SMPS reference manual
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SMPS reference manual

Course: E E 16280, Fall 2013

School: University of Texas

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SWITCHMODEt Power Supplies Reference Manual and Design Guide SMPSRM/D Rev. 3A, July2002 SCILLC, 2006 Previous Edition 2002 All Rights Reserved SMPSRM ON Semiconductor and are registered trademarks of Semiconductor Components Industries, LLC (SCILLC). SCILLC reserves the right to make changes without further notice to any products herein. SCILLC makes no warranty, representation or guarantee regarding the...

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Power SWITCHMODEt Supplies Reference Manual and Design Guide SMPSRM/D Rev. 3A, July2002 SCILLC, 2006 Previous Edition 2002 All Rights Reserved SMPSRM ON Semiconductor and are registered trademarks of Semiconductor Components Industries, LLC (SCILLC). SCILLC reserves the right to make changes without further notice to any products herein. SCILLC makes no warranty, representation or guarantee regarding the suitability of its products for any particular purpose, nor does SCILLC assume any liability arising out of the application or use of any product or circuit, and specifically disclaims any and all liability, including without limitation special, consequential or incidental damages. Typical parameters which may be provided in SCILLC data sheets and/or specifications can and do vary in different applications and actual performance may vary over time. All operating parameters, including Typicals must be validated for each customer application by customers technical experts. SCILLC does not convey any license under its patent rights nor the rights of others. SCILLC products are not designed, intended, or authorized for use as components in systems intended for surgical implant into the body, or other applications intended to support or sustain life, or for any other application in which the failure of the SCILLC product could create a situation where personal injury or death may occur. Should Buyer purchase or use SCILLC products for any such unintended or unauthorized application, Buyer shall indemnify and hold SCILLC and its officers, employees, subsidiaries, affiliates, and distributors harmless against all claims, costs, damages, and expenses, and reasonable attorney fees arising out of, directly or indirectly, any claim of personal injury or death associated with such unintended or unauthorized use, even if such claim alleges that SCILLC was negligent regarding the design or manufacture of the part. SCILLC is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. This literature is subject to all applicable copyright laws and is not for resale in any manner. PUBLICATION ORDERING INFORMATION LITERATURE FULFILLMENT: Literature Distribution Center for ON Semiconductor P.O. Box 5163, Denver, Colorado 80217 USA Phone: 3036752175 or 8003443860 Toll Free USA/Canada Fax: 3036752176 or 8003443867 Toll Free USA/Canada Email: orderlit@onsemi.com N. American Technical Support: 8002829855 Toll Free USA/Canada Europe, Middle East and Africa Technical Support: Phone: 421 33 790 2910 Japan Customer Focus Center Phone: 81357733850 www.onsemi.com 2 ON Semiconductor Website: www.onsemi.com Order Literature: http://www.onsemi.com/orderlit For additional information, please contact your local Sales Representative SMPSRM Forward Every new electronic product, except those that are battery powered, requires converting offline 115 Vac or 230 Vac power to some dc voltage for powering the electronics. The availability of design and application information and highly integrated semiconductor control ICs for switching power supplies allows the designer to complete this portion of the system design quickly and easily. Whether you are an experienced power supply designer, designing your first switching power supply or responsible for a make or buy decision for power supplies, the variety of information in the SWITCHMODE Power Supplies Reference Manual and Design Guide should prove useful. ON Semiconductor has been a key supplier of semiconductor products for switching power supplies since we introduced bipolar power transistors and rectifiers designed specifically for switching power supplies in the mid70s. We identified these as SWITCHMODE products. A switching power supply designed using ON Semiconductor components can rightfully be called a SWITCHMODE power supply or SMPS. This brochure contains useful background information on switching power supplies for those who want to have more meaningful discussions and are not necessarily experts on power supplies. It also provides real SMPS examples, and identifies several application notes and additional design resources available from ON Semiconductor, as well as helpful books available from various publishers and useful web sites for those who are experts and want to increase their expertise. An extensive list and brief description of analog ICs, power transistors, rectifiers and other discrete components available from ON Semiconductor for designing a SMPS are also provided. This includes our newest GreenLine, Easy Switcher and very high voltage ICs (VHVICs), as well as high efficiency HDTMOS and HVTMOS power FETs, and a wide choice of discrete products in surface mount packages. For the latest updates and additional information on analog and discrete products for power supply and power management applications, please visit our website: (www.onsemi.com). MEGAHERTZ, POWERTAP, SENSEFET, SWITCHMODE, and TMOS are trademarks of Semiconductor Components Industries, LLC. HDTMOS and HVTMOS are registered trademarks of Semiconductor Components Industries, LLC. GreenLine, SMARTMOS and Motorola are trademarks of Motorola Inc. www.onsemi.com 3 SMPSRM Table of Contents Page Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Linear versus Switching Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Switching Power Supply Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 The ForwardMode Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 The FlybackMode Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Common Switching Power Supply Topologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Interleaved Multiphase Converters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Selecting the Method of Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 The Choice of Semiconductors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Power Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 The Bipolar Power Transistor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 The Power MOSFET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Driving MOSFETs in Switching Power Supply Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 The Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Rectifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 The Magnetic Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Laying Out the Printed Circuit Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Losses and Stresses in Switching Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Techniques to Improve Efficiency in Switching Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 The Synchronous Rectifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Snubbers and Clamps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 The Lossless Snubber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 The Active Clamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 QuasiResonant Topologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Power Factor Correction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 SMPS Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Integrated Circuits for Switching Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Suggested Components for Specific Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Literature Available from ON Semiconductor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Application Notes, Brochures, Device Data Books and Device Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References for Switching Power Supply Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Websites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 56 58 58 59 Analog ICs for SWITCHMODE Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 www.onsemi.com 4 SMPSRM Introduction A low dropout (LDO) regulator uses an improved output stage that can reduce Vdrop to considerably less than 1.0 V. This increases the efficiency and allows the linear regulator to be used in higher power applications. Designing with a linear regulator is simple and cheap, requiring few external components. A linear design is considerably quieter than a switcher since there is no highfrequency switching noise. Switching power supplies operate by rapidly switching the pass units between two efficient operating states: cutoff, where there is a high voltage across the pass unit but no current flow; and saturation, where there is a high current through the pass unit but at a very small voltage drop. Essentially, the semiconductor power switch creates an AC voltage from the input DC voltage. This AC voltage can then be steppedup or down by transformers and then finally filtered back to DC at its output. Switching power supplies are much more efficient, ranging from 65 to 95 percent. The downside of a switching design is that it is considerably more complex. In addition, the output voltage contains switching noise, which must be removed for many applications. Although there are clear differences between linear and switching regulators, many applications require both types to be used. For example, a switching regulator may provide the initial regulation, then a linear regulator may provide postregulation for a noisesensitive part of the design, such as a sensor interface circuit. The neverending drive towards smaller and lighter products poses severe challenges for the power supply designer. In particular, disposing of excess heat generated by power semiconductors is becoming more and more difficult. Consequently it is important that the power supply be as small and as efficient as possible, and over the years power supply engineers have responded to these challenges by steadily reducing the size and improving the efficiency of their designs. Switching power supplies offer not only higher efficiencies but also greater flexibility to the designer. Recent advances in semiconductor, magnetic and passive technologies make the switching power supply an ever more popular choice in the power conversion arena. This guide is designed to give the prospective designer an overview of the issues involved in designing switchmode power supplies. It describes the basic operation of the more popular topologies of switching power supplies, their relevant parameters, provides circuit design tips, and information on how to select the most appropriate semiconductor and passive components. The guide also lists the ON Semiconductor components expressly built for use in switching power supplies. Linear versus Switching Power Supplies Switching and linear regulators use fundamentally different techniques to produce a regulated output voltage from an unregulated input. Each technique has advantages and disadvantages, so the application will determine the most suitable choice. Linear power supplies can only stepdown an input voltage to produce a lower output voltage. This is done by operating a bipolar transistor or MOSFET pass unit in its linear operating mode; that is, the drive to the pass unit is proportionally changed to maintain the required output voltage. Operating in this mode means that there is always a headroom voltage, Vdrop, between the input and the output. Consequently the regulator dissipates a considerable amount of power, given by (Vdrop Iload). This headroom loss causes the linear regulator to only be 35 to 65 percent efficient. For example, if a 5.0 V regulator has a 12 V input and is supplying 100 mA, it must dissipate 700 mW in the regulator in order to deliver 500 mW to the load , an efficiency of only 42 percent. The cost of the heatsink actually makes the linear regulator uneconomical above 10 watts for small applications. Below that point, however, linear regulators are costeffective in stepdown applications. Switching Power Supply Fundamentals There are two basic types of pulsewidth modulated (PWM) switching power supplies, forwardmode and boostmode. They differ in the way the magnetic elements are operated. Each basic type has its advantages and disadvantages. The ForwardMode Converter The forwardmode converter can be recognized by the presence of an LC filter on its output. The LC filter creates a DC output voltage, which is essentially the volttime average of the LC filters input AC rectangular waveform. This can be expressed as: Vout [ Vin @ duty cycle (eq. 1) The switching power supply controller varies the duty cycle of the input rectangular voltage waveform and thus controls the signals volttime average. The buck or stepdown converter is the simplest forwardmode converter, which is shown in Figure 1. www.onsemi.com 5 SMPSRM LO SW Ion INDUCTOR CURRENT (AMPS) DIODE VOLTAGE (VOLTS) Vin Ioff D Cout Rload Vsat Power Switch ON Power Switch OFF Power Switch ON Power Switch OFF TIME Vfwd Ipk Iload Imin Power SW Diode Power SW Diode TIME Figure 1. A Basic ForwardMode Converter and Waveforms (Buck Converter Shown) clamped when the catch diode D becomes forward biased. The stored energy then continues flowing to the output through the catch diode and the inductor. The inductor current decreases from an initial value ipk and is given by: Its operation can be better understood when it is broken into two time periods: