Chapter_10 - Chapter 10 Muscular Tissue Motion results from...

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Chapter 10 Muscular Tissue
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Motion results from alternating contraction (shortening) and relaxation of muscles; the skeletal system provides leverage and a supportive framework for this movement. The scientific study of muscles is known as myology .
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Types of Muscle Tissue Skeletal muscle tissue is primarily attached to bones. It is striated and voluntary. Cardiac muscle tissue forms the wall of the heart. It is striated and involuntary. Smooth (visceral) muscle tissue is located in viscera. It is nonstraited (smooth) and involuntary. Table 4.4 compares the different types of muscle.
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Functions of Muscle Tissue Through sustained contraction of alternating contraction and relaxation, muscle performs four key functions. These functions are production of body movements, stabilizing body positions, moving substances within the body, and generating heat.
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Properties of Muscle Tissue 1. Electrical excitability is the ability to respond to certain stimuli by producing electrical signals such as action potential (impulse). 2. Contractility is the ability to shorten and thicken (contract), generating force to do work. a. In an isometric contraction , the muscle develops tension but does not shorten. b. In an isotonic contraction , the tension remains constant while the muscle shortens.
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Properties of Muscle Tissue 3. Extensibility is the ability to be extended (stretched) without damaging the tissue. 4. Elasticity is the ability to return to original shape after contraction or extension.
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Skeletal Muscle Tissue * Each skeletal muscle is a separate organ composed of cells called fibers . * Connective Tissue Components - Fascia is a sheet or band of fibrous connective tissue that is deep to the skin and surrounds muscles and other organs of the body.
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Skeletal Muscle Tissue * Superficial fascia (or subcutaneous layer ) separates muscle from skin and functions to provide a pathway for nerves and blood vessels, stores fat, insulates, and protects muscles from trauma. * Deep fascia , which lines the body wall and limbs and holds muscles with similar functions together, allows free movement of muscles, carries nerves, blood vessels, and lymph vessels, and fills spaces between muscles.
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Skeletal Muscle Tissue 2. Other connective tissue components are epimysium , covering the entire muscle; perimysium , covering fasciculi ; and endomysium , covering individual muscle fibers; all are extensions of deep fascia
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*Tendons and aponeuroses are extensions of connective tissue beyond muscle cells that attach muscle to bone or other muscle. * A tendon is a cord of dense connective tissue that attaches a muscle to the periosteum of a bone.
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Skeletal Muscle Tissue An aponeurosis is a tendon that extends as a broad, flat layer.
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* Nerves (containing motor neurons) convey impulses for muscular contraction.
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Chapter_10 - Chapter 10 Muscular Tissue Motion results from...

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