Chapter 15
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Chapter 15

Course Number: PHYS 161,260,27, Spring 2008

College/University: Maryland

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CHAPTER 15 Wave Motion 1* A rope hangs vertically from the ceiling. Do waves on the rope move faster, slower, or at the same speed as they move from bottom to top? Explain. They move faster as they move up because the tension increases due to the weight of the rope below. 2 (a) The bulk modulus for water is 2.0 109 N/m2. Use it to find the speed of sound in water. (b)The speed of sound in mercury is 1410...

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Motion 1* CHAPTER 15 Wave A rope hangs vertically from the ceiling. Do waves on the rope move faster, slower, or at the same speed as they move from bottom to top? Explain. They move faster as they move up because the tension increases due to the weight of the rope below. 2 (a) The bulk modulus for water is 2.0 109 N/m2. Use it to find the speed of sound in water. (b)The speed of sound in mercury is 1410 m/s. What is the bulk modulus for mercury ( = 13.6 103 kg/m3)? (a) Use Equ. 15-4 v = 2 10 9 / 103 m/s = 1.41 103 m/s 2 (b) From Equ. 15-4, B = v B = (14102 1.36 103) N/m2 = 2.70 1010 N/m2 Calculate the speed of sound waves in hydrogen gas at T = 300 K. (Take M = 2 g/mol and = 1.4.) Use Equ. 15-5; M = 2 10-3 kg/mol v = 1.4 8.314 300/2 10 -3 m/s = 1320 m/s A steel wire 7 m long has a mass of 100 g. It is under a tension of 900 N. What is the speed of a transverse wave pulse on this wire? Use Equ. 15-3 900 v= m/s = 251 m/s 3 4 0.1/7.0 5* Transverse waves travel at 150 m/s on a wire of length 80 cm that is under a tension of 550 N. What is the mass of the wire? From Equ. 15-3, = F/v2; m = L = FL/v2 m = (550 0.8/1502) kg = 0.0196 kg = 19.6 g 6 A wave pulse propagates along a wire in the positive x direction at 20 m/s. What will the pulse velocity be if we (a) double the length of the wire but keep the tension and mass per unit length constant? (b) double the tension while holding the length and mass per unit length constant? (c) double the mass per unit length while holding the other variables constant? See Equ. 15-3. (a) 20 m/s. (b) 20 2 m/s = 28.8 m/s. (c) 20/ 2 m/s = 14.1 m/s. Chapter 15 7 Wave Motion A steel piano wire is 0.7 m long and has a mass of 5 g. It is stretched with a tension of 500 N. (a) What is the speed of transverse waves on the wire? (b) To reduce the wave speed by a factor of 2 without changing the tension, what mass of copper wire would have to be wrapped around the steel wire? (a) Use Equ. 15-3 500 v= m/s = 265 m/s 0.005/0.7 (b) From Equ. 15-3, mf = 4mi m = 3mi = 15 g 8 The cable of a ski lift runs 400 m up a mountain and has a mass of 80 kg. When the cable is struck with a transverse blow at one end, the return pulse is detected 12 s later. (a) What is the speed of the wave? (b) What is the tension in the cable? v = x/t v = 800/12 m/s = 66.7 m/s 2 From Equ. 15-3, F = v m/L F = (66.72 80/400) N = 889 N 9* A common method for estimating the distance to a lightning flash is to begin counting when the flash is observed and continue until the thunder clap is heard. The number of seconds counted is then divided by 3 to get the distance in kilometers. (a) What is the velocity of sound in kilometers per second? (b) How accurate is this procedure? (c) Is a correction for the time it takes for the light to reach you important? (The speed of light is 3 108 m/s.) (a) v = 340 m/s = 0.340 km/s. (b) s = vt = 0.340t t/3 = 0.333t; error = 7/340 = 2%. (c) No; e.g., if t = 3 s, s 1 km, and the time required for light to travel 1 km is only 10-5 s. 10 A method for measuring the speed of sound using an ordinary watch with a second hand is to stand some distance from a large flat wall and clap your hands rhythmically in such a way that the echo from the wall is heard halfway between every two claps. (a) Show that the speed of sound is given by v = 4LN, where L is the distance to the wall and N is the number of claps per second. (b) What is a reasonable value for L for this experiment to be feasible? (If you have access to a flat wall outdoors somewhere, try this method and compare your result with the standard value for the speed of sound.) (a) Time of travel = t = 2L/v = 1/2(1/N). So v = 4LN. (b) Assume N = 1 clap/s; then L = 340/4 m = 85 m. So a distance of about 80 m is appropriate. 11 A man drops a stone from a high bridge and hears it strike the water below exactly 4 s later. (a) Estimate the distance to the water based on the assumption that the travel time for the sound to reach the man is negligible. (b) Improve your estimate by using your result from part (a) for the distance to the water to estimate the time it takes for sound to travel this distance and then calculate the distance the rock falls in 4 s minus this time. (c) Calculate the exact distance and compare your result with your previous estimates. (a) d = 1/2gt2 d = 1/2 9.81 16 m = 78.5 m (b) 1. t = d/vs t = 78.5/340 s = 0.23 s 2 2. d = 1/2g(t - t) d = 1/2 9.81 3.772 m = 69.7 m For t = 4 s, vs = 340 m/s, d = 70.5 m (c) t = 2 d/g + d/vs; 2d/g = t2 - 2dt/vs + d 2/vs2 Chapter 15 12 Wave Motion (a) Compute the derivative of the speed of a wave on a string with respect to the tension dv/dF, and show that the 1 differentials dv and dF obey dv/v = 2 dF/F. (b) A wave moves with a speed of 300 m/s on a wire that is under a tension of 500 N. Using dF to approximate a change in tension, determine how much the tension must be changed to increase the speed to 312 m/s. (a) dv d = dF dF F 1 = 2 1 1 v dv 1 dF = ; = . F 2 F v 2 F (b) F = 2F(v/v) = 2 500 12/300 N = 40 N. 13* (a) Compute the derivative of the velocity of sound with respect to the absolute temperature, and show that the 1 differentials dv and dT obey dv/v = 2 dT/T . (b) Use this result to compute the percentage change in the velocity of sound when the temperature changes from 0 to 27C. (c) If the speed of sound is 331 m/s at 0C, what is it (approximately) at 27C? How does this approximation compare with the result of an exact calculation? (a) Follow the same procedure as in Problem 12. Since v T , dv/v = 1/2dT/T. (b) T/T = 27/273; v/v = 4.95%. (c) v300 = v273(1.0495) = 347 m/s. Using the fact that v T we obtain v 300 = 331 300/273 m/s = 347 m/s. 14 In this problem, you will derive a convenient formula for the speed of sound in air at temperature t in Celsius degrees. Begin by writing the temperature as T = T0 + T, where T0 = 273 K corresponds to 0C and T = t, the Celsius temperature. The speed of sound is a function of T, v(T). To a first-order approximation, you can write v(T) v( T 0 ) + (dv/dT )T 0 T , where (dv/dT )T 0 is the derivative evaluated at T = T0. Compute this derivative, and show that the result leads to t v = ( 331 m/s )1 + = (331 + 0.606t ) m/s 2T 0 Since t differs from T only by an additive constant, dv/dt = 1/2(v/T) = 1/2[v/(t + 273)]. So v(t) = v(0o C) + v, where v = 1/2(331 m/s)[t/(t + 273)]. For t << 273, one then obtains v = (331 + 0.606t) m/s. 15 While studying physics in her dorm room, a student is listening to a live radio broadcast of a baseball game. She is 1.6 km due south of the baseball field. Over her radio, the student hears a noise generated by the electromagnetic pulse of a lightning bolt. Two seconds later, she hears over the radio the thunder picked up by the microphone at the baseball field. Four seconds after she hears the noise of the electromagnetic pulse over the radio, thunder rattles her windows. Where, relative to the ballpark, did the lightning bolt occur? Chapter 15 Wave Motion The locations of the lightning strike (L), dorm room (R), and baseball park (P) are indicated in the diagram. We can neglect the time required for the electromagnetic pulse to reach the source of the radio transmission, which is the ball park (see Problem 9). 1. From the data d LP = 2 340 m = 680 m 2. We know that d RP = 1600 m 3. Also, d LR = 6 340 m = 2040 m 4. Use the law of cosines to determine the angle . 20402 = 6802 + 16002 + 2 680 1600 cos cos = 0.524; = 58.4o. The lightning struck 680 m from the ball park, 58.4o W (or E) of North. 16 A coiled spring, such as a Slinky, is stretched to a length L. It has a force constant k and a mass m. (a) Show that the velocity of longitudinal compression waves along the spring is given by v = L k/m (b) Show that this is also the velocity of transverse waves along the spring if the natural length of the spring is much less than L. (a) For longitudinal waves, v = B/ ; for the slinky, = m/V and B = -P/(V/V). Let the cross-sectional area of the slinky be A. Then = m/AL, P = -k(L/A), V = AL. Thus one obtains the result given above. (b) For transverse waves, we use v = F/ . Now = m/L and F = k L L if L >> L0. Then v = L k/m . 17* 3 Show explicitly that the following functions satisfy the wave equation: (a) y(x,t) = k(x+ vt ) ; 0(b) y(x,t) = Aeik(x- vt) , where A and k are constants and i = - 1 ; and (c) y(x,t) = ln k(x - vt). (a) y/ x = 3k(x + vt)2; 2y/ x2 = 6k(x + vt); y/ t = 3kv(x + vt)2; 2y/ t2 = 6kv2(x + vt). v2( 2y/ x2) = 2y/ t2. (b) y/ x = ikAe ik(x - vt); 2y/ x2 = -k 2Ae ik(x - vt); y/ t = -ikvAe ik(x - vt); 2y/ t2 = -k 2v2Ae ik(x - vt) = v2( 2y/ x2). (c) y/ x = 1/(x - vt); 2y/ x2 = -1/(x - vt)2; y/ t = -v/(x - vt); 2y/ t2 = -v2/(x - vt)2 = v2( 2y/ x2). Show that the function y = A sin kx cos t satisfies the wave equation. 