when the power switch is turned on and turned off. When the power switch is turned on, the input voltage is directly connected to the input of the LC filter. Assuming that the converter is in a steadystate, there is the output voltage on the filters output. The inductor current begins a linear ramp from an initial current dictated by the remaining flux in the inductor. The inductor current is given by: iL(on) + (Vin * Vout) t ) iinit L 0 v t v ton Vt iL(off) + ipk * out L 0 v t v toff (eq. 3) The off period continues until the controller turns the power switch back on and the cycle repeats itself. The buck converter is capable of over one kilowatt of output power, but is typically used for onboard regulator applications whose output powers are less than 100 watts. Compared to the flybackmode converter, the forward converter exhibits lower output peaktopeak ripple voltage. The disadvantage is that it is a stepdown topology only. Since it is not an isolated topology, for safety reasons the forward converter cannot be used for input voltages greater than 42.5 VDC. (eq. 2) During this period, energy is stored as magnetic flux within the core of the inductor. When the power switch is turned off, the core contains enough energy to supply the load during the following off period plus some reserve energy. When the power switch turns off, the voltage on the input side of the inductor tries to fly below ground, but is www.onsemi.com 6 SMPSRM The FlybackMode Converter The basic flybackmode converter uses the same components as the basic forwardmode converter, but in a different configuration. Consequently, it operates in a different fashion from the forwardmode converter. The most elementary flybackmode converter, the boost or stepup converter, is shown in Figure 2. L D Cout Vin SW Ion Ioff Iload Rload SWITCH VOLTAGE (VOLTS) Vin Vflbk (Vout) Power Switch ON Vsat Power Switch ON Diode ON Power Switch ON Diode ON INDUCTOR CURRENT (AMPS) TIME Ipk Iload TIME Figure 2. A Basic BoostMode Converter and Waveforms (Boost Converter Shown) Again, its operation is best understood by considering the on and off periods separately. When the power switch is turned on, the inductor is connected directly across the input voltage source. The inductor current then rises from zero and is given by: Vt iL(on) + in L v t v 0on the output rectifier when its voltage exceeds the output voltage. The energy within the core of the inductor is then passed to the output capacitor. The inductor current during the off period has a negative ramp whose slope is given by: (eq. 4) iL(off) + Energy is stored within the flux in the core of the inductor. The peak current, ipk , occurs at the instant the power switch is turned off and is given by: Vt ipk + in on L (Vin * Vout) L (eq. 6) The energy is then completely emptied into the output capacitor and the switched terminal of the inductor falls back to the level of the input voltage. Some ringing is evident during this time due to residual energy flowing through parasitic elements such as the stray inductances and capacitances in the circuit. (eq. 5) When the power switch turns off, the switched side of the inductor wants to flyup in voltage, but is clamped by www.onsemi.com 7 SMPSRM to a 50 percent duty cycle. There must be a time period when the inductor is permitted to empty itself of its energy. The boost converter is used for boardlevel (i.e., nonisolated) stepup applications and is limited to less than 100150 watts due to high peak currents. Being a nonisolated converter, it is limited to input voltages of less than 42.5 VDC. Replacing the inductor with a transformer results in a flyback converter, which may be stepup or stepdown. The transformer also provides dielectric isolation from input to output. When there is some residual energy permitted to remain within the inductor core, the operation is called continuous mode. This can be seen in Figure 3. Energy for the entire on and off time periods must be stored within the inductor. The stored energy is defined by: EL + 0.5L @ ipk2 (eq. 7) SWITCH VOLTAGE (VOLTS) The boostmode inductor must store enough energy to supply the output load for the entire switching period (ton + toff). Also, boostmode converters are typically limited Vflbk (Vout) Vin Power Switch ON Power Switch ON Diode ON Diode ON INDUCTOR CURRENT (AMPS) TIME Vsat Ipk TIME Figure 3. Waveforms for a ContinuousMode Boost Converter Common Switching Power Supply Topologies 5. How much of the input voltage is placed across the primary transformer winding or inductor? Factor 1 is a safetyrelated issue. Input voltages above 42.5 VDC are considered hazardous by the safety regulatory agencies throughout the world. Therefore, only transformerisolated topologies must be used above this voltage. These are the offline applications where the power supply is plugged into an AC source such as a wall socket. Multiple outputs require a transformerbased topology. The input and output grounds may be connected together if the input voltage is below 42.5 VDC. Otherwise full dielectric isolation is required. A topology is the arrangement of the power devices and their magnetic elements. Each topology has its own merits within certain applications. There are five major factors to consider when selecting a topology for a particular application. These are: 1. Is inputtooutput dielectric isolation required for the application? This is typically dictated by the safety regulatory bodies in effect in the region. 2. Are multiple outputs required? 3. Does the prospective topology place a reasonable voltage stress across the power semiconductors? 4. Does the prospective topology place a reasonable current stress upon the power semiconductors? www.onsemi.com 8 SMPSRM Cost is a major factor that enters into the topology decision. There are large overlaps in the performance boundaries between the topologies. Sometimes the most costeffective choice is to purposely design one topology to operate in a region that usually is performed by another. This, though, may affect the reliability of the desired topology. Figure 4 shows where the common topologies are used for a given level of DC input voltage and required output power. Figures 5 through 12 show the common topologies. There are more topologies than shown, such as the Sepic and the Cuk, but they are not commonly used. Factors 3, 4 and 5 have a direct affect upon the reliability of the system. Switching power supplies deliver constant power to the output load. This power is then reflected back to the input, so at low input voltages, the input current must be high to maintain the output power. Conversely, the higher the input voltage, the lower the input current. The design goal is to place as much as possible of the input voltage across the transformer or inductor so as to minimize the input current. Boostmode topologies have peak currents that are about twice those found in forwardmode topologies. This makes them unusable at output powers greater than 100150 watts. 1000 DC INPUT VOLTAGE (V) HalfBridge 100 Flyback FullBridge 42.5 NonIsolated 10 FullBridge Very High Buck Peak Currents 10 100 1000 OUTPUT POWER (W) Figure 4. Where Various Topologies Are Used www.onsemi.com 9 SMPSRM L Power Switch D Vin Cin VFWD VD + + 0 IPK Vout + Cout Control IL Feedback 0 TIME Vin TIME ILOAD IMIN Figure 5. The Buck (StepDown) Converter VFLBK L 0 + + SW Control D ON SW ON D Cin Vin D ON VSAT VSW TIME Vin Vout Cout IPK IL ISW 0 ID TIME Figure 6. The Boost (StepUp) Converter + VL Control Vin Vin TIME 0 SW D Cin + L Vout Vout Cout + Feedback IL ISW 0 ID TIME IPK Figure 7. The BuckBoost (Inverting) Converter VFLBK VSAT SW ON VSW TIME 0 + Vin N1 Cin Control Vin D N2 Cout + + Vout IPRI SW 0 IPK TIME ISEC Feedback 0 Figure 8. The Flyback Converter www.onsemi.com 10 TIME SMPSRM + LO D T + N2 N1 Cout Cin Vin + Vout SW Control Feedback SW ON VSW 0 VSAT TIME 2Vin IPRI 0 TIME IMIN IPK Figure 9. The OneTransistor Forward Converter (Half Forward Converter) SW1 D1 T LO + + D2 Cout + SW2 Vin Cin Control Feedback 2Vin SW2 Vin VSW SW1 TIME 0 VSAT IPK IPRI Vout 0 TIME IMIN Figure 10. The PushPull Converter www.onsemi.com 11 SMPSRM LO Ds + + Cout Vout + N2 XFMR SW1 T Cin Control Vin N1 SW2 C C Feedback Vin SW1 V in 2 SW2 VSW2 0 TIME VSAT IPK IPRI TIME 0 IMIN Figure 11. The HalfBridge Converter LO Ds + Cout + + XFMR Vin Vout N2 SW1 T Cin N1 Control SW3 XFMR C SW4 SW2 Vin SW V in 2 1-4 SW 2-3 VSW2 0 TIME VSAT IPK ISW2 0 TIME IMIN Figure 12. The FullBridge Converter www.onsemi.com 12 SMPSRM Interleaved Multiphase Converters The input and output capacitors are shared among the phases. The input capacitor sees less RMS ripple current because the peak currents are less and the combined duty cycle of the phases is greater than it would experience with a single phase converter. The output capacitor can be made smaller because the frequency of current waveform is ntimes higher and its combined duty cycle is greater. The semiconductors also see less current stress. A block diagram of an interleaved multiphase buck converter is shown in Figure 13. This is a 2phase topology that is useful in providing power to a high performance microprocessor. One method of increasing the output power of any topology and reducing the stresses upon the semiconductors, is a technique called interleaving. Any topology can be interleaved. An interleaved multiphase converter has two or more identical converters placed in parallel which share key components. For an nphase converter, each converter is driven at a phase difference of 360/n degrees from the next. The output current from all the phases sum together at the output, requiring only Iout/n amperes from each phase. + + VIN CIN SA1 SA2 VFDBK Control LA GATEA1 GATEA2 + + GND CFA CFB COUT GATEB2 GATEB1 SB1 CS5308 LB SB2 Current Feedback A Current Feedback B Voltage Feedback Figure 13. Example of a TwoPhase Buck Converter with Voltage and Current Feedback www.onsemi.com 13 VOUT SMPSRM Selecting the Method of Control select the one that is wanted. Table 1 summarizes the features of each of the popular methods of control. Certain methods are better adapted to certain topologies due to reasons of stability or transient response. There are three major methods of controlling a switching power supply. There are also variations of these control methods that provide additional protection features. One should review these methods carefully and then carefully review the controller IC data sheets to Table 1. Common Control Methods Used in ICs Control Method Voltage Mode VoltageMode Current Mode CurrentMode Hysteric Voltage OC Protection Response Time Preferred Topologies Average OC Slow ForwardMode PulsebyPulse OC Slow ForwardMode Intrinsic Rapid BoostMode Hysteretic Rapid Boost & ForwardMode Average Slow Boost & ForwardMode Voltagemode control (see Figure 14) is typically used for forwardmode topologies. In voltagemode control, only the output voltage is monitored. A voltage error signal is calculated by forming the difference between Vout (actual) and Vout(desired). This error signal is then fed into a comparator that compares it to the ramp voltage generated by the internal oscillator section of the control IC. The comparator thus converts the voltage error signal into the PWM drive signal to the power switch. Since the only control parameter is the output voltage, and there is inherent delay through the power circuit, voltagemode control tends to respond slowly to input variations. Overcurrent protection for a voltagemode controlled converter can either be based on the average output current or use a pulsebypulse method. In average overcurrent protection, the DC output current is monitored, and if a threshold is exceeded, the pulse width of the power switch is reduced. In pulsebypulse overcurrent protection, the peak current of each power switch on cycle is monitored and the power switch is instantly cutoff if its limits are exceeded. This offers better protection to the power switch. Currentmode control (see Figure 15) is typically used with boostmode converters. Currentmode control monitors not only the output voltage, but also the output current. Here the voltage error signal is used to control the peak current within the magnetic elements during each power switch ontime. Currentmode control has a very rapid input and output response time, and has an inherent overcurrent protection. It is not commonly used for forwardmode converters; their current waveforms have much lower slopes in their current waveforms which can create jitter within comparators. Hysteretic control is a method of control which tries to keep a monitored parameter between two limits. There are hysteretic current and voltage control methods, but they are not commonly used. The designer should be very careful when reviewing a prospective control IC data sheet. The method of control and any variations are usually not clearly described on the first page of the data sheet. www.onsemi.com 14 SMPSRM VCC OSC Charge Clock Ramp Verror Discharge Ct Volt Comp. VFB + + + Pulsewidth Comparator Vref Steering Average Overcurrent Protection Cur. Comp. Iout (lavOC) or ISW (PPOC) Output Gating Logic Verror Amp. Current Amp. + RCS + PulsebyPulse Overcurrent Protection VOC VSS Figure 14. VoltageMode Control VCC OSC Ct + Discharge Volt Comp. Output Gating Logic S Verror Amp. VFB + Verror Output Q R + Vref Current Comparator S R + ISW Verror RCS VSS Ipk ISW Figure 15. TurnOn with Clock CurrentMode Control www.onsemi.com 15 S SMPSRM The Choice of Semiconductors One should generate a gate drive voltage that is as close to 0.7 volts as possible. This is to minimize any loss created by dropping the base drive voltage at the required base current to the level exhibited by the base. A second consideration is the storage