Chapter 3 - Chapter 3 Motion in Plane Motion in the x...

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1 Chapter 3 Motion in Plane Motion in the x direction is independent from motion in the y direction. We use the same equations as in Chapter 2, but for each dimension separately. There are only a few new equations in this chapter. Quick Review Vectors components x 45° 4.0 m x 30° 3.0 m A B y y A y A x B y B x x y A y B y B x A x A B C C x C y + = A + B = C adding vectors, by components note B = C - A Quick Review Velocity, acceleration and equations of motion for constant acceleration slope of tangent of x vs. t graph slope of tangent of v vs. t graph You throw a ball horizontally off a roof. Assuming the ball behaves as an ideal projectile, the time until it lands is determined only by: A. its initial speed and the horizontal distance to the point where it lands. B. the height of the roof and its initial speed. C. the height of the roof.
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2 You and a friend throw two rocks off a bridge. Your friend throws hers with an initial direction 30° below the horizontal. You throw yours with the same initial speed but in a direction 30° above the horizontal. When the two rocks hit the water: A. your friend's is moving faster. B. yours is moving faster. C. they are moving at the same speed. Motion in a plane Often, motion in three-dimensions is really motion in a plane (two-dimensions). For example, if there’s no wind, a field-goal kick can be considered to move in a vertical plane In this lecture we’ll first consider some generalities, then consider two specific, common examples: • projectile motion (in a plane, with gravity vertically) • uniform circular motion Position Vector Specifies Location and Displacement of an Object in an x-y Coordinate System A position vector points from the origin to the particle. note: y vs. x recall: • co-ordinates indicate position relative to fixed axes (here x, y) • position vector points from the origin to the object • vector has components - for the position they are the co-ordinates Velocity in two-dimensions Velocity is a vector: average velocity is defined as the change in the position vector in a time note: y vs. x
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3 Velocity in two-dimensions - components We can completely separate into components.
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course PHYS 111n taught by Professor Sukenik during the Spring '08 term at Old Dominion.

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Chapter 3 - Chapter 3 Motion in Plane Motion in the x...

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