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 y/ x = -Ak sin kx cos t; y/ t = -A sin kx cos t. y/ x = (1/v ) y/ t if v = /k. 19 Consider the following equation: 18 2 2 y + i y = 0 , i = x2 t -1 where is a constant. Show that y(x, t) = A sin(kx - t) is not a solution of this equation but that the functions y(x,t) = Aei(kx - t) and y(x,t) = Aei(kx+ t) do satisfy that equation. 1. For y(x, t) = A sin(kx - t), 2y/ x2 = -Ak 2 sin(kx - t) and i( y/ t) = -Ai cos(kx - t). Evidently, 2 2 y/ x + i( y/ t) 0. 2. For y(x, t) = Ae i(kx - t), 2y/ x2 = -k 2y and i( y/ t) = y. Likewise, for y(x,t) = Ae i(kx + t). Both functions are solutions of the equation provided k 2 = . 20 A traveling wave passes a point of observation. At this point, the time between successive crests is 0.2 s. Which of the following is true? Chapter 15 Wave Motion (a) The wavelength is 5 m. (b) The frequency is 5 Hz. (c) The velocity of propagation is 5 m/s. (d) The wavelength is 0.2 m. (e) There is not enough information to justify any of these statements. (b) is correct; T = 1/f. 21* True or false: The energy in a wave is proportional to the square of the amplitude of the wave. True; see Equ. 15-24. 22 A rope hangs vertically. You shake the bottom back and forth, creating a sinusoidal wave train. Is the wavelength at the top the same as, less than, or greater than the wavelength at the bottom? The wavelength is greater at the top; = v/f, f is constant and v is greater (see Problem 1). 23 One end of a string 6 m long is moved up and down with simple harmonic motion at a frequency of 60 Hz. The waves reach the other end of the string in 0.5 s. Find the wavelength of the waves on the string. 1. Find the wave velocity 2. = v/f v = (6/0.5) m/s = 12 m/s = 12/60 m = 20 cm 24 Equation 15-13 expresses the displacement of a harmonic wave as a function of x and t in terms of the wave parameters k and . Write the equivalent expressions that contain the following pairs of parameters instead of k and : (a) k and v, (b) and f, (c) and T, (d) and v, and (e) f and v. We have the following relations: k = 2 /; = 2 f; v = f so = 2 v/ = kv. For a wave traveling to the right, the expressions are then: (a) y = A sin k(x - vt); (b) y = A sin 2 (x/ - ft); (c) y = A sin 2 (x/ - t/T); (d) y = A sin[(2 /)(x - vt)]; (e) y = A sin 2 f(x/v - t). For a wave traveling to the left, change the - to a + sign. 25* Equation 15-10 applies to all types of periodic waves, including electromagnetic waves such as light waves and microwaves, which travel at 3 108 m/s in a vacuum. (a) The range of wavelengths of light to which the eye is sensitive is about 4 10 7 to 7 10 7 m. What are the frequencies that correspond to these wavelengths? (b) Find the frequency of a microwave that has a wavelength of 3 cm. (a) f = v/; v = c = 3 108 m/s f min =(3 108/7 10-7) Hz 4.3 1014 Hz; f max = 7.5 1014 Hz (b) f = c/ f = 3 108/3 10-2 Hz = 1010 Hz 26 A harmonic wave on a string with a mass per unit length of 0.05 kg/m and a tension of 80 N has an amplitude of 5 cm. Each section of the string moves with simple harmonic motion at a frequency of 10 Hz. Find the power propagated along the string. Find v = (F/)1/2 v = 80/0.05 m/s = 40 m/s P = 1/22A2v; = 2 f P = (0.05 400 2 25 10-4 40)/2 W = 9.87 W 27 A rope 2 m long has a mass of 0.1 kg. The tension is 60 N. A power source at one end sends a harmonic wave 304 Chapter 15 Wave Motion with an amplitude of 1 cm down the rope. The wave is extracted at the other end without any reflection. What is the frequency of the power source if the power transmitted is 100 W? 1. Determine the wave velocity v = F/ = 60/(0.1/2) m/s = 34.6 m/s 2. From Equation 15-19, f = 1 2A 2P v f = [(1/2 0.01)(200/34.6 0.05) 1/2] Hz = 171 Hz 28 The wave function for a harmonic wave on a string is y(x, t) = (0.001 m) sin(62.8 m-1x + 314s-1t). (a) In what direction does this wave travel, and what is its speed? (b) Find the wavelength, frequency, and period of this wave. (c) What is the maximum speed of any string segment? (a) The wave travels to the left (-x direction); v = /k = 314/62.8 m/s = 5.0 m/s. (b) = 2 /k = 0.1 m; f = /2 = 50 Hz; T = 1/f = 0.02 s. (c) vmax = A = 0.314 m/s. 29* A harmonic wave with a frequency of 80 Hz and an amplitude of 0.025 m travels along a string to the right with a speed of 12 m/s. (a) Write a suitable wave function for this wave. (b) Find the maximum speed of a point on the string. (c) Find the maximum acceleration of a point on the string. (a) See Problem 24(e). y(x, t) = 0.025 sin[(160 )(x/12 - t)] m = 0.025 sin(41.9x - 503t) m. (b) vmax = A = (0.025 503) m/s = 12.6 m/s. (c) a max = A 2 = vmax = 6321 m/s2. 30 Waves of frequency 200 Hz and amplitude 1.2 cm move along a 20-m string that has a mass of 0.06 kg and a tension of 50 N. (a) What is the average total energy of the waves on the string? (b) Find the power transmitted past a given point on the string. (a) Apply Equ. 15-18 with x = L E = 1/2[(0.06/20)(4 2 2002)(0.0122)(20)] J = 6.82 J (b) 1. Determine v = F/ 2. Evaluate P using Equs. 15-19 and 15-18 v = 50/(0.06/2 0) m/s = 129 m/s P = Ev/L = (6.82 129/20) W = 44 W 31 In a real string, a wave loses some energy as it travels down the string. Such a situation can be described by a wave function whose amplitude A(x) depends on x: y = A(x)sin (kx - t) = ( A0 e - bx ) sin (kx - t) (a) What is the original power carried by the wave at the origin? (b) What is the power transported by the wave at point x? (a) At x = 0, A = A0; P(0) = 1/22A02v. (b) At x, A2 = A02e-2bx; P(x) = 1/22A02ve-2bx. 32 Power is to be transmitted along a stretched wire by means of transverse harmonic waves. The wave speed is 10 m/s, and the linear mass density of the wire is 0.01 kg/m. The power source oscillates with an amplitude of 0.50 mm. (a) What average power is transmitted along the wire if the frequency is 400 Hz? (b) The power transmitted can be increased by increasing the tension in the wire, the frequency of the source, or the amplitude of the waves. How would each of these quantities have to be changed to effect an increase in power by a factor of 100 if it is the only quantity changed? (c) Which of the quantities would probably be the easiest to change? (a) Apply Equ. 15-19 P = 1/2(0.01)(2 400 0.0005) 2(10) W Chapter 15 Wave Motion = 0.079 W (b) Since P is proportional to f 2, A2, and v, and v is proportional to F , the frequency or amplitude could be increased by a factor of 10, but the tension would have to be increased by a factor of 10,000. Evidently, it will be simplest to increase the amplitude to 5.0 mm. 33* A sound wave in air produces a pressure variation given by p(x,t) = 0.75 cos (x - 340t) 2 where p is in pascals, x is in meters, and t is in seconds. Find (a) the pressure amplitude of the sound wave, (b) the wavelength, (c) the frequency, and (d) the speed? (a) p 0 = 0.75 Pa. (b) From Problem 24(d), we see that 2 / = /2, = 4 m. (c) f = v/ = 85 Hz. (d) v = 340 m/s. 34 (a) Middle C on the musical scale has a frequency of 262 Hz. What is the wavelength of this note in air? (b) The frequency of the C an octave above middle C is twice that of middle C. What is the wavelength of this note in air? (a) = v/f = 340/262 m = 1.30 m. (b) = /2 = 0.65 m. 35 (a) What is the displacement amplitude for a sound wave having a frequency of 100 Hz and a pressure amplitude of 10-4 atm? (b) The displacement amplitude of a sound wave of frequency 300 Hz is 10-7 m. What is the pressure amplitude of this wave? (a) From Equ. 15-22, s0 = p 0/(v) s0 = [10.1/(1.29 2 100 340)] m = 3.67 10-5 m (b) p 0 = s0v p 0 = 1.29 300 2 340 10-7 Pa = 8.27 10-2 Pa 36 (a) Find the displacement amplitude of a sound wave of frequency 500 Hz at the pain-threshold pressure amplitude of 29 Pa. (b) Find the displacement amplitude of a sound wave with the same pressure amplitude but a frequency of 1 kHz. (a) See Problem 35. s0 = 3.67 10-5 29/(10.1 5) m = 2.11 10-5 m. (b) s0 = (2.11 10-5/2) m = 1.05 10-5 m. 37* A typical loud sound wave with a frequency of 1 kHz has a pressure amplitude of about 10-4 atm. (a) At t = 0, the pressure is a maximum at some point x1. What is the displacement at that point at t = 0? (b) What is the maximum value of the displacement at any time and place? (Take the density of air to be 1.29 kg/m3.) (a) When p is a maximum, s = 0. (b) s0 = p 0/v = 3.67 10-6 m. 38 (a) Find the displacement amplitude of a sound wave of frequency 500 Hz at the threshold-of-hearing pressure amplitude of 2.9 10-5 Pa. (b) Find the displacement amplitude of a wave of the same pressure amplitude but a frequency of 1 kHz. From Problem 36 it follows that (a) s0 = 2.11 10-11 m; (b) s0 = 1.05 10-11 m. 39 A piston at one end of a long tube filled with air at room temperature and normal pressure oscillates with a frequency of 500 Hz and an amplitude of 0.1 mm. The area of the piston is 100 cm2. (a) What is the pressure amplitude of the sound waves generated in the tube? (b) What is the intensity of the waves? (c) What average power is required to keep the piston oscillating (neglecting friction)? (a) p 0 = s0v p 0 = (10-4 1.29 2 500 340) Pa = 138 Pa 306 Chapter 15 Wave Motion I = 1/2(1382/1.29 340) W/m2 = 21.7 W/m2 Pav = 0.217 W (b) I = 1/22s02v = 1/2p 02/ v (c) Pav = IA; A = 10-2 m2 40 A spherical source radiates sound uniformly in all directions. At a distance of 10 m, the sound intensity level is 10-4 W/m2. (a) At what distance from the source is the intensity 10-6 W/m2? (b) What power is radiated by this source? (a) I 1/r2; r(I = 10-6) = 100 m. (b) P = IA = 4 r2I = 0.126 W. 41* A loudspeaker at a rock concert generates 10-2 W/m2 at 20 m at a frequency of 1 kHz. Assume that the speaker spreads its energy uniformly in three dimensions. (a) What is the total acoustic power output of the speaker? (b) At what distance will the intensity be at the pain threshold of 1 W/m2? (c) What is the intensity at 30 m? (a) P = 4 r2I = 4 400 10-2 W = 50.3 W. (b) Since I 1/r2, r at pain threshold is 2.0 m. (c) I = 10-2(4/9) = 4.44 10-3 W/m2. 