you want to install is stored, and double-click its name. The new add-in appears in the list of those that are available for use. 4. In the list, select the check box of the new add-in, and then click OK. The add-in is now loaded and available for use in Word. To unload an add-in, open the Add-Ins dialog box and clear the add-in’s check box to remove the add-in from memory but keep its name in the list. To remove the add-in from the list entirely, click the add-in name, and then click Remove. Tip The Templates And Add-Ins dialog box that is displayed when you select Word Add-Ins and click Go includes pages that allow you to add XML schemas, expansion packs, and cascading style sheets. These topics are beyond the scope of this book. For information, search on XML or the particular type of Word add-in in Word Help. Customizing the Ribbon Even if Word 2010 is the first version of the program you have ever worked with, you will by now be accustomed to working with commands represented as buttons on the ribbon. The ribbon was designed to make all the commonly used commands visible, so that people could more easily discover the full potential of the program. But many people use Word to perform the same set of tasks all the time, and for them, the visibility of buttons (or even entire groups of buttons) that they never use is just another form of clutter. See Also For information about minimizing and expanding the ribbon, see “Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar” later in this chapter. Would you prefer to see fewer commands, not more? Or would you prefer to see more specialized groups of commands? Well, you can. Clicking Customize Ribbon in the left pane of the Word Options dialog box displays the Customize Ribbon page, which is new in Word 2010. 432 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently The Customize Ribbon page of the Word Options dialog box. On this page, you can customize the ribbon in the following ways: ● If you rarely use a tab, you can turn it off. ● If you use the commands in only a few groups on each tab, you can remove the groups you don't use. (The group is not removed from the program, just from its tab.) ● You can move a predefined group by removing it from one tab and then adding it to another. ● You can duplicate a predefined group by adding it to another tab. ● You can create a custom group on any tab and then add commands to it. (You cannot add commands to a predefined group.) ● For the ultimate in customization, you can create a custom tab. For example, you might want to do this if you use only a few commands from each tab and you find it inefficient to flip between them. Customizing the Ribbon 433 Don't be afraid to experiment with the ribbon to come up with the configuration that best suits the way you work. If at any point you find that your new ribbon is harder to work with rather than easier, you can always reset everything back to the default configuration. Tip If you have upgraded from Word 2003 or an earlier version, you might have identified a few commands that no longer seem to be available. A few old features have been abandoned, but others that people used only rarely have simply been pushed off to one side. If you sorely miss one of these sidelined features, you can make it a part of your Word environment by adding it to the ribbon. You can find a list of all the commands that do not appear on the ribbon but are still available in Word by displaying the Customize Ribbon page of the Word Options dialog box and then clicking Commands Not In The Ribbon in the Choose Commands From list. In this exercise, you’ll turn off tabs, remove groups, create a custom group, and add a command to the new group. Then you’ll create a tab and move predefined groups of buttons to it. Finally, you’ll reset the ribbon to its default state. SET UP You need the ProceduresEdited_start document located in your Chapter16 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the ProceduresEdited_start document, and save it as ProceduresEdited. Then follow the steps. 1. Open the Word Options dialog box, and then click Customize Ribbon. The Customize Ribbon page is displayed. 2. In the list on the right, clear the check boxes of the Insert, Page Layout, References, Mailings, and Review tabs. Then click OK . The ribbon now displays only the File, Home, and View tabs. You cannot turn off the File tab. 3. Redisplay the Customize Ribbon page of the Word Options dialog box, and in the right pane, select the Page Layout check box. Then click the plus sign to display the groups on this tab. 4. Above the left pane, display the Choose commands from list, and click Main Tabs. Then in the list below, click the plus sign adjacent to Page Layout to display the groups that are predefined for this tab. 434 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently 5. In the right list, click the Paragraph group, and then click Remove. The group is removed from the Page Layout tab on the ribbon (the list on the right), but is still available in the list on the left. You can add it back to the Page Layout tab, or add it to a different tab, at any time. 6. In the right pane, click the plus sign adjacent to Home to display its groups, and then click the word Home. 7. Below the right pane, click New Group. When the New Group (Custom) group is added to the bottom of the Home group list, click Rename, type Final in the Display name box, and click OK. Then click the Move Up button until the Final group is at the top of the list. Because of its location in the list, the new group will appear at the left end of the Home tab. You have created a custom group on the Home tab. 8. Above the list on the left, display the Choose commands from list, and click File Tab. The available commands list changes to include only the commands that are available in the Backstage view, which you display by clicking the File tab. 9. In the available commands list, click Inspect Document, and click Add. Then repeat this step to add Mark as Final. Customizing the Ribbon 435 The two commands are added to the custom group. You can add commands to a custom group, but not to a predefined group. 10. In the list on the right, remove the Font, Paragraph, and Styles groups from the Home tab, and remove the Page Background group from the Page Layout tab. 11. Click the word Home, and then below the list, click New Tab. A new tab is added to the right pane and is selected for display on the ribbon. It has automatically been given one custom group. 12. Click Remove to remove the custom group. 13. Click New Tab (Custom), then click Rename. In the Rename dialog box, type Formatting in the Display name box, and click OK. 14. Display Main Tabs in the list on the left, and then expand the Home and Page Layout tabs. 15. With the Formatting (Custom) tab selected in the right pane, add the Font, Paragraph, and Styles groups from Home in the left pane, and then add Page Background from Page Layout. The right pane shows the new configuration of the Home, Formatting, and Page Layout tabs. 436 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently You have moved groups from the Home and Page Layout tabs to a new Formatting tab. 16. In the Word Options dialog box, click OK. The Home tab displays the new Final group. The custom Home tab. 17. Click the Formatting tab. The formatting commands are now collected on the Formatting tab. The custom Formatting tab. 18. Display the Customize Ribbon page of the Word Options dialog box. In the lowerright corner, click Reset , and then click Reset all customizations. Then in the message box asking you to confirm that you want to delete all ribbon and Quick Access Toolbar customizations, click Yes. Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar 437 19. Click OK to close the Word Options dialog box. The default ribbon configuration is restored. CLEAN UP Close the ProceduresEdited document. Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar By default, the Save, Undo, and Redo buttons appear on the Quick Access Toolbar. If you regularly use a few buttons that are scattered on various tabs of the ribbon and you don’t want to switch between tabs to access the buttons or crowd your ribbon with a custom tab, you might want to add these frequently used buttons to the Quick Access Toolbar. They are then always visible in the upper-left corner of the program window. Clicking Quick Access Toolbar in the left pane of the Word Options dialog box displays the page where you specify which commands you want to appear on the toolbar. The Quick Access Toolbar page of the Word Options dialog box. 438 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently On this page, you can customize the Quick Access Toolbar in the following ways: ● You can define a custom Quick Access Toolbar for all documents, or you can define a custom Quick Access Toolbar for a specific document. ● You can add any command from any group of any tab, including contextual tabs, to the toolbar. ● You can display a separator between different types of buttons. ● You can move buttons around on the toolbar until they are in the order you want. ● You can reset everything back to the default Quick Access Toolbar configuration. If you never use more than a few buttons, you can add those buttons to the Quick Access Toolbar and then hide the ribbon by double-clicking the active tab or by clicking the Minimize The Ribbon button. Only the Quick Access Toolbar and tab names remain visible. You can temporarily redisplay the ribbon by clicking the tab you want to view. You can permanently redisplay the ribbon by double-clicking any tab or by clicking the Expand The Ribbon button. As you add buttons to the Quick Access Toolbar, it expands to accommodate them. If you add many buttons, it might become difficult to view the text in the title bar, or all the buttons on the Quick Access Toolbar might not be visible, defeating the purpose of adding them. To resolve this problem, you can move the Quick Access Toolbar below the ribbon by clicking the Customize Quick Access Toolbar button and then clicking Show Below The Ribbon. In this exercise, you’ll add a couple of buttons to the Quick Access Toolbar for all documents, and then you’ll test the buttons. SET UP You need the AgendaSH_start document located in your Chapter16 practice file folder to complete this exercise. Open the AgendaSH_start document, and save it as AgendaSH. Then follow the steps. 1. Open the Word Options dialog box, and then click Quick Access Toolbar. A list of available commands appears on the left, and a list of the commands currently displayed on the Quick Access Toolbar appears on the right. Tip If you want to create a Quick Access Toolbar that is specific to the active document, on the right side of the Word Options dialog box, click the arrow at the right end of the box below Customize Quick Access Toolbar, and then click For <name of document>. Then any command you select will be added to that specific toolbar instead of the toolbar for all documents. 2. At the top of the available commands list on the left, double-click Separator. Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar 439 3. Scroll down the available commands list, click the Quick Print command, and then click Add. 4. Repeat step 3 to add the Text Highlight Color command. The list of commands that will appear on the Quick Access Toolbar now includes the items you have added. The arrow to the right of the Text Highlight Color command indicates that clicking this button on the Quick Access Toolbar will display a menu of options. 5. Click OK to close the Word Options dialog box. The Quick Access Toolbar now includes the default Save, Undo, and Repeat buttons and the custom Quick Print and Text Highlight Color buttons, separated by a line. You have added two buttons to the Quick Access Toolbar. To print a document with the default settings, you no longer have to click the File tab to display the Backstage view, click Print in the left pane, and then click the Print button. 6. If you want to test printing from the Quick Access Toolbar, ensure that your printer is turned on, and then on the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Quick Print button. Now let’s see how easy it is to highlight or remove highlighting from text when you are working primarily with the commands on a tab other than the Home tab. 7. Click the Review tab. Then select the first highlighted paragraph, Proof of notice of meeting. 8. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Text Highlight Color arrow, and then click No Color. The yellow highlight is removed from the selection. The No Color option becomes the default for the Text Highlight Color button. 440 Chapter 16 Work in Word More Efficiently 9. Select the next highlighted paragraph, and on the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Text Highlight Color button. The yellow highlight is removed from the selection. 10. Display the Quick Access Toolbar page of the Word Options dialog box, click Reset, and then click Reset only Quick Access Toolbar. 11. In the Reset Customizations message box, click Yes to return the Quick Access Toolbar to its default contents. Then click OK to close the Word Options dialog box. CLEAN UP Save the AgendaSH document, and then close it. Key Points ● The Word environment is flexible and can be customized to meet your needs. ● You can create styles and templates to speed up the work of formatting a docu- ment. Styles and templates ensure that formatting is consistent within a document and between documents. ● Most of the settings that control the working environment are gathered on the pages of the Word Options dialog box. ● You can customize the ribbon to put precisely the document development tools you need at your fingertips. ● You can provide one-click access to any Word 2010 command by adding a button for it to the Quick Access Toolbar, either for all documents or for one document. Glossary aspect ratio The ratio of the width of an image to its height. attribute Individual items of character formatting, such as size or color, which determine how text looks. balloon In Print Layout view or Web Layout view, a box that shows comments and tracked changes in the margins of a document, making it easy to see and respond to them. bar chart A chart with bars that compares the quantities of two or more items. blog A frequently updated online journal or column. Blogs are often used to publish personal or company information in an informal way. Short for web log. building block Frequently used text saved in a gallery, from which it can be inserted quickly into a document. caption Descriptive text associated with a figure, photo, illustration, or screen shot. cell A box formed by the intersection of a row and column in a worksheet or a table, in which you enter information. cell address The location of a cell, expressed as its column letter and row number, as in A1. character formatting Formatting you can apply to selected text characters. character spacing The distance between characters in a line of text. Can be adjusted by pushing characters apart (expanding) or squeezing them together (condensing). character style A combination of any of the character formatting options identified by a style name. chart area A region in a chart object that is used to position chart elements, render axes, and plot data. chevron A small control or button that indicates that there are more items than can be displayed in the allotted space. You click the chevron to see the additional items. Also the « and » characters that surround each merge field in a main document; also known as guillemet characters. Click and Type A feature that allows you to doubleclick a blank area of a document to position the cursor in that location, with the appropriate paragraph alignment already in place. Clipboard A storage area shared by all Office programs where cut or copied items are stored. column Either the vertical arrangement of text into one or more side-by-side sections or the vertical arrangement of cells in a table. column break A break inserted in the text of a column to force the text below it to move to the next column. column chart A chart that displays data in vertical bars to facilitate data comparison. column header In an Excel worksheet, a shaded rectangular area at the top of each column containing a letter. You can click a column header to select an entire column. See also row header. comment A note or annotation that an author or reviewer adds to a document. Word displays the comment in a balloon in the margin of the document or in the Reviewing pane. cross-reference entry An entry in an index that refers readers to a related entry. cursor A representation on the screen of the mouse pointer location. 