• 3 Pages lyelectexam
    Lyelectexam

    School: University Of Michigan

    Course: Phys Meth-analysis

    Chemistry 447 EXAM #3 Winter 2001 Please answer all questions in a blue exam booklet and clearly identify the question (number/letter) that you are responding to! Good Luck! 1) Please indicate the letter that best answers each of the following mul

  • 47 Pages 11_17_ce
    11_17_ce

    School: University Of Michigan

    Flame Ionization Detector the most common detector good for most hydrocarbons oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur functional groups reduced response Analyte is burned in an oxygen (or air)/hydrogen flame Ions produced are detected as current on the collector electr

  • 25 Pages 11_19_ce
    11_19_ce

    School: University Of Michigan

    Analyte Interactions with Stationary Phase a) Partition HPLC -chemical interactions b) Ion HPLC -charge affinity/exchange c) Size Exclusion HPLC -residence time in pores p. 829-848 1 Dumb Detection: Refractive-Index Detector Takes advantage of the large d

  • 25 Pages 11_22_surface_1
    11_22_surface_1

    School: University Of Michigan

    Surface Science Chapter 21 Input (stimulus) Output (response) Input (stimulus) Output (response) Surface Analyses Questions: What is the structure? What is the morphology? What is the chemical composition? Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) Concept in 19

  • 37 Pages 11_24_10_XPS
    11_24_10_XPS

    School: University Of Michigan

    Surface Science: Spectroscopies Chapter 21 Microscopy: Electromagnetic Radiation vs Electron Light Microscope Scanning Electron Microscope Scanning Electron Microscopy Input: electron Output: scattered electron The electron source and EM-focusing lens ar

  • 16 Pages 11_29_echem
    11_29_echem

    School: University Of Michigan

    Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) Non-linear Spectroscopy Selection Rule = electric-dipole in media without inversion symmetry SFG Instrumentation Chen Lab SFG Applications Chen Lab Intro to Electroanalytical Concepts Chapter 22 Electrochemistry Interrelatio

  • 31 Pages 12_01_voltammetry
    12_01_voltammetry

    School: University Of Michigan

    Potential Differences Electrode + Potential - Energy level Of electrons Solution Solution A + e- A- = Ecell B+ + e- B Electrode Draw current (i.e. power your I-pod, hair dryer, Garmin, etc) Total Galvanic Discharge + Potential - Electrode Energy level Of

  • 20 Pages 12_03_potentiometry
    12_03_potentiometry

    School: University Of Michigan

    Amperometry: Potential Step System Response if Flowing Electrolyte Current + Potential - Input Stimulus 0 t 0 t Amperometry: HPLC Electrochemical Detection Oxidation at graphite electrode is used. LC flow replenishes area near electrode. There is a thin d

  • 9 Pages Ch22
    Ch22

    School: University Of Michigan

    Skoog/Holler/Crouch Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 6th ed. Chapter 22 Instructors Manual CHAPTER 22 22-1. (a) E = 0.799 0.0592 1 1 log = 0.799 0.0592 log + 1 [Ag ] 0.0261 E = 0.799 0.094 = 0.705 V (b) E = 0.771 0.0592 log 0.100 = 0.771 0.129 = 0.64

  • 11 Pages Ch23
    Ch23

    School: University Of Michigan

    Skoog/Holler/Crouch Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 6th ed. Chapter 23 Instructors Manual CHAPTER 23 23-1. If an indicator exhibits nernstian behavior, it follows the Nernst equation with its potential changing by 0.059/n V per ten-fold change in con

  • 8 Pages Ch25
    Ch25

    School: University Of Michigan

    Skoog/Holler/Crouch Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 6th ed. Chapter 25 Instructors Manual CHAPTER 25 25-1. (a) In voltammetry, we measure the current in a cell as the applied electrode potential is varied in a systematic fashion. In amperometry, we m

  • 43 Pages 11_15_lc
    11_15_lc

    School: University Of Michigan

    10 096 95 -9 1 90 -8 6 85 -8 1 80 -7 6 75 -7 1 70 -6 6 65 -6 1 60 -5 6 55 -5 1 50 -4 6 45 -4 1 40 -3 6 35 -3 1 Number of Occurrences 10 096 95 -9 1 90 -8 6 85 -8 1 80 -7 6 75 -7 1 70 -6 6 65 -6 1 60 -5 6 55 -5 1 50 -4 6 45 -4 1 40 -3 6 35 -3 1 Number of O

  • 37 Pages 11_12_gc
    11_12_gc

    School: University Of Michigan

    Changes in Peak Separation a) poor separation b) changed the factor, made 1st peak faster, 2nd peak slower c) same factor as a) but a much better separation decreased the band widths Resolution: Theoretical Plates Theoretical plates, N, are a way of d