42 When a pin of mass 0.1 g is dropped from a height of 1 m, 0.05% of its energy is converted into a sound pulse with a duration of 0.1 s. (a) Estimate the range at which the dropped pin can be heard if the minimum audible intensity is 1011 W/m2. (b) Your result in (a) is much too large in practice because of background noise. If you assume that the intensity must be at least 10-8 W/m2 for the sound to be heard, estimate the range at which the dropped pin can be heard. (In both parts, assume that the intensity is P/4 r2.) (a) Sound energy is 5 10-4(mgh) = 5 10-4 1 10-4 9.81 J = 4.9 10-7 J; Pav = E/t = 4.9 10-6 W = 4 r2 10-11 W; so r 200 m. (b) r 200/ 1000 = 6.24 m. 43 True or false: A 60-dB sound has twice the intensity of a 30-dB sound. False 44 What is the intensity level in decibels of a sound wave of intensity (a) 10-10 W/m2, and (b) 10-2 W/m2? Use Equ. 15-29. (a) = 20 dB. (b) = 100 dB. 45* Find the intensity of a sound wave if (a) = 10 dB, and (b) = 3 dB. (c) Find the pressure amplitudes of sound waves in air for each of these intensities. (a), (b) Use Equ. 15-29 (a) I = 10-11 W/m2; (b) I = 2 10-12 W/m2 (a) p 0 = 9.37 10-5 Pa; (b) p 0 = 4.19 10-5 Pa (c) p = 2 Iv 0 46 The sound level of a dog's bark is 50 dB. The intensity of a rock concert is 10,000 times that of the dog's bark. What is the sound level of the rock concert? = dog + 40 dB = 90 dB. 47 Two sounds differ by 30 dB. The intensity of the louder sound is IL and that of the softer sound is IS. The value of the ratio IL /IS is (a) 1000. (b) 30. (c) 9. (d) 100. (e) 300. (a) is correct. 48 Show that if the intensity is doubled, the intensity level increases by 3.0 dB. = 10 log 2 = 3.01 3.0. 49* What fraction of the acoustic power of a noise would have to be eliminated to lower its sound intensity level from 90 to 70 dB? Chapter 15 Wave Motion 99% must be eliminated so that the power is reduced by factor of 100. 50 Normal human speech has a sound intensity level of about 65 dB at 1 m. Estimate the power of human speech. Determine I at 1 m. I = 10-12 106.5 W/m2 = 10-5.5 W/m2 = 3.16 10-6 W/m2 = P/4 . P = 4 10-5 W. 51 A spherical source radiates sound uniformly in all directions. At a distance of 10 m, the sound intensity level is 80 dB. (a) At what distance from the source is the intensity level 60 dB? (b) What power is radiated by this source? (a) I(r) = I(10)/100; I 1/r2 r = 100 m (b) P = IA P = 10-4 4 102 W = 0.126 W 52 A spherical source of intensity I0 radiates sound uniformly in all directions. Its intensity level is 1 at a distance r1, and 2 at a distance r2. Find 2 /1. 2 2 log ( I 2 / I 0) log I 2 log [( r 1 / r 2) I 1] log I 1 + 2 log ( r 1 / r 2) 1 + 20 log ( r1 / r 2) 2 = = = = = . log ( I 1 / I 0) log I 1 log I 1 log I 1 1 1 53* A loudspeaker at a rock concert generates 10-2 W/m2 at 20 m at a frequency of 1 kHz. Assume that the speaker spreads its energy uniformly in all directions. (a) What is the intensity level at 20 m? (b) What is the total acoustic power output of the speaker? (c) At what distance will the intensity level be at the pain threshold of 120 dB? (d) What is the intensity level at 30 m? (a) = 100 dB at 20 m. (b), (c), (d) See Problem 41; (d) 4.44 10-3 W/m2 = 96.5 dB. 54 An article on noise pollution claims that sound intensity levels in large cities have been increasing by about 1 dB annually. (a) To what percentage increase in intensity does this correspond? Does this increase seem reasonable? (b) In about how many years will the intensity of sound double if it increases at 1 dB annually? (a) I/I0 = 100.1 = 1.26; increase in intensity is 26% annually. This is not reasonable; if true, the intensity level would increase by a factor of 10 in ten years. (b) To double, = 3, so the intensity level will double in 3 years. 55 Three noise sources produce intensity levels of 70, 73, and 80 dB when acting separately. When the sources act together, their intensities add. (a) Find the sound intensity level in decibels when the three sources act at the same time. (b) Discuss the effectiveness of eliminating the two least intense sources in reducing the intensity level of the noise. (a) I1 = 10-5 W/m2, I2 = 2 10-5 W/m2, I3 = 10-4 W/m2. So Itot = 1.3 10-4 W/m2 ; tot = 81.14 dB. (b) Eliminating the two least intense sources does not reduce the intensity level significantly. 56 The equation I = Pav / 4 r2 is predicated on the assumption that the transmitting medium does not absorb any energy. It is known that absorption of sound by dry air results in a decrease of intensity of approximately 8 dB/km. The intensity of sound at a distance of 120 m from a jet engine is 130 dB. Find the intensity at 2.4 km from the jet engine (a) assuming no absorption of sound by air, and (b) assuming a diminution of 8 dB/km. (Assume that the sound radiates uniformly in all directions.) (a) = 20 log (r2/r1) 20 log (20) = 26; (2.4 km) = (130 - 26) dB = 104 dB (b) Subtract 2.28 8 dB from result of (a) = (104 - 18.2) dB = 85.8 dB 308 Chapter 15 Wave Motion 57* Everyone at a party is talking equally loudly. If only one person were talking, the sound level would be 72 dB. Find the sound level when all 38 people are talking. Itot = 38I1; tot = [10 log (38) + 72] dB = (15.8 + 72) dB = 88.8 dB. 58 When a violinist pulls the bow across a string, the force with which the bow is pulled is fairly small, about 0.6 N. Suppose the bow travels across the A string, which vibrates at 440 Hz, at 0.5 m/s. A listener 35 m from the performer hears a sound of 60 dB intensity. With what efficiency is the mechanical energy of bowing converted to sound energy? (Assume that the sound radiates uniformly in all directions.) 1. Find the power delivered by the bow to the string Pin = Fv = 0.6 0.5 W = 0.3 W 2. Find the power of the sound emitted Pout = IA = (10-6 4 352) W = 0.0154 W 3. Efficiency = Pout/Pin = 5.13% 59 The noise le vel in an empty examination hall is 40 dB. When 100 students are writing an exam, the sounds of heavy breathing and pens traveling rapidly over paper cause the noise level to rise to 60 dB (not counting the occasional groans). Assuming that each student contributes an equal amount of noise power, find the noise level to the nearest decibel when 50 students have left. -6 -8 2 -6 2 1. Find the noise level increase due to one student I100 = (10 - 10 ) W/m 10 W/m ; -8 2 I1 = 10 W/m 2. Find I50 and 50 I50 = 5.1 10-7 W/m2; 50 = 57 dB 60 If the source and receiver are at rest relative to each other but the wave medium is moving relative to them, will there be any Doppler shift in frequency? No 61* The frequency of a car horn is f 0. What frequency is observed if both the car and the observer are at rest, but a wind blows toward the observer? (a) f 0 (b) Greater than f 0 (c) Less than f 0 (d) It could be either greater or less than f 0 . (e) It could be f 0 or greater than f 0, depending on how wind speed compares to speed of sound. (a) There is no relative motion of the source and receiver. 62 Stars often occur in pairs revolving around their common center of mass. If one of the stars is a black hole, it is invisible. Explain how the existence of such a black hole might be inferred from the light observed from the other, visible star. The light from the companion star will be shifted about its mean frequency periodically due to the relative approach to and recession from the earth of the companion star as it revolves about the black hole. 63 A conveyor belt moves to the right with a speed v = 300 m/min. A very fast piemaker puts pies on the belt at a rate of 20 per minute, and they are received at the other end by a pie eater. (a) If the piemaker is stationary, find the spacing between the pies and the frequency f with which they are received by the stationary pie eater. (b) The piemaker now walks with a speed of 30 m/min toward the receiver while continuing to put pies on the belt at 20 per minute. Find the spacing of the pies and the frequency with which they are received by the stationary pie eater. (c) Chapter 15 Wave Motion Repeat your calculations for a stationary piemaker and a pie eater who moves toward the piemaker at 30 m/min. (a) Since 20 pies per minute are placed on the belt, 20 pies per minute will be received. The time between the placing of the pies is 0.05 min, and during that time the belt moves 300 0.05 m = 15 m. Consequently, the spacing between the pies is = 15 m. (b) Relative to the piemaker, the belt moves at 270 m/min. Consequently, = 270 0.05 m = 13.5 m. Since the pies are traveling toward the receiver at 300 m/min, the number received per minute, i.e., the frequency, is given by f = 300/13.5 min-1 = 22.2 min-1. (c) If the receiver moves toward the piemaker, the spacing of the pies on the belt is, as in (a), 15 m. However, the speed of the belt relative to the receiver is 330 m/min, so the frequency f = 330/15 min-1 = 22 min-1. 