Exp 05 Kirchkoffs law - Experiment 05 To study Kirchhoffs Laws Voltage and Current in Circuits E&M Kirchhoffs Laws Data Studio file 05 Kirchhoff.ds

Exp 05 Kirchkoffs law - Experiment 05 To study Kirchhoffs...

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Experiment 05: To study Kirchhoff’s Laws: Voltage and Current in Circuits E&M: Kirchhoff’s Laws Data Studio file: 05 Kirchhoff.ds Equipment List 1 PASCO Interface (for two sensors) 1 Voltage Sensor 1 ‘DC power supply1.5 volt 1 AC/DC Electronics Laboratory 2 Banana Plug Patch Cord 1 Current Sensor Connect the voltage Sensor to the interface on channel A Connect the Current Sensor to the interface on channel B Introduction The purpose of this activity is to explore Kirchhoff’s two laws of electrical circuits. Use a voltage sensor, current sensor, and the DataStudio software to measure the voltage and current across and through parts of a complex circuit. Ohm's Law describes the relationship between current, voltage, and resistance in simple circuits. Many circuits are more complex and cannot be solved with Ohm's Law. These circuits have many power sources and branches which would make the use of Ohm's Law impractical or impossible. In 1857 the German physicist Gustav Kirchhoff developed methods to solve complex circuits. Kirchhoff produced two conclusions known today as Kirchhoff's Laws. Kirchhoff's two laws describe the unique relationship between current, voltage, and resistance in complex electrical circuits. Kirchhoff's Current Law : The current arriving at any junction point in a circuit is equal to the current leaving that junction. Stated another way: No matter how many paths into and out of a single point, all the current leaving that point must equal the current arriving at that point. This law is sometimes called the junction rule.
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Kirchhoff's Voltage Law : The algebraic sum of the voltages around any closed path is zero. Stated another way: The voltage drops around any closed loop must equal the applied voltages. This law is sometimes called the loop rule.
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