We aren't endorsed by this school

PHYS 012 - Physics 1 - Lehigh Study Resources
  • 31 Pages ch02
    Ch02

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension 1* What is the approximate average velocity of the race cars during the Indianapolis 500? Since the cars go around a closed circuit and return nearly to the starting point, the displacement is nearly zero, and

  • 24 Pages Ch18F
    Ch18F

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    CHAPTER 19 Heat and the First Law of Thermodynamics 1* Body A has twice the mass and twice the specific heat of body B. If they are supplied with equal amounts of heat, CA = 4CB; TA = TB/4 how do the subsequent changes in their temperatures com

  • 11 Pages ch01
    Ch01

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    CHAPTER 1 Systems of Measurement 1* Which of the following is not one of the fundamental physical quantities in the SI system? (a) mass (b) length (c) force (d) time (e) All of the above are fundamental physical quantities. (c) Force is not a f

  • 30 Pages 01_InstructorSolutions - Copy
    01_InstructorSolutions - Copy

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    UNITS, PHYSICAL QUANTITIES AND VECTORS 1 1.1. IDENTIFY: Convert units from mi to km and from km to ft. SET UP: 1 in. = 2.54 cm , 1 km = 1000 m , 12 in. = 1 ft , 1 mi = 5280 ft . 5280 ft 12 in. 2.54 cm 1 m 1 km EXECUTE: (a) 1.00 mi = (1.00 mi

  • 30 Pages 01_InstructorSolutions
    01_InstructorSolutions

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    UNITS, PHYSICAL QUANTITIES AND VECTORS 1 1.1. IDENTIFY: Convert units from mi to km and from km to ft. SET UP: 1 in. = 2.54 cm , 1 km = 1000 m , 12 in. = 1 ft , 1 mi = 5280 ft . 5280 ft 12 in. 2.54 cm 1 m 1 km EXECUTE: (a) 1.00 mi = (1.00 mi

  • 17 Pages Ch19F
    Ch19F

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    CHAPTER 20 The Second Law of Thermodynamics 1* Where does the energy come from in an internal-combustion engine? In a steam engine? steam. Internal combustion engine: From the heat of combustion (see Problems 19-106 to 19-109). Steam engine: Fr

  • 24 Pages ch15
    Ch15

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    CHAPTER 15 Wave Motion 1* A rope hangs vertically from the ceiling. Do waves on the rope move faster, slower, or at the same speed as they move from bottom to top? Explain. They move faster as they move up because the tension increases due to the

  • 25 Pages ch14
    Ch14

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    CHAPTER 14 Oscillations 1* Deezo the Clown slept in again. As he roller-skates out the door at breakneck speed on his way to a lunchtime birthday party, his superelastic suspenders catch on a fence post, and he flies back and forth, oscillating w

  • 24 Pages ch12
    Ch12

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    CHAPTER 12 Static Equilibrium and Elasticity 1* True or false: (a) F = 0 is sufficient for static equilibrium to exist. (b) F = 0 is necessary for static equilibrium to exist. (c) In static equilibrium, the net torque about any point is zero. (

  • 21 Pages ch11
    Ch11

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    CHAPTER 11 Gravity 1* True or false: (a) Kepler's law of equal areas implies that gravity varies inversely with the square of the distance. (b) The planet closest to the sun, on the average, has the shortest period of revolution about the sun. (a

  • 18 Pages ch10
    Ch10

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    CHAPTER 10 Conservation of Angular Momentum 1* True or false: (a) If two vectors are parallel, their cross product must be zero. (b) When a disk rotates about its symmetry axis, is along the axis. (c) The torque exerted by a force is always perp

  • 26 Pages ch09
    Ch09

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    CHAPTER 9 Rotation 1* Two points are on a disk turning at constant angular velocity, one point on the rim and the other halfway between the rim and the axis. Which point moves the greater distance in a given time? Which turns through the greater

  • 26 Pages ch08
    Ch08

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    CHAPTER 8 Systems of Particles and Conservation of Momentum 1* Give an example of a three-dimensional object that has no mass at its center of mass. A hollow sphere. 2 Three point masses of 2 kg each are located on the x axis at the origin, x =

  • 19 Pages ch07
    Ch07

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    CHAPTER 7 Conservation of Energy 1* What are the advantages and disadvantages of using the conservation of mechanical energy rather than Newton's laws to solve problems? Generally simpler, involving only scalars; cannot obtain some details, e.g.,

  • 18 Pages ch06
    Ch06

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    CHAPTER 6 Work and Energy 1* True or false: (a) Only the net force acting on an object can do work. (b) No work is done on a particle that remains at rest. (c) A force that is always perpendicular to the velocity of a particle never does work on

  • 31 Pages ch05
    Ch05

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    CHAPTER 5 Applications of Newton's Laws 1* Various objects lie on the floor of a truck moving along a horizontal road. If the truck accelerates, what force acts on the objects to cause them to accelerate? Force of friction between the objects and

  • 20 Pages ch04
    Ch04

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    CHAPTER 4 Newton's Laws Note: For all problems we shall take the upward direction as positive unless otherwise stated. 1* 2 How can you tell if a particular reference frame is an inertial reference frame? Suppose you find that an object in a par

  • 25 Pages ch03
    Ch03

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    CHAPTER 3 Motion in Two and Three Dimensions 1* Can the magnitude of the displacement of a particle be less than the distance traveled by the particle along its path? Can its magnitude be more than the distance traveled? Explain. The magnitude of

  • 40 Pages 02_InstructorSolutions
    02_InstructorSolutions

    School: Lehigh

    Course: Physics 1

    MOTION ALONG A STRAIGHT LINE 2 x . t 2.1. IDENTIFY: SET UP: The average velocity is vav-x = Let + x be upward. 1000 m - 63 m EXECUTE: (a) vav-x = = 197 m/s 4.75 s 1000 m - 0 (b) vav-x = = 169 m/s 5.90 s EVALUATE: 2.2. 63 m - 0 = 54.8 m/s . Whe

Back to course listings