64 For the situation described in Problem 63, derive general expressions for the spacing of the pies and the frequency f with which they are received by the pie eater in terms of the speed of the belt v, the speed of the sender u s, the speed of the receiver u r, and the frequency f 0 with which the piemaker places pies on the belt. Equations 15-31 and 15-35 apply. Since the source is moving in the direction of the belt and the receiver is moving toward the observer, we must use the negative sign in the numerator of Equ. 15-31 and in the denominator of Equ. 1535. Thus ' = v - us ; f0 f '= f 0 v + ur . v - us In Problems 65 through 70, a source emits sounds of frequency 200 Hz that travel through still air at 340 m/s. 65* The sound source described above moves with a speed of 80 m/s relative to still air toward a stationary listener. (a) Find the wavelength of the sound between the source and the listener. (b) Find the frequency heard by the listener. (a) Apply Equ. 15-31 = (260/200) m = 1.3 m (b) Apply Equ. 15-35 f = 200(340/260) Hz = 262 Hz 66 Consider the situation in Problem 65 from the reference frame in which the source is at rest. In this frame, the listener moves toward the source with a speed of 80 m/s, and there is a wind blowing at 80 m/s from the listener to the source. (a) What is the speed of the sound from the source to the listener in this frame? (b) Find the wavelength of the sound between the source and the listener. (c) Find the frequency heard by the listener. (a) In the reference frame of the source, v = (340 - 80) m/s = 260 m/s. (b) Since f is unchanged, = 260/f = 1.3 m. (c) In the moving reference frame, the observer is approaching the source at 80 m/s. Consequently, applying Equ. 1535, we find f r = [200(1 + 80/260)] Hz = 262 Hz. 67 The source moves away from the stationary listener at 80 m/s. (a) Find the wavelength of the sound waves between the source and the listener. (b) Find the frequency heard by the listener. Proceed as in Problem 65, changing signs as appropriate. (a) = 420/200 m = 2.1 m. (b) f = 200(340/420) Hz = 162 Hz. 68 The listener moves at 80 m/s relative to still air toward the stationary source. (a) What is the wavelength of the 310 Chapter 15 Wave Motion sound between the source and the listener? (b) What is the frequency heard by the listener? (a) is unaffected by the motion the of observer = 340/200 m = 1.7 m (b) Apply Equ. 15-35 f = [200(1 + 80/340)] Hz = 247 Hz 69* Consider the situation in Problem 68 in a reference frame in which the listener is at rest. (a) What is the wind velocity in this frame? (b) What is the speed of the sound from the source to the listener in this frame, that is, relative to the listener? (c) Find the wavelength of the sound between the source and the listener in this frame. (d) Find the frequency heard by the listener. (a) Moving at 80 m/s in still air, the observer experiences a wind of 80 m/s. (b) Using the standard Galilean transformation, v = v + ur = 420 m/s. (c) The distance between wave crests is unchanged, so = = 1.7 m. (d) f = v/ = 247 Hz. 70 The listener moves at 80 m/s relative to the still air away from the stationary source. Find the frequency heard by the listener. Apply Equ. 15-35 f = [200(1 - 80/340)] Hz = 152 Hz 71 A jet is traveling at Mach 2.5 at an altitude of 5000 m. (a) What is the angle that the shock wave makes with the track of the jet? (Assume that the speed of sound at this altitude is still 340 m/s.) (b) Where is the jet when a person on the ground hears the shock wave? -1 o (a) u/v = 2.5; = sin-1(v/u) = sin (0.4) = 23.6 (b) From the diagram showing the wave front of the shock wave, it is evident that x = h/tan x = (5000/tan 23.6o) m = 11.5 km Chapter 15 Wave Motion 72 If you are running at top speed toward a source of sound at 1000 Hz, estimate the frequency of the sound that you hear. Suppose that you can recognize a change in frequency of 3%. Can you use your sense of pitch to estimate your running speed? Top speed 10 m/s. f/f 0 = u/v = 10/340 Hz = 0.0294 or 2.9% . No; it would be impossible to decide between speeds of 8 m/s and 10 m/s. 73* A radar device emits microwaves with a frequency of 2.00 GHz. When the waves are reflected from a car moving directly away from the emitter, a frequency difference of 293 Hz is detected. Find the speed of the car. 1. The frequency f received by the car is given by Equ. 15-37a. 2. The car now acts as the source, sending signals of frequency f to the stationary radar receiver. 3. Consequently, f rec = 1 + v/c f = (1 + 2v/c) f 0 since v << c. 1 - v/c 0 v = (3 108 293/4 109) m/s = 22 m/s = 79.2 km/h 4. Solve for v; v = cf/2f 0 74 A stationary destroyer is equipped with sonar that sends out pulses of sound at 40 MHz. Reflected pulses are received from a submarine directly below with a time delay of 80 ms at a frequency of 39.958 MHz. If the speed of sound in seawater is 1.54 km/s, find (a) the depth of the submarine, and (b) its vertical speed. (a) 2D = vt D = (1540 0.080/2) m = 61.6 m (b) The submarine acts as a receiver and source (see u = vf/2f 0 = (1540 0.042/80) m/s = 0.809 m/s Problem 73) The velocity of the submarine is down 75 Two airplanes, one flying due east and the other due west, are on a near collision course separated by 15 km when the pilot of one plane, traveling at 900 km/h, observes the other on his Doppler radar. The radar unit emits electromagnetic waves of frequency 3 1010 Hz. The radar readout indicates that the other plane's speed is 750 km/h. Determine the frequency of the signal received by the pilot's radar. 1. This is similar to Problem 73; f/f 0 = 2v/c v = 1650 km/h = 458 m/s; f = 2f 0v/c = 9.16 kHz 2. f = f 0 + f f = 30.000916 GHz 76 A police radar unit transmits microwaves of frequency 3 1010 Hz. The speed of these waves in air is 3.0 108 m/s. Suppose a car is receding from the stationary police car at a speed of 140 km/h. What is the frequency difference between the transmitted signal and the signal received from the receding car? Proceed as in Problem 75 v = 38.9 m/s; f = 2f 0v/c = 7.78 kHz 77* Suppose the police car of Problem 76 is moving in the same direction as the other vehicle at a speed of 60 km/h. What then is the difference in frequency between the emitted and the reflected signals? Now the relative velocity is 80 km/h f = (80 7.78/140) kHz = 4.45 kHz 78 At time t = 0, a supersonic plane is directly over point P flying due west at an altitude of 12 km and a speed of Mach 1.6. Where is the plane when the sonic boom is heard? See Problem 71. x = h/tan ; = sin-1(1/1.6) = 38.7o; x = (12/tan 38.7o) km = 15.0 km west of P. 312 Chapter 15 Wave Motion 79 A small radio of 0.10 kg mass is attached to one end of an air track by a spring. The radio emits a sound of 800 Hz. A listener at the other end of the air track hears a sound whose frequency varies between 797 and 803 Hz. (a) Determine the energy of the vibrating massspring system. (b) If the spring constant is 200 N/m, what is the amplitude of vibration of the mass and what is the period of the oscillating system? (a) 1. Determine u max; use f/f 0 = u/v f/f 0 = 3/800; u max = 3 340/800 m/s = 1.275 m/s 2 2. E = 1/2mumax E = 0.05 1.2752 J = 0.0813 J (b) 1. E = 1/2k A2 A = 2 E/k = 2 0.0813/200 = 2.85 cm 2. T = 2 m/k T = 2 1 / 2000 = 0.14 s 80 A sound source of frequency f 0 moves with speed u s relative to still air toward a receiver who is moving with speed u r relative to still air away from the source. (a) Write an expression for the received frequency f . (b) Use the result that (1 - x)-1 1 + x to show that if both u s and u r are small compared to v, then the received frequency is approximately u -u u f 1+ s r f 0 = 1 + rel f 0 v v where u rel is the relative velocity of the source and receiver. Start with Equ. 15-35. Use the binomial expansion for the denominator: (1 - u s/v)-1 1 + u s/v. The product (1 - u r/v)(1 + u s/v) 1 + (u s - u r)/v. So Equ. 15-35 reduces to the expression given above. 81* Two students with vibrating 440-Hz tuning forks walk away from each other with equal speeds. How fast must they walk so that they each hear a frequency of 438 Hz from the other fork? See Problem 80. In this case, f = (1 - 2u/v)f 0. f = 2f 0u/v. u = fv/2f 0 = (2 340/880) m/s = 0.773 m/s. 82 A physics student walks down a long hall carrying a vibrating 512-Hz tuning fork. The end of the hall is closed so that sound reflects from it. The student hears a sound of 516 Hz from the wall. How fast is the student walking? The student serves as a source moving toward the wall, and a moving receiver for the echo. We can use the result of Problem 80, since f/f 0 << 1. So, (4/512) = 2u/v; u = 2 340/512 m/s = 1.33 m/s. 83 A small speaker radiating sound at 1000 Hz is tied to one end of an 0.8-m-long rod that is free to rotate about its other end. The rod rotates in the horizontal plane at 4.0 rad/s. Derive an expression for the frequency heard by a stationary observer far from the rotating speaker. 