The Research Paper-First Draft.docx - 1 The Research Paper...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 13 pages.

1 The Research Paper: First Draft Isata Conteh Grand Canyon University, GCU BIO-317V-0500-Science Communication & Research 24 th April, 2021
2 Article used for the Paper’s Format Format: Chicago Format Journal Article: Fernando, Shelanah A., Timothy J. Gray, and Thomas Gottlieb. "Healthcare‐ acquired infections: prevention strategies." Internal Medicine Journal 47 (2017), 1341-1351. . Abstract Hospital-acquired infections have significantly increased and affected the quality of life for multiple patients. This has attracted the attention of researchers and there are multiple evidence- based practices to alleviate the issue within health care settings. Despite this, the effectiveness of different practices varies and some are hailed to have a greater impact towards the patients. Environment hygiene, safety culture and the interprofessional collaboration between physicians and nurses are some of the common preventive measures to address nosocomial infections. The current study explores the nature of hospital-acquired infections with a focus on preventive measures to improve the patient’s quality of life. The common methods, settings and common hospital-acquired infections have also been addressed in the current study.
3 Prevention of Hospital-Acquired Infections in Hospital Settings Over the years, the united states have worked tirelessly to reduce and prevent instances of hospital-acquired infections. Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) or nosocomial infections are contract either during hospital stay, medical treatment or in surgical conditions. Besides, they can also be contracted in nursing homes and rehabilitation facilities. In most cases HAI are caused by viral, fungal or bacterial pathogens. These cases are common among bloodstream infections (BSI), pneumonia, urinary tract infections or the surgical site infections (SSI); these accounts for 14%, 15%, 32% and 22% for all HAIs respectively. Based on data from the CDC, at least one in 31 patient hospitals contract a healthcare-associated infection daily. 1 Furthermore, it is estimated that HAIs are responsible for an about 1.7 million infections and 99,000 deaths annually. Although there has been tremendous efforts to address rising cases of nosocomial infections, there is need to employ evidence-based practices within health care setting to prevent HAIs. In the last decade, a lot has been done to reduce HAI infections. The National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) has been in place to track incidences of HAI in care settings. Also, the CDC has used the Emerging Infections Program (EIP) for the surveillance, prevention and control of the emerging HAIs. EIP is enacted at state levels and works in collaboration with the state health departments to address emerging threats posed by nosocomial infections. Thus, with the high number of infections and associated deaths per years, there is need to reduce the instances of HAIs in the United States. This paper explores the nature of HAIs with a key focus on measures to prevent the spread of nosocomial infections within the health care settings.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture