Plato's View

Plato's View - Phil 123 Prof. Greg Schaeffer Plato’s View...

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Phil 123 Prof. Greg Schaeffer Plato’s View of Human Nature Through The Republic, Plato creates one of the essential theories of human nature. Plato’s theory stemmed from the pursuit of justice in the context of a hypothetical city. Plato sought to determine what justice actually was and whether justice was truly better than injustice. This of course led to the discussion of human nature and morality. Plato’s view is an optimistic one; he believes that morality and therefore happiness are achieved through acting in accord with our natures. According to Plato, following our human nature to the best of our ability means allowing our rational desires to master our appetitive and spirited desires. Therefore, humans are happiest when they employ good moral conduct and value wisdom and understanding over material goods. While this is certainly something to be strived toward, I do not believe it is human nature to act this way. In forming his theory of human nature, Plato makes a number of assumptions about people and their beliefs. Plato himself admits that people’s values are a result of their training. This already creates a shaky foundation for his future assertions. If people
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This essay was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course PHIL 123 taught by Professor Gregshaefer during the Spring '07 term at CSB-SJU.

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Plato's View - Phil 123 Prof. Greg Schaeffer Plato’s View...

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