441 442 Glossary cycle diagram A diagram that shows a continuous process. Draft view A document view that displays the content of a document with a simplified layout. data marker A customizable symbol or shape that identifies a data point on a chart. A data marker can be formatted with various sizes and colors. drag-and-drop editing A way of moving or copying selected text by dragging it with the mouse pointer. data point An individual value plotted in a chart and represented together with other data points by bars, columns, lines, pie or doughnut slices, dots, and various other shapes referred to as data markers. data series Related data points that are plotted in a chart. One or more data series in a chart can be plotted. A pie chart has just one data series. data source A file containing variable information, such as names and addresses, that is merged with a main document containing static information. demoting In an outline, changing a heading to body text or to a lower heading level; for example, changing from Heading 5 to Heading 6. See also promoting. desktop publishing A process that creates pages by combining text and objects, such as tables and graphics, in a visually appealing way. destination file The file that a linked or embedded object is inserted into. The source file contains the information that is used to create the object. When you change information in a destination file, the information is not updated in the source file. diagram A graphic in which shapes, text, and pictures are used to illustrate a process, cycle, or relationship. dialog box launcher On the ribbon, a button at the bottom of some groups that opens a dialog box with features related to the group. digital signature Data that binds a sender’s identity to the information being sent. A digital signature may be bundled with any message, file, or other digitally encoded information, or transmitted separately. Digital signatures are used in public key environments and provide authentication and integrity services. dragging A way of moving objects by pointing to them, holding down the mouse button, moving the mouse pointer to the desired location, and releasing the button. drawing object Any graphic you draw or insert, which can be changed and enhanced. Drawing objects include AutoShapes, curves, lines, and WordArt. drop cap An enlarged, decorative capital letter that appears at the beginning of a paragraph. embedded object An object created with one program and embedded into a document created by another program. Embedding the object, rather than simply inserting or pasting it, ensures that the object retains its original format. If you double-click the embedded object, you can edit it with the toolbars and menus from the program used to create it. endnote A note that appears at the end of a section or document and that is referenced by text in the main body of the document. An endnote consists of two linked parts, a reference mark within the main body of text and the corresponding text of the note. See also footnote. Extensible Markup Language (XML) A format for delivering rich, structured data in a standard, consistent way. XML tags describe the content of a document, whereas HTML tags describe how the document looks. XML is extensible because it allows designers to create their own customized tags. field A placeholder that tells Word to supply the specified information in the specified way. Also, the set of information of a specific type in a data source, such as all the last names in a contacts list. Glossary field name A first-row cell in a data source that identifies data in the column below. file format The structure or organization of data in a file. The file format of a document is usually indicated by the file name extension. 443 Full Screen Reading view A document view that displays a document as it would appear on a printed page. The view is optimized for reading documents on a computer screen and was previously referred to as Reading Layout view. filtering Displaying files or records in a data source that meet certain criteria; for example, filtering a data source so that you see only the records for people who live in a particular state. Filtering does not delete files, it simply changes the view so that you see only the files that meet your criteria. gallery A grouping of thumbnails that display options visually. font A graphic design applied to a collection of numbers, symbols, and characters. A font describes a certain typeface, along with other qualities such as size, spacing, and pitch. gridlines In a table, thin lines that indicate the cell boundaries in a table. Table gridlines do not print when you print a document. In a chart, lines that visually carry the values on the y-axis across the plot area. font effect An attribute, such as superscript, small capital letters, or shadow, that can be applied to a font. font size The height (in points) of a collection of characters, where one point is equal to approximately 1/72 of an inch. font style The emphasis placed on a font by using formatting such as bold, italic, underline, or color. footer One or more lines of text in the bottom margin area of a page in a document, typically containing elements such as the page number and the name of the file. See also header. footnote A note that appears at the end of a page, section, chapter, or publication that explains, comments on, or provides references for text in the main body of a document. A footnote consists of two linked parts, a reference mark within the main body of the document and the corresponding text of the note. See also endnote. formatting See character formatting and paragraph formatting. formula A sequence of values, cell references, names, functions, or operators in a cell of a table or worksheet that together produce a new value. A formula always begins with an equal sign (=). graphic Any piece of art used to illustrate or convey information or to add visual interest to a document. grayscale The spectrum (range) of shades of black in an image. group On a ribbon tab, an area containing buttons related to a specific document element or function. grouping A ssembling several objects, such as shapes, into a single unit so that they act as one object. Grouped objects can easily be moved, sized, and formatted. header A line, or lines, of content in the top margin area of a page in a document, typically containing elements such as the title, page number, or name of the author. hierarchy diagram A diagram that illustrates the structure of an organization or entity. Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) An application of the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) that uses tags to mark elements in a document to indicate how Web browsers should display these elements to the user and should respond to user actions. hyphenating Splitting a word that would otherwise extend beyond the right margin of the page. indent marker A marker on the horizontal ruler that controls the indentation of text from the left or right margin of a document. 444 Glossary index A list of the words and phrases that are discussed in a printed document, along with the page numbers they appear on. index entry A field code that marks specific text for inclusion in an index. When you mark text as an index entry, Word inserts an XE (Index Entry) field formatted as hidden text. main document In a mail merge operation in Word, the document that contains the text and graphics that are the same for each version of the merged document. manual page break A page break inserted to force subsequent information to appear on the next page. index entry field The XE field, including the braces ( { } ), that defines an index entry. margin The blank space outside the printing area on a page. justifying Making all lines of text in a paragraph or column fit the width of the document or column, with even margins on each side. matrix diagram A diagram that shows the relationship of components to a whole. keyboard shortcut Any combination of keystrokes that can be used to perform a task that would otherwise require a mouse or other pointing device. landscape The orientation of a picture or page where the width is greater than the height. merge field A placeholder inserted in the main document that is replaced with variable information from a data source during the merge process. Microsoft Office Clipboard See Clipboard. legend A key in a chart that identifies the colors and names of the data series or categories that are used in the chart. Navigation task pane A task pane that displays an outline of a document’s headings, or thumbnails of a document’s pages, and allows you to jump to a heading or page in the document by clicking it. Also provides content search capabilities. line break A manual break that forces the text that follows it to the next line. Also called a text wrapping break. nested table A table inserted into a cell of a table that is being used to arrange information on a page. line graph or line chart A t ype of chart in which data points in a series are connected by a line. note separator A set of characters that separates document text from footnotes or endnotes. The default separator is a horizontal line. linked object An object that is inserted into a document but still exists in the source file. When information is linked, the document is updated automatically if the information in the original document changes. list diagram A diagram in which lists of related or independent information are visually represented. Live Preview A feature that temporarily displays the effect of applying a specific format to the selected document element. mail merge The process of merging information into a main document from a data source, such as an address book or database, to create customized documents, such as form letters or mailing labels. object An item, such as a graphic, video clip, sound file, or worksheet, that can be inserted into a document and then selected and modified. orientation The direction—horizontal or vertical— in which a page is laid out. orphan The first line of a paragraph printed by itself at the bottom of a page. Outline view A view that shows the headings of a document indented to represent their level in the document’s structure. You can also use outline view to work with master documents. paragraph In word processing, a block of text of any length that ends when you press the Enter key. Glossary paragraph formatting Formatting that controls the appearance of a paragraph. Examples include indentation, alignment, line spacing, and pagination. paragraph style A combination of character formatting and paragraph formatting that is named and stored as a set. Applying the style to a paragraph applies all the formatting characteristics at one time. path A sequence of folders (directories) that leads to a specific file or folder. A backslash is used to separate each folder in the path. For example, the path to a file called invoice.txt might be C:\Documents\July\invoice.txt. picture A photograph, clip art image, illustration or another type of image created with a program other than Word. picture diagram A diagram that uses pictures to convey information, rather than or in addition to text. pie chart A round chart that shows the size of items in a single data series, proportional to the sum of the items. plot area In a two-dimensional chart, the area bounded by the axes, including all data series. In a three-dimensional chart, the area bounded by the axes, including the data series, category names, tick-mark labels, and axis titles. point The unit of measure for expressing the size of characters in a font, where 72 points equals 1 inch. pointing to Pausing a pointing device over an area of the display. portrait The orientation of a picture or page where the page is taller than it is wide. post A message published on a blog, message board, or help board. Print Layout view A view of a document as it will appear when printed; for example, items such as headers, footnotes, columns, and text boxes appear in their actual positions. 445 process diagram A diagram that visually represents the ordered set of steps required to complete a task. promoting In an outline, to change body text to a heading, or to change a heading to a higherlevel heading. pull quote Text taken from the body of a document and showcased in a text box to create visual interest. pyramid diagram A diagram that shows foundation-based relationships. query Selection criteria for extracting information from a data source for use in the mail merge process. Quick Access Toolbar A small, customizable toolbar that displays frequently used commands. Quick Style A collection of character and paragraph formatting that makes formatting documents and objects easier. Quick Styles appear in the Quick Styles gallery and are organized into ready-made Quick Style sets that are designed to work together to create an attractive and professional-looking document. Quick Table A table with sample data that you can customize. read-only A setting that allows a file to be read or copied, but not changed or saved. If you change a read-only file, you can save your changes only if you give the document a new name. record A collection of data about a person, a place, an event, or some other item. Records are the logical equivalents of rows in a table. reference mark The number or symbol displayed in the body of document when you insert a footnote or endnote. relationship diagram A diagram that shows convergent, divergent, overlapping, merging, or containment elements. revision A change in a document. 