1. Find the velocity of the source u s = r sin(t) = 3.2 sin(4t) m/s 2. Use Equ. 15-35 f = [1000/(1 - 3.2 sin(4t)/340)] Hz 3. Since 3.2/340 << 1 we can use the binomial approximation f = 1000 + 9.41 sin(4t) Hz 84 You have won a free trip on the Queen Elizabeth II and are in mid-Atlantic steaming due east at 45 km/h as the Concorde passes directly overhead flying due west at Mach 1.6 at an altitude of 12,500 m. Where is the Concorde relative to the QEII when you hear the sonic boom? This problem is identical to Problem 71. The horizontal distance between the Concorde and the point at ground level Chapter 15 Wave Motion where the sonic boom is heard is given by x = h/[tan sin-1(v/u)] = 15.6 km due west. 85* A balloon driven by a 36-km/h wind emits a sound of 800 Hz as it approaches a tall building. (a) What is the frequency of the sound heard by an observer at the window of this building? (b) What is the frequency of the reflected sound heard by a person riding in the balloon? The simplest way to approach this problem is to transform to a reference frame in which the balloon is at rest. In that reference frame, the speed of sound is v = 340 m/s, and u r = 36 km/h = 10 m/s. (a) Use Equ. 15-34 f = 800(1 + 10/340) Hz = 823.5 Hz (b) f acts as moving source; use Equ. 15-33 f = 823.5/(1 - 10/340) Hz = 848.5 Hz 86 A car is approaching a reflecting wall. A stationary observer behind the car hears a sound of frequency 745 Hz from the car horn and a sound of frequency 863 Hz from the wall. (a) How fast is the car traveling? (b) What is the frequency of the car horn? (c) What frequency does the car driver hear reflected from the wall? (a) 1. Let = u/v; express data in terms of f 0 and 745 Hz = f 0/(1 + ); 863 Hz = f 0/(1 - ) ( 1+ )/( 1 - ) = 1.158; = 0.0734 2. Find and u = 340 m/s (b) Evaluate f 0 (c) Use Equ. 15-34 with f 0 = 863 Hz u = 24.95 m/s = 89.8 km/l f 0 = 745 1.0734 Hz = 800 Hz f = 863 1.0734 Hz = 926 Hz 87 The driver of a car traveling at 100 km/h toward a vertical cliff briefly sounds the horn. Exactly one second later she hears the echo and notes that its frequency is 840 Hz. How far from the cliff was the car when the driver sounded the horn and what is the frequency of the horn? 1. d = distance to cliff at t = 0; write equation for d d + (d - u t) = vt = 340 m 2. Find d for u = 100 km/h = 27.8 m/s d = 183 m 3. Find f 0 from Equ. 15-35 f 0 = 840[(1 - 27.8/340)/(1 + 27.8/340)] Hz = 713 Hz 88 You are on a transatlantic flight traveling due west at 800 km/h. A Concorde flying at Mach 1.6 and 3 km to the north of your plane is also on an east-to-west course. What is the distance between the two planes when you hear the sonic boom from the Concorde? This problem is almost identical to Problem 84. The Concorde is 15.6 km west and 3 km north of your plane. The 2 distance between the planes is D = (15.6) + 3 km = 15.9 km. 2 314 Chapter 15 Wave Motion 89* Astronomers can deduce the existence of a binary star system even if the two stars cannot be visually resolved by noting an alternating Doppler shift of a spectral line. Suppose that an astronomical observation shows that the source of light is eclipsed once every 18 h. The wavelength of the spectral line observed changes from a maximum of 563 nm to a minimum of 539 nm. Assume that the double star system consists of a very massive, dark object and a relatively light star that radiates the observed spectral line. Use the data to determine the separation between the two objects (assume that the light object is in a circular orbit about the massive one) and the mass of the massive object. (Use the approximation f / f 0 v/c. ) 1. Determine the maximum and minimum frequencies 2. f 0 = 1/2(f max + f min) 3. v = cf/f 0 4. Determine R, the radius of the orbit f max = 3 108 Hz = 5.566 1014 0 Hz; -7 5.39 10 4 2 3 M= R 5. From Equ. 11-15, GT 2 f min = 5.329 Hz f 0 = 5.4475 1014 Hz v = 6.526 106 m/s R = vT/2 = (6.526 106 64800/2 ) m = 6.73 1010 m 4 2 (6.73 1010 )3 M= kg = 4 1034 kg -11 4 2 6.67 10 (6.48 10 ) 90 A physics student drops a vibrating 440-Hz tuning fork down the elevator shaft of a tall building. When the student hears a frequency of 400 Hz, how far has the tuning fork fallen? 1. Find the speed of the source from Equ. 15-33 u = 340(440/400 - 1) m/s = 34 m/s 2. Find the location of the source at that time (t1) y = u 2/2g = 58.92 m; t1 = u/g = 3.466 s 3. Find the time (t2) for sound to travel 58.92 m t2 = 58.92/340 s = 0.173 s 4. Find the distance the source has fallen in time d = 1/2gt2 = 9.81 3.6392/2 m = 65 m t1 + t2 91 When a guitar string is plucked, is the wavelength of the wave it produces in air the same as the wavelength of the wave on the string? No; the frequencies are the same but the speeds of propagation are different. Chapter 15 Wave Motion 92 A wave pulse travels along a light string that is attached to a heavier string in which the wave speed is smaller. The reflected pulse is _____, and the transmitted pulse is _____. (a) inverted/ inverted (b) inverted/ not inverted (c) not inverted/ not inverted (d) not inverted/ inverted (e) nonexistent/ not inverted (b) See Section 15-4. 93* True or false: (a) Wave pulses on strings are transverse waves. (b) Sound waves in air are transverse waves of compression and rarefaction. (c) The speed of sound at 20C is twice that at 5C. (a) True (b) False (c) False 94 Sound travels at 340 m/s in air and 1500 m/s in water. A sound of 256 Hz is made under water. In the air, the frequency will be (a) the same, but the wavelength will be shorter. (b) higher, but the wavelength will stay the same. (c) lower, but the wavelength will be longer. (d) lower, and the wavelength will be shorter. (e) the same, and the wavelength too will stay the same. (a) from = v/f. 95 Figure 15-30 shows a wave pulse at time t = 0 moving to the right. At this particular time, which segments of the string are moving up? Which are moving down? Is there any segment of the string at the pulse that is instantaneously at rest? Answer these questions by sketching the pulse at a slightly later time and a slightly earlier time to see how the segments of the string are moving. The figure shows the pulse at an earlier time (-t) and later time (t). One can see that at t = 0, the portion of the string between 1 cm and 2 cm is moving down, the portion between 2 cm and 3 cm is moving up, and the string at x = 2 cm is instantaneously at rest. 96 Make a sketch of the velocity of each string segment versus position for the pulse shown in Figure 15-30. 316 Chapter 15 Wave Motion The velocity of the string at t = 0 is shown. Note that the velocity is negative for x between 1 cm and 2 cm and is positive for x between 2 cm and 3 cm. (see Problem 95) 97* Consider a long line of cars equally spaced by one car length and moving slowly with the same speed. One car suddenly slows to avoid a dog and then speeds up until it is again one car length behind the car ahead. Discuss how the space between cars propagates back along the line. How is this like a wave pulse? Is there any transport of energy? What does the speed of propagation depend on? The driver of the car behind slows and then speeds up. This gives rise to a longitudinal wave pulse propagating backwards along the line of cars. There is no transport of energy. The speed of propagation of the pulse depends on the length of a car and on the driver's reaction time. 98 At time t = 0, the shape of a wave pulse on a string is given by the function y(x, 0) = 0.12 m3 (2.00 m ) 2 + x 2 where x is in meters. (a) Sketch y(x, 0) versus x. Give the wave function y(x, t) at a general time t if (b) the pulse is moving in the positive x direction with a speed of 10 m/s, and (c) the pulse is moving in the negative x direction with a speed of 10 m/s. (a) The pulse at t = 0 is shown on the right (b) The wave function must be of the form y(x, t) = f(x vt); y(x, t) = 0.12/[4 + (x - 10t)2] m (c) In this case, y(x, t) = 0.12/[4 + (x + 10t)2] m 99 A wave with frequency of 1200 Hz propagates along a wire that is under a tension of 800 N. The wavelength of the wave is 24 cm. What will be the wavelength if the tension is decreased to 600 N and the frequency is kept constant? v T ; 2 / 1 = T2 / T1 2 = 24 600 / 800 cm = 20.8 cm Chapter 15 Wave Motion 100 In a common lecture demonstration of wave pulses, a piece of rubber tubing is tied at one end to a fixed post and is passed over a pulley to a weight hanging at the other end. Suppose that the distance from the fixed support to the pulley is 10 m, the mass of this length of tubing is 0.7 kg, and the suspended weight is 110 N. If the tubing is given a transverse blow at one end, how long will it take the resulting pulse to reach the other end? t = L/v = L/ F/ = Lm/F t = 7/110 s = 0.252 s 101* The following wave functions represent traveling waves: (a) y1(x,t) = A cos k[x + (34 m/s)t], (b) y 2 (x,t)= Ae k [x - (20 m/s)t ], (c) y 