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Group14-M06.docx - Aspen University Group 14 Amber Radmall...

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Aspen UniversityGroup 14Amber RadmallKarolina JakubczakYaleydis BarcaldoKristyn DuranAnatomy and Physiology 1Dr. Dawn Deem DD8July 14, 20211pg.
“It feels like the back of my leg is on fire”. That is how 68-year-old Sarah Mitchell described her pain in her leg when she came into the hospital this morning. Sarah is very healthy for her age so you can imagine how confused she was when she started feeling tired with a burning and tingling sensation on her right high just five days ago. She was then examined and the nurse noticed three or four small red swollen areas. She also had vesicles on the posterior area of her right thigh. You then ask her about any recent exposures or changes in medication, diet or lifestyle. She did explain her stress level from caring for her husband who has Alzheimer’s. She is active, has never smoked, and doesn’t have any drug allergies. Vitals were taken and her temperature showed at 100.6 F. She did have chicken pox as a child which makes you think this may be shingles. Even though you feel strongly about this suspicion, it is crucial toexplore all of your reasoning and be able to support the diagnosis. Considering Sarah had a burning feeling on the back of her leg, it's critical to rule out anyother possibilities. One of these might be paresthesia. Paresthesia is a burning or prickling feeling that most commonly affects the extremities as well as other organs in the body. The tingling sensation, typically presents without notice, is described as pins and needles in their legsor arms after lying on it for too long because their blood supply was abruptly cut. This occurs when a nerve is subjected to prolonged pressure. Once the pressure is relieved, the sensation of pins and needles rapidly fades away. The Chronic paresthesia, on other hand, is frequently a sign of a neurological illness or traumatic nerve injury. Disorders of the central nervous, for instance, a brain tumor, the abnormality pressing against the spinal cord can also produce paresthesia. 2pg.
Carpal tunnel syndrome and other nerve disorders can damage peripheral nerves and produce paresthesia as well as discomfort. The goal of diagnostic assessment is to figure out what's generating the parenthetic feelings. An individual's medical history, physical examination, and laboratory tests are essential for the diagnosis (Paresthesia Information Page | National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, 2019, para. 3).Skin vesicles are fluid bubbles trapped beneath the skin. Vesicles are small, circumscribed, sub corneal (intraepidermal) or subepidermal cyst like spaces that contain serous fluid (U.S Department of Health and Human Services, 2014, Figure 1). Skin vesicles can be caused by a variety of health problems, some of which do not require medical care; however, if the vesicles are severe, ongoing therapy may be required. Vesicles may form after exposure to caustic agents. They may also form as part of an allergic response in the skin in which edema and

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