446 Glossary ribbon A user interface design that organizes commands into logical groups, which appear on separate tabs. row header In an Excel worksheet, a shaded rectangular area to the left of each row containing a number. You can click a row header to select an entire row. See also column header. saturation In color management, the purity of a color’s hue, moving from gray to the pure color. ScreenTip A note that appears on the screen to provide information about a button, tracked change, or comment, or to display a footnote or endnote. ScreenTips also display the text that will appear if you choose to insert a date or AutoText entry. section break A mark you insert to show the end of a section. A section break stores the section formatting elements, such as the margins, page orientation, headers and footers, and sequence of page numbers. selecting Highlighting text or activating an object so that you can manipulate or edit it in some way. selection area An area in a document’s left margin in which you can click and drag to select blocks of text. sizing handle A small circle, square, or set of dots that appears at the corner or on the side of a selected object. You drag these handles to change the size of the object horizontally, vertically, or proportionally. SmartArt graphic A predefined set of shapes and text used as a basis for creating a diagram. soft page break A page break that Word inserts when the text reaches the bottom margin of a page. source file A file containing an object that is inserted in a destination file. stack A set of graphics that overlap each other. status bar A row of information related to the current program. The status bar is usually located at the bottom of a window. Not all windows have a status bar. subentry An index entry that falls under a more general heading; for example, “Mars” and “Venus” might be subentries of the index entry “planets.” switch In fields, a setting that refines the results of the field; for example, by formatting it in a particular way. tab A tabbed page on the ribbon that contains buttons organized in groups. tab leader A repeating character (usually a dot or dash) that separates text before the tab from text or a number after it. tab stop A location on the horizontal ruler that indicates how far to indent text or where to begin a column of text. tabbed list A list that arranges text in simple columns separated by left, right, centered, or decimal tab stops. table of authorities A list of the references in a legal document, such as references to cases, statutes, and rules, along with the numbers of the pages the references appear on. table of contents A list of the headings in a document, along with the numbers of the pages the headings appear on. table of figures A list of the captions for pictures, charts, graphs, slides, or other illustrations in a document, along with the numbers of the pages the captions appear on. table style A set of formatting options, such as font, border style, and row banding, that are applied to a table. The regions of a table, such as the header row, header column, and data area, can be variously formatted. tag A text string used in HTML and XML to identify a page element’s type, format, or appearance. Many elements have start and end tags that define where the element starts and stops. Glossary target A path that identifies a linked object, such as a location in a document or a Web page. template A file that can contain predefined formatting, layout, text, or graphics, and that serves as the basis for new documents with a similar design or purpose. text box A movable, resizable container used to give text a different orientation from other text in the document. text wrapping The way text wraps around an object on the page. text wrapping break A manual break that forces the text that follows it to the next line. Also known as a line break. theme A set of unified design elements that combine color, fonts, and graphics to provide a professional look for a document. thumbnail A small representation of an item, such as an image, a page of content, or a set of formatting, obtained by scaling a snapshot of it. Thumbnails are typically used to provide visual identifiers for related items. tick-mark A small line of measurement, similar to a division line on a ruler, that intersects an axis in a chart. View Shortcuts toolbar A toolbar located at the right end of the status bar that contains tools for switching between views of document content and changes the display magnification. Web Layout view A view of a document as it will appear in a Web browser. In this view, a document appears as one long page (without page breaks), and text and tables wrap to fit the window. 447 Web page A World Wide Web document. A Web page typically consists of a Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) file, with associated files for graphics and scripts, in a particular folder on a particular computer. It is identified by a Uniform Resource Locator (URL). widow The last line of a paragraph printed by itself at the top of a page. wildcard character A keyboard character that can be used to represent one or many characters when conducting a search. The question mark (?) represents a single character, and the asterisk (*) represents one or more characters. Word Help button The button located at the right end of the ribbon and labeled with a question mark (?), that provides access to the Word Help system. word processing The writing, editing, and formatting of documents in a program designed for working primarily with text. word wrap The process of breaking lines of text automatically to stay within the page margins of a document or window boundaries. WordArt object A text object you create with ready-made effects to which you can apply additional formatting options. x-axis Also called a category axis, the axis for grouping data in a chart, usually the horizontal axis. y-axis Also called a value axis, the axis for plotting values in a chart, usually the vertical axis. z-axis Also called a series axis, the optical axis that is perpendicular to the x-axis and y-axis, usually the “floor.” Keyboard Shortcuts This section presents a comprehensive list of all the keyboard shortcuts built into Microsoft Word 2010. The list has been excerpted from Word Help and formatted in tables for convenient lookup. Some of these shortcuts might not be available for your edition of Word 2010 or for your keyboard layout. Creating Custom Keyboard Shortcuts If a command you use frequently doesn’t have a built-in keyboard shortcut, you can create one from the Customize Ribbon page of the Word Options dialog box. To create a keyboard shortcut: 1. Click the File tab to display the Backstage view, and then in the left pane, click Options. 2. In the left pane of the Word Options dialog box, click Customize Ribbon. 3. To the right of Keyboard Shortcuts at the bottom of the dialog box, click Customize. The Customize Keyboard dialog box opens. 449 450 Keyboard Shortcuts The ribbon tabs are listed in the Categories box on the left, and the commands in the selected category are listed in the Commands box on the right. 4. In the Categories list, click Home Tab, and then in the Commands list, click Bold. In the Current Keys box, Word displays the keyboard shortcuts already assigned to the Bold command. 5. Scroll down the Commands list, and click DecreaseIndent. This command has no built-in keyboard shortcut. 6. Click in the Press New Shortcut Key box, and then press Ctrl+D. Under the Current Keys box, Word tells you that this keyboard shortcut is already assigned to the FormatFont command. 7. Press the Backspace key (not Delete) to clear the Press New Shortcut Key box, and then press Alt+D. Under the Current Keys box, Word tells you that this keyboard shortcut is currently unassigned (unless you have already assigned it to a different command). 8. If you want to assign this keyboard shortcut to the current document, not all documents based on the current template, display the Save Changes In list, and click the document name. 9. Click Assign. Keyboard Shortcuts 451 10. Assign the keyboard combination Alt+I to the IncreaseIndent command. 11. Close the Customize Keyboard dialog box, and click OK in the Word Options dialog box. Tip To delete an existing keyboard shortcut to make it available for reassignment, select it in the Current Keys box, and then at the bottom of the dialog box, click Remove. Keyboard Shortcut Lists from Word Help In the following lists, keys you press at the same time are separated by a plus sign (+), and keys you press sequentially are separated by a comma (,). Microsoft Office General Tasks Display and Use Windows Action Keyboard shortcut Switch to the next window. Alt+Tab Switch to the previous window. Alt+Shift+Tab Close the active window. Ctrl+W or Ctrl+F4 Restore the size of the active window after you maximize it. Alt+F5 Move to a task pane from another pane in the program window F6 (clockwise direction). (You might need to press F6 more than once.) Move to a task pane from another pane in the program window (counterclockwise direction). Shift+F6 When more than one window is open, switch to the next window. Ctrl+F6 Switch to the previous window. Ctrl+Shift+F6 Maximize or restore a selected window. Ctrl+F10 Copy a picture of the screen to the Microsoft Office Clipboard. Print Screen Copy a picture of the selected window to the Clipboard. Alt+Print Screen Use Dialog Boxes Action Keyboard shortcut Move to the next option or option group. Tab Move to the previous option or option group. Shift+Tab Switch to the next tab in a dialog box. Ctrl+Tab Switch to the previous tab in a dialog box. Ctrl+Shift+Tab (continued) 452 Keyboard Shortcuts Action Keyboard shortcut Move between options in an open drop-down list, or between options in a group of options. Arrow keys Perform the action assigned to the selected button; select or clear the selected check box. Spacebar Select an option; select or clear a check box. Alt+ the letter underlined in an option Open a selected drop-down list. Alt+Down Arrow Select an option from a drop-down list. First letter of an option in a drop-down list Close a selected drop-down list; cancel a command and close a dialog box. Esc Run the selected command. Enter Use Edit Boxes Within Dialog Boxes Action Keyboard shortcut Move to the beginning of the entry. Home Move to the end of the entry. End Move one character to the left or right. Left Arrow or Right Arrow Move one word to the left. Ctrl+Left Arrow Move one word to the right. Ctrl+Right Arrow Select or unselect one character to the left. Shift+Left Arrow Select or unselect one character to the right. Shift+Right Arrow Select or unselect one word to the left. Ctrl+Shift+Left Arrow Select or unselect one word to the right. Ctrl+Shift+Right Arrow Select from the insertion point to the beginning of the entry. Shift+Home Select from the insertion point to the end of the entry. Shift+End Use the Open and Save As Dialog Boxes Action Keyboard shortcut Display the Open dialog box. Ctrl+F12 or Ctrl+O Display the Save As dialog box. F12 Open the selected folder or file. Enter Open the folder one level above the selected folder. Backspace Keyboard Shortcuts Action Keyboard shortcut Delete the selected folder or file. Delete Display a shortcut menu for a selected item such as a folder or file. Shift+F10 Move forward through options. Tab Move back through options. Shift+Tab Open the Look In list. F4 or Alt+I Undo and Redo Actions Action Keyboard shortcut Cancel an action. Esc Undo an action. Ctrl+Z Redo or repeat an action. Ctrl+Y Access and Use Task Panes and Galleries Action Keyboard shortcut Move to a task pane from another pane in the program window. (You might need to press F6 more than once.) F6 When a menu is active, move to a task pane. (You might need to press Ctrl+Tab more than once.) Ctrl+Tab When a task pane is active, select the next or previous option in the task pane. Tab or Shift+Tab Display the full set of commands on the task pane menu. Ctrl+Spacebar Perform the action assigned to the selected button. Spacebar or Enter Open a drop-down menu for the selected gallery item. Shift+F10 Select the first or last item in a gallery. Home or End Scroll up or down in the selected gallery list. Page Up or Page Down Close a Task Pane 1. Press F6 to move to the task pane, if necessary. 2. Press Ctrl+Spacebar. 3. Use the Arrow keys to select Close, and then press Enter. 453 454 Keyboard Shortcuts Move a Task Pane 1. Press F6 to move to the task pane, if necessary. 2. Press Ctrl+Spacebar. 3. Use the Arrow keys to select Move, and then press Enter. 4. Use the Arrow keys to move the task pane, and then press Enter. Resize a Task Pane 1. Press F6 to move to the task pane, if necessary. 2. Press Ctrl+Spacebar. 3. Use the Arrow keys to select Size, and then press Enter. 