time exhibited by the collector during its turnoff transition. When the base is overdriven, or where the base current is more than needed to sustain the collector current, the collector exhibits a 0.32 ms delay in its turnoff which is proportional to the base overdrive. Although the storage time is not a major source of loss, it does significantly limit the maximum switching frequency of a bipolarbased switching power supply. There are two methods of reducing the storage time and increasing its switching time. The first is to use a base speedup capacitor whose value, typically around 100 pF, is placed in parallel with the base current limiting resistor (Figure 16a). The second is to use proportional base drive (Figure 16b). Here, only the amount of needed base current is provided by the drive circuit by bleeding the excess around the base into the collector. The last consideration with BJTs is the risk of excessive second breakdown. This phenomenon is caused by the resistance of the base across the die, permitting the furthest portions of the collector to turn off later. This forces the current being forced through the collector by an inductive load, to concentrate at the opposite ends of the die, thus causing an excessive localized heating on the die. This can result in a shortcircuit failure of the BJT which can happen instantaneously if the amount of current crowding is great, or it can happen later if the amount of heating is less. Current crowding is always present when an inductive load is attached to the collector. By switching the BJT faster, with the circuits in Figure 15, one can greatly reduce the effects of second breakdown on the reliability of the device. Power Switches The choice of which semiconductor technology to use for the power switch function is influenced by many factors such as cost, peak voltage and current, frequency of operation, and heatsinking. Each technology has its own peculiarities that must be addressed during the design phase. There are three major power switch choices: the bipolar junction transistor (BJT), the power MOSFET, and the integrated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). The BJT was the first power switch to be used in this field and still offers many cost advantages over the others. It is also still used for very low cost or in high power switching converters. The maximum frequency of operation of bipolar transistors is less than 80100 kHz because of some of their switching characteristics. The IGBT is used for high power switching converters, displacing many of the BJT applications. They too, though, have a slower switching characteristic which limits their frequency of operation to below 30 kHz typically although some can reach 100 kHz. IGBTs have smaller die areas than power MOSFETs of the same ratings, which typically means a lower cost. Power MOSFETs are used in the majority of applications due to their ease of use and their higher frequency capabilities. Each of the technologies will be reviewed. The Bipolar Power Transistor The BJT is a current driven device. That means that the base current is in proportion to the current drawn through the collector. So one must provide: IB u IC hFE (eq. 8) In power transistors, the average gain (hFE) exhibited at the higher collector currents is between 5 and 20. This could create a large base drive loss if the base drive circuit is not properly designed. VBB VBB + 100 pF Control IC 100 pF Control IC VCE + VBE Power Ground Power Ground (a) Fixed Base Drive Circuit (b) Proportional Base Drive Circuit (Baker Clamp) Figure 16. Driving a Bipolar Junction Transistor www.onsemi.com 16 SMPSRM The Power MOSFET From the gate terminal, there are two capacitances the designer encounters, the gate input capacitance (Ciss) and the draingate reverse capacitance (Crss). The gate input capacitance is a fixed value caused by the capacitance formed between the gate metalization and the substrate. Its value usually falls in the range of 8003200 pF, depending upon the physical construction of the MOSFET. The Crss is the capacitance between the drain and the gate, and has values in the range of 60150 pF. Although the Crss is smaller, it has a much more pronounced effect upon the gate drive. It couples the drain voltage to the gate, thus dumping its stored charge into the gate input capacitance. The typical gate drive waveforms can be seen in Figure 18. Time period t1 is only the Ciss being charged or discharged by the impedance of the external gate drive circuit. Period t2 shows the effect of the changing drain voltage being coupled into the gate through Crss. One can readily observe the flattening of the gate drive voltage during this period, both during the turnon and turnoff of the MOSFET. Time period t3 is the amount of overdrive voltage provided by the drive circuit but not really needed by the MOSFET. Power MOSFETs are the popular choices used as power switches and synchronous rectifiers. They are, on the surface, simpler to use than BJTs, but they have some hidden complexities. A simplified model for a MOSFET can be seen in Figure 17. The capacitances seen in the model are specified within the MOSFET data sheets, but can be nonlinear and vary with their applied voltages. CDG Coss CGS Figure 17. The MOSFET Model TURN ON t1 VDR t3 t3 t2 t2 VGS 0 TURNOFF Vth t1 Vpl VDS 0 IG + 0 Figure 18. Typical MOSFET Drive Waveforms (Top: VGS, Middle: VDG, Bottom: IG) www.onsemi.com 17 SMPSRM Driving MOSFETs in Switching Power Supply Applications There are three things that are very important in the high frequency driving of MOSFETs: there must be a totempole driver; the drive voltage source must be well bypassed; and the drive devices must be able to source high levels of current in very short periods of time (low compliance). The optimal drive circuit is shown in Figure 19. The time needed to switch the MOSFET between on and off states is dependent upon the impedance of the gate drive circuit. It is very important that the drive circuit be bypassed with a capacitor that will keep the drive voltage constant over the drive period. A 0.1 mF capacitor is more than sufficient. VG VG LOAD LOAD Ron Roff a. Passive TurnON VG b. Passive TurnOFF VG LOAD c. Bipolar Totempole LOAD d. MOS Totempole Figure 19. Bipolar and FETBased Drive Circuits (a. Bipolar Drivers, b. MOSFET Drivers) www.onsemi.com 18 SMPSRM circuit. Both of the series capacitors must be more than 10 times the value of the Ciss of the MOSFET so that the capacitive voltage divider that is formed by the series capacitors does not cause an excessive attenuation. The circuit can be seen in Figure 20. Sometimes it is necessary to provide a dielectricallyisolated drive to a MOSFET. This is provided by a drive transformer. Transformers driven from a DC source must be capacitively coupled from the totempole driver circuit. The secondary winding must be capacitively coupled to the gate with a DC restoration T VG C RG 1k C 1:1 C > 10 Ciss Figure 20. TransformerIsolated Gate Drive The Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) Rectifiers Rectifiers represent about 60 percent of the losses in nonsynchronous switching power supplies. Their choice has a very large effect on the efficiency of the power supply. The significant rectifier parameters that affect the operation of switching power supplies are: forward voltage drop (Vf), which is the voltage across the diode when a forward current is flowing the reverse recovery time (trr), which is how long it requires a diode to clear the minority charges from its junction area and turn off when a reverse voltage is applied the forward recovery time (tfrr) which is how long it take a diode to begin to conduct forward current after a forward voltage is applied. There are four choices of rectifier technologies: standard, fast and ultrafast recovery types, and Schottky barrier types. A standard recovery diode is only suitable for 5060 Hz rectification due to its slow turnoff characteristics. These include common families such as the 1N4000 series diodes. Fastrecovery diodes were first used in switching power supplies, but their turnoff time is considered too slow for most modern applications. They may find application where low cost is paramount, however. Ultrafast recovery diodes turn off quickly and have a forward voltage drop of 0.8 to 1.3 V, together with a high reverse voltage capability of up to 1000 V. A Schottky rectifier turns off very quickly and has an average forward voltage drop of between 0.35 and 0.8 V, but has a low reverse breakdown voltage and The IGBT is a hybrid device with a MOSFET as the input device, which then drives a siliconcontrolled rectifier (SCR) as a switched output device. The SCR is constructed such that it does not exhibit the latching characteristic of a typical SCR by making its feedback gain less than 1. The die area of the typical IGBT is less than onehalf that of an identically rated power MOSFET, which makes it less expensive for highpower converters. The only drawback is the turnoff characteristic of the IGBT. Being a bipolar minority carrier device, charges must be removed from the PN junctions during a turnoff condition. This causes a current tail at the end of the turnoff transition of the current waveform. This can be a significant loss because the voltage across the IGBT is very high at that moment. This makes the IGBT useful only for frequencies typically less than 20 kHz, or for exceptional IGBTs, 100 kHz. To drive an IGBT one uses the MOSFET drive circuits shown in Figures 18 and 19. Driving the IGBT gate faster makes very little difference in the performance of an IGBT, so some reduction in drive currents can be used. The voltage drop of across the collectortoemitter (VCE) terminals is comparable to those found in Darlington BJTs and MOSFETs operated at high currents. The typical VCE of an IGBT is a flat 1.52.2 volts. MOSFETs, acting more resistive, can have voltage drops of up to 5 volts at the end of some high current ramps. This makes the IGBT, in high current environments, very comparable to MOSFETs in applications of less than 530 kHz. www.onsemi.com 19 SMPSRM a high reverse leakage current. For a typical switching power supply application, the best choice is usually a Schottky rectifier for output voltages less than 12 V, and an ultrafast recovery diode for all other output voltages. The major losses within output rectifiers are conduction losses and switching losses. The conduction loss is the forward voltage drop times the current flowing through it during its conduction period. This can be significant if its voltage drop and current are high. The switching losses are determined by how fast a diode turns off (trr) times the reverse voltage across the rectifier. This can be significant for high output voltages and currents. The characteristics of power rectifiers and their applications in switching power supplies are covered in great detail in Reference (5). The major losses within output rectifiers are conduction losses and switching losses. The conduction loss is the forward voltage drop times the current flowing through it during its conduction period. This can be significant if its voltage drop and current are high. The switching losses are determined by how fast a diode turns off (trr) times the reverse voltage across the rectifier. This can be significant for high output voltages and currents. Table 2. Types of Rectifier Technologies Rectifier Type Average Vf Reverse Recovery Time Typical Applications Standard Recovery 0.71.0 V 1,000 ns 5060 Hz Rectification Fast Recovery 1.01.2 V 150200 ns Output Rectification UltraFast Recovery 0.91.4 V 2575 ns Output Rectification (Vo > 12 V) Schottky 0.30.8 V < 10 ns Output Rectification (Vo < 12 V) Table 3. Estimating the Significant Parameters of the Power Semiconductors Topology Topology Bipolar Pwr Sw MOSFET Pwr Sw Rectifier VCEO IC VDSS ID VR IF Buck Vin Iout Vin Iout Vin Iout Boost Vout (2.0 Pout) Vin(min) Vout (2.0 Pout) Vin(min) Vout Iout Buck/Boost Vin * Vout (2.0 Pout) Vin(min) Vin * Vout (2.0 Pout) Vin(min) Vin * Vout Iout 1.7 Vin(max) (2.0 Pout) Vin(min) 1.5 Vin(max) (2.0 Pout) Vin(min) 5.0 Vout Iout Flyback 1 Transistor Forward 2.0 Vin (1.5 Pout) Vin(min) 2.0 Vin (1.5 Pout) Vin(min) 3.0 Vout Iout PushPull 2.0 Vin (1.2 Pout) Vin(min) 2.0 Vin (1.2 Pout) Vin(min) 2.0 Vout Iout HalfBridge Vin (2.0 Pout) Vin(min) Vin (2.0 Pout) Vin(min) 2.0 Vout Iout FullBridge Vin (1.2 Pout) Vin(min) Vin (2.0 Pout) Vin(min) 2.0 Vout Iout www.onsemi.com 20 SMPSRM The Magnetic Components Coiltronics, Division of Cooper Electronics Technology The magnetic elements within a switching power supply are used either for steppingup or down a switched AC voltage, or for energy storage. In forwardmode topologies, the transformer is only used for steppingup or down the AC voltage generated by the power switches. The output filter (the output inductor and capacitor) in forwardmode topologies is used for energy storage. In boostmode topologies, the transformer is used both for energy storage and to provide a stepup or stepdown function. Many design engineers consider the magnetic elements of switching power supplies counterintuitive or too complicated to design. Fortunately, help is at hand; the suppliers of magnetic components have applications engineers who are quite capable of performing the transformer design and discussing the tradeoffs needed for success. For those who are more experienced or more adventuresome, please refer to Reference 2 in the Bibliography for transformer design guidelines. The general procedure in the design of any magnetic component is as follows (Reference 2, p 42): 1. Select an appropriate core material for the application and the frequency of operation. 