WK8Assgn+Mason+F.docx - 1 Decision Tree for Neurological...

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1Decision Tree for Neurological and musculoskeletalKaren MasonWalden UniversityNURS 6521- Advanced PharmacologyDr.April 26, 2021
2IntroductionAlzheimer’s disease is defined as a moderate onset of loss of cognitive function, judgement, decision making, and the likelihood to recognize faces, and places that were once familiar (Arcangelo et al., 2017). In most cases, individual who are affected with Alzheimer’s disease live through an astonishing change in their behavior, sleep, and personality pattern. Therehasn’t been any available drug to treat the underling factors of this disease (Arcangelo et al., 2017). The main purpose of this paper is to summarize each of the three decisions of this case study, and to give an explanation of what is to be achieved for the recommended decisions. This paper will also seek to address the differences between the intended achievement in each of the decision tree, and the outcome for each decision. Summary of Patient’s Case Study and the Decision TreeIn this case study, the patient is a 76-year-old Iranian male who manifested “strange behavior”. The patient’s son stated that, his father had been showing some strange thoughts, and odd behavior for the past two years, and that the symptoms do not go away, but continue to appear. Mr. Akkad was taken for diagnostics tests which came back normal. According to the patient’s son, his father began lacking interest in his religious activities, and that had been disastrous for the whole family. The family also noted some difficulties in choosing the right words when conversing with people, and he has also been diverting the focus of the conversation. Mr. Akkad declines any auditory and visual hallucinations, and also declines suicidal and homicidal thoughts. The patient shows signs of moderate dementia, for he had a score of 18 out of 30 on his MMSE test. Besides, there are no signs of delusion or paranoid thoughts observed during the course of the interview, however, there were signs of disorientation, inattentiveness,
3difficulty to recall, and register things) Laureate Education, 2019b). Also, there were signs of impaired judgement and perception of things. Mr. Akkad also demonstrated signs of decreased impulse control; this is seen when he stood up and walked towards the door during the interview.When Mr. Akkad was asked where he was going, he said he didn’t where he was going. Mr. Akkad was diagnosed with major neurocognitive disorder as a result of Alzheimer’s disease (Presumptive).

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