4. Use the Arrow keys to resize the task pane, and then press Enter. Access and Use Available Actions Action Keyboard shortcut Display the shortcut menu for the selected item. Shift+F10 Display the menu or message for an available action or for the AutoCorrect Options button or the Paste options button. If more than one action is present, switch to the next action and display its menu or message. Alt+Shift+F10 Move between options in a menu of available actions. Arrow keys Perform the action for the selected item on a menu of available actions. Enter Close the available actions menu or message. Esc Ribbon Tasks Access Any Command with a Few Keystrokes 1. Press Alt. The KeyTips are displayed over each feature that is available in the current view. 2. Press the letter shown in the KeyTip over the feature that you want to use. 3. Depending on which letter you press, you may be shown additional KeyTips. For example, if the Home tab is active and you press N, the Insert tab is displayed, along with the KeyTips for the groups on that tab. Keyboard Shortcuts 455 4. Continue pressing letters until you press the letter of the command or control that you want to use. In some cases, you must first press the letter of the group that contains the command. Tip To cancel the action and hide the KeyTips, press Alt. Change the Keyboard Focus Without Using the Mouse Action Keyboard shortcut Select the active tab of the ribbon and activate the access keys. Alt or F10. Press either of these keys again to move back to the document and cancel the access keys. Move to another tab of the ribbon. F10 to select the active tab, and then Left Arrow or Right Arrow Expand or collapse the ribbon. Ctrl+F1 Display the shortcut menu for the selected item. Shift+F10 Move the focus to select each of the following areas of the window: ● Active tab of the ribbon ● Any open task panes ● Status bar at the bottom of the window ● Your document F6 Move the focus to each command on the ribbon, forward or backward, respectively. Tab or Shift+Tab Move down, up, left, or right, respectively, among the items on the ribbon. Down Arrow, Up Arrow, Left Arrow, or Right Arrow Activate the selected command or control on the ribbon. Spacebar or Enter Open the selected menu or gallery on the ribbon. Spacebar or Enter Activate a command or control on the ribbon so that you can modify a value. Enter Finish modifying a value in a control on the ribbon, and move focus back to the document. Enter Get help on the selected command or control on the ribbon. (If no Help topic is associated with the selected command, a general Help topic about the program is shown instead.) F1 456 Keyboard Shortcuts Microsoft Word Tasks Common Tasks Action Keyboard shortcut Create a nonbreaking space. Ctrl+Shift+Spacebar Create a nonbreaking hyphen. Ctrl+Shift+Hyphen Make letters bold. Ctrl+B Make letters italic. Ctrl+I Make letters underlined. Ctrl+U Decrease font size one value. Ctrl+Shift+< Increase font size one value. Ctrl+Shift+> Decrease font size 1 point. Ctrl+[ Increase font size 1 point. Ctrl+] Remove paragraph or character formatting. Ctrl+Spacebar Copy the selected text or object. Ctrl+C Cut the selected text or object. Ctrl+X Paste text or an object. Ctrl+V Refine paste action (Paste Special). Ctrl+Alt+V Paste formatting only. Ctrl+Shift+V Undo the last action. Ctrl+Z Redo the last action. Ctrl+Y Open the Word Count dialog box. Ctrl+Shift+G Work with Documents and Web Pages Create, View, and Save Documents Action Keyboard shortcut Create a new document. Ctrl+N Open a document. Ctrl+O Close a document. Ctrl+W Split the document window. Alt+Ctrl+S Remove the document window split. Alt+Shift+C or Alt+Ctrl+S Save a document. Ctrl+S Keyboard Shortcuts 457 Find, Replace, and Browse Through Text Action Keyboard shortcut Open the Navigation task pane (to search the document). Ctrl+F Repeat a Find action (after closing the Find And Replace dialog box). Alt+Ctrl+Y Replace text, specific formatting, and special items. Ctrl+H Go to a page, bookmark, footnote, table, comment, graphic, or other location. Ctrl+G Switch between the last four places that you have edited. Alt+Ctrl+Z Open a list of browse options. Press the Arrow keys to select an option, and then press Enter to browse through a document by using the selected option. Alt+Ctrl+Home Move to the previous browse object (set in browse options). Ctrl+Page Up Move to the next browse object (set in browse options). Ctrl+Page Down Switch to Another View Action Keyboard shortcut Switch to Print Layout view. Alt+Ctrl+P Switch to Outline view. Alt+Ctrl+O Switch to Draft view. Alt+Ctrl+N Work in Outline View Action Keyboard shortcut Promote a paragraph. Alt+Shift+Left Arrow Demote a paragraph. Alt+Shift+Right Arrow Demote to body text. Ctrl+Shift+N Move selected paragraphs up. Alt+Shift+Up Arrow Move selected paragraphs down. Alt+Shift+Down Arrow Expand text under a heading. Alt+Shift+Plus sign Collapse text under a heading. Alt+Shift+Minus sign Expand or collapse all text or headings. Alt+Shift+A Hide or display character formatting. The slash (/) key on the numeric keypad Show the first line of body text or all body text. Alt+Shift+L Show all headings with the Heading 1 style. Alt+Shift+1 Show all headings up to the Heading 9 style. Alt+Shift+9 Insert a tab character. Ctrl+Tab 458 Keyboard Shortcuts Print and Preview Documents Action Keyboard shortcut Print a document. Ctrl+P Display the Print page of the Backstage view. Alt+Ctrl+I Move around the preview page when zoomed in. Arrow keys Move by one preview page when zoomed out. Page Up or Page Down Move to the first preview page when zoomed out. Ctrl+Home Move to the last preview page when zoomed out. Ctrl+End Review Documents Action Keyboard shortcut Insert a comment. Alt+Ctrl+M Turn change tracking on or off. Ctrl+Shift+E Close the Reviewing pane if it is open. Alt+Shift+C Work in Full Screen Reading View Action Keyboard shortcut Go to the beginning of the document. Home Go to the end of the document. End Go to page <n>. <n>, Enter Exit reading layout view. Esc Work with References, Footnotes, and Endnotes Action Keyboard shortcut Mark a table of contents entry. Alt+Shift+O Mark a table of authorities entry (citation). Alt+Shift+I Mark an index entry. Alt+Shift+X Insert a footnote. Alt+Ctrl+F Insert an endnote. Alt+Ctrl+D Keyboard Shortcuts 459 Work with Web Pages Action Keyboard shortcut Insert a hyperlink. Ctrl+K Go back one page. Alt+Left Arrow Go forward one page. Alt+Right Arrow Refresh. F9 Edit and Move Text and Graphics Delete Text and Graphics Action Keyboard shortcut Delete one character to the left. Backspace Delete one word to the left. Ctrl+Backspace Delete one character to the right. Delete Delete one word to the right. Ctrl+Delete Cut selected text to the Clipboard. Ctrl+X Undo the last action. Ctrl+Z Copy and Move Text and Graphics Action Keyboard shortcut Open the Clipboard. Press Alt+H to move to the Home tab, and then press F,O. Copy selected text or graphics to the Clipboard. Ctrl+C Cut selected text or graphics to the Clipboard. Ctrl+X Paste the most recent addition or pasted item from the Clipboard. Ctrl+V Move text or graphics once. F2 (then move the cursor and press Enter) Copy text or graphics once. Shift+F2 (then move the cursor and press Enter) When text or an object is selected, open the Create New Building Block dialog box. Alt+F3 When a building block—for example, a SmartArt graphic—is selected, display the shortcut menu that is associated with it. Shift+F10 Copy the header or footer used in the previous section of the Alt+Shift+R document. 460 Keyboard Shortcuts Insert Special Characters Action Keyboard shortcut A field Ctrl+F9 A line break Shift+Enter A page break Ctrl+Enter A column break Ctrl+Shift+Enter An em dash Alt+Ctrl+Minus sign An en dash Ctrl+Minus sign An optional hyphen Ctrl+Hyphen A nonbreaking hyphen Ctrl+Shift+Hyphen A nonbreaking space Ctrl+Shift+Spacebar The copyright symbol Alt+Ctrl+C The registered trademark symbol Alt+Ctrl+R The trademark symbol Alt+Ctrl+T An ellipsis Alt+Ctrl+Period A single opening quotation mark Ctrl+` (single quotation mark), ` (single quotation mark) A single closing quotation mark Ctrl+’ (single quotation mark), ‘ (single quotation mark) Double opening quotation marks Ctrl+` (single quotation mark), Shift+’ (single quotation mark) Double closing quotation marks Ctrl+’ (single quotation mark), Shift+’ (single quotation mark) An AutoText entry Enter (after you type the first few characters of the AutoText entry name and when the ScreenTip appears) Insert Characters by Using Character Codes Action Keyboard shortcut Insert the Unicode character for the specified Unicode (hexadecimal) character code. For example, to insert the euro currency symbol (€), type 20AC, and then hold down Alt and press X. <Unicode>, Alt+X Find out the Unicode character code for the selected character. Alt+X Insert the ANSI character for the specified ANSI (decimal) character code. For example, to insert the euro currency symbol, hold down Alt and press 0128 on the numeric keypad. Alt+ <ANSI code> (on the numeric keypad) Keyboard Shortcuts 461 Select Text and Graphics Action Keyboard shortcut Select text and graphics. Hold down Shift and use the Arrow keys to move the cursor Extend a Selection Action Keyboard shortcut Turn extend mode on. F8 Select the nearest character. F8, and then press Left Arrow or Right Arrow Increase the size of a selection. F8 (press once to select a word, twice to select a sentence, and so on) Reduce the size of a selection. Shift+F8 Turn extend mode off. Esc Extend a selection one character to the right. Shift+Right Arrow Extend a selection one character to the left. Shift+Left Arrow Extend a selection to the end of a word. Ctrl+Shift+Right Arrow Extend a selection to the beginning of a word. Ctrl+Shift+Left Arrow Extend a selection to the end of a line. Shift+End Extend a selection to the beginning of a line. Shift+Home Extend a selection one line down. Shift+Down Arrow Extend a selection one line up. Shift+Up Arrow Extend a selection to the end of a paragraph. Ctrl+Shift+Down Arrow Extend a selection to the beginning of a paragraph. Ctrl+Shift+Up Arrow Extend a selection one screen down. Shift+Page Down Extend a selection one screen up. Shift+Page Up Extend a selection to the beginning of a document. Ctrl+Shift+Home Extend a selection to the end of a document. Ctrl+Shift+End Extend a selection to the end of a window. Alt+Ctrl+Shift+Page Down Extend a selection to include the entire document. Ctrl+A Select a vertical block of text. Ctrl+Shift+F8, and then use the Arrow keys; press Esc to cancel selection mode Extend a selection to a specific location in a document. F8+Arrow keys; press Esc to cancel selection mode 462 Keyboard Shortcuts Select Text and Graphics in a Table Action Keyboard shortcut Select the preceding cell’s contents. Shift+Tab Extend a selection to adjacent cells. Hold down Shift and press an Arrow key repeatedly Select a column. Use the Arrow keys to move to the column’s top or bottom cell, and then do one of the following: ● Press Shift+Alt+Page Down to select the column from top to bottom. ● Press Shift+Alt+Page Up to select the column from bottom to top. Extend a selection (or block). Ctrl+Shift+F8, and then use the Arrow keys; press Esc to cancel selection mode Select an entire table. Alt+5 on the numeric keypad (with Num Lock off) Select the next cell’s contents. Tab Move Through Documents Action Keyboard shortcut One character to the left Left Arrow One character to the right Right Arrow One word to the left Ctrl+Left Arrow One word to the right Ctrl+Right Arrow One paragraph up Ctrl+Up Arrow One paragraph down Ctrl+Down Arrow One cell to the left (in a table) Shift+Tab One cell to the right (in a table) Tab Up one line Up Arrow Down one line Down Arrow To the end of a line End To the beginning of a line Home To the top of the window Alt+Ctrl+Page Up To the end of the window Alt+Ctrl+Page Down Up one screen (scrolling) Page Up Down one screen (scrolling) Page Down To the top of the next page Ctrl+Page Down To the top of the previous page Ctrl+Page Up Keyboard Shortcuts Action Keyboard shortcut To the end of a document Ctrl+End To the beginning of a document Ctrl+Home To a previous revision Shift+F5 After opening a document, to the location you were working in when the document was last closed 463 Shift+F5 Move Around in Tables Action Keyboard shortcut To the next cell in a row Tab To the previous cell in a row Shift+Tab To the first cell in a row Alt+Home To the last cell in a row Alt+End To the first cell in a column Alt+Page Up To the last cell in a column Alt+Page Down To the previous row Up Arrow To the next row Down Arrow Row up Alt+Shift+Up Arrow Row down Alt+Shift+Down Arrow Insert Paragraphs and Tab Characters in Tables Action Keyboard shortcut New paragraphs in a cell Enter Tab characters in a cell Ctrl+Tab Use Overtype Mode To change the overtype settings so that you can access overtype mode by pressing Insert, do the following: 1. Press Alt+F, T to open the Word Options dialog box. 2. Press A to display the Advanced page, and then press Tab. 3. Press Alt+O to move to the Use The Insert Key To Control Overtype Mode check box. 4. Press the Spacebar to select the check box, and then press Enter. To turn Overtype mode on or off, press Insert. 464 Keyboard Shortcuts Character and Paragraph Formatting Copy Formatting Action Keyboard shortcut Copy formatting from text. Ctrl+Shift+C Apply copied formatting to text. Ctrl+Shift+V Change or Resize the Font Action Keyboard shortcut Open the Font dialog box to change the font. Ctrl+Shift+F Increase the font size. Ctrl+Shift+> Decrease the font size. Ctrl+Shift+< Increase the font size by 1 point. Ctrl+] Decrease the font size by 1 point. Ctrl+[ Apply Character Formats Action Keyboard shortcut Open the Font dialog box to change the formatting of characters. Ctrl+D Change the case of letters. Shift+F3 Format all letters as capitals. Ctrl+Shift+A Apply bold formatting. Ctrl+B Apply an underline. Ctrl+U Underline words but not spaces. Ctrl+Shift+W Double-underline text. Ctrl+Shift+D Apply hidden text formatting. Ctrl+Shift+H Apply italic formatting. Ctrl+I Format letters as small capitals. Ctrl+Shift+K Apply subscript formatting (automatic spacing). Ctrl+Equal sign Apply superscript formatting (automatic spacing). Ctrl+Shift+Plus sign Remove manual character formatting. Ctrl+Spacebar Change the selection to the Symbol font. Ctrl+Shift+Q Keyboard Shortcuts 465 View and Copy Text Formats Action Keyboard shortcut Display nonprinting characters. Ctrl+Shift+* (asterisk on numeric keypad does not work) Review text formatting. Shift+F1 (then click the text with the formatting you want to review) Copy formats. Ctrl+Shift+C Paste formats. Ctrl+Shift+V Set the Line Spacing Action Keyboard shortcut Single-space lines. Ctrl+1 Double-space lines. Ctrl+2 Set 1.5-line spacing. Ctrl+5 Add or remove one line space preceding a paragraph. Ctrl+0 (zero) Align Paragraphs Action Keyboard shortcut Switch a paragraph between centered and left-aligned. Ctrl+E Switch a paragraph between justified and left-aligned. Ctrl+J Switch a paragraph between right-aligned and left-aligned. Ctrl+R Left align a paragraph. Ctrl+L Indent a paragraph from the left. Ctrl+M Remove a paragraph indent from the left. Ctrl+Shift+M Create a hanging indent. Ctrl+T Reduce a hanging indent. Ctrl+Shift+T Remove paragraph formatting. Ctrl+Q 466 Keyboard Shortcuts Apply Paragraph Styles Action Keyboard shortcut Open the Apply Styles task pane. Ctrl+Shift+S Open the Styles task pane. Alt+Ctrl+Shift+S Start AutoFormat. Alt+Ctrl+K Apply the Normal style. Ctrl+Shift+N Apply the Heading 1 style. Alt+Ctrl+1 Apply the Heading 2 style. Alt+Ctrl+2 Apply the Heading 3 style. Alt+Ctrl+3 Close the Styles Task Pane 1. If the Styles task pane is not selected, press F6 to select it. 2. Press Ctrl+Spacebar. 3. Use the Arrow keys to select Close, and then press Enter. Insert and Edit Objects Insert Objects 1. Press Alt, N, J, and then J to open the Object dialog box. 2. Do one of the following. ❍ Press Down Arrow to select an object type, and then press Enter to create an object. ❍ Press Ctrl+Tab to switch to the Create From File page, press Tab, and then type the file name of the object that you want to insert or browse to the file. Edit Objects 1. With the cursor positioned to the left of the object in your document, select the object by pressing Shift+Right Arrow. 2. Press Shift+F10. 3. Press the Tab key to get to the command you want, and then press Enter. Insert SmartArt Graphics 1. Press and release Alt, N, and then M to select SmartArt. 2. Press the Arrow keys to select the type of graphic that you want. 3. Press Tab, and then press the Arrow keys to select the graphic that you want to insert. 4. Press Enter. Keyboard Shortcuts 467 Insert WordArt 1. Press and release Alt, N, and then W to select WordArt. 2. Press the Arrow keys to select the WordArt style that you want, and then press Enter. 3. Type the text that you want. 4. Press Esc to select the WordArt object, and then use the Arrow keys to move the object. 