Documents about Cerebrospinal Fluid

  • 5 Pages

    nervous3

    George Mason, BIOL 303

    Excerpt: ... Nervous system, integration: Overview, and peripheral nervous system: Some review & misc. parts [Fig., not in text]: - white matter -> looks white due to the myelinated sheaths, which are quite fatty. - gray matter -> consists mostly of nerve cell bodies, dendrites, and axons without fatty sheath. - ventricles -> spaces in the CNS that contain cerebrospinal fluid . This moves nutrients, hormones and other substances around, and, particularly in the brain acts as a shock absorber. - meninges [Fig., not in text]: - nervous tissue generally has the consistency of watery jello. Its very fragile. - meninges surround the nervous tissue and help maintain the structural integrity; they also allow for cerebrospinal fluid to circulate. Consists of: an outer covering, the dura mater a space in between made up of cerebrospinal fluid and the arachnoid membrane an inner membrane lying right over the brain, the pia mater The PNS, or Peripheral Nervous System: consists of paired spinal nerves and paired cranial nerves [ ...

  • 3 Pages

    lab_2-_midsagittal

    UC Davis, PSC 121

    Excerpt: ... Lab 2: Midsagittal view Sheep Brain Dissection: To look at the internal features of the brain today, we will be making a midsaggital cut on one of your groups sheep brains. The midsaggital cut will divide the brain into left and right halves between the cerebral hemispheres. When making the cut, one clean slice is preferable to a sawing cut. Sawing the brain in half could cause more damage to the tissue, making identifying structures more difficult. The resulting views of the brain can be seen on pages 21 and 22 of your lab manual. Identification- know the location an function Ventricles and Cerebrospinal Fluid You may remember from class lectures, that the ventricles are filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF is also found in between the pia mater and the arachnoid layers of the meninges in the subarachnoid space. Cerebrospinal fluid is made in the ventricles of the brain by the choroid plexus. It serves to cushion the brain and help support its weight. Lateral Ventricles largest ven ...

  • 7 Pages

    exam2-2007

    Shoreline, BIOL 210

    Excerpt: ... abinski reflex is normal in adults. _ 8. A. True B. False Cerebrospinal fluid is made by the choroid plexuses in the ventricles of the brain. _ 9. A. True B. False The limbic system is the electrical conducting system within the heart. _ 10. A. True B. False The reticular activating system is thought to be involved in sleep and wakefulness. II Multiple choice. On your SCANTRON sheet fill in the correct letter and also circle the correct answer on this sheet. Only one correct answer per question. (Two points each). _ 11. The tough thicker layer surrounding the heart that is composed of fibrous connective tissue which prevents over distension is the a. b. c. d. e. endocardium. fibrous pericardium. serous pericardium. visceral pericardium (=epicardium). myocardium 2 _ 12. a. b. c. d. e. _ 13. a. b. c. d. e. Formed elements are leukocytes, erythrocytes and thrombocytes. the fluid part of the cell. the fluid part of the cell after blood is allowed to coagulate. red blood cells. white bl ...

  • 6 Pages

    APK 2100 Tillman Exam Two Supplement

    University of Florida, APK 2100C

    Excerpt: ... APK 2100 Applied Human Anatomy Professor Tillman Exam Two Supplement Spring 2008 CORRECTION TO MAIN PACKET! On page 18 of the main packet, under the heading Cerebrospinal fluid , the term cerebrafroduct is supposed to be cerebral aqueduct. Please note the adjustment when studying, and apologies for the inconvenience. -Einsteins Notes February 29, 2008 Friday Special areas of the brain Language Both the frontal and the parietal lobes are involved in speech in different ways. Brocas area, located in the frontal lobe, sends the signal telling your muscles how to form the words you want to say to the pregyrus, which then sends the message to the muscles. Wernikes area is located in the parietal lobe. This area focuses on language comprehension. Basically, this region determines what it is that you want to say. Aphasia is a general word that means disorder. Wernikes aphasia leads to nonsense sentences because you are unable to comprehend and process what you want to say in words. Conn ...

  • 7 Pages

    study_list_midterm1

    Washington, PSYCH 202

    Excerpt: ... 1 PSYCHOLOGY 202 Spring 2008 - Kim STUDY SHEET FOR MIDTERM I *Book chapters be able to recognize BOLD words/phrases and their general significance *Video(s) Psychoneural Identity Hypothesis (aka Monism) Dualism Layout of the Nervous System Sympathetic NS (aka thoraco-lumbar system) Parasympathetic NS (aka cranio-sacral system) Meninges Ventricles Cerebrospinal fluid Neurons - characteristic, components, types Glial cells Blood brain barrier Anatomical terminologies Spinal cord - divisions, features Myelencephalon Metencephalon Mesencephalon Diencephalon Telencephalon Locus ceruleus norepinephrine (NE) Raphe nucleus serotonin (5-HT) Substantia nigra dopamine (DA) Sulci(us), fissures & gyri(us) 4 lobes: frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital Primary regions: primary motor cortex primary somatosensory cortex primary visual cortex primary auditory cortex Differences between neurons and other somatic cells Major components of neuron Neuron doctrine Law of dynamic polarization Properties of membrane p ...