3(x,t) = BC + {k[x - (10 m/s)t]}2, where x is in meters, t is in seconds, and A, k, B, and C are constants that have the proper units for y to be in meters. Give the direction of propagation and the speed of the wave for each wave function. (a) Wave propagates to the left (-x direction) at a speed of 34 m/s. (b) Wave propagates to the right at 20 m/s. (c) Wave propagates to the right at 10 m/s. 102 A boat traveling at 10 m/s on a still lake makes a bow wave at an angle of 20 with its direction of motion. What is the speed of the bow wave? From Equ. 15-38, v = u sin v = 10 sin 20o m/s = 3.42 m/s 103 If a wavelength is much larger than the diameter of a loudspeaker, the speaker radiates in all directions, much like a point source. On the other hand, if the wavelength is much smaller than the diameter, the sound travels in an approximately straight line in front of the speaker. Find the frequency of a sound wave that has a wavelength (a) 10 times the diameter of a 30-cm speaker, and (b) one-tenth the diameter of a 30-cm speaker. (c) Repeat this problem for a 6-cm speaker. In each case use f = v/. (a) f = 340/3 Hz = 113 Hz. (b) f = 11.3 kHz. (c)-(a) f = 567 Hz. (c)-(b) f = 56.7 kHz. 104 A whistle of frequency 500 Hz moves in a circle of radius 1 m at 3 rev/s. What are the maximum and minimum frequencies heard by a stationary listener in the plane of the circle and 5 m away from its center? As shown in the figure, the maximum and minimum frequencies are determined by f 0 and the tangential speed u s = 2 r/T. We now apply Equ. 15-33. f = 1 us / v f0 ; u s = 6 m/s = 18.85 m/s f max = 500/(1 - 18.85/340) Hz = 529 Hz; f min = 500/(1 + 18.85/340) Hz = 474 Hz 105* Ocean waves move toward the beach with a speed of 8.9 m/s and a crest-to-crest separation of 15.0 m. You are 318 Chapter 15 Wave Motion in a small boat anchored off shore. (a) What is the frequency of the ocean waves? (b) You now lift anchor and head out to sea at a speed of 15 m/s. What frequency of the waves do you observe? Given: = 15 m, v = 8.9 m/s. (a) f 0 = v/ f 0 = 8.9/15 Hz = 0.593 Hz (b) f = f 0(1 + u r/v) f = 0.593(1 + 15/8.9) Hz = 1.59 Hz 106 Two connected wires with linear mass densities that are related by 1 = 32 are under the same tension. When the wires oscillate at a frequency of 120 Hz, waves of wavelength 10 cm travel down the first wire with the linear density of 1. (a) What is the wave speed in the first wire? (b) What is the wave speed in the second wire? (c) What is the wavelength in the second wire? (a) v1 = f 1 v1 = 120 0.1 m/s = 12.0 m/s (b) v 1/ u ; 2 = 1/3 (c) f 1 = f 2 = f; 2 = 1(v2/v1) v2 = 12.0 3 m/s = 20.8 m/s 2 = 0.1 3 m = 17.3 cm 107 A 12.0-m wire of mass 85 g is stretched under a tension of 180 N. A pulse is generated at the left end of the wire, and 25 ms later a second pulse is generated at the right end of the wire. Where do the pulses first meet? Let t be the time of travel of the left hand pulse. Both pulses travel at the same speed. 1. Find the pulse speed v = F/ = 180 12/0.085 m/s = 159 m/s 2. Write the equation for the distance traveled 12 m = vt + v(t - 2.5 10-2 s) 3. Solve for vt = distance from left end vt = 8.0 m 108 A harmonic wave moves down a string with speed 12.4 m/s. A particle on the string has a maximum displacement of 4.5 cm and a maximum speed of 9.4 m/s. Find (a) the wavelength of the wave, and (b) the frequency. (c) Write an equation for the wave function. The general expression is y(x, t) = A sin(kx - t). We are given A = 0.045 m, (dy/dt)max = 9.4 m/s and v = 12.4 m/s. -1 1. Find using (dy/dt)max = A = 9.4/0.045 rad/s = 209 s 2. Find k using v = /k k = /v = 209/12.4 m-1 = 16.85 m-1 (a) = 2 /k = 37.3 cm (b) f = /2 f = 33.3 Hz (c) Write y(x, t) using numerical results y(x, t) = 0.045 sin(16.85x - 209t) 109* Find the speed of a car for which the tone of its horn will drop by 10% as it passes you. Let = u s/v. 1+ = 0.1/1.9; u s = 34/1.9 m/s = 17.9 m/s = 64.4 km/h = 0.9 ; solve for and u s Then we are given 1- 110 A loudspeaker diaphragm 20 cm in diameter is vibrating at 800 Hz with an amplitude of 0.025 mm. Assuming that the air molecules in the vicinity have this same amplitude of vibration, find (a) the pressure amplitude immediately in Chapter 15 Wave Motion front of the diaphragm, (b) the sound intensity, and (c) the acoustic power being radiated. Except for numerical values, this problem is identical to Example 15-6. Following the same procedure, one finds (a) p 0 = 55.1 N/m2. (b) I = 3.46 W/m2. (c) P = 0.109 W. 111 A plane, harmonic, acoustical wave that oscillates in air with an amplitude of 10-6 m has an intensity of 10-2 W/m2. What is the frequency of the sound wave? From Equ. 15-28, = 2I vs2 0 = 2 10-2 -1 = 6.75 103 s -1 -12 s 1.29 340 10 = 1.07 kHz 112 Water flows at 7 m/s in a pipe of radius 5 cm. A plate having an area equal to the cross-sectional area of the pipe is suddenly inserted to stop the flow. Find the force exerted on the plate. Take the speed of sound in water to be 1.4 km/s. (Hint: When the plate is inserted, a pressure wave propagates through the water at the speed of sound vs. The mass of water brought to a stop in time t is the water in a length of tube equal to vst.) 1. Find m of water in length vt m = vAt 2. F = p/t = mvw/t = vvwA F = 1.4 103 103 7 0.052 N = 77 kN 113* Two wires of different linear mass densities are soldered together end to end and are then stretched under a tension F (the tension is the same in both wires). The wave speed in the second wire is three times that in the first wire. When a harmonic wave traveling in the first wire is reflected at the junction of the wires, the reflected wave has half the amplitude of the incident wave. (a) If the amplitude of the incident wave is A, what are the ampli-tudes of the reflected and transmitted waves?(b) Assuming no loss in the wire, what fraction of the incident power is reflected at the junction and what fraction is transmitted? (c) Show that the displacement just to the left of the junction equals that just to the right of the junction. (a) 1. From Example 15-9, A2/v1 = At2/v2 + Ar2/v1 A2/v1 = At2/3v1 + At2/4v1 2. Solve for At and Ar At = 3A/2, Ar = 1/2A (given) 2 2 (b) Pr = (Ar /A )Pi; Pt = Pi - Pr Pr = Pi/4; Pt = 3Pi/4 (c) Aleft = A + Ar Aleft = 3A/2 = At 114 A column of precision marchers keeps in step by listening to the band positioned at the head of the column. The beat of the music is for 100 paces per minute. A television camera shows that only the marchers at the front and the rear of the column are actually in step. The marchers in the middle section are striding forward with the left foot when those at the front and rear are striding forward with the right foot. The marchers are so well trained, however, that they are all certain that they are in proper step with the music. Explain the source of the problem, and calculate the length of the column. The source of the problem is that it takes a finite time for the sound to travel from the front of the line of marchers to the back. From the data given, the time for the sound to travel the length of the column is 1/100 min = 0.6 s. Therefore, the length of the column is L = 340 0.6 m = 204 m. 320 Chapter 15 Wave Motion 115 Hovering over the pit of hell, the devil observes that as a student falls past (with terminal velocity), the frequency of his scream decreases from 842 to 820 Hz. (a) Find the speed of descent of the student. (b) The student's scream reflects from the bottom of the pit. Find the frequency of the echo as heard by the student. (c) Find the frequency of the echo as heard by the devil. (a) 1. 842 Hz = f 0(1 + u/v); 820 Hz = f 0(1 - u/v) f 0 = 1662/2 Hz = 831 Hz 2. Solve for u u = 11v/831 m/s = 4.5 m/s (b) Apply Equ. 15-35 f = [831(1 + 4.5/340)/(1 - 4.5/340)] Hz = 853 Hz (c) Here the shift is only due to the moving source f = 842 Hz 116 A bat flying toward an obstacle at 12 m/s emits brief, high-frequency sound pulses at a repetition frequency of 80 Hz. What is the time interval between the echo pulses heard by the bat? 1. Use Equ. 15-35 to find the reflected repetition rate f = [80(1 + 12/340)/(1 - 12/340)] s-1 = 85.9 s-1 2. Time interval t = 1/f t = 11.6 ms 117* A tuning fork attached to a stretched wire generates transverse waves. The vibration of the fork is perpendicular to the wire. Its frequency is 400 Hz, and the amplitude of its oscillation is 0.50 mm. The wire has linear mass density of 0.01 kg/m and is under a tension of 1 kN. Assume that there are no reflected waves. (a) Find the period and frequency of waves on the wire. (b) What is the speed of the waves? (c) What are the wavelength and wave number? (d) Write a suitable wave function for the waves on the wire. (e) Calculate the maximum speed and acceleration of a point on the wire. (f) At what average rate must energy be supplied to the fork to keep it oscillating at a steady amplitude? 