5. Press Esc again to return to the document. Mail Merge and Fields Perform Mail Merges Important The Mailings tab must be displayed when you use these keyboard shortcuts. Action Keyboard shortcut Preview a mail merge. Alt+Shift+K Merge a document. Alt+Shift+N Print the merged document. Alt+Shift+M Edit a mail-merge data document. Alt+Shift+E Insert a merge field. Alt+Shift+F Work with Fields Action Keyboard shortcut Insert a DATE field. Alt+Shift+D Insert a LISTNUM field. Alt+Ctrl+L Insert a PAGE field. Alt+Shift+P Insert a TIME field. Alt+Shift+T Insert an empty field. Ctrl+F9 Update linked information in a Microsoft Word source document. Ctrl+Shift+F7 Update selected fields. F9 Unlink a field. Ctrl+Shift+F9 Switch between a selected field code and its result. Shift+F9 Switch between all field codes and their results. Alt+F9 Run GOTOBUTTON or MACROBUTTON from the field that displays the field results. Alt+Shift+F9 (continued) 468 Keyboard Shortcuts Action Keyboard shortcut Go to the next field. F11 Go to the previous field. Shift+F11 Lock a field. Ctrl+F11 Unlock a field. Ctrl+Shift+F11 Language Bar Handwriting Recognition Action Keyboard shortcut Switch between languages or keyboard layouts. Left Alt+Shift Display a list of correction alternatives. Windows logo key+C Turn handwriting on or off. Windows logo key +H Turn Japanese Input Method Editor (IME) on 101 keyboard on or off. Alt+~ Turn Korean IME on 101 keyboard on or off. Right Alt Turn Chinese IME on 101 keyboard on or off. Ctrl+Spacebar Function Key Tasks Function Keys Action Keyboard shortcut Get Help or visit Microsoft Office.com. F1 Move text or graphics. F2 Repeat the last action. F4 Choose the Go To command (Home tab). F5 Go to the next pane or frame. F6 Choose the Spelling command (Review tab). F7 Extend a selection. F8 Update the selected fields. F9 Show KeyTips. F10 Go to the next field. F11 Choose the Save As command. F12 Keyboard Shortcuts 469 Shift+Function Key Action Keyboard shortcut Start context-sensitive Help or reveal formatting. Shift+F1 Copy text. Shift+F2 Change the case of letters. Shift+F3 Repeat a Find or Go To action. Shift+F4 Move to the last change. Shift+F5 Go to the previous pane or frame (after pressing F6). Shift+F6 Choose the Thesaurus command (Review tab, Proofing group). Shift+F7 Reduce the size of a selection. Shift+F8 Switch between a field code and its result. Shift+F9 Display a shortcut menu. Shift+F10 Go to the previous field. Shift+F11 Choose the Save command. Shift+F12 Ctrl+Function Key Action Keyboard shortcut Expand or collapse the ribbon. Ctrl+F1 Choose the Print Preview command. Ctrl+F2 Close the window. Ctrl+F4 Go to the next window. Ctrl+F6 Insert an empty field. Ctrl+F9 Maximize the document window. Ctrl+F10 Lock a field. Ctrl+F11 Choose the Open command. Ctrl+F12 Ctrl+Shift+Function Key Action Keyboard shortcut Edit a bookmark. Ctrl+Shift+F5 Go to the previous window. Ctrl+Shift+F6 Update linked information in a Word 2010 source document. Ctrl+Shift+F7 Extend a selection or block. Ctrl+Shift+F8, and then press an Arrow key (continued) 470 Keyboard Shortcuts Action Keyboard shortcut Unlink a field. Ctrl+Shift+F9 Unlock a field. Ctrl+Shift+F11 Choose the Print command. Ctrl+Shift+F12 Alt+Function Key Action Keyboard shortcut Go to the next field. Alt+F1 Create a new building block. Alt+F3 Exit Word 2010. Alt+F4 Restore the program window size. Alt+F5 Move from an open dialog box back to the document, for dialog boxes that support this behavior. Alt+F6 Find the next misspelling or grammatical error. Alt+F7 Run a macro. Alt+F8 Switch between all field codes and their results. Alt+F9 Display the Selection And Visibility task pane. Alt+F10 Display Microsoft Visual Basic code. Alt+F11 Alt+Shift+Function Key Action Keyboard shortcut Go to the previous field. Alt+Shift+F1 Choose the Save command. Alt+Shift+F2 Display the Research task pane. Alt+Shift+F7 Run GOTOBUTTON or MACROBUTTON from the field that displays the field results. Alt+Shift+F9 Display a menu or message for an available action. Alt+Shift+F10 Choose the Table Of Contents button when the Table Of Contents is active. Alt+Shift+F12 Ctrl+Alt+Function Key Action Keyboard shortcut Display Microsoft System Information. Ctrl+Alt+F1 Choose the Open command. Ctrl+Alt+F2 Index A absolute positioning, 273, 277 Accept button, 390, 392, 395 accepting revisions, 390, 392 all in document, 395 accessibility, checking, 195 activating blogs in Word, 300 active document, closing, 25 add-ins, 428, 430, 431 Add-Ins dialog box, 431 address lists, e-mail. See e-mail mail merging Add Template dialog box, 421 advanced options, 426 Align button, 278 Align Center button, 131 Align Center Right button, 132, 139 Align gallery, 278 aligning diagrams, 209, 215 aligning objects, 278 aligning text, 97-98, 101-102 around objects, 273 around pictures, 145 in tables, 131, 132, 139 with tab stops, 97 alt text in tables, 135 anchoring text to objects, 273 Apply Styles dialog box, 410 Arrange All button, 36 arranging stacked objects, 273, 280 arrows on buttons, 7 Artistic Effects button, 149 aspect ratio, 441 Attach File button, 383 attaching templates, 408, 420 attachments, e-mail. See also e-mail messages inserting, 383 sending documents as, 382 Attach Template dialog box, 420 attributes, 441 authenticating documents, 384, 482 author name, viewing, 196 authors. See sources AutoCorrect adding to list, 67 fixing spelling errors with, 64-65 options, setting, 65, 424 AutoCorrect dialog box, 65, 112 AutoFormatting options, 112 AutoRecover customizing settings for, 19 options, setting, 424 AutoText for user name/initials, changing, 166 B Back button (Help), xxvii backgrounds appropriate use of, 152 color, applying, 152 gradients, applying, 153 overview of, 144 pictures as, applying, 155 textures, applying, 154 Backspace key, 40 Backstage view, 5, 14, 184, 193 displaying, 16 Help page, 15 Info page, 14 New page, 15 opening documents from, 23 Print page, 15 Recent page, 14 Share page, 15 balloon comments balloons for, 441 defined, 441 deleting, 385, 387 displaying, 386 displaying all text, 385 editing, 385 from specific reviewer, hiding, 385 hiding, 385 highlighting, 386 inserting, 385, 386 471 472 balloons balloon comments (continued) navigating, 385, 386 nesting, 385 responding to, 385, 387 reviewer’s name, displaying, 385, 386 balloons. See ScreenTips banded rows in tables, 137 bar charts, 441 bibliographies compiling, 347 inserting, 353 overview of, 347 updating, 348 Bibliography button, 347 Bibliography gallery, 352 bilingual dictionary overview of, 59 translating text with, 63 blank documents, creating, 17 Blank Page button, 159 blank pages, inserting, 159 blocking content, trusted locations for, 429 Blogger service, 300 blog posts creating, 17 defined, 445 overview of, 299 publishing, 304-305 saving, 304 blogs, 441 activating in Word, 300 addresses for, 303 creating, 299 drafts, opening, 305 e-mail publishing, turning on, 301 home page, navigating to, 305 on Windows Live Spaces, creating, 300, 302 overview of, 299 picture upload options, 303 posting to, 303 publishing documents as posts, 299 publishing posts, 305 publishing posts as drafts, 304 registering accounts, 299, 302 saving posts, 304 service providers, 300 setting up, 299, 300 Web links, adding, 304 Bold button, 89, 124, 422 bolding text, 89 book features and conventions, xix booklets, printing, 184 Bookmark button, 323 Bookmark dialog box, 323 bookmarks displaying, 324 hiding, 327 inserting, 323 jumping to, 322, 324-325 overview of, 309, 322 spaces in names, 324 Border button, 99, 104, 284 borders. See also page borders 3-D, 104 adding, 99, 100, 104 cell, 138 table, 284 Borders And Shading dialog box, 100, 104, 138, 157 Borders button (tables), 138 bound documents, previewing, 185 breaks. See column breaks; page breaks; line breaks; section breaks Breaks button, 96, 101, 122, 192 brightness, adjusting, 147 Browse By Page button, 28 browsers opening Web pages in, 298 previewing documents in, 29, 34 setting for Web pages, 295 specifying, for Web pages, 294 browsing objects, 27 building blocks. S ee a lso header/footers; Quick Parts cover pages, 159, 162 creating, 70, 170 defined, 69, 441 deleting, 161 entering in existing text, 72 gallery of, 160, 166 inserting, 70 keyboard shortcuts for, 70 overview of, 69, 144 page numbers, 159, 165, 166 properties, viewing, 161 saving, 71 in templates, 408 text boxes, 159, 167, 172 Building Blocks Organizer, 160, 166 Building Blocks template, 408 bulleted lists. See also lists bullet symbol, changing, 107, 109 bullet symbol, live preview of, 109 creating, 107-108 in diagrams, adding to, 207 collaborating on documents bullet points merging, 47 selecting, 45 Bullets button, 107, 108 buttons. See also specific button names adding to Quick Access Toolbar, 438 arrows on, 7 inactive, 10 ScreenTips for. See ScreenTips separator between, 438 viewing information on. See ScreenTips C calculations in tables, 134 capital letters. See uppercase Caption dialog box, 338 captions, 441 case formatting, 94-95 Cell Margins button, 135 cells addresses, 441 borders around, 138 defined, 441 deleting, 129 inserting, 129 merging, 129, 131 setting width of, 135 shading, 138 splitting, 130 Center button, 101, 105, 119, 165, 174 centering text, 97-98, 101, 119 with Click And Type, 97 in header/footers, 165 keyboard shortcut for, 97, 119 in tables, 131 in WordArt objects, 174 Center Tab button, 124 Change Colors button, 213 Change Shape button, 214, 215 Change Styles button, 77, 80, 412, 421 change tracking in balloons, 389-390, 392 final version, displaying, 392 options, setting, 389 toggle button, adding, 388 turning off, 393 turning on, 388, 390 user information, changing, 389 473 character formatting. S ee also fonts; paragraph styles appropriate use of, 95 attributes, 441 bolding, 89 case, 94 clearing, 94 copying, 90 defined, 441 underlining, 89 characters, non-printing. See formatting marks character spacing, 87 changing, 93 defined, 441 character styles, 76, 411. See also Quick Styles defined, 441 finding/replacing, 106 chart area, 441 chevrons, 363, 441 Choose A SmartArt Graphic dialog box, 204, 205, 217 citations. See also sources inserting, 339, 350 style guide, setting, 348 Clear Formatting button, 94 clearing formatting, 94 Click And Type centering text with, 97 defined, 441 clip art. See also pictures inserting, 144, 150 saving, 150 searching for, 150 Clip Art button, 144, 150 Clipboard, 42 closing, 48 defined, 441 deleting items from, 48 options for, 48 viewing, 48 Clipboard dialog box launcher, 48 Close button, xxix, 4, 25 Close Header and Footer button, 166, 192 Close Outline View button, 272 closing Clipboard task pane, 48 closing documents, 25, 28 closing Word 2010, 4 co-authoring documents, 380 collaborating on documents, 380 474 Collapse button Collapse button, 270 collapsing outlines to single level, 269 collating printed documents, 193 Color button, 147 Color gallery, 147 coloring backgrounds. See backgrounds coloring pictures, 147 colors, for revision marks, 389 color saturation, 446 color, user interface, 423 column breaks, 116 defined, 441 inserting, 122 column charts, 441 column headings, 441 columns, 115. See also table columns applying to entire document, 117 defined, 441 formatting, 116 hyphenating text in, 117, 121 indenting text in, 121 justifying, 117, 118 margins, 119 overview of, 116 section/column breaks in, 116, 118 separated by tab stops. See tabbed lists spacing, changing, 120 Columns button, 117 Columns dialog box, 120 Columns gallery, 116-117 Combine Documents dialog box, 393 combining documents. See merging documents commands from previous versions, adding, 6 comments balloons for, 441 defined, 441 deleting, 385, 387 displaying, 386 displaying all text, 385 editing, 385 from specific reviewer, hiding, 385 hiding, 385 highlighting, 386 inserting, 385, 386 navigating, 385, 386 nesting, 385 responding to, 385, 387 reviewer’s name, displaying, 385, 386 Compare button, 393 comparing documents by combining, 393-394 overview of, 393 viewing results of, 394 compatibility, checking, 195, 298 Compatibility Checker, 298 Compatibility mode, 22 Compatibility Mode, 406 compatibility with earlier versions of Word, 22 Confirm Password dialog box, 397 contacts (Outlook), mail merging, 363 contrast, adjusting, 147 Convert button, 22 converting documents to .docx format, 22 to Web pages, 427 converting tables to text, 128 converting text to tables, 128, 132 Convert Text To Table dialog box, 132 Convert To Text button, 128 Copy button, 42, 46, 215, 284 copying character formatting, 90 copying diagrams, 215 copying formatting, 90, 149 copying pictures, 149 copying tables, 284 copying text with Copy button, 42 vs. cutting, 43 keyboard shortcut for, 43 in selection, 42 Corrections button, 147 Cover Page button, 161 cover pages, 159, 162 Create button, 18 Create New Building Block dialog box, 70, 170 Create New Style From Formatting dialog box, 413, 417 Create PDF/XPS button, 290 Create Source dialog box, 348 creating documents with templates, 406 Crop button, 146 cropping pictures, 146 Cross-reference button, 325 Cross-Reference dialog box, 325 cross-reference entries, 441 cross-references inserting, 325, 326 jumping to, 326 overview of, 309, 322 updating, 326 digital signatures cursor defined, 441 function of, 16 keyboard shortcuts for, 24-25, 27 moving to beginning of line, 27 moving to end of line, 27 paging up or down with, 24 placing, 24 status bar display for, 24 Custom DPI Setting dialog box, xvii Customize Keyboard dialog box, 449 Customize Quick Access Toolbar button, 438 Customize Ribbon page, 431, 433 customizing ribbon, 433, 438 custom keyboard shortcuts, 449-450 Cut button, 42, 46, 169 cutting text, 42, 46, 169 keyboard shortcut for, 43, 169 vs. copying, 43 cycle diagrams, 204, 442 D data markers, 442 data points, 442 data series, 442 data source (charts), 442 data source (mail merge) creating in outside program, 357 editing, 360 for e-mail addresses, 372 field names in, 356, 357 filtering, 357, 361 Outlook contacts list as, 363 overview of, 356 queries for, 357 recipients, adding, 360 selecting, 358 sorting, 357, 361 subset, merging from, 357 date and time automatic updating, 319 automatic updating, turning off, 318 as field, vs. as text, 317 inserting, 317, 319 updating, 317 Date And Time dialog box, 318 Date & Time button, 317, 318 decimal alignment, 97, 103 Decimal Tab button, 103 Decrease Indent button, 96, 105 default font, 87 Delete button (tables), 129 Delete Comment button, 387 Delete key, 40 deleting building blocks, 161 deleting comments, 387 deleting keyboard shortcuts, 451 deleting page/section breaks, 190 deleting styles, 413 deleting table rows/columns/cells, 129 deleting tab stops, 98 deleting text, 40, 42, 44, 47 Demote button, 270 demoting outline headings, 270, 442 deselecting text, 42 desktop publishing, 442 destination files, 442 Developer tab, 420 diagrams. See also SmartArt graphics aligning, 209, 215 in bulleted lists, 207 colors, changing, 213 copying, 215 creating, 204, 205 defined, 442 entering text, 206 gallery of, 211 inserting text, 205 layout, changing, 210, 212 pasting, 215 positioning on page, 208, 215 punctuation