2. Select a core form factor that is appropriate for the application and that satisfies applicable regulatory requirements. 3. Determine the core crosssectional area necessary to handle the required power 4. Determine whether an airgap is needed and calculate the number of turns needed for each winding. Then determine whether the accuracy of the output voltages meets the requirements and whether the windings will fit into the selected core size. 5. Wind the magnetic component using proper winding techniques. 6. During the prototype stage, verify the components operation with respect to the level of voltage spikes, crossregulation, output accuracy and ripple, RFI, etc., and make corrections were necessary. The design of any magnetic component is a calculated estimate. There are methods of stretching the design limits for smaller size or lower losses, but these tend to be diametrically opposed to one another. One should be cautious when doing this. Some useful sources for magnetics components are: 6000 Park of Commerce Blvd Boca Raton, FL (USA) 33487 website: http://www.coiltronics.com Telephone: 5612417876 Cramer Coil, Inc. 401 Progress Dr. Saukville, WI (USA) 53080 website: http://www.cramerco.com email: techsales@cramercoil.com Telephone: 2622682150 Pulse, Inc. San Diego, CA website: http://www.pulseeng.com Telephone: 8586748100 TDK 1600 Feehanville Drive Mount Prospect, IL 60056 website: http://www.component.talk.com Telephone: 8478036100 Laying Out the Printed Circuit Board The printed circuit board (PCB) layout is the third critical portion of every switching power supply design in addition to the basic design and the magnetics design. Improper layout can adversely affect RFI radiation, component reliability, efficiency and stability. Every PCB layout will be different, but if the designer appreciates the common factors present in all switching power supplies, the process will be simplified. All PCB traces exhibit inductance and resistance. These can cause high voltage transitions whenever there is a high rate of change in current flowing through the trace. For operational amplifiers sharing a trace with power signals, it means that the supply would be impossible to stabilize. For traces that are too narrow for the current flowing through them, it means a voltage drop from one end of the trace to the other which potentially can be an antenna for RFI. In addition, capacitive coupling between adjacent traces can interfere with proper circuit operation. There are two rules of thumb for PCB layouts: short and fat for all powercarrying traces and one point grounding for the various ground systems within a switching power supply. Traces that are short and fat minimize the inductive and resistive aspects of the trace, thus reducing noise within the circuits and RFI. Singlepoint grounding keeps the noise sources separated from the sensitive control circuits. CoilCraft, Inc. 1102 Silver Lake Rd. Cary, IL (USA) 60013 website: http://www.coilcraft.com/ email: info@coilcraft.com Telephone: 8476396400 www.onsemi.com 21 SMPSRM Within all switching power supplies, there are four major current loops. Two of the loops conduct the highlevel AC currents needed by the supply. These are the power switch AC current loop and the output rectifier AC current loop. The currents are the typical trapezoidal current pulses with very high peak currents and very rapid di/dts. The other two current loops are the input source and the output load current loops, which carry low frequency current being supplied from the voltage source and to the load respectively. For the power switch AC current loop, current flows from the input filter capacitor through the inductor or transformer winding, through the power switch and back to the negative pin of the input capacitor. Similarly, the output rectifier current loops current flows from the inductor or secondary transformer winding, through the rectifier to the output filter capacitor and back to the inductor or winding. The filter capacitors are the only components that can source and sink the large levels of AC current in the time needed by the switching power supply. The PCB traces should be made as wide and as short as possible, to minimize resistive and inductive effects. These traces should be the first to be laid out. Turning to the input source and output load current loops, both of these loops must be connected directly to their respective filter capacitors terminals, otherwise switching noise could bypass the filtering action of the capacitor and escape into the environment. This noise is called conducted interference. These loops can be seen in Figure 21 for the two major forms of switching power supplies, nonisolated (Figure 21a) and transformerisolated (Figure 21b). Power Switch Current Loop Output Rectifier Current Loop L Vout SW Input Current Loop Output Load Current Loop + Vin VFB Control Cin Cout Analog GND C A Input Source Ground B Power Switch Ground Join Output Load Ground Output Rectifier Ground Join Join (a) The NonIsolated DC/DC Converter Output Rectifier Current Loop Power Switch Current Loop Input Current Loop Output Load Current Loop Vout VFB SW + Vin Cout Cin Control FB RCS Analog GND C A Input Source Ground B Output Rectifier Ground Output Load Ground Join Join Power Switch Ground Join (b) The TransformerIsolated Converter Figure 21. The Current Loops and Grounds for the Major Converter Topologies www.onsemi.com 22 SMPSRM The last important factor in the PCB design is the layout surrounding the AC voltage nodes. These are the drain of the power MOSFET (or collector of a BJT) and the anode of the output rectifier(s). These nodes can capacitively couple into any trace on different layers of the PCB that run underneath the AC pad. In surface mount designs, these nodes also need to be large enough to provide heatsinking for the power switch or rectifier. This is at odds with the desire to keep the pad as small as possible to discourage capacitive coupling to other traces. One good compromise is to make all layers below the AC node identical to the AC node and connect them with many vias (platedthrough holes). This greatly increases the thermal mass of the pad for improved heatsinking and locates any surrounding traces off laterally where the coupling capacitance is much smaller. An example of this can be seen in Figure 22. Many times it is necessary to parallel filter capacitors to reduce the amount of RMS ripple current each capacitor experiences. Close attention should be paid to this layout. If the paralleled capacitors are in a line, the capacitor closest to the source of the ripple current will operate hotter than the others, shortening its operating life; the others will not see this level of AC current. To ensure that they will evenly share the ripple current, ideally, any paralleled capacitors should be laid out in a radiallysymmetric manner around the current source, typically a rectifier or power switch. The PCB layout, if not done properly, can ruin a good paper design. It is important to follow these basic guidelines and monitor the layout every step of the process. The grounds are extremely important to the proper operation of the switching power supply, since they form the reference connections for the entire supply; each ground has its own unique set of signals which can adversely affect the operation of the supply if connected improperly. There are five distinct grounds within the typical switching power supply. Four of them form the return paths for the current loops described above. The remaining ground is the lowlevel analog control ground which is critical for the proper operation of the supply. The grounds which are part of the major current loops must be connected together exactly as shown in Figure 21. Here again, the connecting point between the highlevel AC grounds and the input or output grounds is at the negative terminal of the appropriate filter capacitor (points A and B in Figures 21a and 21b). Noise on the AC grounds can very easily escape into the environment if the grounds are not directly connected to the negative terminal of the filter capacitor(s). The analog control ground must be connected to the point where the control IC and associated circuitry must measure key power parameters, such as AC or DC current and the output voltage (point C in Figures 21a and 21b). Here any noise introduced by large AC signals within the AC grounds will sum directly onto the lowlevel control parameters and greatly affect the operation of the supply. The purpose of connecting the control ground to the lower side of the current sensing resistor or the output voltage resistor divider is to form a Kelvin contact where any common mode noise is not sensed by the control circuit. In short, follow the example given by Figure 21 exactly as shown for best results. Power Device Via PlatedThru Hole PCB Top PCB Bottom Figure 22. Method for Minimizing AC Capacitive Coupling and Enhancing Heatsinking www.onsemi.com 23 SMPSRM Losses and Stresses in Switching Power Supplies the circuitry, and some are controlled by simply selecting a different part. Identifying the major sources for loss can be as easy as placing a finger on each of the components in search of heat, or measuring the currents and voltages associated with each power component using an oscilloscope, AC current probe and voltage probe. Semiconductor losses fall into two categories: conduction losses and switching losses. The conduction loss is the product of the terminal voltage and current during the power devices on period. Examples of conduction losses are the saturation voltage of a bipolar power transistor and the on loss of a power MOSFET shown in Figure 23 and Figure 24 respectively. SATURATION VOLTAGE STORAGE TIME CLEARING RECTIFIERS IPEAK SATURATION CURRENT TURN-OFF CURRENT SATURATION LOSS TURN-ON LOSS TURN-OFF LOSS SWITCHING LOSS Figure 23. Stresses and Losses within a Bipolar Power Transistor IPEAK PINCHING OFF INDUCTIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE TRANSFORMER ON CURRENT TURN-ON CURRENT CURRENT TAIL CURRENT CROWDING PERIOD SECOND BREAKDOWN PERIOD FALL TIME CLEARING RECTIFIERS PINCHING OFF INDUCTIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE TRANSFORMER TURN-ON CURRENT ON VOLTAGE RISE TIME INSTANTANEOUS ENERGY LOSS (JOULES) COLLECTOR CURRENT (AMPS) FALL TIME VPEAK DRAIN CURRENT (AMPS) COLLECTOR-TO-EMITTER (VOLTS) VPEAK RISE DYNAMIC TIME SATURATION INSTANTANEOUS ENERGY LOSS (JOULES) DRAIN-TO-SOURCE VOLTAGE (VOLTS) Much of the designers time during a switching power supply design is spent in identifying and minimizing the losses within the supply. Most of the losses occur in the power components within the switching power supply. Some of these losses can also present stresses to the power semiconductors which may affect the long term reliability of the power supply, so knowing where they arise and how to control them is important. Whenever there is a simultaneous voltage drop across a component with a current flowing through, there is a loss. Some of these losses are controllable by modifying TURN-OFF CURRENT ON LOSS TURN-ON LOSS TURN-OFF LOSS SWITCHING LOSS Figure 24. Stresses and Losses within a Power MOSFET www.onsemi.com 24 SMPSRM creates a very large VI product which is as significant as the conduction losses. Switching losses are also the major frequency dependent loss within every PWM switching power supply. The lossinduced heat generation causes stress within the power component. can This be minimized by an effective thermal design. For bipolar power transistors, however, excessive switching losses can also provide a lethal stress to the transistor in the form of second breakdown and current crowding failures. Care should be taken in the careful analysis of each transistors Forward BiasedSafe Operating Area (FBSOA) and Reverse BiasedSafe Operating Area (RBSOA) operation. DIODE VOLTAGE (VOLTS) The forward conduction loss of a rectifier is shown in Figure 25. During turnoff, the rectifier exhibits a reverse recovery loss where minority carriers trapped within the PN junction must reverse their direction and exit the junction after a reverse voltage is applied. This results in what appears to be a current flowing in reverse through the diode with a high reverse terminal voltage. The switching loss is the instantaneous product of the terminal voltage and current of a power device when it is transitioning between operating states (ontooff and offtoon). Here, voltages are transitional between fullon and cutoff states while simultaneously the current is transitional between fullon and cutoff states. This FORWARD VOLTAGE REVERSE VOLTAGE DIODE CURRENT (AMPS) IPK FORWARD CONDUCTION CURRENT DEGREE OF DIODE RECOVERY ABRUPTNESS INSTANTANEOUS ENERGY LOSS (JOULES) FORWARD RECOVERY TIME (Tfr) REVERSE RECOVERY TIME (Trr) FORWARD CONDUCTION LOSS SWITCHING LOSS Figure 25. Stresses and Losses within Rectifiers Techniques to Improve Efficiency in Switching Power Supplies rectification is a technique to reduce this conduction loss by using a switch in place of the diode. The synchronous rectifier switch is open when the power switch is closed, and closed when the power switch is open, and is typically a MOSFET inserted in place of the output rectifier. To prevent crowbar current that would flow if both switches were closed at the same time, the switching scheme must be breakbeforemake. Because of this, a diode is still required to conduct the initial current during the interval between the opening of the main switch and the closing of the synchronous rectifier switch. A Schottky rectifier with a current rating of 30 percent of The reduction of losses is important to the efficient operation of a switching power supply, and a great deal of time is spent during the design phase to minimize