Moons of the Outer Planets.docx - UAHT INTRO TO ASTRONOMY...

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The Moons of the Giant PlanetsReference:Karen Steed, MSE, NBCT, Instructor, University of Arkansas-Hope-TexarkanaPurpose:The purpose of this lab is to investigate and gain appreciation forthe splendor and diversity of the moons of the outer planets.Background:In Chapter 7 we began an exploration of our own solarsystem.Our solar system is made up of 8 planets, around 200 moons, atleast 5 dwarf planets, asteroids, meteoroids and a host of other objects.Oneof the most exciting things the Hubble Telescope told us about our own homesolar system involved the moons of the outer four planets.Since Galileo Galilea first turned a telescope to the sky and observed objectsclearly orbiting something other than the earth, scientists have wanted toknow more and more about the moons of our planets.Note:This lab is going to be quite different from previous labs.This is goingto be an exploration you will do with little guidance from me.You will exploreand gather information about some of the most prominent moons in oursolar system.You will find them on Stellarium and then further explore themusing the Internet or other sources.ApparatusStellarium programOther Internet sourcesPart 1 –The Moons of JupiterProcedure:1.Use Stellarium to find Jupiter.You will probably want to use thesearch feature of Stellarium to do this. Make sure to turn off theatmosphere and turn on the planets and deep space objects.

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Term
Fall
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Tags
Solar System, Planet, Natural satellite, special feature

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