in, 206 resetting to original, 211 selecting, 211, 215 shapes, changing, 214-215 shapes, deleting, 210 shapes, selecting, 211 sizing, 207, 209, 218 text overflow, 210 Text pane, opening, 206 text placeholders in, 205-206 text wrapping, 208 types of, 203-205 dialog boxes. See also specific dialog boxes closing, 12 displaying, 7 help with, xxv dialog box launcher, 7, 442 dictionaries, bilingual, 59, 63 digital signatures, 384, 442 475 476 directory paths directory paths, 445 display settings different from book, xviii distributing documents electronically, 195 in XPS format, 199 dividing cells, 130 .doc format, 289 document format, setting default, 424 document headings navigating to, 28 tables of contents based on, 332 document history, 14 Document Inspector, 195, 197 document navigation keyboard shortcuts, 54 document outlines. See outlines; Outline view document properties displaying, 14 inserting as fields, 319 inserting in fields, 318 viewing, 195-196 document review. See revisions; tracking changes documents blank, creating, 17, 19 closing, 28 closing, while leaving Word running, 25 compatibility with earlier versions, 22 creating, 16, 19 creating from existing, 17 formatting in columns, 117. See also columns full-screen display, 29, 33 inserting in other documents, 73 maximizing, 36 moving to top of, 31 navigating, 24, 32, 34, 47 opening, 23, 26 outlines, viewing, 29 read-only, opening as, 24 recently opened, 14, 23 renaming when saving, 20 repairing, 24 saving, 18, 20 saving, as earlier version, 22 saving, creating folders for, 19 saving, creating folders when, 20 saving, in new location, 19, 21 saving, renaming when, 20 scrolling through, 24, 27 selecting, 41, 296 sharing. See sharing documents side-by-side display, 32 splitting into two panes, 30 switching between, 30, 35 translating, 60 viewing multiple, 36 views for. See views zooming in/out, 30 document statistics, 69 document summaries, viewing, 197 document templates applying, 414 attaching, 408, 420 building blocks in, 408 Building Blocks template, 408 Compatibility Mode, 406 components of, 407-408 creating, 408 creating documents with, 406 default, 406 defined, 447 displaying, 15 downloading, 406 file name extensions, 408 global, 408, 421 graphic elements, 407 macros in, 408 Normal template, 406, 408-409 opening, 419 organizing, 416 placeholders in, 407 previewing, 18 recently used, 17 sample, installed with Word, 17, 406 saving, 408 saving documents as, 415 searching for, 18 switching, 420 Document Themes folder, 83 document title, inserting as field, 319 .docx format, 22, 288 .dotm format, 408 .dotx format, 408 downloading practice files, xxi downloading templates, 406 dpi settings, xvii Draft button, 35 drafts, publishing blog posts as, 304 Draft view, 29, 442 drag-and-drop editing, 42, 47, 442 dragging objects, 442 drawing grid positioning objects with, 273 turning off, 280 turning on, 279 Field dialog box Drawing Grid dialog box, 278 drawing objects absolute positioning, 277 alignment options, 278 defined, 442, 444 hiding, 282 overview of, 143 positioning, 273-274 positioning with grid, 279 sending backwards in stack, 280 wrapping text around, 274 drawings. See diagrams; pictures drawing tables, 127, 282, 283. See also tables drawing text boxes, 172 Drop Cap dialog box, 178 drop caps defined, 442 inserting, 178 duplex printing, 193 E earlier Word versions, saving files for, 289 Edit Data Source dialog box, 360 Edit Hyperlink dialog box, 314 editing, drag-and-drop, 42, 47, 442 editing comments, 385 editing documents after finalizing, 199 in Full Screen Reading view, 29 multiple editors on. See revisions; tracking changes restricting, 401, 402 editing hyperlinks, 314 editing sources, 349 editing text drag-and-drop, 42, 47, 442 tracking. See revisions; tracking changes undoing, 43-44, 46 Edit Name dialog box, 349 effects, text applying, 77, 81, 92 defined, 443 live preview of, 81 efficiency, improving, 5 e-mail hyperlinks, 313 e-mailing documents, 381 as attachments, 382 as PDF files, 382 as XPS files, 382 477 e-mail mail merging, 370 options, setting, 374 previewing, 373 selecting recipients, 371-372 e-mail messages. See also attachments, e-mail formatting text, 383 greeting lines, inserting, 372 importance, setting, 383 merge fields, inserting, 371, 372 sending, 384 embedded fonts, 425 embedded objects, 442 Encrypt Document dialog box, 399 encrypted password protection, 396, 399 encrypting documents, 399 endnotes defined, 442 formatting, 330 entering text, 19, 40 Enter Text dialog box, 297 Envelope Options dialog box, 370 Envelopes And Labels dialog box, 370 Envelopes button, 370 envelopes, printing, 370 errors, fixing with AutoCorrect, 64-65 with shortcut menu, 64, 66 with Spelling and Grammar dialog box, 64 flagging of, 20 exercise format, xviii exiting Word 2010, 4 Expand button, 270 Expand button (Mini Translator), 63 expanding outline headings, 270 expanding ribbon, 7, 438 Expand The Ribbon button, 7 Extensible Markup Language (XML), 442 extensions, file name. See also file formats .docx, 22 .dotm, 408 .htm, 294 .rtf, 289 .txt, 289 for templates, 408 F fancy effects. See WordArt objects faxing documents, 382 features and conventions of book, xix Field dialog box, 316, 321 478 field names field names, 443 Field Options dialog box, 316 fields. See also merge fields code display, toggling, 317 components of, 316 date or time, inserting, 317 defined, 316, 442 for document properties, 318 inserting, 316 locking, 318 options, setting, 316 overview of, 309, 316 switches, 316 syntax, displaying, 316 updating, 317-320 file formats, 443. See also file name extensions changing, 290 default, 288, 424 Plain Text, 289 Rich Text Format, 289 saving as, 425 saving documents in different, 288 Single File Web Page, 294 Web Page, Filtered, 294 file locations, specifying, 427 file name extensions, 20. See also file formats .docx, 22 .dotm, 408 .htm, 294 .rtf, 289 .txt, 289 for templates, 408 files, inserting in documents, 73 File tab, 14 Fill Effects dialog box, 152 Filter And Sort dialog box, 360 filtering, 443 filtering mail merge data sources, 357, 361 finalizing documents, 195, 199 Find And Replace dialog box, 51 Go To tab, keyboard shortcut for, 322 Replace tab, displaying, 52 Find button, 49, 52, 322 finding/replacing formatting, 106 finding text, 49, 52. See also Navigation task pane advanced options for, 50, 53 in bilingual dictionary, 59 keyboard shortcut for, 49 matching case when, 51 and replacing, 51, 54 ScreenTips with page numbers for, 50 search direction, specifying, 51 sound-alikes, 51 wildcards in searches, 51, 447 Finish & Merge button, 373 first line indent, 96 First Record button, 376 folder paths, 445 folders, creating when saving documents, 19, 20 Font button, 90 font color, 87, 93 Font Color button, 93 Font dialog box, 88, 92 font effects applying, 77, 81, 92 defined, 443 live preview of, 81 Font gallery, 90 fonts. See also character formatting applying, 91 attributes for, 87 available, 87 default, 87 defined, 75, 443 embedding, 425 in themes, changing, 85 font size, 87 changing, 92 defined, 443 incrementing, 92 keyboard shortcuts for adjusting, 92 font style, 87, 443 Footer button, 318 footers. See header/footers Footnote And Endnote dialog box, 330 footnotes defined, 443 formatting, 330 foreign languages, specifying, 426 Format Painter button, 90, 149 format previewing. See Live Preview formats, setting default, 424 formatting. See also styles; themes automatically. See AutoFormatting options copying, 149 restricting, 401-402 saving style from, 413 selecting similar, 331 formatting, finding/replacing, 106 formatting marks displaying, 30 hiding, 33 keyboard shortcut for, 44 section break indicator, 190, 192 showing/hiding, 44, 125 Hyperlink button formatting option thumbnails, 9 Formatting Restrictions dialog box, 401 formatting tables, 136 formatting text in columns, 116 form letters. See main document (mail merge) Formula button, 134 Formula dialog box, 134 formulas in tables, 134 constructing, 134 defined, 443 referencing cells in, 134 Forward button, 34 Forward button (Help), xxvii frequently misspelled words, correcting, 64 Full Screen Reading button, 33 Full Screen Reading view, 29, 33, 443 functions, constructing, 134 G galleries building blocks, 441 closing without making selection, 12 defined, 443 of formatting thumbnails, 9 sizing handles, 212 General Options dialog box, 396 global templates, 408, 421 Go To Footer button, 165 grammar checker, 67. See also checking spelling graphics. See building blocks; diagrams; drawing objects; pictures; SmartArt graphics grayed-out buttons, 10 grayscale, 443 Greeting Line button, 372 grid positioning objects with, 273 turning off, 280 turning on, 279 gridlines, chart, 443 grouping shapes, 443 groups, ribbon, 443 Grow Font button, 92 guillemet characters, 363, 441 H hanging indent adjusting, 102 in columns, adjusting, 121 defined, 96 Header button, 164, 192 header/footers centering text in, 165 closing, 166, 192 defined, 443 different first page, 192 editing, 192, 318 hiding, 31 inserting, 164 moving to, 165 navigating between, 164 overview of, 159 settings inheritance, 159, 192 headings navigating to, 28 tables of contents based on, 332 Help button, xxv, xxvi, 7, 447 Help page of Backstage view, 15 Help window navigating, xxvii opening, xxvi printing from, xxviii searching, xxviii table of contents, displaying, xxvii topics, displaying, xxvi hidden characters, displaying, 30 hidden formatting marks, displaying, 44 hidden text, 30, 195, 342 hiding bookmarks, 327 hiding comments, 385 hiding formatting marks, 33, 125 hiding headers/footers, 31 hiding Mini Toolbar, 423 hiding objects, 282 hiding revisions, 389, 392 hiding ribbon commands, 7 hiding text, 30, 342 hierarchy diagrams, 204, 443 High Importance button, 383 highlighting comments, 386 highlighting text. See also selecting text color selection for, 93 removing highlighting, 94 Highlight Merge Fields button, 373 home page, blog, 305 Home Page button, 305 Home tab, 9 horizontal scroll bar, 24 HTML format, 294. See also Web pages HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), 443 HTML tags, 293, 446 Hyperlink button, 310 479 480 hyperlinks hyperlinks, 309 appearance of, 310, 312 in blog posts, 304 deleting, 310 editing, 310, 314 for e-mail addresses, 313 following, 312 inserting, 310 jumping to target, 310, 312 opening in new window, 312 ScreenTips for, 312, 314 targets, setting, 310, 311 Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), 443 hyphenating text in columns, 117, 121 defined, 443 Hyphenation button, 121 I images. See pictures importance, setting in e-mail messages, 383 inactive buttons, 10 Increase Indent button, 96, 102, 109, 124 indentation, Web page, 296 indenting columns, 121 indenting lists, 108, 109 indenting paragraphs, 96, 102 indent markers, 96 defined, 443 moving, 102 Index dialog box, 345 index entry fields defined, 444 deleting, 342, 346 displaying, 341 editing, 340, 342-343 inserting, 340 marking, 342 selecting, 342 indexes. See also tables of contents constructing, 340, 341 cross-references in, 340-341, 344 defined, 444 editing, 342, 346 formatting, 340, 342, 345 inserting, 342, 345 marking all instances of word, 343 marking entries, 340, 342 overview of, 329, 340 subentries, marking, 344 updating, 342, 346 Info page of Backstage view, 14 information bar. See status bar initials AutoText for, changing, 166 setting, 423 Insert Above button, 129 Insert Address Block dialog box, 364 Insert Below button, 129, 131 Insert Cells dialog box, 129 Insert Citation button, 350 Insert File dialog box, 383 Insert Greeting Line dialog box, 365, 372 Insert Hyperlink dialog box, 310, 311 Insert Index button, 342, 345 inserting text, 40 Insert Left button, 129 Insert Merge Field dialog box, 366 Insert Picture dialog box, 145, 219 Insert Right button, 129 Insert tab, 10 Insert Table dialog box, 126 Insert Table gallery, 126 inspecting documents. See Document Inspector installing add-ins, 430 international languages, specifying, 426 Internet faxes, sending documents as, 382 J Justify button, 101, 118 justifying text, 97, 101 in columns, 117, 118 defined, 444 keyboard shortcut for, 97, 118 K Keep Text Only button, 63 keyboard shortcuts, 449 creating, 449, 450 defined, 444 deleting, 451 for bolding text, 89 for building blocks, 70 for centering text, 97, 119 for clearing formatting, 94 for copying text, 43 Mailings tab for cursor placement, 25, 27 for cutting text, 43, 169 for demoting outline headings, 270 for document navigation, 47, 54 for expanding outline headings, 270 for finding text, 49 for Font dialog box display, 92 for font size, 92 for formatting marks, 44 for Go To function, 322 for inserting page breaks, 191 for inserting SmartArt graphics, 205 for justifying text, 97, 118 for left-aligning text, 97 for line breaks, 97 for moving outline headings, 271 for navigation, 31 for pasting text, 43 for printing, 184 for repeating editing, 43, 122 for replacing text, 52, 106 for Research task pane, 55 for right-aligning text, 97 for selecting all, 41, 118 for selecting documents, 296 for underlining text, 89 for undoing editing, 43 moving cursor with, 24 keywords, adding, 197 Knowledge Base, xxix legacy commands, 6, 433 legacy compatibility, 22 legacy Word versions, saving files for, 289 legal citations, 339 Line And Paragraph Spacing button, 98, 337 line breaks defined, 444 inserting, 96, 101 keyboard shortcut for, 97 line graphs, 444 lines, selecting, 41, 79 line spacing, for pictures, 145 Line Spacing button, 103 linked objects, 444 linked styles, 411 linking text boxes, 172 linking within documents. See hyperlinks links. See hyperlinks list diagrams, 203, 444 lists. See also tabbed lists converting text into, 107, 108 ending, 107 indenting, 108, 109 modifying, 107 multiple levels, 107, 111 overview of, 106 sorting, 107, 111 undoing formatting of, 107 Live Preview, 9, 423, 444 locking fields, 318 L M Label Options dialog box, 375 labels, mailing. See also mail merge address blocks, inserting, 376 creating, 374 merge fields for, 374, 376 previewing, 376 printing, 377 recipients, selecting, 375 vendor, selecting, 375 Landscape orientation, 184, 444 languages, specifying additional, 426 languages, translating entire documents, 60 options for, 62 Layout dialog box, 176, 208, 215, 274, 277 Layouts gallery, 211 left-aligning text, 97 left indent, 96, 102 Left Tab button, 102 machine translator, 60 macros, 30 macros, template, 408 magnification, adjusting, 30, 78 globally, xvi to full page, 152 by percentage, 33 to view multiple pages, 32, 185 mailing address, setting, 370 mailing labels. See also mail merge address blocks, inserting, 376 creating, 374 merge fields for, 374, 376 previewing, 376 printing, 377 recipients, selecting, 375 vendor, selecting, 375 Mailings tab, 13 481 482 mail merge mail merge, 444. See also data source (mail merge); main document (mail merge) for e-mail, 370-371, 374 from Outlook contacts list, 363 main document, selecting, 358 to new document, 369 overview of, 356 previewing, 367, 368 recipients, excluding, 369 recipients, selecting, 371, 372 setting up, 358 Mail Merge Recipients