  • 1 Pages

    Exam 1 Self-Review Ch. 2

    Community College of Rhode Island, ENGL 1010

    Excerpt: ... General Psychology Exam 1 Self-Review Chapter 2 1. What do neuroscientists study? 2. What are neurons? 3. What is phrenology? 4. What is meant by split-brain? 5. Which parts of the limbic system play a role in forming new memories? 6. What is the largest region of the brain? 7. Which parts of the body have the largest representation on the primary motor cortex? 8. What are the major neurotransmitters and what do they do? 9. How does Prozac work? 10. Degeneration of neurons that make acetylcholine can lead to _ disease. 11. How does nerve gas kill? 12. What is the structure of a neuron? 13. Contrast PET scans with fMRIs. 14. What is the synapse? 15. Name the two branches of the autonomic nervous system. 16. What is a function of cerebrospinal fluid ? 17. Which gland regulates the production of hormones in other endocrine glands? 18. What are the three basic types of neurons? 19. What are the 4 lobes of the brain and what functions are they responsible for? 20. Chemicals released by the nervous system a ...

  • 25 Pages

    Lecture 1 Overview

    SUNY Buffalo, PGY 300

    Excerpt: ... Lecture 1 Overview of Central Nervous System Chapter Nine Figure 9-4a Figure 9-4b (2 of 2) Figure 9-7 - Overview Figure 9-8 Figure 9-4b (1 of 2) Cerebrospinal Fluid Figure 9-5 - Overview Choroid Plexus Figure 9-5bc Blood Brain Barrier Figure 9-6 - Overview Figure 9-3d Figure 9-9ab (1 of 5) Sensory, Motor, and Association Areas of Cerebral Cortex Figure 9-15 Figure 9-23 - Overview Figure 9-16 Figure 9-11 Limbic System Figure 9-13 Figure 9-21 Figure 9-9ce (2 of 5) Figure 9-10 Table 9-2 Figure 9-9 (3 of 5) Table 9-1 Magnetic Resonance Imaging: MRI http:/www.med.harvard.edu/AANLIB/cases/case2/mr2/016.html Positron Emission Tomography - PET Figure 9-17 Electroencephalography - EEG Figure 9-20 - Overview ...

  • 4 Pages

    Class 05 CNS

    SUNY Stony Brook, BIO 208

    Excerpt: ... The Central Nervous System. I CSF, Blood-Brain Barrier and Intro to Localization of Function Class #6 September 18, 2008 Outline General organization of central and peripheral nervous systems Importance of cerebro-spinal fluid, the blood brain bar ...

  • 7 Pages

    Exam2 416K-Fall 06

    University of Texas, BIO 416K

    Excerpt: ... fects mostly young adults. In this disease the body's immune system attacks myelin proteins and eventually destroys the myelin sheaths in the CNS. The myelin sheaths are reduced to nonfunctioning lesions called scleroses. Which of the following would likely result from destruction of the myelin sheaths in the CNS? a. decreased production of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) b. a breakdown of the blood brain barrier c. decreased speed of action potential conduction in nerve axons d. decreased supply of glucose to neurons + e. decreased K levels in the CNS interstitial fluid 13. If a patient suffering from multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disease, was under your medical care, which of the following hormones (at high doses) might you give to your patient to reduce the frequency and intensity of MS attacks? a. epinephrine b. growth hormone c. aldosterone d. testosterone e. cortisol 3 14. During the relative refractory period, a stronger-than-normal depolarizing, graded potential is needed to bring the cell membra ...

  • 7 Pages

    KEY_-_Bio416K_Exam_2_Fall_06

    University of Texas, BIO 416K

    Excerpt: ... stly young adults. In this disease the bodys immune system attacks myelin proteins and eventually destroys the myelin sheaths in the CNS. The myelin sheaths are reduced to nonfunctioning lesions called scleroses. Which of the following would likely result from destruction of the myelin sheaths in the CNS? a. decreased production of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) b. a breakdown of the blood brain barrier c. decreased speed of action potential conduction in nerve axons d. decreased supply of glucose to neurons e. decreased K+ levels in the CNS interstitial fluid 13. If a patient suffering from multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disease, was under your medical care, which of the following hormones (at high doses) might you give to your patient to reduce the frequency and intensity of MS attacks? a. epinephrine b. growth hormone c. aldosterone d. testosterone e. cortisol 3 14. During the relative refractory period, a stronger-than-normal depolarizing, graded potential is needed to bring the cell membrane up to th ...