Unit 01 Emergencies - Massachusetts Maritime Academy/Vessel...

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Capt. Murphy/Unit 01 1 Vessel Familiarization Unit 01 Types of Shipboard Emergencies and Contingency Plans
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Capt. Murphy/Unit 01 2 Unit Learning Objectives 1. Explain the types of shipboard emergencies which could occur or result in having to abandoning a foundering ship, voluntarily or involuntarily. 2. Explain the basic philosophy of crisis management and the use of contingency plans. 3. State the Principles of Survival at Sea. 4. 5. Describe and demonstrate the USTS Enterprise emergency signals 6. Describe and demonstrate the USTS Enterprise emergency traffic patterns 7. Describe crewmembers duties and responsibilities during emergency situations 8. Explain risk management and the risk factors that significantly contribute to major marine casualties. Mass. Maritime wants to celebrate your survival, not lament your loss at sea. We pray to God that you will never have to use the skills we will teach you in Vessel Familiarization & Basic Safety Training. We are committed to training the finest mariners in the world. Captain Murphy
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Capt. Murphy/Unit 01 3 Types of Shipboard Emergencies The principal threats to human life and hazards of emergency situations, which could occur or result in having to abandoning a foundering ship, voluntarily or involuntarily, including: 1. Explosion and fire 2. Collision and allision 3. Foundering 4. Stranding and grounding 5. Hull failure Types of Shipboard Emergencies 6. Catastrophic machinery failure 8. Shift of cargo 9. Adverse reaction from dangerous goods or hazardous bulk materials 10.Man-overboard PowerPoint ® presentations will be utilized illustrate the nature of the distress and the use of contingency planning for emergency response.
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Capt. Murphy/Unit 01 4 The tanker, Mega Borg , contained approximately 38 million gallons of raw crude oil when it exploded in the Gulf of Mexico on June 8, 1990. The world's largest oil spill was averted because this blaze was controlled. Some fires may be purely accidental, and other may be caused by circumstances beyond the control. But many fire have been caused by carelessness, irresponsible or ill-advised actions and omissions by the crew. The principal causes of explosions and fire aboard ship are the careless disposal of smoking materials, spontaneous ignition, faulty electrical circuits and equipment, unauthorized construction, cargo stowage and operations, galley operations, fuel oil transfer, welding, burning and repair operations, and collisions.
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course VESSEL FAM MT-1111-22 taught by Professor Murphy during the Spring '08 term at Mass Maritime.

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Unit 01 Emergencies - Massachusetts Maritime Academy/Vessel...

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