these losses. Some common techniques are described below. The Synchronous Rectifier As output voltages decrease, the losses due to the output rectifier become increasingly significant. For Vout = 3.3 V, a typical Schottky diode forward voltage of 0.4 V leads to a 12% loss of efficiency. Synchronous www.onsemi.com 25 SMPSRM typical switching power supply. The synchronous rectifier can be driven either actively, that is directly controlled from the control IC, or passively, driven from other signals within the power circuit. It is very important to provide a nonoverlapping drive between the power switch(es) and the synchronous rectifier(s) to prevent any shootthrough currents. This dead time is usually between 50 to 100 ns. Some typical circuits can be seen in Figure 26. the MOSFET should be placed in parallel with the synchronous MOSFET. The MOSFET does contain a parasitic body diode that could conduct current, but it is lossy, slow to turn off, and can lower efficiency by 1% to 2%. The lower turnon voltage of the Schottky prevents the parasitic diode from ever conducting and exhibiting its poor reverse recovery characteristic. Using synchronous rectification, the conduction voltage can be reduced from 400 mV to 100 mV or less. An improvement of 15 percent can be expected for the Vin + Vout SW Drive GND Direct SR RG C VG C D 1k 1:1 C > 10 Ciss TransformerIsolated (a) Actively Driven Synchronous Rectifiers LO + Vout Primary (b) Passively Driven Synchronous Rectifiers Figure 26. Synchronous Rectifier Circuits www.onsemi.com 26 SMPSRM Snubbers and Clamps Snubbers and clamps are used for two very different purposes. When misapplied, the reliability of the semiconductors within the power supply is greatly jeopardized. A snubber is used to reduce the level of a voltage spike and decrease the rate of change of a voltage waveform. This then reduces the amount of overlap of the voltage and current waveforms during a transition, thus reducing the switching loss. This has its benefits in the Safe Operating Area (SOA) of the semiconductors, and it reduces emissions by lowering the spectral content of any RFI. A clamp is used only for reducing the level of a voltage spike. It has no affect on the dV/dt of the transition. ZENER CLAMP SOFT CLAMP Therefore it is not very useful for reducing RFI. It is useful for preventing components such as semiconductors and capacitors from entering avalanche breakdown. Bipolar power transistors suffer from current crowding which is an instantaneous failure mode. If a voltage spike occurs during the turnoff voltage transition of greater than 75 percent of its VCEO rating, it may have too much current crowding stress. Here both the rate of change of the voltage and the peak voltage of the spike must be controlled. A snubber is needed to bring the transistor within its RBSOA (Reverse Bias Safe Operating Area) rating. Typical snubber and clamp circuits are shown in Figure 27. The effects that these have on a representative switching waveform are shown in Figure 28. SNUBBER SNUBBER SOFT CLAMP ZENER CLAMP Figure 27. Common Methods for Controlling Voltage Spikes and/or RFI VOLTAGE (VOLTS) CLAMP SNUBBER ORIGINAL WAVEFORM t, TIME (sec) Figure 28. The Effects of a Snubber versus a Clamp www.onsemi.com 27 SMPSRM The Lossless Snubber A lossless snubber is a snubber whose trapped energy is recovered by the power circuit. The lossless snubber is designed to absorb a fixed amount of energy from the transition of a switched AC voltage node. This energy is stored in a capacitor whose size dictates how much energy the snubber can absorb. A typical implementation of a lossless snubber can be seen in Figure 29. The design for a lossless snubber varies from topology to topology and for each desired transition. Some adaptation may be necessary for each circuit. The important factors in the design of a lossless snubber are: 1. The snubber must have initial conditions that allow it to operate during the desired transition and at the desired voltages. Lossless snubbers should be emptied of their energy prior to the desired transition. The voltage to which it is reset dictates where the snubber will begin to operate. So if the snubber is reset to the input voltage, then it will act as a lossless clamp which will remove any spikes above the input voltage. 2. When the lossless snubber is reset, the energy should be returned to the input capacitor or back into the output power path. Study the supply carefully. Returning the energy to the input capacitor allows the supply to use the energy again on the next cycle. Returning the energy to ground in a boost mode supply does not return the energy for reuse, but acts as a shunt current path around the power switch. Sometimes additional transformer windings are used. 3. The reset current waveform should be band limited with a series inductor to prevent additional EMI from being generated. Use of a 2 to 3 turn spiral PCB inductor is sufficient to greatly lower the di/dt of the energy exiting the lossless snubber. Unsnubbed VSW + VSW Snubbed VSW ID Drain Current (ID) Figure 29. Lossless Snubber for a One Transistor Forward or Flyback Converter www.onsemi.com 28 SMPSRM The Active Clamp An active clamp is a gated MOSFET circuit that allows the controller IC to activate a clamp or a snubber circuit at a particular moment in a switching power supplys cycle of operation. An active clamp for a flyback converter is shown in Figure 30. In Figure 30, the active clamp is reset (or emptied of its stored energy) just prior to the turnoff transition. It is then disabled during the negative transition. Obviously, the implementation of an active clamp is more expensive than other approaches, and is usually reserved for very compact power supplies where heat is a critical issue. Unclamped Switch Voltage (VSW) Clamped Switch Voltage (VSW) Vin Switch Current (ISW) + ICL VDR + ISW VSW GND Drive Voltage (VDR) Discharge Charge Clamp Current (ICL) Figure 30. An Active Clamp Used in a One Transistor Forward or a Flyback Converter www.onsemi.com 29 SMPSRM QuasiResonant Topologies A quasiresonant topology is designed to reduce or eliminate the frequencydependent switching losses within the power switches and rectifiers. Switching losses account for about 40% of the total loss within a PWM power supply and are proportional to the switching frequency. Eliminating these losses allows the designer to increase the operating frequency of the switching power supply and so use smaller inductors and capacitors, reducing size and weight. In addition, RFI levels are reduced due to the controlled rate of change of current or voltage. The downside to quasiresonant designs is that they are more complex than nonresonant topologies due to parasitic RF effects that must be considered when switching frequencies are in the 100s of kHz. Schematically, quasiresonant topologies are minor modifications of the standard PWM topologies. A resonant tank circuit is added to the power switch section to make either the current or the voltage ring through a half a sinusoid waveform. Since the sinusoid starts at zero and ends at zero, the product of the voltage and current at the starting and ending points is zero, thus has no switching loss. There are two quasiresonant methods: zero current switching (ZCS) or zero voltage switching (ZVS). ZCS is a fixed ontime, variable offtime method of control. ZCS starts from an initial condition where the power switch is off and no current is flowing through the resonant inductor. The ZCS quasiresonant buck converter is shown in Figure 31. ILR LR CR VSW Vin Cin LO D Cout CONTROL Vout FEEDBACK A ZCS QuasiResonant Buck Converter V SW SWITCH TURN-OFF Vin POWER SWITCH ON VD I LR IPK Figure 31. Schematic and Waveforms for a ZCS Quasi-Resonant Buck Converter www.onsemi.com 30 SMPSRM power delivered to the load, the amount of resonant off times are varied. For light loads, the frequency is high. When the load is heavy, the frequency drops. In a typical ZVS power supply, the frequency typically varies 4:1 over the entire operating range of the supply. There are other variations on the resonant theme that promote zero switching losses, such as full resonant PWM, full and halfbridge topologies for higher power and resonant transition topologies. For a more detailed treatment, see Chapter 4 in the Power Supply Cookbook (Bibliography reference 2). In this design, both the power switch and the catch diode operate in a zero current switching mode. Power is passed to the output during the resonant periods. So to increase the power delivered to the load, the frequency would increase, and vice versa for decreasing loads. In typical designs the frequency can change 10:1 over the ZCS supplys operating range. The ZVS is a fixed offtime, variable ontime method control. Here the initial condition occurs when the power switch is on, and the familiar current ramp is flowing through the filter inductor. The ZVS quasiresonant buck converter is shown in Figure 32. Here, to control the LR LO D CR Vin Cin VI/P FEEDBACK CONTROL A ZVS QuasiResonant Buck Converter V I/P Vin POWER SWITCH TURNS ON 0 V I SW IPK V L *V R out )L O in R ILOAD ID 0 in L Figure 32. Schematic and Waveforms for a ZVS Quasi-Resonant Buck Converter www.onsemi.com 31 Cout Vout SMPSRM Power Factor Correction requiring all electrical equipment connected to a low voltage distribution system to minimize current harmonics and maximize power factor. 2. The reflected power not wasted in the resistance of the power cord may generate unnecessary heat in the source (the local stepdown transformer), contributing to premature failure and constituting a fire hazard. 3. Since the ac mains are limited to a finite current by their circuit breakers, it is desirable to get the most power possible from the given current available. This can only happen when the power factor is close to or equal to unity. The typical AC input rectification circuit is a diode bridge followed by a large input filter capacitor. During the time that the bridge diodes conduct, the AC line is driving an electrolytic capacitor, a nearly reactive load. This circuit will only draw current from the input lines when the inputs voltage exceeds the voltage of the filter capacitor. This leads to very high currents near the peaks of the input AC voltage waveform as seen in Figure 33. Since the conduction periods of the rectifiers are small, the peak value of the current can be 35 times the average input current needed by the equipment. A circuit breaker only senses average current, so it will not trip when the peak current becomes unsafe, as found in many office areas. This can present a fire hazard. In threephase distribution systems, these current peaks sum onto the neutral line, not meant to carry this kind of current, which again presents a fire hazard. Power Factor (PF) is defined as the ratio of real power to apparent power. In a typical AC power supply application where both the voltage and current are sinusoidal, the PF is given by the cosine of the phase angle between the input current and the input voltage and is a measure of how much of the current contributes to real power in the load. A power factor of unity indicates that 100% of the current is contributing to power in the load while a power factor of zero indicates that none of the current contributes to power in the load. Purely resistive loads have a power factor of unity; the current through them is directly proportional to the applied voltage. The current in an ac line can be thought of as consisting of two components: real and imaginary. The real part results in power absorbed by the load while the imaginary part is power being reflected back into the source, such as is the case when current and voltage are of opposite polarity and their product, power, is negative. It is important to have a power factor as close as possible to unity so that none of the delivered power is reflected back to the source. Reflected power is undesirable for three reasons: 1. The transmission lines or power cord will generate heat according to the total current being carried, the real part plus the reflected part. This causes problems for the electric utilities and has prompted various regulations VOLTAGE Power not used Power used 110/220 AC VOLTS IN I + CURRENT Clarge IAV Figure 33. The Waveforms of a Capacitive Input Filter www.onsemi.com 32 DC To Power Supply SMPSRM pulses generate more heat than a purely resistive load of the same power. The active power factor correction circuit is placed just following the AC rectifier bridge. An example can be seen in Figure 34. Depending upon how much power is drawn by the unit, there is a choice of three different common control modes. All of the schematics for the power sections are the same, but the value of the PFC inductor and the control method are different. For input currents of less than 150 watts, a discontinuousmode control scheme is typically used, in which the PFC core is completely emptied prior to the next power switch conduction cycle. For powers between 150 and 250 watts, the critical conduction mode is recommended. This is a method of control where the control IC senses just when the PFC core is emptied of its energy and the next power switch conduction cycle is immediately begun; this eliminates any dead time exhibited in the discontinuousmode of control. For an input power greater than 250 watts, the continuousmode of control is recommended. Here the peak currents can be lowered by the use of a larger inductor, but a troublesome reverse recovery characteristic of the output rectifier is encountered, which can add an additional 2040 percent in losses to the PFC circuit. Many countries cooperate in the coordination of their power factor requirements. The most