Chapter_9 - Chapter 9 Joint Articulation Joint...

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Chapter 9 Joint Articulation
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Joint Classification A joint ( articulation or arthrosis ) is a point of contact between two or more bones, between cartilage and bones, or between teeth and bones. The scientific study of joints is called arthrology. Structural classification is based on the presence or absence of a synovial (joint) cavity and type of connecting tissue. Structurally, joints are classified as fibrous , cartilaginous , or synovial . Functional classification of joints is based on the degree of movement permitted. Joints may be synarthroses (immovable), amphiarthroses (partially movable), or diarthroses (freely movable).
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Joint Classification Fibrous joints lack a synovial cavity, have the articulating bones held together by fibrous connective tissue, and permit little or no movement. Types of fibrous joints include sutures , s yndesmoses , and gomphoses .
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Fibrous Joints 1. A suture is a fibrous joint composed of a thin layer of dense fibrous connective tissue that unites skull bones. A synostosis is a suture joint that has ossified. An example of a synostosis is the frontal suture between the left and right sides of the frontal bone. A synostosis is functionally classified as a synarthrosis .
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Fibrous Joints 2. A syndesmosis is a fibrous joint in which there is more fibrous connective tissue than in a suture.
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Fibrous Joints 3. A gomphosis (dentoalveolar) is a fibrous joint in which a cone-shaped peg fits into a socket. An example is the root of a tooth in its socket.
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A cartilaginous joint lacks a synovial cavity, has the articulating bones connected by either fibrocartilage or hyaline cartilage, and allows little or no movement. The two types of cartilaginous joints
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course BIOL 141L taught by Professor Townsend during the Spring '06 term at Scranton.

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Chapter_9 - Chapter 9 Joint Articulation Joint...

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