Documents about American English

  • 2 Pages

    ling233_test_2_study_guide

    Washington, LING 233

    Excerpt: ... mmatical differences Morphology Derivational suffixes Inflectional suffixes Verb inflection Regularized forms Syntax Verbs Completive done, habitual be, double modals Structures Pragmatic differences Speech act Directness/indirectness Forms of address Power/solidarity Greetings/leave taking Backchanneling Pages like 66, 78, 91 Chapter 4: Dialects in the US: past, present, future People from different UK regions settled in separate regions in US Development of American English Primary cultural centers Jamestown 1607 Boston Philadelphia Charleston New Orleans Language contact Geographic isolation Effects of geographic mobility Dialect leveling Pidgin Creole Louisiana Creole Innovation Native words or new meanings for old words Desire for independence Spelling changes American English Extended Settlement patterns beyond the east coast 19th century Foreign immigration The westward expansion of English 20th century changes Change in immigration patterns Change in patterns of population movement Change in cultura ...

  • 2 Pages

    ling233_test4_studyguide-1

    Washington, LING 233

    Excerpt: ... LING/COM/ANTH 233 Test 4 Study Guide Wolfram & Shilling-Estes chapters 7 and 8 Lecture and section notes Chapter 7: African American English (AAE) The linguistic structure of AAE Supra-regional features Sytactic features Phonological features Social class/regional variation Northern metropolitan Southern rural Shared features Pattern differences The origin and early development of AAE Anglicist Hypothesis Creolist Hypothesis Creole Neo-Anglicist Hypothesis Substrate Hypothesis Substrate language Naming of language varieties Language ideology King vs. Ann Arbor (1979) The problem The argument The ruling Oakland controversy (1996-97) The resolution The misconceptions The intensions Language change taking place in AAE Mobility Population and habituation shifts Current development of AAE Supra-regional base of AAE in 20th century Some structures intensifying Solidarity Social evaluation of AAE Attitudes to language variation Principle of linguistic subordination Chapter 8: Gender and language variation Sex Gend ...

  • 3 Pages

    113AAEAssignment1

    Michigan State University, LIN 113

    Excerpt: ... Ling 113 Fall 2005 Language and Diversity in the US Assignment on Chapter 2 of Lisa Greens African American English . Hand in by Monday, November 14 (A note on length: content is more relevant than length, but if youre unsure aim for maybe a page and a half or so.) One. Describe some differences and commonalities in the auxiliary system of African American English and Mainstream English. Give examples. Two. Suppose somebody claimed that speakers of African American English (AAE) didnt use the auxiliary be properly, and illustrated it with the example in (1), claiming that is really should be like the Mainstream English (ME) sentence in (2). Show that his argument is based on the wrong assumption that be in (1) is an auxiliary in the same way that are is in (2). You can use examples (3) (5) to illustrate your point. Then mention the differences in meaning between AAE (1) and ME (2). (1) Mice be squeaking. (2) Mice are squeaking. (3) Mice DO be squeaking. (4) Mice dont be squeaki ...

  • 4 Pages

    socio

    Ohio State, LING 201

    Excerpt: ... e English speaking world: British English vs. American English vs. Australian English (along with others). Northern American English , Southern American English , etc. (1) Brit/American: lay by/rest area, petrol/gasoline, lorry/truck, minerals/soft drinks A dialect spoken by one individual is called an idiolect. Everyone has small differences between the way they talk and the way even their family and best friends talk, creating a "minimal dialect". 3 Language Variation Accent What Factors Enter into Language Variation? It's clear that there are many systematic differences between different languages. (English and Japanese, for example). By "systematic" we mean describable by rules. But what is not as obvious is that languages also contain many levels of internal variation, related to such variables as age, region, socioeconomic status, group identification, and others. These various dimensions of variation are systematic in the same way as the variation between different languages is. 2 An accent i ...

  • 3 Pages

    AAEQuiz1

    Michigan State University, LIN 113

    Excerpt: ... Ling 113 YOUR NAME: QUIZ on Selected Linguistic Features of African American English . DUE Monday 12/12/05, in class (11:15am). Selkirk Fall 2005 Teachers and other educators need to know about the features of AAE so that they can understand AAE-speaking children and help them acquire school language (= mainstream American English ) while giving recognition to their home language (= African American English ). If you were a teacher of AAE-speaking children, it would be important for you to get 100% on the quiz below. The quiz is based on the Child dialogue in African American English collected by Dr. Toya Wyatt of Cal State University, Fullerton, CA. Following the format below, you are to provide a translation of each of the sentences of the AAE Child Dialogue into mainstream American English . (Some sentences will be identical in both varieties). When there is a difference between the AAE sentence and the translation into MAE, you must, for each difference, (i) note what that difference is, ( ...

