Cell Structure and Function, Chapter 4. 2007

Cell Structure and Function, Chapter 4. 2007 - Cell...

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Cell Structure and Function
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Beauty and Diversity of Cells RBC’s: www.biu.soton.ac.uk Fibroblast cell: www.olympusfluoview.com Gartersnake sperm: www.bios.niu.edu Retinal cell: www.anat.ucl.ac.uk Slime mold plasmodium: www.deh.gov.au Elodea cells: faculty.clintoncc.suny.edu Mating paramecia: www.luc.edu Syphilis-causing bacterium: www2.hu-berlin.de
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The Cell Theory Key players: Anthony van Leeuwenhoek (Dutch linen merchant and amateur lens grinder, 1632-1723) Robert Hooke (English naturalist (1635 - 1703) Matthias Jakob Schleiden (German botanist, 1804-1881) Theodor Schwann (German cytologist and physiologist, 1810-1882) Rudolph Virchow (German pathologist, archaeologist, and anthropologist, 1821-1902)
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van Leeuwenhoek– A self-taught amateur scientist First became fascinated by magnifying lenses (used for quality control in calculating the fiber density in good linens), when he was a teenager Experimented with peppercorn infusions, in which he discovered microscopic swarming “animalcules” Was the first person to observe individual sperm cells, blood cells, microscopic worms; also studied wood and various crystals with his microscopes Pioneered microbiology, plant Made some of the first microscopes– 400 of them– by hand:
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Hooke– A Renaissance Man www.fusd.org www.chemheritage.org www.biologyreference.com Greatest experimental scientist of the 17th century Interests in physics, chemistry, astronomy, biology, geology, architecture, and naval technology Many inventions, including an advanced compound microscope Examined numerous biological materials– for example, from insects, sponges, bryozoans, and thin slices of cork Coined the word “cell”
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Schleiden– A Dedicated Botanist Found that certain fungi live on or within the roots of some plants. This relationship between fungi and plants, called mycorrhiza ("fungi roots"), has since been shown to be very common and extremely beneficial to both organisms Examined many tissues from a great variety of plants First to observe “cytoplasmic www2.uni-jena.de
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Schwann– Another Renaissance Man A German cytologist and physiologist (1810-1882) who discovered the following: The enzyme pepsin Fermentation of sugar and starch as living processes (coining the term “metabolism”) Striated muscle in the upper digestive tract Myelin sheath of peripheral nerves Basic principles of embryology, after watching complete development from a single fertilized ovum to a multicellular organism
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Contributions of Schleiden and Schwann to the Cell Theory Worked together to develop a significant part of what we now call the cell theory: namely, that cells are the basic functional and structural units of all life forms Examined and compared cells from a great variety of plants and animals (and probably some other organisms, as well) Realized that some organisms are unicellular and others multicellular Found a nucleus, membranes, and various cell bodies in
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course BIOLOGY 101 taught by Professor Beitch during the Fall '07 term at Quinnipiac.

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Cell Structure and Function, Chapter 4. 2007 - Cell...

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