dialog box, 359 mailto links, 313 main document (mail merge), 356, 444 address block, inserting, 364 greeting lines, inserting, 365 highlighting merge fields, 373 overview of, 363 saving as normal document, 364 saving before merging, 364 selecting, 358 setting up, 365 Manage Sources button, 348 manual page breaks, 444 margins changing, 182, 184, 187, 192 of columns, 119 defined, 444 gallery of, 185 mirroring, 186 specifying, 95 in tables, 135 Margins button, 11, 95, 192, 219 Mark Citation dialog box, 339 Mark Entry button, 340, 342 Mark Index Entry dialog box, 340, 343 marking documents as final, 199 marking index entries, 340, 342 all instances of word, 343 as subentries, 344 markup displaying, 386 hiding, 385 mass e-mails. See e-mail mail merging master documents, 269 mathematical functions in tables. See formulas in tables; functions matrix diagrams, 204, 444 Maximize button, 36 maximizing documents, 36 Merge Cells button, 129, 131, 132 merge fields, 356, 363, 444 editing, 366 in e-mail messages, 371, 372 highlighting, 373 inserting, 364, 365, 366 in mailing labels, 374, 376 Merge List button, 46 Merge To E-Mail dialog box, 373 Merge To New Document dialog box, 369 Merge To Printer dialog box, 377 merging addresses. See mail merge merging bullet points, 47 merging cells in tables, 129, 131 merging documents, 393-394 hiding revisions by specific reviewer, 395 viewing results of, 394 Microsoft Knowledge Base, xxix Microsoft Office Clipboard, 444 Microsoft Office Online Web site themes, 83 Microsoft Product Support Services, xxix Microsoft SharePoint, 424 Microsoft Translator service, 60 Microsoft Word 2010 closing, 4 compatibility with earlier versions, 22, 289 first time starting, 9 new features in, x starting, 4, 9 upgrading to, x, xi uses for, ix Microsoft Word Help button, xxv, xxvi Minimize button, 4 Minimize The Ribbon button, 7 minimizing documents, 4 minimizing ribbon, 7 Mini Toolbar, 41 character formatting with, 87 hiding, 423 Mini Translator, 58, 60 mirroring margins, 186 misspellings. See spelling errors, fixing Modify Style dialog box, 412 More button, 211 Move Up button, 271, 434 moving tables, 128-129 Multilevel List button, 107 N name and initials, entering, 9 naming documents, 20 navigating comments, 385, 386 Page Number button navigating documents, 47 navigating tables, 128 navigating revisions, 389, 392 Navigation task pane, 53. See also finding text defined, 444 displaying, 19. 28 editing while open, 50 Search tab, displaying, 49 nested tables creating, 282, 284 defined, 444 formatting, 282 worksheet data as, 284 New Address List dialog box, 371 New Blog Account dialog box, 302 New Comment button, 385, 386 New dialog box, 415 New Folder button, 19, 20, 416 New page of Backstage view, 15 New Style button, 413 New Windows Live Spaces Account dialog box, 302 Next Comment button, 386 Next Page button, 24, 27, 32 Next Revision button, 392 non-printing characters. See formatting marks Normal template, 406, 408-409 notes. See comments note separators, 444 numbered lists. See also lists creating, 107, 109 numbering value, setting, 110 number style, changing, 108 restarting numbering, 109 Numbering button, 107, 109 O objects, drawing absolute positioning, 277 alignment options, 278 defined, 442, 444 hiding, 282 overview of, 143 positioning, 273-274 positioning with grid, 279 sending backwards in stack, 280 wrapping text around, 274 Office.com Web site templates, 406 online bilingual dictionary, 59, 63 483 Open dialog box, 23 opening documents, 26 from Backstage view, 23 as read-only, 24 from Recent page, 23 from Windows, 23 opening Web pages, 298 opening Word 2010, 4, 9 Options dialog box, 292 orientation, page changing, 182, 184 defined, 444 orphans defined, 188, 444 setting options for, 188, 191 Outline button, 34, 269 outlines collapsing, 269 creating, 268 demoting headings, 270 displaying, 269 expanding headings, 270 moving headings in, 271 promoting headings, 271 Outline view, 29 closing, 272 defined, 444 displaying, 269 symbols in, 268 Outlining tab, 34 Outlook contacts list, mail merging from, 363 overwriting documents when saving, 19 P page borders, 157 Page Borders button, 157 Page Break button, 191, 335 page breaks deleting, 190 inserting, 188, 335 keyboard shortcut for, 191 manual, 444 soft, 188, 446 Page Color button, 12, 152 page colors, previewing effects of, 12 page layout, with tables, 282 Page Layout tab, 10 page length, defining. See margins Page Number button, 165 484 page numbers page numbers, 159 formatting, 166 inserting, 165 page orientation changing, 182, 184 defined, 444 Page Setup dialog box, 11, 182, 184, 219 pages, jumping to, 323 pagination automatic, 188 paragraph settings, 188, 191 widows and orphans, 188 paper size , 182, 184 Paragraph dialog box, 188, 190, 296 opening, 99 tab alignment, 98 paragraph formatting aligning, 96-98, 101-102 borders, 99-100, 104 creating styles from, 417 defined, 95, 445 saving as style, 413 shading, 104 paragraph marks, 33. See also formatting marks paragraphs aligning, 97 defined, 444 first letter, formatting, 178 indenting, 96 keeping lines together, 191 keeping with next, 188 overview of, 95 selecting, 41, 47 spacing, changing, 98, 103, 124 width, defining. See margins paragraph styles, 76, 411. See also character formatting; Quick Styles defined, 445 finding/replacing, 106 Password dialog box, 398 password protection choosing passwords, 397 entering password, 398 read-only documents, opening, 398 removing, 399 setting up, 397 unencrypted vs. encrypted, 396 Paste All button, 48 Paste button, 42, 46, 215 Paste Options button, 43 pasting diagrams, 215 pasting text, 42, 46 from Clipboard pane, 48 keyboard shortcut for, 43 options for, 46 without formatting, 167 paths, 445 PDF files creating, 290 optimizing size, 290 options for, 290 saving documents as, 290 sending documents as, 382 permissions, restricting, 400 Permissions dialog box, 400 personal information, clearing, 195, 198 photographs. See pictures Picture button, 144, 145 picture diagrams, 204, 445 entering text, 219 inserting, 217 inserting pictures in, 219 overview of, 216 Picture Options dialog box, 303 pictures. See also clip art artistic effects, adding, 149 aspect ratio, 441 as backgrounds, 155 brightness, adjusting, 147 captions, 441 contrast, adjusting, 147 copying, 149 copying formatting between, 149 correcting, 147 cropping, 146 defined, 445 incomplete display, 145 inserting, 144-145, 149 inserting in diagrams. See picture diagrams and line spacing, 145 modifying, 144 overview of, 143 recoloring, 147 resizing, 146 styles, applying, 148 text alignment around, 145 troubleshooting, 145 uploading to blogs, 303 Picture Styles gallery, 148 pie charts, 445 pyramid diagrams placeholders, template, 407 Plain Text format, 289 plot area, chart, 445 pointing, 445 points (unit of measure), 445 popup tips. See ScreenTips Portable Document Format (PDF) files creating, 290 optimizing size, 290 options for, 290 saving documents as, 290 sending documents as, 382 Portrait orientation, 184, 445 Position button, 174, 208, 215, 276 Position gallery, 273 positioning diagrams, 208 positioning objects, 274 absolute vs. relative, 273 with drawing grid, 273, 279 manually, 273 stacked, 273 posts, blog. See also blogs creating, 17 defined, 445 overview of, 299 publishing, 304-305 saving, 304 ppi settings, xvii practice files, xxi preformatted tables. See Quick Tables previewing color effects, 12 previewing documents, 183-184 as bound, 185 navigating when, 186 in Web browsers, 29, 34 previewing formats. See Live Preview previewing mail merge, 367, 368 previewing styles, 410 previewing table styles, 137 previewing templates, 18 Preview Results button, 373 Previous Page button, 24 Previous Record button, 368 Previous Screen button, 34 Print button, 193, 194 printers settings, changing, 193 status, viewing, 194 switching, 194 printing collating, 193 with default settings, 193, 194 485 duplex, 193 Help topics, xxviii keyboard shortcut for, 184 number of copies, setting, 194 pages per sheet, setting, 184 settings for, 193 printing booklets, 184 printing envelopes, 370 printing mailing labels, 377 printing to PDF/XPS. See PDF files; XPS files Print Layout view, 29, 31, 183, 445 Print page, 184, 193 Print page of Backstage view, 15 print previewing. See previewing documents priority, setting in e-mail messages, 383 process diagrams, 204-205, 445 program window minimizing, 4 overview of, 4 resizing, xv, 4 scrolling contents of, 24 Promote button, 271 promoting outline headings, 271, 445 proofreading, importance of, 63, 68 properties displaying, 14 inserting as fields, 319 inserting in fields, 318 viewing, 195-196 Properties dialog box, 197 protecting documents, 384. See also password protection by restricting formatting/editing, 401 by restricting permissions, 400 marking as final, 199 Publish as PDF Or XPS dialog box, 290 Publish button, 304 publishers. See sources publishing blog posts, 305 as drafts, 304 via e-mail, 301 publishing documents as blog posts, 299 publishing PDF/XPS files. S ee PDF files; XPS files pull quotes (quote boxes) defined, 445 inserting, 167 modifying, 296 replacing text in, 167 wrapping text around, 297 pyramid diagrams, 204, 445 486 queries Q queries, 445 Quick Access Toolbar adding buttons to, 437-438 customizing, 438 defined, 445 legacy commands, adding, 6 moving, 5 resetting, 438, 440 specifying for active document, 438 Quick Parts. See building blocks; fields Quick Parts button, 71, 166, 170, 316, 319 Quick Parts gallery, 170 Quick Print button, 439 Quick Styles, 76. See also style sets applying, 79 applying multiple, 80 changing style set, 76 defined, 445 live preview of, 78 saving, 412-413, 417 Quick Styles button, 176 Quick Styles gallery, 76, 418 displaying, 79 navigating in, 78 removing styles from, 413 Quick Tables, 139-140. See also tables defined, 445 inserting, 140 overview of, 127 Quick Tables gallery, 140 quote boxes defined, 445 inserting, 167 modifying, 296 replacing text in, 167 wrapping text around, 297 R read-only defined, 445 opening documents as, 24 recommending when users open document, 397 recent documents, displaying, 14 Recent page of Backstage view, 14 opening documents from, 23 recoloring pictures, 147 recommending read-only, 397 records, 445 Redo button, 5, 44 redoing editing, 43 red wavy lines under words, 20 reference marks, 330, 445 reference materials, specifying, 57 References tab, 12 Register A Blog Account dialog box, 299 Reject button, 390, 392 rejecting revisions, 390, 392 relationship diagrams, 204, 445 relative positioning, 273 Rename dialog box, 435 renaming ribbon tabs, 435 repairing documents, 24 Repeat button, 44, 89 repeating editing, 44, 89, 122 Repeat Insertion button, 122 replacing styles, 421 replacing text, 51, 54 keyboard shortcut for, 52, 106 options for, 52 Research button, 56 Research Options dialog box, 57 Research task pane keyboard shortcuts for, 55 opening, 57, 62 Reset Graphic button, 211 resetting diagrams, 211 resizing diagrams, 207, 209, 218 resizing pictures, 146 resizing program window, xv, 4 resizing ribbon, xv resizing table elements, 129 resizing tables, 128, 133 resolution, screen, xv responding to comments, 385, 387 Restore Down/Maximize button, 4 Restrict Editing button, 401 Restrict Formatting and Editing task pane, 401 restricting document permissions, 400 restricting formatting and editing, 401-402 return address, setting, 370 reviewers. See also tracking changes; revisions accepting/rejecting changes from, 390 hiding comments from, 385 reviewing documents. S ee r evisions; tracking changes ScreenTips Reviewing pane closing, 385, 387 displaying, 385 opening, 387 overview of, 385 resizing, 385 Reviewing Pane button, 385, 387 Review tab, 13 revisions. See also tracking changes accepting, 390, 392 accepting all in document, 395 appearance of, 388, 390 clearing, before distributing document, 195 colors for, 389 customizing display of, 389 defined, 445 displaying, 389 hiding, 389, 392 inline display of, 390 navigating, 386, 389, 392 rejecting, 390, 392 reviewer’s name, displaying, 389, 391 ribbon button appearance, xiv buttons, separator between, 438 character formatting with, 88 commands, adding to, 434 commands no longer on, 433 commands on, xiii customizing, 431-433, 438 decreasing width of, xiv defined, 446 dynamic nature of, xiv expanding, 7, 438 groups, 6 groups, displaying all commands in, xiv groups, removing, 432, 434 hidden groups, displaying, xiv hiding commands, 7 legacy commands, 433 location of, 5 minimizing, 7 moving commands on, 434 navigating and using, 5 overview of, xiii resetting customizations, 436 tabs, removing, 432, 433 width, changing, xv Rich Text Format, 289 right-aligning text, 97, 98 right indent, 96, 102 rights management software, 400 Right Tab button, 125 487 row headings, 446 rows deleting, 129 inserting, 129 resizing, 129 setting properties of, 135 .rtf format, 289 rulers and gridlines displaying, 30, 96 hiding, 33 markers on, 96 setting tab stops with, 97 running Word 2010. See starting Word 2010 S sample templates, 17 saturation, 446 Save Address List dialog box, 372 Save As dialog box, 18, 20, 288, 290-291, 416 Save As Quick Style dialog box, 412 Save button, 5, 18-20, 369 saving blog posts, 304 saving documents, 18, 20 automatically, 19 creating folders for, 20 in different file format, 288 in .doc format, 289 as earlier version, 22 folders, creating for, 19 in new location, 19, 21 overwriting when, 19 as PDF files, 290 in Rich Text Format, 289 as templates, 415 as Web pages, 297. See also Web pages as XPS files, 290, 291 in Word 97-2003 format, 289 saving templates, 408 saving themes, 83, 85 scaling printed pages, 184 screen magnification, changing, xvi screen resolution, xv ScreenTips customizing display of, 6 defined, 446 displaying, xxv, 10 feature descriptions, hiding in, 423 language, specifying, 426 overview of, xxv for search results, 50 viewing, 6 488 scroll bar navigation scroll bar navigation, 24 searching for templates, 18 searching for text, 49, 52 advanced options for, 50, 53 in bilingual dictionary, 59 keyboard shortcut for, 49 matching case when, 51 and replacing, 51, 54 ScreenTips with page numbers for, 50 search direction, specifying, 51 sound-alikes, 51 wildcards in searches, 51, 447 searching Help, xxviii section breaks for columns, 116, 118 defining, 446 deleting, 190 formatting mark designating, 190, 192 inserting, 190, 192 overview of, 190 sections, changing margins for, 184 Select Browse Object button, 25, 27 Select button, 118, 129, 296 Select Data Source dialog box, 358 selecting, 446 selecting all keyboard shortcut for, 41 with Select button, 190 selecting documents, 296 selecting index entry fields, 342 selecting tables, 129 selecting text, 41, 44, 47, 117. See also highlighting text all, 41, 118, 190 by line, 79 deselecting, 42 with similar formatting, 331 in tables, 131 Selection And Visibility task pane, 281 selection area, 41, 446 Selection Pane button, 280 Select Recipients button, 371 Select Table dialog box, 359 Send Backward button, 280 Send button, 384 sending documents via e-mail, 381-382 sending e-mail messages, 384 sentences, selecting, 