Infographics

INFOGRAPHIC: Write it down

Write it Down

To bring your laptop or not to bring your laptop: that is the question. In today’s classrooms, students are presented with a variety of ways to take notes ranging from the old school pen and paper to laptops and tablets. This week, we take a look at various note-taking methods to try and suss out the best techniques for recording–and retaining–important information. Check it out.

 

About the author

Course Hero

Course Hero is a digital learning platform providing students with a suite of online educational resources, including crowdsourced study documents, expert tutors, and customizable flashcards. For students exploring new subjects, mastering key concepts—and everything in between—Course Hero offers essential tools to help them achieve their goals and succeed in their courses.

43 Comments

  • I doubt the average student typing speed is 1.5 words a second. That’s 90 wpm which is considered very high. I’m skeptical of infographics because the style is often to not cite sources effectively or at all.

    Though they’ve listed sources, here, I’m not about to dig through the list of websites they’ve listed to try to verify what I consider an error. Hum.

    • I type around this speed. I learned how to touch type ages ago and that is the difference between slow note taking and fast note taking. If students took the time to learn how to type properly, they’ll save themselves a lot of time [and sore fingers].

      • I type 110 words per minute and I don’t doubt that students should learn to type better, but it doesn’t change the fact that the average typing speed is closer to 60 words per minute. You’ve missed Dan’s point entirely.

    • Take into account that the average words includes short and long words…so..actually there are people who are able to type faster than the average.mmmm what I consider more important about note-taking is the way it makes the brain works…although we need to consider alte the learning styles….what can be reinforce with good learning habits.

  • Do you remember notes better when they are typed or hand written?…

    I came across a nice infographic covering this topic (see below), although I haven’t looked up resources to back it up, you might find it useful. They conclude by saying that pen and paper helps you remember more, whereas typing gives you a greater qu…

  • […] To bring your laptop or not to bring your laptop: that is the question. In today’s classrooms, students are presented with a variety of ways to take notes ranging from the old school pen and paper to laptops and tablets. Infographic: Write It Down | Course Hero […]

  • […] To bring your laptop or not to bring your laptop: that is the question. In today’s classrooms, students are presented with a variety of ways to take notes ranging from the old school pen and paper to laptops and tablets. Infographic: Write It Down | Course Hero […]

  • I prefer a mix. When I’m studying I like to use hand written notes but using my laptop in class lets me take more accurate notes and more of them too.. I type pretty fast so it just makes sense for me to use my laptop and write additional notes later on.

    Hailey
    Justin Bieber Quotes

  • […] To bring your laptop or not to bring your laptop: that is the question. In today’s classrooms, students are presented with a variety of ways to take notes ranging from the old school pen and paper to laptops and tablets. This week, we take a look at various note-taking methods to try and suss out the best techniques for recording–and retaining–important information. Infographic: Write It Down | Course Hero […]

  • I vastly prefer typed notes. They can be organized later, or hand copied if you really like that. They can be printed and written on, emailed to a friend, etc. Also, I’m going to get rid of my sloppy notebooks, but my typed notes will stay on my 8gb flash drive forever, so i can always go back to them to retain things I learn even after the class is done.

  • […] Infographic: Write It Down | Course Hero To bring your laptop or not to bring your laptop: that is the question. In today’s classrooms, students are presented with a variety of ways to take notes ranging from the old school pen and paper to laptops and tablets. […]

  • […] To bring your laptop or not to bring your laptop: that is the question. In today’s classrooms, students are presented with a variety of ways to take notes ranging from the old school pen and paper to laptops and tablets. Infographic: Write It Down | Course Hero – StumbleUpon […]

  • Trying to fact check the data into this infographic.
    Regarding the rates of forgetting, Dr. Walter PAUK compares rates with taking notes, not out of anything.
    it gives the following numbers :

    Don’t take notes = Forget 60 % in 14 days
    Take some notes = Remember 60 %
    Take organized notes and do something with them=
    Remember 90-100% indefinitely!

    If all data are treated the same way, this infographic proves nothing…

  • Take an audio of the lecture–I use an H2 Zoom–take notes with a pen while you are there so that you can write down key organizational points of the lecture. The act of writing, I believe makes important connections in our brains.
    Also I have learned Gregg shorthand, so when I study my notes I am also transcribing them as I listen to the MP3 of the lecture which also helps to cement things in the gray matter. yes I am a bit of a fossil.

  • I personally prefer types notes but I have also seen some handwritten notes with hand writing so beautiful that I couldn’t help but to fall for it and used it all the time.

  • I find I enjoy writing my notes, while they are sloppy and don’t look great I remember a lot of what I’ve been taught, I’m typing would make my notes legible and not to mention my bag would be much lighter after a while on the computer switching from listening to the teacher glancing at the board and typing it would be very easy to get a headache. And while that doesn’t seem all that bad, listening to a lecture is hard enough as it is, add a headache and you’ve officially lost my attention.

  • I’m currently at University and obviously, have a lot of reading to do. The problem I have though is when I read, none of it really goes in. I don’t have a problem reading, just a problem absorbing the information. Anyone have any tips to help me?…

    I am going to write this for any reading that would be non-fiction, literature, and law classes (which require either intensive memorization or contextual understanding). One thing that you will almost always experience is that the teachers will review…

  • What I got out of the article is the two types of notetaking and for what type of information each is good regarding remembering.

  • What about K-12 students? Those who want to learn (the college prep class) and those seat warmers, a fraction of whom just might be persuaded to believe that getting an education is really worth their time and attention and–dare I say it?—discipline?

Leave a Comment