Jamestown Paper - Jamestown Scene of the Crime The document I have chosen to analyze is an excerpt of The Starving Time written by John Smith in 1624

Jamestown Paper - Jamestown Scene of the Crime The document...

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Jamestown: Scene of the Crime The document I have chosen to analyze is an excerpt of “ The Starving Time” written by John Smith in 1624, detailing the horrors suffered by the settlers of the Jamestown colony. The Jamestown colony is considered by most historians as one of England’s first permanent settlements in North America. The history behind establishing the Jamestown colony began when the Virginia Company of London was founded. The company was one of several joint stock companies, which sold shares to investors and used the funds to finance expeditions to the New World. In 1606, King James I granted a charter to the Virginia Company of London to set sail to the Chesapeake area of North America, with three goals: first establish a permanent English settlement, second they were tasked with finding a western oceanic route to China and last they were sent to find gold. The group that set out on this journey was mainly made up of gentlemen and unskilled laborers. John Smith, the author of the passage, was among the group and one of the few who had military experience, useful negotiation skills and eventually rose to become one of the leaders of the colony. The Starving Time ”, refers to a time of starvation endured by the colonists at Jamestown in the winter of 1609 to 1610. Smith contributes the fact that only sixty men, women and children remained alive out of the original five hundred colonists in the winter of 1609, due to the lack of leadership by the commanders, the loss of their ships containing supplies, the lack of experience among the settlers and the hostility the settlers experienced at the hands of the Powhatan Indians. Captain John Smith was an English soldier and explorer who had military experience in Eastern Europe that educated him in negotiations with “barbarians” ( Nash, 2007, p.53 ). It was Smith’s appetite for adventure that led him to join the Virginia Company of London and eventually sailing to Jamestown in 1607. Smith expresses disappointment in the group of men that were chosen to establish the Jamestown settlement identifying them as “gentlemen gold-seeking adventurers” ( Nash, 2007, p.52) totaling approximately six times greater than the gentry of England. During this time in English history, gentry were generally regarded as highborn men in

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