41 Set Hyperlink ScreenTip dialog box, 314 Set Numbering Value dialog box, 110 Set Target Frame dialog box, 311 Shading button (tables), 139 shading cells, 138 paragraphs, 104 Shape Fill button, 214 Shapes gallery, 214 Share page of Backstage view, 15 SharePoint file location, setting default, 424 sharing documents, 15 shortcuts, keyboard, 449 creating, 449, 450 defined, 444 deleting, 451 for bolding text, 89 for building blocks, 70 for centering text, 97, 119 for clearing formatting, 94 for copying text, 43 for cursor placement, 25, 27 for cutting text, 43, 169 for demoting outline headings, 270 for document navigation, 47, 54 for expanding outline headings, 270 for finding text, 49 for Font dialog box display, 92 for font size, 92 for formatting marks, 44 for Go To function, 322 for inserting page breaks, 191 for inserting SmartArt graphics, 205 for justifying text, 97, 118 for left-aligning text, 97 for line breaks, 97 for moving outline headings, 271 for navigation, 31 for pasting text, 43 for printing, 184 for repeating editing, 43, 122 for replacing text, 52, 106 for Research task pane, 55 for right-aligning text, 97 for selecting all, 41, 118 for selecting documents, 296 for underlining text, 89 for undoing editing, 43 moving cursor with, 24 Show/Hide ¶ button, 30, 44, 125, 345 Show Level button, 269 Show Markup button, 385, 386, 390, 395 Show Table of Contents button, xxvii Shrink Font button, 92 synonyms sidebars inserting, 168 resizing, 169 side-by-side page display, 32 signatures, digital, 384 sizing diagrams, 207, 209, 218 sizing handles, 446 sizing pictures, 146 SkyDrive, 380 SmartArt button, 204, 205, 217 SmartArt graphics, 203, 446. See also diagrams gallery of, 212 inserting, 205, 217 keyboard shortcuts for, 205 SmartArt Styles gallery, 212 smart cut and paste, 45 soft page breaks, 188, 446 Sort button, 107, 111 Sort button (tables), 130 sorting lists, 107, 111 sorting mail merge data sources, 357, 361 sorting tables, 130 Sort Text dialog box, 113 source files, 446 Source Manager entering sources, 347, 348 opening, 348 Source Manager dialog box, 348 sources. See also citations compiling, 347 editing, 349 entering in Source Manager, 347, 348 inserting, 350 style guide, setting, 348 spaces, automatic insertion of, 45 spacing, column, 120. See also paragraph spacing special text. See text effects Spelling And Grammar dialog box, 64, 67 spelling errors, fixing, 39 with AutoCorrect, 64-65 flagging of, 20 with shortcut menu, 64, 66 with Spelling and Grammar dialog box, 64 Spelling & Grammar button, 64, 67 Split Cells button, 130 splitting cells, 130 splitting documents, 30 stacked objects, 273 arranging, 280 defined, 446 Start button, 4 Start Enforcing Protection dialog box, 403 starting Word 2010, 4, 9 Start Mail Merge button, 358, 375 Start menu, displaying, 4 statistics, 69 status bar cursor location on, 24 default items on, 8 defined, 446 strong passwords, 397 style area pane, 268 Style Pane Options dialog box, 409 styles applying, 409-411, 415 creating, 413, 417 deleting, 413 displaying available, 409 displaying style area pane, 268 editing, 413 limiting, 400-401 modifying, 411-413, 417 overview of, 409 previewing, 410 removing from gallery, 413 replacing, 421 reverting to original, 413 updating, 411, 417 styles, character, 411 style sets. See also Quick Styles changing, 76, 80 displaying list of, 77 live preview of, 77 saving, 412 styles, linked, 411 styles, paragraph, 411 styles, picture, 148 styles, table, 136-137 styles, table of contents, 333, 335-336 Styles task pane, 409 subdocuments, 269 subentries, 446 summaries, viewing, 197 switches, 446 switches, in fields, 316 switching documents, 35 switching templates, 420 Switch Windows button, 284, 312 synonyms. See also Thesaurus defined, 55 searching for, 55, 61 489 490 T tabbed lists tabbed lists. See also tab stops defined, 446 entering text for, 123 formatting text in, 124 overview of, 123 setting up, 123 tab leaders, 446 Table button, 130, 140, 283 table columns deleting, 129 inserting, 129 resizing, 129 setting width of, 135 Table of Contents button, 333 Table Of Contents dialog box, 333, 335 Table Of Contents gallery, 333 Table Properties dialog box, 135 tables, 115. See also nested tables; Quick Tables aligning text, 132, 139 alt text, entering, 135 banded rows, 137 borders around cells, 138 borders, removing, 284 calculations in, 134 captions, inserting, 338 cell width, setting, 135 centering text in, 131 column width, setting, 133, 135 components of, 128 converting to/from regular text, 128, 132 copying, 284 creating, 126, 130 cutting and pasting, 129 deleting rows/columns/cells, 129 drawing, 127, 282-283 entering text, 128, 131 formatting, 136 formatting text in, 131 headings, turning sideways, 139 inserting rows/columns/cells, 129, 131-132 margin settings, 135 merging cells, 129, 131 move handle, 128-129, 133 moving, 129 navigating in, 128 overview of, 125 page layout with, 282 previewing, 130 resizing, 129, 133 row properties, setting, 135 saving as Quick Tables, 141 selecting elements in, 129, 131 shading cells, 138 size handle, 128, 133 sorting, 130 splitting cells, 130 styles, applying, 285 total rows, 137 width, setting, 135 tables of authorities creating, 339 defined, 446 tables of contents. See also indexes creating, 332-333, 335 defined, 446 deleting, 335 formatting, 333 in Help window, displaying, xxvii linking entries in, 332 overview of, 329 paragraph spacing, setting, 337 selecting field, 336 styles for, 333, 335-336 tab leaders, setting, 336 updating, 333, 336 tables of figures creating, 338 defined, 446 table styles, 136 defined, 446 previewing, 137 Table Styles gallery, 136-137 tabs, 5, 446 tabs, keyboard, 33. See also formatting marks tabs, ribbon customizing, 432 removing, 432, 433 renaming, 435 tab stops. See also tabbed lists center-aligned, setting, 124 default, 97 defined, 446 deleting, 98 left-aligned, setting, 97, 98 moving, 98 precisely placing, 98 right-aligned, setting, 125 tagging documents, 197 tags, HTML, 293 templates applying, 414 attaching, 408, 420 tracking changes building blocks in, 408 Building Blocks template, 408 Compatibility Mode, 406 components of, 407-408 creating, 408 creating documents with, 406 default, 406 defined, 447 displaying, 15 downloading, 406 file name extensions, 408 global, 408, 421 graphic elements, 407 macros in, 408 Normal template, 406, 408-409 opening, 419 organizing, 416 placeholders in, 407 previewing, 18 recently used, 17 sample, installed with Word, 17, 406 saving, 408 saving documents as, 415 searching for, 18 switching, 420 Templates And Add-Ins dialog box, 420, 431 Templates folder, 408 text entering, 19, 40 formatting in columns, 116 hiding, 30, 342 selecting. See selecting text text boxes defined, 447 drawing, 172 inserting, 167 linking, 172 overview of, 159 positioning, 172 replacing text in, 167 saving to Quick Parts Gallery, 170 Text Direction button, 139 text effects applying, 77, 81, 92 defined, 443 live preview of, 81 Text Effects button, 77, 81 text files, 289 Text Highlight Color button, 93, 439 Text pane closing, 207 opening, 206 Text Pane button, 206 textures, applying to backgrounds, 154 text wrapping, 274 absolute vs. relative positioning, 273 breaks. See line breaks defined, 447 around diagrams, 208 layout options for, 274 around objects, 273, 274 around quote boxes, 297 around WordArt, 175 theme colors, 83 changing, 93 previewing effects of, 12 Theme Colors button, 83 Theme Fonts button, 84 themes applying, 82-83 color set, changing, 84 defined, 447 displaying gallery of, 12 font set, changing, 85 live preview of, 83 from Microsoft Office Online Web site, 83 mixing and matching, 83 overview of, 82 saving, 83, 85 Themes button, 12, 82-83 Thesaurus finding synonyms in, 61 overview of, 55 Thesaurus button, 55, 61 3-D borders, 104 thumbnails defined, 447 of formatting options, 9 tick-marks, 447 title bar, 4 title, document, 196 titles, Web page, 297 toolbars. See specific toolbars total rows in tables, 137 Track Changes button, 388, 390 Track Changes Options dialog box, 389 tracking changes. See also revisions in balloons, 389-390, 392 final version, displaying, 392 options, setting, 389 toggle button, adding, 388 turning off, 393 turning on, 388, 390 user information, changing, 389 491 492 Translate button Translate button, 58, 62 translating text entire documents, 60 options for, 62 Translation Language Options dialog box, 60 Trust Center, 428-429 Trust Center dialog box, 429 trusted locations, setting, 429 .txt format, 289 typos. See spelling errors, fixing U Underline button, 89 underlining text, 89 Undo button, 5, 44, 46, 270, 276 undoing editing, 43-44, 46 unencrypted password protection, 396 unloading add-ins, 431 Update Citations And Bibliography button, 348 Update Index button, 342, 346 Update Table button, 336 Update Table Of Contents dialog box, 336 updating bibliographies, 348 updating cross-references, 326 updating fields, 317, 318, 320 automatically, 319 updating indexes, 342, 346 updating tables of contents, 333, 336 updating styles, 411, 417 upgrading Word, x, xi uploading pictures to blogs, 303 uppercase, formatting text as, 94 user information, 389 user interface color scheme, 423 user interface elements, 3-4 user name AutoText for, changing, 166 setting, 423 V version control, 380 vertical scoll bar, 24 View Ruler button, 96 views, switching, 29. See also specific views View Shortcuts toolbar, 8, 29, 447 View tab, 13 Document Views group, 29 Macros group, 30 W Web browsers opening Web pages in, 298 previewing documents in, 29, 34 setting for Web pages, 294-295 Web Layout button, 34, 295 Web Layout view, 29, 295, 447 Web links (hyperlinks), 309 appearance of, 310, 312 in blog posts, 304 deleting, 310 editing, 310, 314 for e-mail addresses, 313 following, 312 inserting, 310 jumping to target, 310, 312 opening in new window, 312 ScreenTips for, 312, 314 targets, setting, 310, 311 Web logs. See blogs Web Options dialog box, 294, 295 Web Page, Filtered format, 294 Web pages, 447. See also HTML format browsers, setting, 294-295 Compatibility Checker, 298 conversion settings, 427 entering text, 298 Filtered format, 294 indentation, changing, 296 Office-specific tags, removing, 294 opening, 298 previewing documents as, 295 quote boxes, modifying, 296 saving documents as, 293, 297 Single File format, 294 titles, setting, 297 unsupported formatting error, 293 Web Page, Single File format, 294 white space between pages, hiding, 31 wide margins, 186, 192 widows defined, 188, 447 setting options for, 188, 191 wildcards in searches, 51, 447 windows, switching, 284 Windows Live Online Services, 380 Windows Live SkyDrive, 380 Windows Live Spaces, 300, 302 Windows Live Translator, 60 Word 2003, upgrading from, xi Word 2007, upgrading from, x Zoom Slider Word 2010 closing, 4 compatibility with earlier versions, 22, 289 first time starting, 9 new features in, x starting, 4, 9 upgrading to, x, xi uses for, ix WordArt button, 174 WordArt objects centering, 174 converting text into, 173 defined, 447 inserting, 173, 174 overview of, 173 positioning, 174 starting new lines in, 174 styles, applying, 176 text wrapping, 175 word count, 69 Word Count button, 69 Word Count dialog box, 69 Word Help button, xxv, xxvi, 7, 447 Word Help window navigating, xxvii opening, xxvi printing from, xxviii searching, xxviii table of contents, displaying, xxvii topics, displaying, xxvi Word icon, 4 Word Options dialog box, 6, 15, 295, 370, 422, 423, 426, 431, 449 word processing, 3, 447 words, selecting, 41, 44 word wrap, 447 works cited, 347. See also citations; sources wrapping text, 175, 274, 447 absolute vs. relative positioning, 273 around diagrams, 208 around objects, 273, 274 around quote boxes, 297 layout options for, 274 Wrap Text button, 175, 208, 274, 297 Wrap Text gallery, 274 X x-axis, 447 XML data, removing custom, 198 XML (Extensible Markup Language), 442 XML file formats, 22 XML Paper Specification (XPS). See XPS files XML tags, 446 XPS files creating, 290 opening after publishing, 292 optimizing size, 290 options for, 290, 292 page range, setting, 292 printing documents to, 199 saving documents as, 290, 291 sending documents as, 382 XPS Viewer, 292 Y y-axis, 447 Z z-axis, 447 Zoom button (preview), 185 Zoom dialog box, 31, 185 Zoom In button, 33 zooming in/out, 30, 78 by percentage, 33 displaying multiple pages, 32, 185 to full page, 152 Zoom Level button, 8, 30, 31, 33, 152, 161 Zoom Out button, 33, 78, 167 Zoom Slider, 8 493 About the Authors Joyce Cox Joyce has 30 years’ experience in the development of training materials about technical subjects for non-technical audiences, and is the author of dozens of books about Office and Windows technologies. She is the Vice President of Online Training Solutions, Inc. (OTSI). As President of and principal author for Online Press, she developed the Quick Course series of computer training books for beginning and intermediate adult learners. She was also the first managing editor of Microsoft Press, an editor for Sybex, and an editor for the University of California. Joan Preppernau Joan has worked in the training and certification industry for 13 years. As President of OTSI, Joan is responsible for guiding the translation of technical information and requirements into useful, relevant, and measurable training and certification tools. Joan is a Microsoft Office Master (MOM), a Microsoft Certified Application Specialist (MCAS), a Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS), a Microsoft Certified Trainer (MCT), and the author of more than two dozen books about Windows and Office (for Windows and Mac). The Team This book would not exist without the support of these hard-working members of the OTSI publishing team: ● Kathleen Atkins ● Jan Bednarczuk ● Jenny Moss Benson ● Rob Carr ● Susie Carr ● Jeanne Craver ● Patty Gardner ● Elizabeth Hansford ● Kathy Krause ● Marlene Lambert ● Patty Masserman ● Brianna Morgan ● Jaime Odell ● Jean Trenary ● Liv Trenary ● Elisabeth Van Every We are especially thankful to the support staff at home who make it possible for our team members to devote their time and attention to these projects. Devon Musgrave provided invaluable support on behalf of Microsoft Learning. Online Training Solutions, Inc. (OTSI) OTSI specializes in the design, creation, and production of Office and Windows training products for information workers and home computer users. For more information about OTSI, visit: www.otsi.com What do you think of this book? We want to hear from you! To participate in a brief online survey, please visit: microsoft.com/learning/booksurvey Tell us how well this book meets your needs—what works effectively, and what we can do better. Your feedback will help us continually improve our books and learning resources for you. Thank you in advance for your input! Stay in touch! To subscribe to the Microsoft Press® Book Connection Newsletter—for news on upcoming books, events, and special offers—please visit: microsoft.com/learning/books/newsletter www.FreeDownload.ir SurvPage_corp.indd 1 8/14/09 4:40 AM ... View Full Document

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