5 (a) f = 400 Hz (given); T = 1/f = 2.5 ms. (b) v = F/ = 10 m/s = 316 m/s . (c) = f/v = 79 cm; k = 2 / = 7.95 m-1. (d) y(x, t) = A sin(kx - t) = [5 10-4 sin(7.95x - 2.51 103t)] m. (e) vmax = A = 1.26 m/s; a max = A 2 = 3.16 103 m/s2. (f) Pav = 1/2 2A2v = 10-2 2 2 16 104 25 10-8 316 W = 2.5 W. 118 A very long wire can be vibrated up and down with a mechanical motor to produce waves traveling down the wire. At the far end of the wire, the traveling waves are absorbed by a clever device that allows no reflected waves to be returned to the motor. The wave speed is observed to be 240 m/s, the maximum transverse displacement of the wire is 1 cm, and the distance between maxima is 3.0 m. (a) Write a wave function to represent the wave propagating down this wire. (b) What is the frequency of vibration of the motor? (c) What is the period of the transverse oscillations of the wire? (d) What is the maximum transverse velocity of a small insect clinging to the wire? (a) 1. Determine k and ; k = 2 /; = kv k = 2 /3 m-1; = 160 rad/s 2. y(x, t) = A sin(kx - t) y(x, t) = 0.01 sin(2 x/3 - 160 t) m (b) f = /2 f = 80 Hz (c) T = 1/f T = 12.5 ms (d) vmax = A vmax = 1.6 m/s = 5.03 m/s 119 If a loop of chain is spun at high speed, it will roll like a hoop without collapsing. Consider a chain of linear mass density that is rolling without slipping at a high speed v0. (a) Show that the tension in the chain is F = v02. (b) If the Chapter 15 Wave Motion chain rolls over a small bump, a transverse wave pulse will be generated in the chain. At what speed will it travel along the chain? (c) How far around the loop (in degrees) will a transverse wave pulse travel in the time the hoop rolls through one complete revolution? Since the chain is rolling at high speed we shall neglect the effect of gravity. (a) The adjacent figure shows a (small) portion of the chain. The angle is presumed to be small (although shown large). Let m be the mass of that segment of the chain. Then we require that mv02/R = Fnet . Now m = R and Fnet = 2F sin(/2). For << 1, sin(/2) = 2 2 /2. Thus v0 = F and F = v0 . (b) The wave speed is (F/)1/2 = v0, i.e., the same as the speed at which the chain is moving. (c) As seen by an observer at rest, the pulse remains at the same position since its speed along the chain is the same as the speed of the chain. With respect to a fixed point on the chain, the pulse travels through 360o. 120 A long rope with a mass per unit length of 0.1 kg/m is under a constant tension of 10 N. A motor at the point x = 0 drives one end of the rope with harmonic motion at 5 oscillations per second and an amplitude of 4 cm. (a) What is the wave speed? (b) What is the wavelength? (c) What is the maximum transverse linear momentum of a 1-mm segment of the rope? (d) What is the maximum net force on a 1-mm segment of the rope? v = 10 m/s (a) v = F/ =2m (b) = v/f p max = 2 0.1 10-3 0.04 5 kg.m/s (c) p max = xA = 1.26 10-4 kg.m/s Fmax = 10 1.26 10-4 N = 3.95 mN (d) Fmax = xA 2 = p max 121* A heavy rope 3 m long is attached to the ceiling and is allowed to hang freely. (a) Show that the speed of transverse waves on the rope is independent of its mass and length but does depend on the distance y from the bottom according to the formula v = gy . (b) If the bottom end of the rope is given a sudden sideways displacement, how long does it take the resulting wave pulse to go to the ceiling, reflect, and return to the bottom of the rope? (a) The speed is given by v = F/ . At a distance y from the bottom, F = gy. Thus v = gy . (b) dy/dt = v gy . The time to travel up and back is two times t, the time to travel from y = 0 to y = 3 m. We find t by integration. t= 1 g 0 3 dy = 2 3 / 9.81s = 1.106s . y Thus the total time is 2.21 s. 122 The linear mass density of a nonuniform wire under constant tension decreases gradually along the wire so that an 322 Chapter 15 Wave Motion incident wave is transmitted without reflection. The wire is uniform for - x 0. In this region, a transverse wave has the form y(x, t) = 0.003 cos(25x 50t), where y and x are in meters and t is in seconds. From x = 0 to x = 20 m, the linear mass density decreases gradually from 1 to 1/4. For 20 x , the linear mass density is = 1/4. (a) Find the wave velocity for large values of x. (b) Find the amplitude of the wave for large values of x. (c) Give y(x, t) for 20 x . (a) 1. Find v1 from the expression for y(x, t) v1 = /k = 2 m/s v2 = 2v1 = 4 m/s 2. v 1/ (b) No reflection, so use energy conservation; P1 = P2. P A2v, so A2 = A1 1 v1 / 2 v 2 (c) Write y(x, t) using above results; k 2 = k 1/2. A2 = A1 2 = 4.24 mm y(x,t) = 0.00424 cos(12.5x - 50t) 123 In this problem you will derive an expression for the potential energy of a segment of a string carrying a traveling wave (Figure 15-31). The potential energy of a segment equals the work done by the tension in stretching the string, which is U = F( l - x), where F is the tension, l is the length of the stretched segment, and x is its original length. From the figure we see that l ( x ) 2 + (y ) 2 = x[1 + ( y / x ) 2 ]1/ 2 1 1 (a) Use the binomial expansion to show that l - x 2 ( y/x ) x,and therefore U 2 F( y/ x ) x. 2 2 2 2 2 (b) Compute dy/dx from the wave function in Equ. 15-13 and show that U 1 Fk A cos (kx - t)x. 2 (c) (a) (b) (c) Use F = v2 and v = /k to show that your result for (b) is the same as Equ. 15-16b. For y/x << 1, l = x[1 + 1/2(y/x)2]; so, l - x = 1/2(y/x)2x and U = 1/2F(y/x)2x. (dy/dx)2 = A2k 2 cos 2 (kx - t). So U = 1/2FA2k 2x cos 2 (kx - t). Replace F by v2 = 2/k 2. This gives Equ. 15-16b.

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Maryland - PHYS - 260
Lecture 12 Beats: interference of slightly differentfrequencies Introduction to thermodynamics superposition of waves of slightly different fBeats(so far, same f): e.g. 2 tones with f 1 Hz single tone with intensity modulated: loud-soft-lo
Maryland - PHYS - 260
Lecture 18 relate T to kinetic energy of molecules predict molar specific heats of solids andgasesaverage translational kinetic energy of molecule (E is energy of system)1 2mTemperature( )avg =v2 avg=1 2 mvrms 22 Using p = 2 N
Maryland - PHYS - 260
Lecture 20This week (chapter 19: Heat Engines and Refrigerators) physical principles for all heat engines(transform heat energy into work) and refrigerators (uses work to move heat from cold to hot) 2nd law: limit on efficiency (Carnot cycle)
Maryland - PHYS - 260
Lecture 9 Power and Intensity Doppler effect for(i) mechanical waves e.g. sound (ii) EM waves Power is rate of transfer of energy by wave Brightness/loudness depends also on area receiving power:Power and Intensityintensity, I = P = power-
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER7Conservation of Energy1* What are the advantages and disadvantages of using the conservation of mechanical energy rather than Newton's laws to solve problems? Generally simpler, involving only scalars; cannot obtain some details, e.g.,
Maryland - PHYS - 260
Lecture 19 Interaction of 2 systems at differenttemperatures Irreversible processes: 2nd Law ofThermodynamicsThermal interactions T's change via collisions at boundary (not mechanicalinteraction) elastic collision (total energy conserved)
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER19Heat and the First Law of Thermodynamics1* Body A has twice the mass and twice the specific heat of body B. If they are supplied with equal amounts of heat, CA = 4CB; TA = TB/4how do the subsequent changes in their temperatures com
Maryland - PHYS - 260
Lecture 8 Sinusoidal waves Wave speed on a string 2D/3D waves Sound and LightSinusoidal waves (graphical) generated by source in SHM snapshot and history graphs sinusoidal/periodic in space, time Wavelength (): spatial analog of T, distance
Maryland - PHYS - 260
Lecture 10 this week:superposition (combination of 2 or more waves) applications to lasers, musical instruments. today:basic principle standing waves (2 waves traveling in opposite direction) Principle of SuperpositionTwo particles can't o
Maryland - PHYS - 260
Lecture 22 Maximum efficiency for a perfectlyreversible engine conditions for perfectly reversible engine efficiency for Carnot cycleWhat's most efficient heat engine/refrigerator operating between hot and cold reservoirs at temperatures TC
Maryland - PHYS - 260
Lecture 11: Interference superposition of waves in same directiongraphical and mathematical phase and path-length difference application to thin films in 2/3 D standing waves: superposition of waves traveling in opposite direction (not a tra
Maryland - PHYS - 260
Lecture 23 limits on efficiency, calculate efficiency ofCarnot cycle Electricity: chapters 25-31Proof by Contradiction: I want to prove statement &quot;A&quot; is not true assume A is true, find a violation of basic law assumption is incorrect, A is
Maryland - PHYS - 260
Lecture 7 Traveling Waves (I) particles (localized, individual, discrete) andwave (collective, continuous): two fundamental models of physics This week: (single) traveling waves (gooutward from source thru' medium), e.g. ripples on water, wave
Maryland - MATH - 240
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Maryland - MATH - 240
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Maryland - MATH - 240
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Maryland - PHYS - 261
David O'Brien Prelab #2t l m w2. tx = mgsin( ) ty = mgcos( ) Fx = tx = (mgsin( )*l 3. (sin( )- )/ .01 = 0% .1 = .1% .2 = .1% .3 =1.5% .4 = 2.6% .5 = 4.1% .6 = 5.9% .7 = 8.0% .8 = 10.3% .9 = 13.0% 1.0 = 15.9% 1.1= 19.0% 1.2 = 22.3% 1.3 = 25.9% 1.
