Unit 6 Hypothermia - Massachusetts Maritime Academy/Vessel...

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Capt. Murphy/Unit 06 1 Vessel Familiarization Unit 06 Hypothermia Hypothermia
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Capt. Murphy/Unit 06 2 Hypothermia Unit Learning Objectives 1. Describe the methods of heat loss 2. Explain the cold challenge 3. Describe how the body regulates core temperature 4. Describe the signs and symptoms of hypothermia 5. Explain the treatment methods to be followed Hypothermia Methods of Heat Loss Radiation - loss of heat to the environment due to the temperature gradient (this occurs only as long as the ambient temperature is below 98.6°. Factors important in radiant heat loss are the surface area and the temperature gradient.
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Capt. Murphy/Unit 06 3 Hypothermia Conduction - through direct contact between objects, molecular transference of heat energy Water conducts heat away from the body 25 times faster than air because it has a greater density (therefore a greater heat capacity). Stay dry = stay alive! Steel conducts heat away faster than water. You are dieing 25 times faster in cold water than in air of the same temperature. Example: Generally conductive heat loss accounts for only about 2% of overall loss. However, with wet clothes the loss is increased 5 times. Hypothermia Convection - is a process of conduction where one of the objects is in motion. Molecules against the surface are heated, move away, and are replaced by new molecules that are also heated. The rate of convective heat loss depends on the density of the moving substance and the velocity of the moving substance. Water convection (current) occurs more quickly than air convection (wind chill). Wind Chill - is an example of the effects of air convection, the wind chill table gives a reading of the amount of heat lost to the environment relative to a still air temperature.
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Capt. Murphy/Unit 06 4 Hypothermia Evaporation - heat loss from converting water from a liquid to a gas. • Perspiration - evaporation of water to remove excess heat • Sweating - body response to remove excess heat • Insensible Perspiration - body sweats to maintain humidity level of 70% next to skin - particularly in a cold, dry environment you can lose a great deal of moisture this way • Respiration - air is heated as it enters the lungs and is exhaled with an extremely high moisture content It is important to recognize the strong connection between fluid levels, fluid loss, and heat loss. As body moisture is lost through the various evaporative processes the overall circulating volume is reduced which can lead to dehydration. This decrease in fluid level makes the body more susceptible to hypothermia and other cold injuries. Hypothermia
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course VESSEL FAM MT-1111-22 taught by Professor Murphy during the Spring '08 term at Mass Maritime.

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Unit 6 Hypothermia - Massachusetts Maritime Academy/Vessel...

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