appropriate document is IEC6100032, which encompasses the performance of generalized electronic products. There are more detailed specifications for particular products made for special markets. A Power Factor Correction (PFC) circuit is a switching power converter, essentially a boost converter with a very wide input range, that precisely controls its input current on an instantaneous basis to match the waveshape and phase of the input voltage. This represents a zero degrees or 100 percent power factor and mimics a purely resistive load. The amplitude of the input current waveform is varied over longer time frames to maintain a constant voltage at the converters output filter capacitor. This mimics a resistor which slowly changes value to absorb the correct amount of power to meet the demand of the load. Short term energy excesses and deficits caused by sudden changes in the load are supplemented by a bulk energy storage capacitor, the boost converters output filter device. The PFC input filter capacitor is reduced to a few microfarads, thus placing a halfwave haversine waveshape into the PFC converter. The PFC boost converter can operate down to about 30 V before there is insufficient voltage to draw any more significant power from its input. The converter then can begin again when the input haversine reaches 30 V on the next halfwave haversine. This greatly increases the conduction angle of the input rectifiers. The dropout region of the PFC converter is then filtered (smoothed) by the input EMI filter. A PFC circuit not only ensures that no power is reflected back to the source, it also eliminates the high current pulses associated with conventional rectifierfilter input circuits. Because heat lost in the transmission line and adjacent circuits is proportional to the square of the current in the line, short strong current Switch Current Input Voltage I Vout Vsense Csmall + Control Clarge To Power Supply Conduction Angle Voltage Figure 34. Power Factor Correction Circuit Current IAVG Figure 35. Waveform of Corrected Input www.onsemi.com 33 SMPSRM Bibliography 1. BenYaakov Sam, Gregory Ivensky, Passive Lossless Snubbers for High Frequency PWM Converters, Seminar 12, APEC 99. 2. Brown, Marty, Power Supply Cookbook, ButterworthHeinemann, 1994, 2001. 3. Brown, Marty, Laying Out PC Boards for Embedded Switching Supplies, Electronic Design, Dec. 1999. 4. Martin, Robert F., Harmonic Currents, Compliance Engineering 1999 Annual Resources Guide, Cannon Communications, LLC, pp. 103107. 5. ON Semiconductor, Rectifier Applications Handbook, HB214/D, Rev. 2, Nov. 2001. www.onsemi.com 34 SMPSRM SWITCHMODE Power Supply Examples This section provides both initial and detailed information to simplify the selection and design of a variety of SWITCHMODE power supplies. The ICs for Switching Power Supplies figure identifies control, reference voltage, output protection and switching regulator ICs for various topologies. Page ICs for Switching Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Integrated circuits identified for various sections of a switching power supply. Suggested Components for Specific Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 A list of suggested control ICs, power transistors and rectifiers for SWITCHMODE power supplies by application. CRT Display System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AC/DC Power Supply for CRT Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AC/DC Power Supply for Storage, Imaging & Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DCDC Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Typical PC ForwardMode SMPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 39 39 40 41 Real SMPS Applications 80 W Power Factor Correction Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Compact Power Factor Correction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitor PulsedMode SMPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 W Wide Mains TV SMPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 W Wide Mains TV SMPS with 1.3 W Standby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LowCost Offline IGBT Battery Charger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 W Output Flyback SMPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Efficient Safety Circuit for Electronic Ballast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACDC Battery Charger Constant Current with Voltage Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 43 44 46 48 50 51 53 55 Some of these circuits may have a more complete application note, spice model information or even an evaluation board available. Consult ON Semiconductors website (www.onsemi.com) or local sales office for more information. www.onsemi.com 35 www.onsemi.com 36 STARTUP MMSZ46xx MMSZ52xx MMBZ52xx STARTUP REF CS3843 CS51021 CS51022 CS51023 CS51024 CS5106 CS51220 CS51221 CONTROL OSC PWM SNUBBER/ CLAMP CONTROL CS51227 CS5124 MC33023 MC33025 MC33065 MC33067 MC33364 MC44603A TRANS FORMERS OUTPUT FILTERS MC44604 MC44605 MC44608 NCP1200 NCP1205 UC384x OUTPUT FILTERS MC33161 MC33164 MC3423 NCP30x NCP803 OUTPUT PROTECTION MAX707 MAX708 MAX809 MAX810 MC33064 VOLTAGE FEEDBACK MC33275 MC33761 MC34268 MC78xx MC78Bxx MC78Fxx MC78Lxx MC78Mxx MC78PCxx MC78Txx MC7905 MC7905.2 MC7905A MC7906 MC7908 MC7908A MC7912 MC7915 MC7918 MC7924 MC79Mxx NCP1117 NCP50x NCP51x VOLTAGE REGULATION L4949 LM2931 LM2935 LM317 LM317L LM317M LM337 LM350 LP2950 LP2951 MC33263 MC33269 V ref VOLTAGE REGULATION CS51031 MC34063A CS51033 MC34163 CS51411 MC34166 CS51412 MC34167 CS51413 NCP1400A CS51414 NCP1402 CS5171 NCP1410 CS5172 NCP1411 NCP1417 CS5173 CS5174 NCP1450A MC33463 NCP1550 MC33466 DCDC CONVERSION DCDC CONVERSION OUTPUT PROTECTION CS5101 NCP100 TL431/A/B TLV431A VOLTAGE FEEDBACK MBRS240L MBR1100 MBRS360 MBR3100 MBR360 MURHF860CT MURS360 MBRD360 MBRS1100 Figure 30. Integrated Circuits for Switching Power Supplies POWER SWITCH POWER MOS DRIVERS MC33153 1N62xxA 1N63xxA MUR160 MUR260 MURS160 MURS260 P6KExxxA P6SMB1xxA Figure 36. . Intergrated Ciruits for Switching Power Supplies HV SWITCHING REGULATORS MC33362 MC33363 MC33365 NCP100x NCP105x POWER FACTOR CORRECTION MC33260 MC33262 MC33368 MC34262 NCP1650 NCP1651 POWER FACTOR CORRECTION MC33152 MC33151 POWER MOS DRIVERS SNUBBER/ CLAMP SMPSRM USB HUB www.onsemi.com 37 600V 8A NCh MOSFET Sync Signal S.M.P.S Controller UC384x MC44603/5 MC44608 NCP1200 NCP1205 PFC Devices NCP1650 NCP1651 MC34262 MC33368 MC33260 Line A.C. RGB or I2C PWM H_Sync V_Sync I2C BUS MUR420 MUR440 MUR460 H_Sync V_Sync MC33363A/B NCP100x NCP105x NCP1200 HC05 CPU CORE MEMORY USB & Auxiliary Standby AC/DC Power Supply 1280 x 1024 10101100101 RWM G Overlayed RGB Figure 31. 15 Monitor Power Supplies Timebase Processor IRF630 / 640 / 730 /740 / 830 / 840 Geometry Correction B R RGB On Screen Display Generator Figure 37. . 15 Monitor Power Supplies UP DOWN H_Sync V_Sync SYNC PROCESSOR Monitor MCU Vertical Driver HDriver TR UC3842/3 MTP6P20E HOutput TR MTD6N10/15 RGB Line Driver HDriver DC TO DC CONTROLLER B G R Video Driver MUR8100E MUR4100E MUR460 Damper Diode CRT SMPSRM SMPSRM Ultrafast Rectifier Startup Switch Rectifier + Bulk Storage Capacitor AC Line + Load PWM Control IC MOSFET noutputs PWM Switcher Prog. Prec. Ref Figure 38. AC/DC Power Supply for CRT Displays Table 1. Part # Description Key Parameters Samples/Prod. MC33262 PFC Control IC Critical Conduction PFC Controller Now/Now MC33368 PFC Control IC Critical Conduction PFC Controller + Internal Startup Now/Now MC33260 PFC Control IC Low System Cost, PFC with Synchronization Capability, Follower Boost Mode, or Normal Mode Now/Now MC33365 PWM Control IC Fixed Frequency Controller + 700 V Startup, 1 A Power Switch Now/Now MC33364 PWM Control IC Variable Frequency Controller + 700 V Startup Switch Now/Now MC44603A/604 PWM Control IC GreenLine, Sync. Facility with Low Standby Mode Now/Now MC44605 PWM Control IC GreenLine, Sync. Facility, Currentmode Now/Now MC44608 PWM Control IC GreenLine, Fixed Frequency (40 kHz, 75 kHz and 100 kHz options), Controller + Internal Startup, 8pin Now/Now MSR860 Ultrasoft Rectifier 600 V, 8 A, trr = 55 ns, Ir max = 1 uA Now/Now MUR440 Ultrafast Rectifier 400 V, 4 A, trr = 50 ns, Ir max = 10 uA Now/Now MRA4006T3 Fast Recovery Rectifier 800 V, 1 A, Vf = 1.1 V @ 1.0 A Now/Now MR856 Fast Recovery Rectifier 600 V, 3 A, Vf = 1.25 V @ 3.0 A Now/Now NCP1200 PWM CurrentMode Controller 110 mA Source/Sink, O/P Protection, 40/60/110 kHz Now/Now NCP1205 SingleEnded PWM Controller Quasiresonant Operation, 250 mA Source/Sink, 836 V Operation Now/Now High Performance CurrentMode Controllers 500 kHz Freq., Totem Pole O/P, CyclebyCycle Current Limiting, UV Lockout Now/Now UC3842/3/4/5 www.onsemi.com 38 SMPSRM Ultrafast Rectifier Startup Switch Rectifier + Bulk Storage Capacitor AC Line + Load PWM Control IC MOSFET noutputs PWM Switcher Prog. Prec. Ref Figure 39. AC/DC Power Supply for Storage, Imaging & Entertainment Table 2. Part # Description Key Parameters Samples/Prod. MC33363A/B/65 PWM Control IC Controller + 700 V Startup & Power Switch, < 15 W Now/Now MC33364 PWM Control IC Critical Conduction Mode, SMPS Controller Now/Now 0.4% Tolerance, Prog. Output up to 36 V, Temperature Compensated Now/Now 200 V, 6 A, trr = 55 ns, Ir max = 1 uA Now/Now 600 V, 3 A, Vf = 1.25 V @ 3.0 A Now/Now TL431B MSRD620CT MR856 Program Precision Reference Ultrasoft Rectifier Fast Recovery Rectifier NCP1200 PWM CurrentMode Controller 110 mA Source/Sink, O/P Protection, 40/60/110 kHz Now/Now NCP1205 SingleEnded PWM Controller Quasiresonant Operation, 250 mA Source/Sink, 836 V Operation Now/Now High Performance CurrentMode Controllers 500 kHz Freq., Totem Pole O/P, CyclebyCycle Current Limiting, UV Lockout Now/Now UC3842/3/4/5 www.onsemi.com 39 SMPSRM Lo + V in Lo Voltage Regulation + Co Control IC Vout + V in Load + Control IC Co Vout Load Buck Regulator Synchronous Buck Regulator Figure 40. DC DC Conversion Table 3. Part # Description MC33263 Low Noise, Low Dropout Regulator IC MC33269 Medium Dropout Regulator IC MC33275/375 LP2950/51 Low Dropout Regulator Low Dropout, Fixed Voltage IC Key Parameters Samples/Prod. 150 mA; 8 Outputs 2.8 V 5 V; SOT 23L 6 Lead Package Now/Now 0.8 A; 3.3; 5, 12 V out; 1 V diff; 1% Tolerance Now/Now 300 mA; 2.5, 3, 3.3, 5 V out Now/Now 0.1 A; 3, 3.3, 5 V out; 0.38 V diff; 0.5% Tolerance Now/Now Iout = 150 mA, Available in 2.8 V, 3 V, 3.3 V, 5 V; SOT 23 5 Leads Now/Now MC78PC CMOS LDO Linear Voltage Regulator MC33470 Synchronous Buck Regulator IC Digital Controlled; Vcc = 7 V; Fast Response Now/Now NTMSD2P102LR2 PCh FET w/Schottky in SO8 20 V, 2 A, 160 mW FET/1 A, Vf = 0.46 V Schottky Now/Now NTMSD3P102R2 PCh FET w/Schottky in SO8 20 V, 3 A, 160 mW FET/1 A, Vf = 0.46 V Schottky Now/Now MMDFS6N303R2 NCh FET w/Schottky in SO8 30 V, 6 A, 35 mW FET/3 A, Vf = 0.42 V Schottky Now/Now NTMSD3P303R2 PCh FET w/Schottky in SO8 30 V, 3 A, 100 mW FET/3 A, Vf = 0.42 V Schottky Now/Now MBRM140T3 1A Schottky in POWERMITE Package 40 V, 1 A, Vf = 0.43 @ 1 A; Ir = 0.4 mA @ 40 V Now/Now MBRA130LT3 1A Schottky in SMA Package 40 V, 1 A, Vf = 0.395 @ 1 A; Ir = 1 mA @ 40 V Now/Now MBRS2040LT3 2A Schottky in SMB Package 40 V, 2 A, Vf = 0.43 @ 2 A; Ir = 0.8 mA @ 40 V Now/Now A(1), 12.5 mW @ 10 V MMSF3300 Single NCh MOSFET in SO8 30 V, 11.5 NTD4302 Single NCh MOSFET in DPAK 30 V, 18.3 A(1), 10 mW @ 10 V Now/Now Now/Now NTTS2P03R2 Single PCh MOSFET in Micro8 Package 30 V, 2.7 A, 90 mW @ 10 V Now/Now MGSF3454X/V Single NCh MOSFET in TSOP6 30 V, 4.2 A, 65 mW @ 10 V Now/Now NTGS3441T1 Single PCh MOSFET in TSOP6 20 V, 3.3 A, 100 mW @ 4.5 V Now/Now Prog. O/P Voltage 1.0, 1.3, 1.5, 1.8 V Now/Now NCP1500 Dual Mode PWM Linear Buck Converter NCP1570 Low Voltage Synchronous Buck Converter UV Lockout, 200 kHz Osc. Freq., 200 ns Response Now/Now NCP1571 Low Voltage Synchronous Buck Converter UV Lockout, 200 kHz Osc. Freq., 200 ns Response Now/Now Dual Synchronous Buck Converter 150 kHz600 kHz Prog. Freq., UV Lockout, 150 ns Transient Response Now/Now CS5422 (1) Continuous at TA = 25 C, Mounted on 1 square FR4 or G10, VGS = 10 V t 10 seconds www.onsemi.com 40 400 X1000 400 X1000 400 X1000 1N5404RL 1N5406RL 1N5408RL www.onsemi.com 41 600 X1000 600 X1000 600 X1000 600 MUR180E, MUR1100E MUR480E, MUR4100E MR756RL, MR760RL 1N4937 DIP8/SO8/SO14 DIP14/SO14 DIP16/SO16 DIP16/SO16 DIP16/SO16 DIP8 DIP16/SO16 DIP16/SO16 U384X Series MC34060 TL494 TL594 MC34023 MC44608 MC44603 MC44603A Part No. Package 5 V 0.1 A Part No. Voltage Standby Axial Axial Axial Mains 230 Vac 3 3 3 I o (A) Package V RRM (V) V RRM (V) Part No. 60 MBR160 Axial Axial Axial Axial 1 I o (A) Axial MATRIX + + + + + Package 12 V 0.8 A 5 V 0.5 A +12 V 6 A +5 V 22 A +3.3 V 14 A Figure 35. Typical 200 W ATX Forward Mode SMPS 1 4 6 1 I o (A) Package PWM IC + V RRM (V) Part No. V RRM (V) I o (A) 25 35 45 25 45 30 45 25 45 30 45 30 MBR2535CTL MBR2545CT MBR3045ST MBRF2545CT MBR3045PT MBR3045WT V RRM (V) TO220 TO220 TO220 TO220 TO220 TO220 Package TO92 TL431 SMC DPAK Axial Axial Axial Axial Package 3 3 3 3 3 Package I o (A) I o (A) 3 Package TO220 TO220 TO220 TO220 TO218 TO247 Package TO220 Package 20 20 20 16 16 16 Part No. 100 MBRS340T3 MBRD340 1N5821 1N5822 MBR340 V RRM (V) 40 40 30 40 40 Part No. Part No. V RRM (V) MBR2060CT MBR20100CT MBR20200CT MUR1620CT MUR1620CTR MURF1620CT MBR3100 60 100 200 200 200 200 Part No. Part No. I o (A) V RRM (V) I o (A) 25 35 Part No. MBR2535CTL SMPSRM Figure 41. . Typical 200 W ATX Forward Mode SMPS SMPSRM Application: 80 W Power Factor Controller 1 100 k R6 8 C5 MC33262 92 to 138 Vac RFI FILTER D2 D4 + ZERO CURRENT DETECTOR D1 D3 + 1.6 V/ 1.4 V 2.5 V REFERENCE TIMER 10 DRIVE OUTPUT 10 1.5 V OVERVOLTAGE MUR130 D5 7 500 V/8 A NCh MOSFET Q1 4 0.1 R7 10 pF COMPARATOR VO 230 V/ 0.35 A + MULTIPLIER ERROR AMP + 10 mA Vref 3 1 QUICKSTART 2 0.68 C1 Figure 42. 