Aristotle

Aristotle - It is up to you to decide what your mean is....

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Drew Iadanza 10/18/07 Prof Mekios GP 100 Nicomachean Ethics The aim of Nicomachean Ethics is simple. The aim is how to attain the highest good. Virtue is a big part of this. Virtue defined by Aristotle is much different than that of Plato. Aristotle talks about two types of Virtue. The first is Virtue of Thought, which is Virtue that is acquired by learning from teachers. The second is Virtue of Character, which is developing good habits, mostly from your surroundings. Virtue is based on moderation and self-control. Aristotle believed that everyone was born with a blank slate and could achieve excellence or be virtuous. Aristotle’s account of mean is nowhere near precise. Everyone has a different mean. If you are a millionaire you can be more philanthropic. If you are a working class citizen you have the right to be less philanthropic than the millionaire.
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Unformatted text preview: It is up to you to decide what your mean is. The subject of attaining the good life only allows for a certain degree of precision. Everyones idea of the good life is different. Some may be content with the bare minimum while others just want more more more. When we look at mathematics we see precision. Two plus two will always be four regardless of the time, day, year or person. With this knowledge it is quite evident that the subject matter in Nicomachean Ethics is not treatable with mathematical precision. There could never be precise directions to attaining the good life. There can also never be a formula to show a person what their mean is. Every person has their own perception of the good life and it is up to the individual to decide what their mean is....
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course GP 100 taught by Professor Mekios during the Fall '08 term at Stonehill.

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