Maryland - PHYS - 261
David O'Brien Prelab 7 1) pv = nRT =&gt; n = pv/RT n = (1.013x10^5)(100cm^3)/(300*8.3145) = 4061 moles 2) p1v1 = p2v2 20(30) = 10*p2 p2=60lbs/in2 3) Anytime the temperature drops below freezing.
Columbia - IEOR - 4106
IEOR 4106: Introduction to Operations Research: Stochastic Models Spring 2004, Professor Whitt, Final Exam Chapters 4-7 and 10 in Ross, Tuesday, May 11, 9:00am-12:00noon Open Book: but only the Ross textbook plus three 8 11 pages of notesJustify yo
Maryland - GEOG - 202
Essay: 1.2. 3.Briefly discuss what geographers mean by the site and situation of a place &quot;or&quot; its absolute and relative location. a. Site is related to absolute location, whereas situation is related to relative location. Site deals with the inte
Maryland - MATH - 241
Maryland - MATH - 241
Maryland - MATH - 241
Maryland - MATH - 241
Maryland - MATH - 241
Maryland - MATH - 241
Maryland - PHYS - 260
Lecture 13 Temperature scales, absolute zero Phase changes, equilibrium, diagram Ideal gas model temperature is related to system's thermal energy(kinetic and potential energy of atoms)Temperature measured by thermometer: small system under
Maryland - ENES - 220
Problem H.02: The rigid bar ABCD shown below is supported by four identical, equally spaced wires. Find the tension in each of the wires in terms of the applied load P. Assume P and L are known quantities.Problem 4.47:Problem 4.48:Problem 4.49:
Maryland - ENES - 220
Problem 13.15:Problem 13.20:Problem 13.20: (con't)Problem 13.23:Problem 13.28:Problem 13.31:Problem 13.34:Problem 13.37:Problem 13.38:
Maryland - ENES - 220
Problem 11.13:Problem 11.14:Problem 11.15:Problem 11.20:Problem H.03:Problem H.04:Problem H.05:Problem H.06:
Maryland - ENES - 220
Problem 13.43:Problem 13.44:Problem 13.49:Problem 13.49: (con't)Problem 13.52:Problem 12.1(a):Problem 12.2(b):Problem 12.3:--Problem 5.18:
Maryland - MATH - 240
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Maryland - ENES - 220
Problem 10.22:-Problem 10.23:Problem 10.24:Problem 10.26:Problem H.13:Problem H.14:Problem H.14: (con't.)Problem 13.6(b):Problem 13.14:
Maryland - ENES - 220
Problem 12.4(a):Problem 12.5:Problem 12.6:Problem 12.7(a):Problem 12.8:Problem 12.9:Problem 12.10:Problem 12.12:Problem 12.13:Problem 12.14:Problem H.15:Problem H.16:
Maryland - ENES - 220
Problem 14.2:-Problem 14.4:Problem 14.8:Problem 14.12:Problem 14.15:Problem 14.17:Problem 14.18:Problem 14.21:
Maryland - MATH - 240
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Maryland - ENES - 220
Problem H.07:Problem H.08:Problem H.09:Problem H.10:Problem H.11:Problem H.11: (con't.)Problem H.12:Problem 10.28:Problem 10.30:Problem 10.31:Problem 10.32:Problem 10.35:Problem 10.36:
Maryland - ENES - 220
Problem 12.29 &amp; 30:Problem 12.29 &amp; 30: (con't)Problem 12.31:Problem 12.31: (con't)Problem 12.32:Problem 12.33:Problem 12.34:Problem 12.34: (con't)Problem 12.35:Problem 12.36:Problem 12.36: (con't)
Maryland - ENES - 220
Problem 5.19:-Problem 5.22:Problem 5.24:Problem 5.26:Problem 4.36:--Problem 11.18:Problem 10.44:Problem 10.45:
Maryland - MATH - 240
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Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER5Applications of Newton's Laws1* Various objects lie on the floor of a truck moving along a horizontal road. If the truck accelerates, what force acts on the objects to cause them to accelerate? Force of friction between the objects and
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER6Work and Energy1* True or false: (a) Only the net force acting on an object can do work. (b) No work is done on a particle that remains at rest. (c) A force that is always perpendicular to the velocity of a particle never does work on
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER Alternating-Current Circuits31Note: Unless otherwise indicated, the symbols I, V, E, and P denote the rms values of I, V, and E and the average power. 2 1* A 200-turn coil has an area of 4 cm and rotates in a magnetic field of 0.5 T. (a)
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER9Rotation1* Two points are on a disk turning at constant angular velocity, one point on the rim and the other halfway between the rim and the axis. Which point moves the greater distance in a given time? Which turns through the greater
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER10Conservation of Angular Momentum1* True or false: (a) If two vectors are parallel, their cross product must be zero. (b) When a disk rotates about its symmetry axis, is along the axis. (c) The torque exerted by a force is always perp
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER18Temperature and the Kinetic Theory of Gases1* True or false:(a) Two objects in thermal equilibrium with each other must be in thermal equilibrium with a third object. (b) The Fahrenheit and Celsius temperature scales differ only in t
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER Properties of Light331* Why is helium needed in a heliumneon laser? Why not just use neon? The population inversion between the state E2,Ne and the state 1.96 eV below it (see Figure 33-9) is achieved by inelastic collisions between neon
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER8Systems of Particles and Conservation of Momentum1* Give an example of a three-dimensional object that has no mass at its center of mass. A hollow sphere. 2 Three point masses of 2 kg each are located on the x axis at the origin, x =
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER20The Second Law of Thermodynamics1* Where does the energy come from in an internal-combustion engine? In a steam engine? steam.Internal combustion engine: From the heat of combustion (see Problems 19-106 to 19-109). Steam engine: Fr
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER12Static Equilibrium and Elasticity1* True or false: (a) F = 0 is sufficient for static equilibrium to exist. (b) F = 0 is necessary for static equilibrium to exist. (c) In static equilibrium, the net torque about any point is zero. (
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER2Motion in One Dimension1* What is the approximate average velocity of the race cars during the Indianapolis 500?Since the cars go around a closed circuit and return nearly to the starting point, the displacement is nearly zero, and
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER1Systems of Measurement1* Which of the following is not one of the fundamental physical quantities in the SI system?(a) mass (b) length (c) force (d) time (e) All of the above are fundamental physical quantities. (c) Force is not a f
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER11Gravity1* True or false: (a) Kepler's law of equal areas implies that gravity varies inversely with the square of the distance. (b) The planet closest to the sun, on the average, has the shortest period of revolution about the sun. (a
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER Maxwell's Equations and Electromagnetic Waves321* A parallel-plate capacitor in air has circular plates of radius 2.3 cm separated by 1.1 mm. Charge is flowing onto the upper plate and off the lower plate at a rate of 5 A. (a) Find the t
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER24Electric Potential1* A uniform electric field of 2 kN/C is in the x direction. A positive point charge Q = 3 C is released fromrest at the origin. (a) What is the potential difference V(4 m) V(0)? (b) What is the change in the pot
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER22The Electric Field I: Discrete Charge Distributions1* If the sign convention for charge were changed so that the charge on the electron were positive and the charge on the proton were negative, would Coulomb's law still be written the
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER23The Electric Field II: Continuous Charge Distributions1* A uniform line charge of linear charge density = 3.5 nC/m extends from x = 0 to x = 5 m. (a) What is the total charge? Find the electric field on the x axis at (b) x = 6 m, (c)
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER27The Microscopic Theory of Electrical Conduction1* In the classical model of conduction, the electron loses energy on average in a collision because it loses the drift velocity it had picked up since the last collision. Where does this
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER4Newton's LawsNote: For all problems we shall take the upward direction as positive unless otherwise stated. 1* 2 How can you tell if a particular reference frame is an inertial reference frame? Suppose you find that an object in a par
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER The Magnetic Field281* When a cathode-ray tube is placed horizontally in a magnetic field that is directed vertically upward, the electrons emitted from the cathode follow one of the dashed paths to the face of the tube in Figure 28-30.
Maryland - PHYS - 161,260,27
CHAPTER3Motion in Two and Three Dimensions1* Can the magnitude of the displacement of a particle be less than the distance traveled by the particle along its path? Can its magnitude be more than the distance traveled? Explain. The magnitude of