80 W Power Factor Controller Features: Reduced part count, lowcost solution. ON Semiconductor Advantages: Complete semiconductor solution based around highly integrated MC33262. Description MC33262 MUR130 Power Factor Controller Axial Lead Ultrafast Recovery Rectifier (300 V) Transformer Coilcraft N2881A Primary: 62 turns of #22 AWG Secondary: 5 turns of #22 AWG Core: Coilcraft PT2510 Gap: 0.072 total for a primary inductance (Lp) of 320 mH www.onsemi.com 42 220 C3 1.0 M R2 + 1.08 Vref 6 Devices: Part Number T 22 k R4 UVLO 20 k CURRENT SENSE COMPARATOR 7.5 k R3 5 16 V R RS LATCH 0.01 C2 6.7 V 100 C4 + 13 V/ 8.0 V DELAY 2.2 M R5 + 36 V 1.2 V 1N4934 D6 11 k R1 SMPSRM Application: Compact Power Factor Correction Vcc FUSE 0.33 F 1N5404 AC LINE 100 nF L1 + 10 F/ 16 V MAINS FILTER Vout MUR460 + 2 100 nF 3 8 MC33260 1 4 7 10 W 500 V/8 A NCh MOSFET 6 5 12 kW 1 MW 120 pF 45 kW 0.5 W/3 W 1 MW Figure 43. Compact Power Factor Correction Features : Lowcost system solution for boost mode follower. Meets IEC100032 standard. Critical conduction, voltage mode. Follower boost mode for system cost reduction smaller inductor and MOSFET can be used. Inrush current detection. Protection against overcurrent, overvoltage and undervoltage. ON Semiconductor advantages: Very low component count. No Auxiliary winding required. High reliability. Complete semiconductor solution. Significant system cost reduction. Devices: Part Number MC33260 MUR460 1N5404 Description Power Factor Controller Ultrafast Recovery Rectifier (600 V) General Purpose Rectifier (400 V) www.onsemi.com 43 100 F/ 450 V SMPSRM Application: Monitor PulsedMode SMPS 90 Vac to 270 Vac 22 H 1 nF/1 kV RFI FILTER MR856 4.7 MW 1 nF/500 V 1W 1 nF/500 V 120 pF 150 F 400 V 3.9 kW/6 W 1N4934 MCR226 100 nF 1N4934 22 kW 8 10 10 pF 47 kW 45 V/ 1A + 15 V/ 0.8 A + 10 V/ 0.3 A + 8 V/ 1.5 A 1000 F MR856 1 H 9 + MR856 + 47 F 25 V 3.3 kW 1.2 kW 4.7 kW 1N4148 2W SYNC + 47 F 47 F Vin D1 D4 1N5404 + 90 V/0.1 A SMT31 7 2.2 nF MR852 470 pF 6 MC44605P 4.7 F 2.2 kW 11 + 8.2 kW 12 22 470 1N4148 nF kW 13 2.2 nF 14 56 kW 4.7 F + 10 V 5 4.7 F+ 10 V 560 kW 4 3 15 2 16 150 kW 470 pF MR852 Note 1 220 F 10 W 1N4934 1 1 kW 270 W 470 W 56 kW 1000 F Lp 10 kW MBR360 0.1 W 4700 F 100 W MOC8107 1.8 MW 10 kW 96.8 kW Vin 100 nF TL431 2.7 kW 1N4742A 12 V 2.7 kW Note 1: 500 V/8 A NChannel MOSFET 1 kW BC237B 100 nF VmP FROM mP 0: STANDBY 1: NORMAL MODE Figure 44. Monitor PulsedMode SMPS www.onsemi.com 44 SMPSRM Features: Off power consumption: 40 mA drawn from the 8 V output in Burst mode. Vac (110 V) about 1 watt Vac (240 V) about 3 watts Efficiency (pout = 85 watts) Around 77% @ Vac (110 V) Around 80% @ Vac (240 V) Maximum Power limitation. Overtemperature detection. Winding short circuit detection. ON Semiconductor Advantages: Designed around high performance current mode controller. Builtin latched disabling mode. Complete semiconductor solution. Devices: Part Number MC44605P TL431 MR856 MR852 MBR360 BC237B 1N5404 1N4742A Transformer Description High Safety Latched Mode GreenLinet Controller For (Multi) Synchronized Applications Programmable Precision Reference Fast Recovery Rectifier (600 V) Fast Recovery Rectifier (200 V) Axial Lead Schottky Rectifier (60 V) NPN Bipolar Transistor GeneralPurpose Rectifier (400 V) Zener Regulator (12 V, 1 W) G635100 (SMT31M) from Thomson Orega Primary inductance = 207 mH Area = 190 nH/turns2 Primary turns = 33 Turns (90 V) = 31 www.onsemi.com 45 SMPSRM Application: 70 W Wide Mains TV SMPS 95 Vac to 265 Vac F1 FUSE 1.6 A C30 100 nF 250 Vac RFI FILTER LF1 C19 1 nF/1 kV R21 4.7 MW D1D4 1N4007 C1 220 mF 3.8 MW C4C5 1 nF/1 kV R7 68 kW/1 W D13 1N4148 C16 100 F D15 1N4148 C9 100 nF 9 C8 560 pF 10 7 C10 1 F 11 R18 5.6 kW R15 1 MW R4 3.9 kW C7 10 nF 12 13 5 4 14 3 15 2 16 C26 4.7 nF D12 MR856 C20 47 F D5 MR854 C11 100 pF R22 C12 1 nF 1 kW 15 kW D23 47 F C21 1000 F 11 V/0.5 A 180 kW R20 47W L3 22 H 115 V/0.45 A 15 V/1.5 A D8 MR854 Q1 600 V/4 A NCh MOSFET 1 R5 2.2 kW R14 47 kW 6 C15 220 pF D7 1N4937 L1 1 H R19 27 kW 8 MC44603AP R3 22 kW R16 68 kW/2 W R8 1 kW OREGA TRANSFORMER G619100 THOMSON TV COMPONENTS R9 150W R33 0.31 W C14 220 pF R13 10 kW Figure 45. 70 W Wide Mains TV SMPS www.onsemi.com 46 C22 1000 F SMPSRM Features: 70 W output power from 95 to 265 Vac. Efficiency @ 230 Vac = 86% @ 110 Vac = 84% Load regulation (115 Vac) = " 0.8 V. Cross regulation (115 Vac) = " 0.2 V. Frequency 20 kHz fully stable. ON Semiconductor Advantages: DIP16 or SO16 packaging options for controller. Meets IEC emi radiation standards. A narrow supply voltage design (80 W) is also available. Devices: Part Number MC44603AP Description MR856 MR854 1N4007 1N4937 Enhanced Mixed Frequency Mode GreenLinet PWM Controller Fast Recovery Rectifier (600 V) Fast Recovery Rectifier (400 V) General Purpose Rectifier (1000 V) General Purpose Rectifier (600 V) Transformer Thomson Orega SMT18 www.onsemi.com 47 SMPSRM Application: Wide Mains 100 W TV SMPS with 1.3 W TV Standby F1 C31 100 nF 47283900 R F6 C19 2N2FY RFI FILTER C3 1 nF R16 4.7 MW/4 kV D1D4 1N5404 C11 220 pF/500 V + C4 1 nF D5 1N4007 R5 100 kW C5 R1 220 mF 22 kW 400 V 5W 112 V/0.45 A 14 C6 47 nF 630 V D6 MR856 6 C12 47 F/250 V 12 MC44608P75 Isense 2 3 + 7 Vcc 6 4 R2 10 W C8 100 nF 2 11 8 V/1 A C14 + 1000 F/35 V 3 10 C16 100 pF 8 D14 MR856 D10 MR852 9 R17 2.2 kW 5W R4 3.9 kW 2 D9 MR852 C9 470 pF 630 V 600 V/6 A NCH MOSFET DZ1 MCR226 R19 18 kW D13 1N4148 + R12 1 kW C15 1000 F/16 V R3 0.27 W ON R21 47 W C18 100 nF OFF R9 100 kW OPT1 R11 47 kW DZ3 10 V 1N4740A C19 33 nF DZ2 TL431CLP R10 10 kW R8 2.4 kW Figure 46. Wide Mains 100 W TV SMPS with Secondary Reconfiguration for 1.3 W TV Standby www.onsemi.com 48 J3 3 1 D12 1N4934 C7 22 mF 16 V 5 16 V/1.5 A 1 7 8 2 C13 100 nF R7 47 k C17 120 pF D7 1N4148 1 1 + D18 MR856 ON = Normal mode OFF = Pulsed mode J4 SMPSRM Features: Off power consumption: 300mW drawn from the 8V output in pulsed mode. Pin = 1.3W independent of the mains. Efficiency: 83% Maximum power limitation. Overtemperature detection. Demagnetization detection. Protection against open loop. ON Semiconductor Advantages: Very low component count controller. Fail safe open feedback loop. Programmable pulsedmode power transfer for efficient system standby mode. Standby losses independent of the mains value. Complete semiconductor solution. Devices: Part Number Description MC44608P75 TL431 MR856 MR852 1N5404 1N4740A GreenLinet Very High Voltage PWM Controller Programmable Precision Reference Fast Recovery Rectifier (600 V) Fast Recovery Rectifier (200 V) General Purpose Rectifier (400 V) Zener Regulator (10 V, 1 W) Transformer SMT19 4034629 (9 slots coil former) Primary inductance: 181 mH Nprimary: 40 turns N 112 V: 40 turns N 16 V: 6 turns N 8 V: 3 turns www.onsemi.com 49 SMPSRM Application: LowCost Offline IGBT Battery Charger + 130 to 350 V DC R1 C3 220 mF/ 10 V D1 150 1N4148 + C2 220 mF/ 10 V D3 R3 220 k C10 1 nF R13 100 k R1 150 1N4148 M1 MMG05N60D R11 113 k 120 k C3 10 mF/ 350 V R5 IC1 MOC8103 1k MC14093 R5 1.2 k 8 7 6 5 + 1 D2 12 V R9 Q1 MBT3946DW C9 1 nF 3 C4 47 nF 470 C5 1 nF 2 R2 3.9 R9 100 Q5 R10 0V Figure 47. LowCost Offline IGBT Battery Charger Features: Universal ac input. 3 Watt capability for charging portable equipment. Light weight. Space saving surface mount design. ON Semiconductor Advantages: Specialprocess IGBT (Normal IGBTs will not function properly in this application). Off the shelf components. SPICE model available for MC33341. Devices: Part Number MMG05N60D MC33341 MBT3946DW MBRS240LT3 MC14093 1N4937 Description Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor in SOT223 Package Power Supply Battery Charger Regulator Control Circuit Dual General Purpose (Bipolar) Transistors Surface Mount Schottky Power Rectifier Quad 2Input NAND Schmitt Trigger GeneralPurpose Rectifier (600 V) www.onsemi.com 50 + C8 1 mF MC33341 C7 10 mF MBRS240LT3 D5 R2 D4 1N4937 + 8 V at 400 mA + 4 D4 12 V R12 20 k SMPSRM Application: 110 W Output Flyback SMPS 180 VAC TO 280 VAC RFI FILTER C3 1 nF / 1 KV R1 1W/5W R3 4.7 kW C4C7 1 nF / 1000 V C32 C1 100 mF D1D4 1N4007 C2 220 mF R2 68 kW / 2 W 9 C10 820 pF 1 mF R15 10 kW C11 1 nF R16 10 kW 10 7 11 6 12 13 MC44603P C9 5 C29 3 15 2 220 pF D9 MR852 R5 1.2 kW C27 1000 mF R6 180 W C26 R10 10 W 220 pF 15 V / 1 A D10 MR852 R26 1 kW C25 1000 mF C23 R14 2 X 0.56 W// 8V/1A D11 MR852 R17 10 kW R24 270 W R21 C19 10 kW 100 nF C12 6.8 nF TL431 Note 1: 600 V/ 6 A NChannel MOSFET Figure 48. 110 W Output Flyback SMPS www.onsemi.com 51 C24 0.1 mF 220 pF C21 1000 mF R25 1 kW C28 0.1 mF LP C14 4.7 nF R8 15 kW C13 100 nF C31 0.1 mF 28 V / 1 A 1 R19 10 kW C30 100 mF Laux D6 1N4148 C15 1 nF R7 180 kW D7 MR856 Note 1 14 16 R18 27 kW L1 1 mH R9 C16 100 pF 1 kW 4 D8 MR856 C17 47 nF R4 27 kW 8 120 V / 0.5 A R20 22 kW 5W D5 1N4934 220 pF C22 0.1 mF R23 117.5 kW D14 1N4733 C20 33 nF R22 2.5 kW SMPSRM Features: Offline operation from 180 V to 280 Vac mains. Fixed frquency and standby mode. Automatically changes operating mode based on load requirements. Precise limiting of maximum power in fixed frequency mode. ON Semiconductor Advantages: Builtin protection circuitry for current limitation, overvoltage detection, foldback, demagnetization and softstart. Reduced frequency in standby mode. Devices: Part Number MC44603P MR856 MR852 TL431 1N4733A 1N4007 Description Enhanced Mixed Frequency Mode GreenLinet PWM Controller Fast Recovery Rectifier (600 V) Fast Recovery Rectifier (200 V) Programmable Precision Reference Zener Voltage Regulator Diode (5.1 V) General Purpose Rectifier (1000 V) www.onsemi.com 52 SMPSRM Application: Efficient Safety Circuit for Electronic Ballast C13 100 nF C14 100 nF AGND 250 V 250 V C12 22 nF R18 PTC C11 4.7 nF 1200 V PTUBE = 55 W T1A FT063 L1 1.6 mH Q3 MJE18004D2 Q2 MJE18004D2 R13 2.2 R R14 2.2 R R11 4.7 R C9 2.2 nF C8 2.2 nF R12 4.7 R DIAC C6 10 nF C7 10 nF NOTES: * All resistors are 5%, 0.25 W unless otherwise noted * All capacitors are Polycarbonate, 63 V, 10%, unless otherwise noted D4 R10 10 R T1B D3 1N4007 T1C C5 0.22 mF R9 330 k C4 47 mF + 450 V R7 1.8 M P1 20 k C15 100 nF D2 MUR180E Q1 500 V/4 A NCh R6 1.0 R MOSFET 3 D9 C16 47 nF R5 1.0 R AGND 5 + C2 330 mF 25 V 8 R3 100 k/1.0 W R2 1.2 M 7 3 2 630 V 1N5407 D7 1N5407 4 U1 MC34262 R4 22 k D1 MUR120 1N5407 D8 1 2 T2 1N5407 D6 FILTER C3 1.0 mF 6 C17 47 nF 1 630 V C1 10 nF FUSE LINE 220 V R1 12 k Figure 49. Efficient Safety Circuit for Electronic Ballast www.onsemi.com 53 SMPSRM Features: Easy to implement circuit to avoid thermal runaway when fluorescent lamp does not strike. ON Semiconductor Advantages: Power devices do not have to be oversized lower cost solution. Includes power factor correction. Devices: Part Number Description MC34262 MUR120 MJE18004D2 1N4007 1N5240B 1N5407 Power Factor Controller Ultrafast Rectifier (200 V) High Voltage Planar Bipolar Power Transistor (100 V) General Purpose Diode (1000 V) Zener Voltage Regulator Diode (10 V) Rectifier (3 A, 800 V) *Other Lamp Ballast Options: 1, 2 Lamps 825 V 100 V 1200 V 3, 4 Lamps BUL642D2 MJD18002D2 MJD18202D2 BUL642D2 MJB18004D2 MJB18204D2 MJE18204D2 ON Semiconductors H2BIP process integrates a diode and bipolar transistor for a single package solution. www.onsemi.com 54 SMPSRM Application: ACDC Battery Charger Constant Current with Voltage Limit T0.2x D1 F1 250R 1N4140 + R1 1N4140 220 D3 4 kW D4 C2 20 mF BZX84/18V 1N4140 R3 8 7 VCC 22 k 1N4140 1 Line 4 R2 + D2 5 R5 3 6 MC33364 5 GND Vref C3 100 nF C3 FL 4 D5 R14 22 k U2 8 765 MC33341 Q1 600 V/1 A NCh MOSFET 330 2 C5 MURS160T3 R4 2 D7 1 MURS320T3 47 k R6 47 k C4 1 nF 2 D6 ICD U1 7 J2 VSI 10 V R8 100 T1 6 5V R7 2.7 GND 10 mF/350 V R4 D8 C5 + 4 kW D9 1 mF BZX84/5 V 100 mF + CMP LINE C1 DO VCC CSI 2 CTA 1 CSI J1 1234 C7 3 5 1SO1 2 MOC0102 4 R10 100 R 1 33 nF R11 0.25 Figure 50. ACDC Battery Charger Constant Current with Voltage Limit Features: Universal ac input. 