T.S. Eliot Student Booklet 2021.pdf - Module B Critical...

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Module B: Critical Study of Literature T.S. Eliot
Module B: Critical Study of Literature - Rubric Learning intention: 1. Establish a clear understanding of what is expected from the syllabus. 2. Develop an understanding of key terminology (textual integrity, literary canon) In this module, students develop detailed analytical and critical knowledge, understanding and appreciation of a substantial literary text. Through increasingly informed and personal responses to the text in its entirety, students understand the distinctive qualities of the text, notions of textual integrity and significance. Students study one prescribed text. Central to this study is the close analysis of the text’s construction, content and language to develop students’ own rich interpretation of the text, basing their judgements on detailed evidence drawn from their research and reading. In doing so, they evaluate notions of context with regard to the text’s composition and reception; investigate and evaluate the perspectives of others; and explore the ideas in the text, further strengthening their informed personal perspective. Students have opportunities to appreciate and express views about the aesthetic and imaginative aspects of the text by composing creative and critical texts of their own. Through reading, viewing or listening they critically analyse, evaluate and comment on the text’s specific language features and form. They express complex ideas precisely and cohesively using appropriate register, structure and modality. They draft, appraise and refine their own texts, applying the conventions of syntax, spelling and grammar appropriately. Opportunities for students to engage deeply with the text as a responder and composer further develops personal and intellectual connections with the text, enabling them to express their considered perspective of its value and meaning. Task: Read the rubric and highlight/underline all important phrases (key words/words you would like to use in your writing). Use this powerpoint for further deconstruction of the rubric. 1
Textual Integrity and the Literary Canon “The term “literary canon” refers to a body of books, narratives and other texts considered to be the most important and influential of a particular time period or place.” A text can attain canonical status because of its use of form. Perhaps it is considered groundbreaking in its use of the sonnet form, or it is lauded as being the best example of a ballad. Some texts gain their canonical status because they do all of these things. You need to decide and discuss if Eliot’s poetry fits these descriptions. For a text to have lasting value, it has to be widely lauded and have appeal to audiences over a range of periods. A text’s appeal to a range of audiences can lie in its thematic relevance to audiences. You need to figure out if it is speaking to, or perhaps challenging, a society’s values over time. Canonical texts engage with universal human concerns such as the human condition

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