  • 5 Pages chem 447 Chapters 8-10 notes
    Chem 447 Chapters 8-10 Notes

    School: University Of Michigan

    Course: Instrumentation

    Chapter 8 (based on importance; problems assigned, lecture notes, extra book notes) Based on problems: (#1, 4, 9) possible answers? 1. Molecular bands and continuum radiation are a potential source of interference that must be minimized by proper choice o

  • 1 Page problemset4
    Problemset4

    School: University Of Michigan

    Course: Phys Meth-analysis

    Spectroscopy Problem Set # 2 1. Define the following terms: a) b) c) d) e) f) bathochromic shift hypsochromic shift auxochrome chromophore isobestic point quantum yield 2. A solution containing 4.48 ppm KmnO4 has a transmittance of 0.309 in a 1 cm c

  • 2 Pages problemset5
    Problemset5

    School: University Of Michigan

    Course: Phys Meth-analysis

    Chemistry 447 Problem Set (Spectroscopy) Winter 2001 1. Why must the slit width of a prism-based monochromator be varied to provide a constant effective bandwidth whereas it can be nearly constant for a gratingbased monochromator? 2. Interference

  • 20 Pages 01_08_intro
    01_08_intro

    School: University Of Michigan

    Course: Instrumentation

    We eto C lcom HEM 447! C ourse : Physical Me thods of Analysis This courseintroduce theprinciple and te s s chnique of m rn s ode analytical che istry. m This is an im portant course ! I nstructor: Profe Kristina Hkansson ssor kicki@ ich.e Office C m4521

  • 29 Pages 01_15 computers _ signal processing
    01_15 Computers _ Signal Processing

    School: University Of Michigan

    Course: Instrumentation

    Electronics in Chemical Measurements (part 2) Chapters 2, 3&4 Transistors (diodesandwich) pnp npn Most com on use am m s: plifie and low-noise rs switche s Bipolar junction type(shown he ) has thre re e e ctrode le s C nt flows (in or out) on thebasele

  • 16 Pages 01_20_spectroscopy
    01_20_spectroscopy

    School: University Of Michigan

    Course: Instrumentation

    Introduction to S ctroscopy pe Basic Principle (C 6) sh De finition: S ctroscopy is a ge ral te for thescie that pe ne rm nce de with theinte als ractions of various type of s e ctrom tic radiation with m r. le agne atte 1 Ele ctrom tic Radiation agne Wav

  • 18 Pages 01_22_spectrometer
    01_22_spectrometer

    School: University Of Michigan

    Course: Instrumentation

    Optical Spectrometers Text, Chapter 7A-D Radiation Sources (e.g., Lasers) Monochromator (Grating, Slit) Basic Schematic absorption fluorescence, scattering emission Glo-bar IR source Heat a material until it glows (usually by running current through a re

  • 18 Pages 02_10_Raman
    02_10_Raman

    School: University Of Michigan

    Course: Instrumentation

    Raman Scattering Spectroscopy Materials characterization Industrial process control Micro-spectroscopy (to <1 m resolution) Remote measurements, through optical fibers (to 100 meters) Environmental monitoring Clinical diagnostics? Problems: 18-1, 18-2, 18

  • 3 Pages Ch. 5 Notes
    Ch. 5 Notes

    School: University Of Michigan

    Course: Instrumentation

    Signal-to-Noise Ratio o Equals mean divided by standard deviation o It becomes impossible to detect a signal when this ratio is about 2-3 Bandwidth o The frequency interval over which a measurement is made o The absolute frequency interval is called the

  • 3 Pages Ch. 6 Notes
    Ch. 6 Notes

    School: University Of Michigan

    Course: Instrumentation

    Wave properties of electromagnetic radiation o Wave characteristics Frequency of a beam of radiation is determined by source and remains invariant, while velocity depends on the composition of the medium Power is energy that reaches a given area per seco

  • 12 Pages Ch. 7 Notes
    Ch. 7 Notes

    School: University Of Michigan

    Course: Instrumentation

    Sources of Radiation o Radiant power of a source varies exponentially with its power supply o 2 types Continuum sources Thus, power supplies must be regulated Emit radiation that changes in intensity only slowly as a function of wavelength Have widespre

  • 22 Pages 11_05_chromatography
    11_05_chromatography

    School: University Of Michigan

    Chromatography Chapter 26 Chromatography Tswett used CaCO3 to separate the colored pigments found in plant material The affinity of each analyte for the solid column packing material determines a different rate of elution. Nobel Prize 1952 12 Nobel Prizes

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