9.5 Watt capability for charging portable equipment. Light weight. Space saving surface mount design. ON Semiconductor Advantages: Off the shelf components SPICE model available for MC33341 Devices: Part Number MC33341 MC33364 MURS160T3 MURS320T3 BZX84C5V1LT1 BZX84/18V Transformer R13 12 k Description Power Supply Battery Charger Regulator Control Circuit Critical Conduction SMPS Controller Surface Mount Ultrafast Rectifier (600 V) Surface Mount Ultrafast Rectifier (200 V) Zener Voltage Regulator Diode (5.1 V) Zener Voltage Regulator Diode (MMSZ18T1) For details consult AN1600 www.onsemi.com 55 R12 10 k SMPSRM Literature Available from ON Semiconductor Application Notes These older Application Notes may contain part numbers that are no longer available, but the applications information may still be helpful in designing an SMPS. They are available through the ON Semiconductor website at www.onsemi.com. AN873 Understanding Power Transistor Dynamic Behavior: dv/dt Effects on Switching RBSOA AN875 Power Transistor Safe Operating Area: Special Consideration for Switching Power Supplies AN913 Designing with TMOS Power MOSFETs AN915 Characterizing CollectortoEmitter and DraintoSource Diodes for Switchmode Applications AN918 Paralleling Power MOSFETs in Switching Applications AN920 Theory and Applications of the MC34063 and mA78S40 Switching Regulator Control Circuits AN929 Insuring Reliable Performance from Power MOSFETs AN952 Ultrafast Recovery Rectifiers Extend Power Transistor SOA AN1040 Mounting Considerations for Power Semiconductors AN1043 SPICE Model for TMOS Power MOSFETs AN1080 ExternalSync Power Supply with Universal Input Voltage Range for Monitors AN1083 Basic Thermal Management of Power Semiconductors AN1090 Understanding and Predicting Power MOSFET Switching Behavior AN1320 300 Watt, 100 kHz Converter Utilizes Economical Bipolar Planar Power Transistors AN1327 Very Wide Input Voltage Range, Offline Flyback Switching Power Supply AN1520 HDTMOS Power MOSFETs Excel in Synchronous Rectifier Applications AN1541 Introduction to Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor AN1542 Active Inrush Current Limiting Using MOSFETs AN1543 Electronic Lamp Ballast Design AN1547 A DC to DC Converter for Notebook Computers Using HDTMOS and Synchronous Rectification AN1570 Basic Semiconductor Thermal Measurement AN1576 Reduce Compact Fluorescent Cost with Motorolas (ON Semiconductor) IGBTs for Lighting AN1577 Motorolas (ON Semiconductor) D2 Series Transistors for Fluorescent Converters AN1593 Low Cost 1.0 A Current Source for Battery Chargers AN1594 Critical Conduction Mode, Flyback Switching Power Supply Using the MC33364 AN1600 ACDC Battery Charger Constant Current with Voltage Limit www.onsemi.com 56 SMPSRM Literature Available from ON Semiconductor (continued) AN1601 Efficient Safety Circuit for Electronic Ballast AN1628 Understanding Power Transistors Breakdown Parameters AN1631 Using PSPICE to Analyze Performance of Power MOSFETs in StepDown, Switching Regulators Employing Synchronous Rectification AN1669 MC44603 in a 110 W Output SMPS Application AN1679 How to Deal with Leakage Elements in Flyback Converters AN1680 Design Considerations for Clamping Networks for Very High Voltage Monolithic OffLine PWM Controllers AN1681 How to Keep a Flyback Switch Mode Supply stable with a CriticalMode Controller Brochures and Data Books The following literature is available for downloading from the ON Semiconductor website at www.onsemi.com. Analog/Interface ICs Device DL128/D Bipolar Device Data DL111/D Thyristor Device Data DL137/D Power MOSFETs DL135/D TVS/Zener Device Data DL150/D Rectifier Device Data DL151/D Master Components Selector Guide SG388/D Device Models Device models for SMPS circuits (MC33363 and MC33365), power transistors, rectifiers and other discrete products are available through ON Semiconductors website or by contacting your local sales office. www.onsemi.com 57 SMPSRM Reference Books Relating to Switching Power Supply Design Baliga, B. Jayant, Power Semiconductor Devices, PWS Publishing Co., Boston, 1996. 624 pages. Brown, Marty, Practical Switching Power Supply Design, Academic Press, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1990. 240 pages. Brown, Marty Power Supply Cookbook, EDN Series for Design Engineers, ON Semiconductor Series in Solid State Electronics, ButterworthHeinmann, MA, 1994. 238 pages Chrysiss, G. C., High Frequency Switching Power Supplies: Theory and Design, Second Edition, McGrawHill, 1989. 287 pages Gottlieb, Irving M., Power Supplies, Switching Regulators, Inverters, and Converters, 2nd Edition, TAB Books, 1994. 479 pages. Kassakian, John G., Martin F. Schlect, and George C. Verghese, Principles of Power Electronics, AddisonWesley, 1991. 738 pages. Lee, YimShu, ComputerAided Analysis and Design of SwitchMode Power Supplies, Marcel Dekker, Inc., NY, 1993 Lenk, John D., Simplified Design of Switching Power Supplies, EDN Series for Design Engineers, ButterworthHeinmann, MA, 1994. 221 pages. McLyman, C. W. T., Designing Magnetic Components for High Frequency DCDC Converters, KG Magnetics, San Marino, CA, 1993. 433 pages, 146 figures, 32 tables Mitchell, Daniel, SmallSignal MathCAD Design Aids, e/j Bloom Associates, 115 Duran Drive, San Rafael, Ca 949032317, 4154928443, 1992. Computer disk included. Mohan, Ned, Tore M. Undeland, William P. Robbins, Power Electronics: Converter, Applications and Design, 2nd Edition, Wiley, 1995. 802 pages Paice, Derek A., Power Electronic Converter Harmonics, Multipulse Methods for Clean Power, IEEE Press, 1995. 224 pages. Whittington, H. W., Switched Mode Power Supplies: Design and Construction, 2nd Edition, Wiley, 1996 224 pages. Basso, Christophe, SwitchMode Power Supply SPICE Cookbook, McGrawHill, 2001. CDROM included. 255 pages. www.onsemi.com 58 SMPSRM Web Locations for SwitchingMode Power Supply Information Ardem Associates (Dr. R. David Middlebrook) http://www.ardem.com/ Applied Power Electronics Conference (APEC) The power electronics conference for the practical aspects of power supplies. http://www.apecconf.or g/ Dr. Vincent G. Bellos Home Page SPICE simulation for switchingmode power supplies. http://www.SpiceSim.com/ e/j BLOOM Associates (Ed Bloom) Educational Materials & Services for Power Electronics. http://www.ejbloom.com/ The Darnell Group (Jeff Shepard) Contains an excellent list of power electronics websites, an extensive list of manufacturers contact information and more. http://www.darnell.com/ SwitchingMode Power Supply Design by Jerrold Foutz An excellent location for switching mode power supply information and links to other sources. http://www.smpstech.com/ Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) http://www.ieee.org/ IEEE Power Electronics Society http://www.pels.org/pels.html Power Control and Intelligent Motion (PCIM) Articles from present and past issues. http://www.pcim.com/ Power Corner Frank Greenhalghs Power Corner in EDTN http://fgl.com/power1.htm Power Designers http://www.powerdesigners.com/ Power Quality Assurance Magazine Articles from present and past issues. http://powerquality.com/ Power Sources Manufacturers Association A trade organization for the power sources industry. http://www.psma.com/ Quantum Power Labs An excellent hypertextlinked glossary of power electronics terms. http://www.quantumpower.com/ Ridley Engineering, Inc. Dr. Ray Ridley http://www.ridleyengineering.com/ www.onsemi.com 59 SMPSRM Web Locations for SwitchingMode Power Supply Information (continued) Springtime Enterprises Rudy Severns Rudy Severns has over 40 years of experience in switchingmode power supply design and static power conversion for design engineers. http://www.rudyseverns.com/ TESLAco Dr. Slobodan Cuk is both chairman of TESLAco and head of the Caltech Power Electronics Group. http://www.teslaco.com/ Venable Industries http://www.venableind.com/ www.onsemi.com 60 SMPSRM Analog ICs for SWITCHMODE Power Supplies A number of different analog circuits that can be used for designing switchmode power supplies can be found in our Analog IC Family Tree and Selector Guide (SGD504/D) available on our website at www.onsemi.com. These circuits are the same as those in the Power Management and System Management sections of the ON Semiconductor Master Components Selector Guide, also available as SG388/D. Circuits used specifically for the offline controllers and power factor controllers are in the Power Management section. Additional circuits that are frequently used with a SMPS design (dcdc converters, voltage references, voltage regulators, MOSFET/IGBT drivers and dedicated power management controllers) are included for reference purposes. Undervoltage and overvoltage supervisory circuits are in the System Management section. Information about the discrete semiconductors that are shown in this brochure and other discrete products that may be required for a switching power supply can also be found in the ON Semiconductor Master Components Selector Guide (SG388/D). www.onsemi.com 61 ON Semiconductor and the ON logo are registered trademarks of Semiconductor Components Industries, LLC (SCILLC). SCILLC reserves the right to make changes without further notice to any products herein. SCILLC makes no warranty, representation or guarantee regarding the suitability of its products for any particular purpose, nor does SCILLC assume any liability arising out of the application or use of any product or circuit, and specifically disclaims any and all liability, including without limitation special, consequential or incidental damages. Typical parameters which may be provided in SCILLC data sheets and/or specifications can and do vary in different applications and actual performance may vary over time. All operating parameters, including Typicals must be validated for each customer application by customers technical experts. SCILLC does not convey any license under its patent rights nor the rights of others. SCILLC products are not designed, intended, or authorized for use as components in systems intended for surgical implant into the body, or other applications intended to support or sustain life, or for any other application in which the failure of the SCILLC product could create a situation where personal injury or death may occur. Should Buyer purchase or use SCILLC products for any such unintended or unauthorized application, Buyer shall indemnify and hold SCILLC and its officers, employees, subsidiaries, affiliates, and distributors harmless against all claims, costs, damages, and expenses, and reasonable attorney fees arising out of, directly or indirectly, any claim of personal injury or death associated with such unintended or unauthorized use, even if such claim alleges that SCILLC was negligent regarding the design or manufacture of the part. SCILLC is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. This literature is subject to all applicable copyright laws and is not for resale in any manner. PUBLICATION ORDERING INFORMATION LITERATURE FULFILLMENT: LiteratureDistributionCenterforONSemiconductor P.O.Box5163,Denver,Colorado80217USA Phone:303-675-2175or800-344-3860TollFreeUSA/Canada Fax:303-675-2176or800-344-3867TollFreeUSA/Canada Email:orderlit@onsemi.com PDF N. American Technical Support:800-282-9855TollFree USA/Canada. Europe, Middle East and Africa Technical Support: Phone:421337902910 Japan Customer Focus Center Phone:81-3-5773-3850 ON Semiconductor Website:www.onsemi.com Order Literature:http://www.onsemi.com/orderlit Foradditionalinformation,pleasecontactyourlocal SalesRepresentative

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LAB #2 Design a Weather App1. In this course, all our labs involve paired programming. You do not have to keep thesame partner for each lab, but you MUST work with someone in each lab. Two ofthe ten points for each lab is based on following the paired
Oregon State - CS - 160
LAB #3Programming w/ Python1. In this course, all our labs involve paired programming. You do not have to keep thesame partner for each lab, but you MUST work with someone in each lab. Two ofthe ten points for each lab is based on following the paired
Oregon State - CS - 160
LAB #4More Programming w/ Python1. In this course, all our labs involve paired programming. You do not have to keep thesame partner for each lab, but you MUST work with someone in each lab. Two ofthe ten points for each lab is based on following the p
Oregon State - CS - 160
LAB #5Some Graphics in Python using Turtle1. In this course, all our labs involve paired programming. You do not have to keep thesame partner for each lab, but you MUST work with someone in each lab. Two ofthe ten points for each lab is based on follo
Oregon State - CS - 160
LAB #6Make Your Academic Plan1. You will not be doing paired programming in this lab. First, you need to watch CalvinHughess video on making a CS plan using MyDegrees:http:/www.youtube.com/watch?v=6K2OrHVHFLA&amp;feature=youtube2. Now, you need to decide
Oregon State - CS - 160
LAB #71-D Arrays/Lists in Python1. In this course, all our labs involve paired programming. You do not have to keep thesame partner for each lab, but you MUST work with someone in each lab. Two ofthe ten points for each lab is based on following the p
N. Arizona - FINANCE - 340
Spreadsheet Assignment #1The Restaurant BusinessAssignment:1. Create 3 years of the following financial statements required for a business plan.a) Monthly Cash Budgetsb) Year-End Income Statementsc) Year-End Balance SheetsNotes:1. This is a start-
Wisconsin - ENGLISH - 367
Sam JanowiakK. DeFazio10/25/13ENG 367Midterm EssayIndividualism and Collectivism in This Lime-Tree Bower My PrisonIn his poem This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison, Samuel Taylor Coleridge describes at lengthhis melancholy at being left behind in a garden
Tianjin University - F - t
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Tianjin University - F - t
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Tianjin University - F - t
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USC - AME - 526
AME 526Homework #2Solutions1. S 2.5 Problem 22. S 2.5 Problem 63. S 2.5 Problem 164. S 3.1 Problem 25. S 3.1 Problem 46. S 3.1 problem 67. S 3.1 Problem 88. S 3.1 problem 109. S 3.1 Problem 1810. S 3.1 Problem 22
USC - AME - 526
1. S 1.2 Problem 22. S 1.2 PROBLEM 43. S 1.2 PROBLEM 64. S 2.2 problem 25. S 2.2 Problem 46. S 2.2 problem 87. S 2.2 Problem 108. S 2.2 problem 149. S 2.2 problem 2110. S 2.3 problem 211. S 2.3 Problem 412. S 2.3 Problem 813. S 2.3 Problem 12
USC - AME - 526
AME 526Homework 5Solutions1. S 14.1 Problem 4Next, the B coefficient is given by -Therefore,2. S 14.1 PROBLEM 83. S 14.2 Problem 24. S 14.2 Problem 6Therefore,5. S 14.3 Problem 2Section 14.3 Problem 2 Amplitude Spectrum2.5k=2Amplitude Spectr
USC - AME - 526
AME 526Homework #3Solutions1. S 3.2 Problem 22. S 3.2 Problem 63. S 3.2 Problem 84. S 3.3 Problem 25. S 3.3 Problem 4--+-++--++Thus,+6. S 3.4 Problem 27. S 3.7 problem 48. S 3.7 problem 6
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AME 526Homework 6Solutions1. S 16.2 Problem 2for all x belongs to [0, 4]Therefore,2. S 16.2 Problem 43. S 16.2 Problem 84. S 16.2 Problem 10_TlInCS 16.2 Problem 10S 16.2 Problem 105. EXTRA PROBLEM ASSIGNED IN HW66. S 17.2 Problem 27. S 17
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1. S 13.2 Problem 2Section 13.2 Problem 23Function ValueFourier Sum2f101233210x1232. S 13.2 Problem 4Convergence of the Series :Using Theorem 13.1, we conclude that the series converges to(1 + x)for-2 &lt; x &lt; 0,(1 - x)for0 &lt; x &lt;
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Approximate Integrals for Legendre PolynomialsSet 1:Set 2:Set 3:
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