  • 2 Pages

    AAEQuiz1

    UMass (Amherst), LING 113

    Excerpt: ... Ling 113 YOUR NAME: QUIZ on Selected Linguistic Features of African American English . DUE Monday 12/12/05, in class (11:15am). Selkirk Fall 2005 Teachers and other educators need to know about the features of AAE so that they can understand AAE-speaking children and help them acquire `school language' (= mainstream American English ) while giving recognition to their `home language' (= African American English ). If you were a teacher of AAE-speaking children, it would be important for you to get 100% on the quiz below. The quiz is based on the `Child dialogue in African American English ' collected by Dr. Toya Wyatt of Cal State University, Fullerton, CA. Following the format below, you are to provide a translation of each of the sentences of the AAE Child Dialogue into mainstream American English . (Some sentences will be identical in both varieties). When there is a difference between the AAE sentence and the translation into MAE, you must, for each difference, (i) note what that difference is, (ii) mention ...

  • 3 Pages

    3-lang-noteguide

    Arizona, LING INDV 101

    Excerpt: ... Note-taking guide for INDV101 Language, Spring 2009 Mon., 1/26 When is the standard language supposedly used? (1) (2) (3) (4) Real News, Real Fast (CNN Headline News Slogan) Do drive as careful as you can. (University of Arizona National Public Radio Announcer) It dun work. Ya gum bring it with? The illiteracy level of our children are appalling. Will the highways of the Internet become more few? Sometimes you misunderestimated me. (George W. Bush) What conclusions can we get from the above examples? What do they show us about who uses what varieties of English? Why do we need a standard? Illustrate how the following language examples demonstrate language change. (5) (6) Latin Standard British and Standard American English What register of language is mostly used in school? What does the following example show about written language? (7) Although it could perhaps be maintained that that You-tube video was amusing, . What are the differences between written and spoken language? What is the pu ...

  • 3 Pages

    H1301 Unit 1 Lecture Two class 2008 [4]

    Tarrant County, HISTORY 1301

    Excerpt: ... English Colonies in America: Transplantation of the English Culture Little mingling with Native Americans English Common Law / religion / social conventions Social mobility based on financial success and land Continual threat from Native ...

  • 4 Pages

    ESL 911 Course Outline 2.07

    Santa Monica, ESL 911

    Excerpt: ... Santa Monica College Non-Credit Course Outline ESL 911 Course Title: ESL 911: Beginning Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Date Submitted: 10/08/2002 Updated: 2/28/2007 Total Hours Instruction: 60 I. Catalog Description: Prerequisite: Note This course is designed for the beginning ESL student. In this course students build their pronunciation and comprehension of American English through exercises that improve aural discrimination of sounds; build association of sounds with written letters; teach placement of lips, tongue, and teeth for correct pronunciation; impart correct intonation and stress patterns; improve conversational skills; and appropriate communication patterns (including vocabulary and intonation) for a variety of socio-cultural contexts. II. Required Text and References: One or more of the following or similar texts: Benz, Cheryl and Kara Dworak. Tapestry Listening and Speaking 1. MA: Heinle and Heinle, 2000. Benz, Cheryl and Kara Dworak. Tapestry Listening and Speaking 1 CD. MA: Heinle a ...

  • 2 Pages

    ling final NOTES

    USC, LING 115g

    Excerpt: ... Sapir-whorf hypothesis: Strong version- language determines thought and perception Weak version- language influences thought and perception Research shows that language does affect 1) how we encode spatial relations 2) how we conceive of objects and their makeup Semantics- study of meaning Language varies in National groups, social classes, ethnic groups, gender, regional groups DARE- Dictionary of American Regional English TELSUR- telephone survey ANAE- Atlas of North American English Vowel mergers Conditional- ex: before the letter n or m in pin v. pen Unconditional- the entire word ex: cot v. caught African American English (AAE) Copula deletion, habitual "be" and "it" AAE and Latino English don't participate in NCS or Southern shift Register- language characteristic of a particular social situation Dialect- language characerisitic of a particular social group Accent- pronuniciation of a dialect Standard language variety- codified in dicitionaries and grammars and serving a speech commu ...

  • 3 Pages

    113LectureNotesOct21

    Michigan State University, LIN 113

    Excerpt: ... Ling 113: Language and Diversity in the U.S. Lisa Selkirk October 21, 2005 Class Notes Octo Categorizing sociolinguistic variables A sociolinguistic variable is a linguistic feature which varies in its use by different social groups. Certain sociolinguistic variables are treated, consciously or unconsciously, as socially diagnostic, meaning that members of society make an association (conscious or unconscious) between the use of such a variable by a speaker and the social group to which the speaker using that variable belongs. According to WSE, most socially diagnostic linguistic variables in American English are associated with lack of prestige. (An exception to this in the history of American English was the treating of r-dropping as a prestigious feature in certain areas (until the middle of the last century).) Social stereotype (1) There seem to be two properties identifying linguistic features that constitute what WSE refer to as social stereotypes: (a) "A language feature that speakers are aware of a ...

  • 1 Pages

    ECs07

    Washington, COM 374

    Excerpt: ... hn Baugh's experience, and the experience of many nonstandard dialect speakers, reflect this? Relate John Baugh's personal experience growing up speaking AAE in school, as well as the experience of his Hawaiian Pidgin English-speaking friends, to the Oakland, CA Ebonics controversy that we talked about in class. What are some of the ways (either as discussed by Baugh or as we discussed in lecture) in which teachers can avoid stigmatizing/devaluing the speech of nonstandard English speakers and help them to learn Standard American English ? ...