Lecture_Notes_Rankine_Cycle
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Lecture_Notes_Rankine_Cycle

Course Number: ENG mece, Fall 2013

College/University: Columbia

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1.1kviBode Plotvo10nF2.Bode Plot3.1kviBode Plot1k10nFvo10nF4.1nHviBode Plotvo1pF25
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1.1kviBode Plotvo10nF2.Bode Plot3.1kviBode Plot1k10nFvo10nF4.1nHviBode Plotvo1pF25
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Wayne State University - BIO - 2200
Experiment 2-6:Agar Deep Stabs (pgs 48-49)/ Agar Shakes/Experiment 2-7: Fluid Thioglycollate Medium (pgs.50-51)/ Experiment 2-8: Anaerobic Jar (pgs 52-53)Purpose: To learn how to determine the oxygen requirements of bacteria and how to growthem in liq
Wayne State University - BIO - 2200
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9/10/10Experiment 1-4: (pgs.25-28) /Pure Culture Technique/ Complex andDened Media (Handout)Purpose: To learn the methods for making a pure culture.Pure culture: culture containing only one kind of microorganismAlways use aseptic technique.Two Diffe
Wayne State University - BIO - 2200
Experiment 2-1: Ubiquity of Microorganisms(pgs 33-35), 2-2 and 2-4(pgs 36-43;45): Cultural CharacteristicsPurpose: To demonstrate the wide distribution of bacteria. Also, to show the importance ofaseptic technique (so pure, uncontaminated cultures can
Wayne State University - BIO - 2200
5/6/13Experiment 3-3: Examination of Eukaryotic Microbes (pgs 79-83)/Experiment 3-4: Microscopic Examination of Pond Water (pgs84-94) Purpose: To learn and understand the workings of a brighteld microscope and to attemptto identify the microscopic or
Wayne State University - BIO - 2200
1/7/13Experiment 3-1: Brighteld Microscopy (pgs 69-74)Purpose: To familiarize oneself with the components and the workings of abrighteld microscope4 Types of Light Microscopes:Bright-eld MicroscopeDark-eld MicroscopePhase contrast MicroscopeFluore
Wayne State University - BIO - 2200
9/7/10Experiment 3-5: Smear Preparation (pgs. 95-102)Purpose: To learn the proper procedure for making a smear, which will help in later labswhen staining bacteria. An improperly made smear could allow the bacteria to wash off theslide or be too thick
Wayne State University - BIO - 2200
8/8/13Experiment 6-5: Plaque Assay of Virus Titre (pgs 255-258)/Handout: Isolation of Bacteriophage from SewagePurpose: To learn about bacteriophage and to isolate them fromsewage.Viruses vs. Bacteria- viruses are smaller, non-cellular, and intracel
Wayne State University - BIO - 2200
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Wayne State University - BIO - 2200
8/27/13BIO 2200MICROBIOLOGYLABORATORYTA Name:Section : Email:Ofce Hrs:(By prior appointment by email.)TOTAL POINTS FOR BIO 2200LECTURELABTOTAL - 600 - 400 - 1000LAB 400 POINTSDAILY QUIZZESRECORD NOTEBOOKMIDTERMFINAL PRACTICALTOTAL-